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16 records – page 1 of 1.
Part Of
Jewish Vocational Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 75
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Vocational Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
75
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
moving images
Date
1947-2006
Physical Description
5.1 m of textual records and graphic material
1 DVD
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Vocational Services (JVS) was established on 16 June, 1947. After the war, thousands of survivors arrived in Canada in search of homes, education for their children and jobs. The returning servicemen, in turn, were also in need of employment as well. The first two years of its existence, it catered to these two groups. By 1949, it expanded its mandate to become a community-wide agency.
Max Enkin, the founder of the famous post-war "tailor scheme," became its first president and chairman of the board. Under this scheme, he and other members of his delegation were able to bring over 6000 survivors to Canada. Other members of the board included Lipa Green, Sydney Harris, Dr. Albert Rose and Louis Lockshin. The executive director was Norman Stack. He served for a few years and was replaced by Milton Freidman in 1949. Freidman was a social worker who relocated to Toronto from Buffalo and spent close to 40 years in this position, retiring in 1985.
Its early mandate was to serve as a placement service for applicants and employers and to provide individual counselling services to its clients. Its office was situated above the original Tip Top Tailor building at 455 Spadina Avenue. It later moved its office to 152 Beverley Street and then in the 1960s to Tycos Drive. By the 1960s, JVS began to expand its services to all segments of society including newcomers, people with disabilities and from all sectors of life. The staff included social workers, psychologists, job counsellors and clerical staff.
During the 1980s, Bernie Berger became the new executive director. He served in that capacity until 1991. He was replaced by Ed Segalowitz. During this period, JVS set up a seniors' program called ATLAZ on the grounds of the Baycrest Home for the Aged. It was funded by the Bick family and was intended to create programs to keep seniors occupied. Today, this program is called the Al Green Resource Centre and provides employment, placement, training and volunteer opportunities to adults of all ages and with developmental disabilities. JVS also launched a youth program called Youthinc and a women's program.
Karen Goldenberg became executive director in 1998 and was replaced by Frank Markel in 2011 after her retirement. JVS has expanded its clientele, helping people from all backgrounds with diverse needs to identify their strengths and goals, develop skills, and achieve success in school, work and life. By 2009 it offered an expansive range of over 40 employment-related support programs and services throughout the Greater Toronto Area to thousands of unemployed and underemployed individuals and served 23,000 people. They operated out of 12 locations and have approximately 200 professionals on staff.
Kim Coulter became president and CEO in 2013.
Custodial History
The case files were located in the vault with no accession number. They were likely transferred to the OJA during the 1970s or 1980s. They were assigned accession number 2002-10/34.
The remaining records were in the possession of Amanda Batchelor of JVS, who had acquired the material from various past board and committee members for the creation of the 60th anniversary book.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the activities, programs, finances, operation and history of the Jewish Vocational Services. Included are meeting minutes, photographs, correspondence, surveys, reports, financial statements, certificates, bulletins, newsletters, newsclippings, press releases, anniversary books, and one DVD. The fonds is arranged into the following series: 1) Formation and history; 2) Board of Directors; 3) Executive board; 4) Annual general meetings; 5) Special and general meetings; 6) Committees; 7) Career, employment and training services; 8) Disability services; 9) Immigrant and newcomer services; 10) Women in New Roles (WINR); 11) Youth services; 12) Volunteer program; 13) Studies and reports; 14) Finance; 15) Personnel; 16) Planning and operations; 17) Publications and publicity; 18) Fundraising; 19) United Way; 20) Events; 21) Conferences and workshops.
Name Access
Jewish Vocational Services of Toronto
Subjects
Charities
Immigrants--Canada
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Creator
Jewish Vocational Services of Toronto (1947-)
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
2002-10/34
2008-9/6
2010-11/7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2015-12-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-7
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 10 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1986, 1991-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the personal and professional activities of Janice Benatar. Personal records include a family tree, speeches Janice delivered at the Lipa Lippers Toastmaster's Group meetings, a sephardic cookbook, and immigration papers, and a Sharon School Reunion invitation for alumni living in Toronto. Also included are photographs of Janice with her family, performing in a ballet production with the Academy of Ballet and Jazz, with her newborn son, at her son's Bar Mitzvah at Chabad Flamingo, and with the keys to her first home in Thornhill. Also identified in photographs are: Elan Levitan, Viviane Benatar, Michael Benatar, Claudia Benatar, Rachel Pasternak, and Samuel Pasternak.
