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Accession Number
2015-9-30
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-30
Material Format
sound recording
Physical Description
2 audiotapes
Date
1968
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two reel-to-reel audiotapes recording John Beattie at Allan Gardens on June 30, 1968.
Custodial History
There is no information on the acquisition of this material
Subjects
Antisemitism
Demonstrations
Human rights
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region (Toronto, Ont.)
Beattie, John
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-6-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-6-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 scrapbook : 28 x 41 cm
Date
1949-1985
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one scrapbook documenting the Supreme Court of Canada case between Bernard Wolf, Annie Noble and property owners at the Beach O' Pines resort regarding antisemitic restrictive property covenants. The scrapbook includes news clippings, correspondence, CJC Public Relations Information bulletins, one photograph of Wolf, factums of court proceedings and a resolution of London's B'nai Brith Lodge #1012. Also included are event programmes and invitations that do not appear related to the court case.
Use Conditions
None
Subjects
Antisemitism
Human rights
Name Access
Wolf, Bernard
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Genya Intrator
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
November 26, 1990
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Genya Intrator
Number
AC 223
AC 224
Subject
Antisemitism
Women
Human rights
Interview Date
November 26, 1990
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Mindy A. Skapinker
AccessionNumber
1993-9-1
Total Running Time
AC 223A: 46 minutes AC 223B: 46 minutes AC 224A: 16 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Genya was born in Moscow and moved as a child to Palestine in the 1930's. She was a member of the Israeli underground and served in the Israeli army during the War of Independence. She played a central leadership role in the Soviet Jewry Movement in Canada. She founded "Women for Soviet Jewry" and served as chair of "National Soviet Jewry Committee". She helped with creation of the Toronto "Group of 35", a Soviet Jewry activist group. Genya had regular contact by phone with Soviet activists and relayed their information back to Israeli consuls. She was an advisor to B'nai Brith on Soviet Jewry. She started an Inter-religious Task Force for Soviet Jewry in Canada.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Intrator, Genya
Skapinker, Mindy A.
Canadian Jewish Congress
Geographic Access
Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Genya Intrator discusses the formation of the "Group of 35", a Soviet Jewry activist group.

In this clip, Genya Intrator describes how information about Soviet Jews was passed on to the Israeli consulate in New York who tracked all the data. She explains how she was appointed as a "secret agent" who would report information from her many phone calls to the Soviet Union.

Accession Number
1979-9-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-8
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
April 1977-March 1978
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one Information Bulletin on Soviet Jewry (vol. 3, issue 4) and two Communique (No. 10, No. 21), both produced by the Canadian Committee for Soviet Jewry.
Subjects
Human rights
Name Access
Canadian Committee for Soviet Jewry
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-6-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-6-4
Material Format
object
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
6 artifacts
1 postcard
1 textual record
Date
[193-?]-[195-?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a Tip Top Tailors wall clock and five tzedakah boxes from Israel. Also included is a postcard of the Mossington Park resort on Lake Simcoe featuring a Gentiles Only sign, several copies from the mid-1940s of the CJC Committee on Social and Economic Studies Information and Comment bulletins, as well as a tribute flyer for the 27th anniversary celebrations for the Soviet Union, held at Maple Leaf Gardens in 1944. The program includes a message from the Prime Minister, W. L. MacKenzie King, and a broadcast from Paul Robeson. The MC was Lorne Green.
Custodial History
The items were bought by Morris Norman, a collector of Judaica and donated to the Archives on June 3, 2009.
Subjects
Human rights
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region (Toronto, Ont.)
Tip Top Tailors
Places
Lake Simcoe
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records and other materials
Date
[197-]-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting personal and professional achievements of Morley S. Wolfe. It includes a photograph of Morley being introduced as B'Nai Brith Toronto Regional Council President, and a photograph of Morley addressing a group at B'Nai Brith Canada. Also includes two medals, one from Harbord Collegiate and a Peace Medal from the YMCA. There is a paper copy of a family tree created on the internet, a letter to the Toronto Star editor written by Wolfe, an article he wrote about jobs, a speech from his daughters for his 75th birthday, B'Nai Brith Central region mailing lists, material related to a donation to the Osgoode collections library from Morley Wolfe and the Osgoode class of 1955, two of Morley Wolfe's passports, a "Harbord Romeos" members list, a form nominating Karen Mock for the William Hubbard Award, and the text for a League for Human Rights of B'Nai Brith Canada brochure.
Administrative History
Morley S. Wolfe was born in Winnipeg in 1928 to Cecil (b. 1895) and Betty (nee Davidow) Wolfe. He spent his early childhood in various cities in Saskatchewan and Manitoba until moving to Toronto in 1940. Soon after graduating from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1955 he started his own practice as a senior member of the law firm Burt, Burt, Wolfe and Bowman. In 1971 he was appointed Queen’s Council, and from 1973 to 1977 he served as counsel for B’nai Brith Canada. After his retirement from practice in 1993, the Province of Ontario appointed him presiding Justice of the Peace for Ontario and Deputy Judge in Small Claims Court. His first marriage was to Sandra Newman in 1958 and they had three children together: Leslie, Lee, and Melanie. He later married Joan and became the step-father to her daughter, Erin. Throughout his life Morley was passionate about fighting prejudice and discrimination and became involved with organizations, such as the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews and the Urban Alliance on Race Relations. He was also a member of the Toronto Police Services Board Committee on Race Relations, served as Chair of the North York Committee on Community, Race and Ethnic Relations, and was appointed to the Canadian Multiculturalism Council. In addition, he was the founding president of Toronto Residents in Partnership (TRIP) from 2003 to 2006. His involvement extended to Jewish organizations. He served as National President of B’nai Brith Canada (BBC) from 1982 to 1983 and was a founding member of its League for Human Rights. He was also President of BBC’s Toronto Regional Council and Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998, and of the Jewish Camp Council of Toronto as well as many other organizations. Morley’s hard work and involvement in the community earned him many awards, including, City of Toronto’s William P. Hubbard Race Relations Award, the YMCA Canada Peace Medal, B’Nai Brith Canada Service Award, and the Province of Ontario’s Senior Achievement Award. Around 2002, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 began filing a series of appeals with B’nai Brith International (BBI) over concerns that BBC’s national executive was governing undemocratically. Morley played a key role in filing these appeals and was the centre of one appeal filed after BBC censured him without advance notice or the opportunity for a hearing. These appeals were not all successful. Around 2006, Morley became involved in another appeal against BBC that was filed by a group of members who called themselves the Concerned Members of B’nai Brith Canada (CMOBBC). They alleged that BBC’s national executive had too much centralized power, was not governing transparently, failed to provide members with audited financial statements at multiple annual general meetings (AGMs), passed a constitution that members had defeated at the 2005 AGM, and was threatening and harassing some members. BBI’s appeal court rendered its verdict in 2007 in favour of BBC. Soon after this judgment was made BBC took steps to expel all the members of CMOBBC. In response, Morley resigned from the organization. Morley currently resides in Brampton.
Subjects
Human rights
Name Access
Wolfe, Morley, 1928-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-5
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
3 cm textual records
7 photographs
Date
1955-2005
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the professional achievements of Morley S. Wolfe. It includes academic certificates and awards, plaques and certificates honouring his service to the community, a composite photograph of his graduating class at Osgoode Law School, and photographs of Morley Wolfe with notable people. Idenitifed in the photographs: Jean Chretien, Hilary Weston and Rosa Parks.