Also included are speeches, invitations, event programs and video recordings of Book Of Life events as well as a bookmark that was designed by artist Enya Keshet for Book of Life honourees. Finally, accession also includes Professional Advisory Committee meeting minutes (2009-2015) and breakfast seminar presentations (2014-2015).
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes 7 photographs, 4 DVDs, 200 KB of textual records, and 1 bookmark.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Philanthropy and fundraising
Women
Name Access
Jewish Foundation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
9
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1925-1989
Physical Description
31.8 m of textual records
319 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Immigrant Aid Society of Canada was established in 1920 by the newly-formed Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC). A Toronto branch was established in a storefront office on Spadina Avenue, but the organization was rudimentary. As the enthusiasm that spurred the founding of CJC died out, JIAS soon faltered. Then in 1922 it was taken over and reactivated under the cooperative support of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto, B'nai B'rith, and the Council of Jewish Women. JIAS was legally incorporated on 30 August 1922. It also operated under the moniker of the Emergency Jewish Immigrant Aid Committee, and it changed its name to Jewish Immigrant Aid Services in 1954.
Charged with organizing emergency relief for European Jews in distress, JIAS became the central agency of the Jewish community to facilitate the lawful entry of Jewish immigrants into Canada, and provided them with welfare services, transportation, and assistance with accommodation and employment after their arrival. In addition, JIAS offered consultation services for sponsors of potential immigrants, ran a competitive foreign remittance service, and campaigned to counter the activities of unscrupulous steamboat agents, lawyers, and influence peddlers, or “shtadlanim,” who often victimized immigrants and sponsors alike.
In conjunction with similar efforts by the CJC, JIAS was also actively engaged in negotiating for the increased admission of Jewish immigrants to Canada. In 1923, the federal government instituted a permit-based immigration program and JIAS competed with travel agents and solicitors in the private sector for these limited quota permits. After combating the anti-immigration policies of the Depression era, the outbreak of war in 1939 virtually closed the already limited avenues for immigration.
JIAS Canada was organized into a national office in Montreal and regional offices in Winnipeg (Western Region), Toronto (Central Region), and Halifax (Eastern Region). The Central Region covered Ontario, and established a full-time head office in 1935 at 399 Spadina Avenue in Toronto (hence the Central Region was sometimes called simply the Toronto Office). The office later moved to 265 Spadina Avenue. JIAS Toronto’s board of directors met on a regular basis at different locations in Toronto, including 206 Beverley Street and in the Talmud Torah building at 9 Brunswick Avenue. The first JIAS Toronto board included notable Toronto residents such as Henry Dworkin, Mrs. Draiman, Mr. Kronick, Dr. Brodey and Mrs. Willinsky. The role of the board was to oversee the operations of the Central Region. It rendered decisions on issues relating to finances, procedures and policies, negotiations with the federal Immigration Branch, as well as individual cases that required their attention.
General meetings of the Central Region membership were held annually. The 1943 JIAS constitution states that regional annual meetings were to be held for “receiving and considering reports,” holding nominations and elections for the executive, and discussing JIAS’s program and policies.
In the post-war era, JIAS shifted its focus to renewed efforts on behalf of individual claimants and community support, while the focus for lobbying for a reversal of Canada's immigration policy fell increasingly under the jurisdiction of the CJC. A boom in immigration between 1947 and 1952 saw the arrival of large numbers of Jewish immigrants to all parts of Canada and the Toronto Office of JIAS renewed its efforts to meet the needs of this new influx. Major world events also sparked other waves of immigration from Hungary, Czechoslovakia, North Africa, and Russia, to which JIAS responded in turn. JIAS worked in conjunction with other immigrant aid societies such as HIAS, the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, in the United States, to facilitate immigration to the United States, and later to Israel, where many of the immigrants and refugees coming to Canada had family and ultimately settled.