Administrative History
Morley S. Wolfe was born in Winnipeg in 1928 to Cecil (b. 1895) and Betty (nee Davidow) Wolfe. He spent his early childhood in various cities in Saskatchewan and Manitoba until moving to Toronto in 1940. Soon after graduating from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1955 he started his own practice as a senior member of the law firm Burt, Burt, Wolfe and Bowman. In 1971 he was appointed Queen’s Council, and from 1973 to 1977 he served as counsel for B’nai Brith Canada. After his retirement from practice in 1993, the Province of Ontario appointed him presiding Justice of the Peace for Ontario and Deputy Judge in Small Claims Court. His first marriage was to Sandra Newman in 1958 and they had three children together: Leslie, Lee, and Melanie. He later married Joan and became the step-father to her daughter, Erin. Throughout his life Morley was passionate about fighting prejudice and discrimination and became involved with organizations, such as the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews and the Urban Alliance on Race Relations. He was also a member of the Toronto Police Services Board Committee on Race Relations, served as Chair of the North York Committee on Community, Race and Ethnic Relations, and was appointed to the Canadian Multiculturalism Council. In addition, he was the founding president of Toronto Residents in Partnership (TRIP) from 2003 to 2006. His involvement extended to Jewish organizations. He served as National President of B’nai Brith Canada (BBC) from 1982 to 1983 and was a founding member of its League for Human Rights. He was also President of BBC’s Toronto Regional Council and Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998, and of the Jewish Camp Council of Toronto as well as many other organizations. Morley’s hard work and involvement in the community earned him many awards, including, City of Toronto’s William P. Hubbard Race Relations Award, the YMCA Canada Peace Medal, B’Nai Brith Canada Service Award, and the Province of Ontario’s Senior Achievement Award. Around 2002, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 began filing a series of appeals with B’nai Brith International (BBI) over concerns that BBC’s national executive was governing undemocratically. Morley played a key role in filing these appeals and was the centre of one appeal filed after BBC censured him without advance notice or the opportunity for a hearing. These appeals were not all successful. Around 2006, Morley became involved in another appeal against BBC that was filed by a group of members who called themselves the Concerned Members of B’nai Brith Canada (CMOBBC). They alleged that BBC’s national executive had too much centralized power, was not governing transparently, failed to provide members with audited financial statements at multiple annual general meetings (AGMs), passed a constitution that members had defeated at the 2005 AGM, and was threatening and harassing some members. BBI’s appeal court rendered its verdict in 2007 in favour of BBC. Soon after this judgment was made BBC took steps to expel all the members of CMOBBC. In response, Morley resigned from the organization. Morley currently resides in Brampton.
Subjects
Human rights
Name Access
Wolfe, Morley, 1928-
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Research Records sub-series
Civil and Human Rights Legislation sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
5-4-1
File
12
Material Format
textual record
Date
1950
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of correspondence, newspaper clippings and a statement by Rabbi A.L. Feinberg regarding the Forest Hill Village Board of Education's experimental project to segregate Jewish and non-Jewish students.
Notes
Previously processed and cited as part of MG8 S.
Subjects
Human rights
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2015-9-23
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-23
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
[194-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a bound document entitled 'This Is Our Faith'. The subtitle is 'The Religion of the Jews' and it appears to have been presented at a seminar of religions, under the auspices of Community Programs Branch, Department of Education, Province of Ontario.
Custodial History
There is no information on the acquisition of this material.
Subjects
Religion
Politics and government
Name Access
Cohen, Julius
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Ben Kayfetz
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
March 4, 1984
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Ben Kayfetz
Number
AC 210
Subject
Antisemitism
Human rights
Law
Nonprofit organizations
Interview Date
March 4, 1984
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Phyllis Platnick
Total Running Time
46 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
Christie Pits riot at approximately minute 16:00
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Benjamin Gershon Kayfetz was born on December 24, 1916 in Toronto. He married Eva Silver and had two children. Ben graduated from the University of Toronto in 1939, with a B.A. in modern languages. He worked as a high school teacher in Huntsville and Niagara Falls between 1941 and 1943. In 1943, he joined the war effort, working for the Department of National Defense in Postal Censorship and was responsible for reviewing prisoner of war mail. After the war, Kayfetz traveled to British Occupied Germany where he worked as a censor of telecommunications with the Control Commission until 1947. Upon returning to Toronto, he was hired as the National Director of Community Relations by the Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC), and as the Executive (National) Director of the Joint Community Relations Committee (JCRC), a CJC - B'nai B'rith cooperative organization. He also served as the Central Region Executive Director of the CJC between 1973 and 1978. He worked to develop anti-discrimination laws and for the protection of minority and religious rights. Kayfetz was also actively involved in promoting the welfare of Jewish Communities worldwide. He was awarded the Samuel Bronfman Medal by the Canadian Jewish Congress in 1985 and the Order of Canada in 1986. In addition to his professional activities, Kayfetz wrote articles for various Jewish publications under both his own name and the pseudonym, Gershon B. Newman, and gave a weekly radio address on CHIN radio addressing various contemporary Jewish issues. He was also actively involved in the Toronto Jewish Historical Society (serving as its president), Canadian Jewish Historical Society and Yiddish Luncheon Circle. Ben Kayfetz died in 2002.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Balmy Beach Swastika Club
Canadian Jewish Congress
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Geographic Access
Toronto
Kew Beach
Christie Pits
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\AC 210, Ben Kayfetz\AC 210 notes.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Ben Kayfetz describes the skirmish between antisemitic and Jewish youths at Kew Beach in July 1933.

In this clip, Ben Kayfetz discusses the laws that restricted “Jews or other objectionable races” from purchasing, owning or renting properties in Toronto and summer resort areas. He describes the steps taken to change the law.

Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
International Council of Jewish Women series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 38; Series 6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
International Council of Jewish Women series
Level
Series
Fonds
38
Series
6
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1940-1996
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
11 photographs
Admin History/Bio
The International Council of Jewish Women is made up of Jewish women's organizations from across the world. Founded in 1912 and revived in 1949, the ICJW's goals were to promote equal rights, women's rights, understanding, and peace throughout the world. It sought to spread knowledge about and strengthen Jewish cultural traditions, to help build Israel, and to encourage women to participate in community services. It cooperated actively as a non-governmental organization with UNESCO, and was an accredited observer at the United Nations. The National Council of Jewish Women has been a vital member of the ICJW, with a number of its members having served on the executive and as vice-presidents and presidents of the ICJW.
In a first attempt to form an international council of Jewish women, representatives from the National Council of Jewish Women in the United States, along with similar organizations in Great Britain and Germany, met in Rome in 1912. Their efforts were aborted with the onset of World War I, but in the 1920s, Jewish women's groups reconvened and ended up holding three meetings. After a long hiatus due to the devastation of World War II and the Holocaust, the International Council of Jewish Women was officially re-born in 1949 in Paris. The ICJW has held conventions every three years since 1954, and in countries around the world, including in Toronto in 1972, and in Vancouver in 1987.
The ICJW was organized in a committee system which communicated through a network of newsletters, mailings, and triennial meetings. Committees have included By-Laws, Community Services, Herczeg Israel Seminar, Newsletter, North American Committee, Public Relations, Resolutions, Soviet Jewry, Status of Women, and United Nations. The ICJW also held regional meetings, seminars such as the Rosa and Esteban Herczeg seminars in Jerusalem, and field trips.
Canadian presidents of the ICJW have included Antonia S. Robinson (1957-1960), and Helen Marr (1990-1993). While serving as president, Tony Robinson represented Jewish women of Canada at the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II.
Helen Marr served as president of National Council of Jewish Women of Canada, Toronto Section from 1973 to 1976, and as president of the NCJWC from 1981 to 1985. She married Gerald Marr, and has three children. Helen served as Canada's Vice-President to the ICJW from 1986-1989, and chaired the ICJW's triennial convention in Vancouver in 1987. She also held leadership positions with the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, Ben Gurion University, Canadian Jewish Congress, and the Skylight Theatre.
Scope and Content
Series contains records documenting the National Council of Jewish Women of Canada's involvement in the International Council of Jewish Women. It includes pamphlets and publicity material, newsletters, the 75th anniversary tribute book, by-laws and resolutions, material from conventions and other activities, correspondence, and photographs.
A portion of the records were generated during Helen Marr's presidency of the ICJW. These records include by-laws and guidelines, committee files, and mailings.
Notes
The International Council of Jewish Women was variously called the World Congress of Jewish Women, the World Conference of Jewish Women, and the World Organization of Jewish Women between 1912 and 1929.
Name Access
Helen Marr
World Congress of Jewish Women
World Conference of Jewish Women
World Organization of Jewish Women
Subjects
Human rights
Women
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2015-11-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-4
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
19 photographs : b&w and col. ; 20 x 26 cm and smaller
1 folder of textual records
1 poster ; 35 x 51 cm
Date
[194-]-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs and textual records related to the personal and professional life of Morley S. Wolfe. Photographs include a snapshot of Morely dressed in a Harbord Collegiate sweater; his first year law class at Osgoode Hall (1951); attendance at B'nai Brith Wilson Height Heights Lodge events and publicity stills from Branson Hospital. Textual records include a Branson Hospital promotional flyer; correspondence with Sir Martin Gilbert, the official biographer of Winston Churchill; email print outs of a series of letter to the editor correspondnece from Morely to the Toronto Star con cerning human rights,immigration and Israel's right to exist.