Custodial History
Custody of these records was transferred to the Ontario Jewish Archives by JIAS in 1983, as preparations were under way for the move to a new facility in North York. Much of the material was in four-cubic-foot boxes and in file cabinets.
The accession was divided into three sections: files which were at the JIAS office and had been retained in their original order; files which had been retrieved from a flood in the basement of 152 Beverley St. and consequently had been thrown into dry boxes without regard to order; files discovered in the furnace rooms at 150 and 152 Beverley St., intact but covered in coal dust. The bulk of the records were stored off-site, with dirty files being isolated from the rest.
The dust-covered materials were cleaned at an off-site location, placed in temporary boxes and transferred to the Archives and restored, as far as was possible, to their original order.
Clips were removed and replaced as appropriate with archivally acceptable ones. All materials were transferred to acid-free folders and boxes.
Scope and Content
Fonds contains the records of the Toronto Office (Central region) of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Canada. The fonds consists primarily of textual records: minutes, correspondence, financial records, reports, immigration files, naturalization case files, social service case files and the records of attempts to trace missing individuals. There are also photographs of special events, speakers and arriving immigrants.
The fonds represents an important resource for the study of Canadian Jewry, especially when taken in conjunction with the JIAS National Office records at the Canadian Jewish Congress National Archives in Montreal, and those of the Western Office at the Library and Archives of Canada. It documents the means by which a particular Canadian ethnic community has dealt with the problems of rescue, settlement and government relations. These records also offer insight into the relationship between the Toronto Office and the other branches of JIAS, and invite comparison with similar agencies in the United States, as well as those of other ethnic groups in Canada.
The material collected includes information about the countries of origin, transportation routes, settlement and employment patterns of Jewish immigrants to Canada in the twentieth century. The documents also touch upon important related issues such as advocacy, sponsorship, admission processes, health and social problems.
These records cover several waves of immigration following the Second World War: Holocaust survivors in the late 1940s, Sephardic (North African) and Hungarian Jews in the 1950s, Russian and Czechoslovakian Jews in the 1960s, and additional Russians in the 1970s.
The records also contain significant information for those researchers looking to conduct genealogical research into Jewish immigrants and their descendents.
The fonds has been arranged with one sous-fonds, which contains the records of the National JIAS office in Montreal. In total there are 17 series. The Toronto office (main fonds) series are: 1. Board of Directors and Executive Committee Minutes; 2. Annual meeting proceedings; 3. Reports; 4. Legal ; 5. Administration; 6. JIAS Committees; 7. External committees; 8. Financial ; 9. Arrivals; 10. Immigration case files; 11. Social service assistance case files; 12. Photographs; 13. Miscellaneous. The National Office sous-fonds is divided into the following series: 1. National executive meeting minutes; 2. National annual meeting proceedings; 3. National annual reports; 4. Publications; and Photographs.
Notes
Physical description note: Physical extent is based on fully processed records. Additional accessions are not included (see Related Material note below).
Associated material note: The CJC National Archive, in Montreal, has additional JIAS records from 1920-1989 including 275 m of textual records and graphic materials (3250 photos): collection number I0037; alpha-numeric designation MA 4. The National Archives of Canada, Manitoba branch, in Winnipeg, has Jewish Historical Society of Western Canada JIAS textual records from 1923-1950 on 18 microfilm reels: Former archival reference number MG28-V114 (no replacement listed). The originals of these records are maintained by the Jewish Historical Society of Western Canada.
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
Other OJA records relating to JIAS may be found in the following accessions: 1979-9-5; 1988-5-2; 1991-10-5; 2006-3-11.
Creator
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto
Accession Number
1983-8-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Betty Goldstick Lindgren fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 45; Item 18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Betty Goldstick Lindgren fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
45
Item
18
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[192-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : sepia toned ; 29 x 22 cm on mat 44 x 28 cm
Admin History/Bio
Dorothy Dworkin (née Goldstick) was born in Latvia in 1890. She was the daughter of William and Sarah Goldstick. She came to Canada in 1904 at 14 years of age. She studied nursing in the United States, by training at Mount Sinai Hospital in Cleveland. She then took her exams in midwifery, and in 1909, she received her diploma from the State Board of Ohio.
In 1911 she married Henry Dworkin, who was the founder of the Toronto Labour Lyceum. Henry opened a variety store in 1917, which later became a tobacco and shipping agency business called Dworkin Travel, located at 525 Dundas Street West. Together, the Dworkins helped bring in hundreds of immigrants from Poland, Roumania and Latvia. The couple had a daughter, Ellen, whom they referred to as Honey. In 1928, Henry was tragically killed in an automobile accident. After her husband's death, Dorothy brought up her daughter alone, ran the travel business, and continued to do charitable work with Mount Sinai Hospital.
Scope and Content
Portrait of Dorothy Dworkin taken when she was in her 30s at the Lyonde Photo Studio in Toronto.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Related Material
See Dorothy Dworkin fonds 10.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1978-10-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Betty Goldstick Lindgren fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 45; Item 13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Betty Goldstick Lindgren fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
45
Item
13
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1910]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 10 x 7 cm in mat 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Dr. Isadore Goldstick was the son of William and Sarah Goldstick. He was born in Latvia in 1890. He graduated with a Ph.D. from the University of Toronto in the Department of Pedagogy in 1928. He married Anna Nathanson in December 1917, and they had two daughters, Reva and Esther. The family lived in London, Ontario. He spent many years teaching at the secondary school level and later became a professor at the University of Western Ontario. He was the author of 8 German and French texts that were used in Canadian schools.
Scope and Content
Portrait of Isadore Goldstick as a young man.
Notes
The image is an albumen print glued on a mat board.
Subjects
Authors
Immigrants--Canada
Teachers
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Related Material
There is a fonds for the Isadore Goldstick family at the Ottawa Jewish Archives.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1978-10-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1228
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1228
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[190-?]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Admin History/Bio
Mark Geldzaeler was born in 1862 in Galicia, probably Kolbuszowa, and died in Toronto in 1932. His wife Yetta [Shumer] (1870-1952) had immigrated to Toronto from Stanislau with her parents, Louis (Leib) and Chava Shumer, in the mid-1880s. Mark and Yetta were married in Toronto on February 2, 1890.
Prior to his arrival in Toronto, Mark Geldzaeler had been a religious scholar and teacher in the old country. In 1892, he became the Assistant Chazan at Holy Blossom synagogue on Bond Street. This official title notwithstanding, he was also the synagogue's shamus [caretaker], religious school teacher, and bar mitzvah tutor. He lived with his family just behind the synagogue, in a property owned by the synagogue, before eventually moving to a house on Walmer Road.
The family had six children: Bernard (1891-1974) m. Hortense; Rose (1892-1966) m. Samuel Aaron Harris; Rachel (1897-?) m Isidore Ruskin; Solly (1899-1902); Alfred ("Alfie") Benjamin (1901-1918) d. of influenza during the epidemic; and Freda Frances (1907-2002) m. Simon Ramm.
Scope and Content
Item is a studio portrait of Mark Geldzaeler.
Notes
Photo by A. Barrett, 324 Yonge St., Toronto.
Name Access
Geldzaeler, Mark
Holy Blossom Temple (Toronto, Ont.)
Subjects
Cantors (Judaism)
Immigrants--Canada
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1977-2-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 520
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
520
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1890]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 25 x 20 cm
Scope and Content
Item is photograph of David Papernick, father of Henry Papernick. David came to Canada in 1884.
Notes
No negative.
Name Access
Papernick, David
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
Acquired 22 June 2005.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Leonard Berger fonds
Level
Item
ID
Item 3790
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Leonard Berger fonds
Level
Item
Item
3790
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1897
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of the Rottenberg family taken in a studio in 1897, shortly after the time they arrived in Canada. It includes from left to right: Bertha, Goldie, Lena (in front), Louis, Lazer and Rebecca.
Notes
For further identification, see accession record.
Name Access
Rotenberg family
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1985-7-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2018-2-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-2-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
[1946?]-1951
Scope and Content
Accession includes an undated document describing immigration prospects following the Second World War and the anti-immigration sentiment. The document was published by an unknown group "interested in combating race-hatred and anti-Semitism and on strengthening the unity between the groups which make up the people of Canada". In addition, there is a copy of a confidential letter dated February 14, 1951 listing immigrants identified as skilled workers and selected by overseas Canadian immigration officials under the auspices of the Settlement Branch to settle in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. These immigrants were to arrive in Halifax on the above noted date of on board the SS Staveangerfgord.
Custodial History
File discovered while processing CJC fonds 17.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1612
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1612
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1925
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Notes
Photo by Modern Studio.
Name Access
Ukrainian Immigrants' Society of Toronto
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Societies
Ukrainians--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Toronto Islands (Ont.)
Accession Number
1978-12-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2018-11-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-11-13
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
7 cm of textual records
Date
1993-1998
Scope and Content
Accession consists of meeting minutes of the Southern African Jewish Association of Canada (SAJAC). The earliest minutes are from 8 May 1993; the latest minutes are from 12 January 1998.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Southern African Jewish Association of Canada
Places
Ontario
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-3-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-3-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1980
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a report prepared by JIAS Canada detailing the situation of recent immigrant arrivals to various small communities in Ontario. The communities discussed are Cambridge, Hamilton, Kitchener, London, Ottawa, St. Catharines and Windsor.
Custodial History
The custodial history for this item is unknown. The accession number has been assigned by the assistant archivist.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Communities
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Cambridge (Ont.)
Hamilton (Ont.)
Kitchener (Ont.)
London (Ont.)
Ottawa (Ont.)
St. Catharines (Ont.)
Windsor (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1229
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1229
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[190-?]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Admin History/Bio
Yetta Shumer Geldzaeler (1870-1952) was born in Stanislau to Leib and Chava Shumer. She immigrated to Toronto with her parents in the mid-1880s. In 1890 she married Mark Geldzaeler in Toronto. They had six children: Bernard (1891-1974) m. Hortense; Rose (1892-1966) m. Samuel Aaron Harris; Rachel (1897-?) m Isidore Ruskin; Solly (1899-1902); Alfred ("Alfie") Benjamin (1901-1918) d. of influenza during the epidemic; and Freda Frances (1907-2002) m. Simon Ramm.
Scope and Content
Item is a studio portrait of Yetta Shumer Geldzaeler.
Notes
Photo by A. Barrett, 324 Yonge St., Toronto.
Name Access
Geldzaeler, Yetta Shumer
Gledzaeler, Mrs. Mark
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1977-2-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1541
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1541
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1927
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Halifax (N.S.)
Accession Number
1978-4-9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 628
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
628
Material Format
graphic material
Date
6 Feb. 1948
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 21 x 26 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
The General Sturgis was originally a military ship (called a Liberty ship) that was being used to transport people from post-World War Two Europe to Canada. The ship accommodated the men on board in stacked cots in the hold, while the women and children slept separately in cabins. The boat had sailed from Braemanhaven, Germany, landing in Halifax on 6 Feb. 1948. On board were Jewish immigrants from Displaced Persons camps, most of whom were brought over as tailors with the aid of the CJC, and JIAS. Many of the individuals pictured eventually settled in Montreal.
Scope and Content
Item is a copy photograph and corresponding negative of the boat General Sturgis landing at Pier 1 in Halifax. Pictured far left in the front is David Mangarten and [his sister Eva], fourth from the right is Eli Goldberg (b. 1897, Rafalovka, Poland-d. 1983, Montreal). Pictured seventh from the right is Mr. Hister.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Ships
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Halifax (N.S.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
1979-9-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
2 May 1976
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one booklet for the annual meeting of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Canada, Central Region held at Temple Sinai with guest speaker Mr. Gaynor Jacobson, Executive Vice-President of H.I.A.S.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services (Toronto, Ont.)
Jacobson, Gaynor
Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
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