In addition, there is a photocopy of a Toronto Star photo of Mayor Art Eggleton, awarding Morley S. Wolfe with the William P. Hubbard race relations award; a print out from Harbordite (page 21) of Morely's entry into the Harbord club; a print out of his review of the book Walking with Giants by Saoul Feldberg; and a poster presented to Morely by the Children's Breakfast Club's presdient Rick Gosling, on the occasion of his 75th birthday (2003), in hounour of Morely's volunteer work with the club.
Administrative History
Morley S. Wolfe was born in Winnipeg in 1928 to Cecil (b. 1895) and Betty (nee Davidow) Wolfe. He spent his early childhood in various cities in Saskatchewan and Manitoba until moving to Toronto in 1940. Soon after graduating from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1955 he started his own practice as a senior member of the law firm Burt, Burt, Wolfe and Bowman. In 1971, he was appointed Queen’s Council, and from 1973 to 1977 he served as counsel for B’nai Brith Canada. After his retirement from practice in 1993, the Province of Ontario appointed him presiding Justice of the Peace for Ontario and Deputy Judge in Small Claims Court. His first marriage was to Sandra Newman in 1958 and they had three children together: Leslie, Lee, and Melanie. He later married Joan and became the step-father to her daughter, Erin. Throughout his life Morley was passionate about fighting prejudice and discrimination and became involved with organizations, such as the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews and the Urban Alliance on Race Relations. He was also a member of the Toronto Police Services Board Committee on Race Relations, served as Chair of the North York Committee on Community, Race and Ethnic Relations, and was appointed to the Canadian Multiculturalism Council. In addition, he was the founding president of Toronto Residents in Partnership (TRIP) from 2003 to 2006. His involvement extended to Jewish organizations. He served as National President of B’nai Brith Canada (BBC) from 1982 to 1983 and was a founding member of its League for Human Rights. He was also President of BBC’s Toronto Regional Council and Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998, and of the Jewish Camp Council of Toronto as well as many other organizations. Morley’s hard work and involvement in the community earned him many awards, including, City of Toronto’s William P. Hubbard Race Relations Award, the YMCA Canada Peace Medal, B’Nai Brith Canada Service Award, and the Province of Ontario’s Senior Achievement Award. Around 2002, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 began filing a series of appeals with B’nai Brith International (BBI) over concerns that BBC’s national executive was governing undemocratically. Morley played a key role in filing these appeals and was the centre of one appeal filed after BBC censured him without advance notice or the opportunity for a hearing. These appeals were not all successful. Around 2006, Morley became involved in another appeal against BBC that was filed by a group of members who called themselves the Concerned Members of B’nai Brith Canada (CMOBBC). They alleged that BBC’s national executive had too much centralized power, was not governing transparently, failed to provide members with audited financial statements at multiple annual general meetings (AGMs), passed a constitution that members had defeated at the 2005 AGM, and was threatening and harassing some members. BBI’s appeal court rendered its verdict in 2007 in favour of BBC. Soon after this judgment was made BBC took steps to expel all the members of CMOBBC. In response, Morley resigned from the organization. Morley currently resides in Brampton.
Subjects
Law
Human rights
Name Access
Wolfe, Morley, 1928-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-16
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-16
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1975
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records relating to a "Teach-In on Israel" held at the university on 22 January 1975. There is also an announcement of a meeting of the Revolutionary Marxist Group at York.
MG_RG
MG2 P1d
Subjects
Education
Children
Politics and government
Name Access
Jewish Student Federation (York University)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-8-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-8-7
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
12 photographs : b&w and col ; 26 x 21 cm or smaller
Date
1929-[198-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the life of Debby Alter (née Speyer). Included are: certificates and diplomas for Alter and her brother Lloyd; newspaper clippings relating to Alter and her family; photographs of Alter and her family, and a small amount of correspondence addressed to Alter, primarily from her father.
Custodial History
Debby Alter's daughter, Bonnie, donated the records to the Archives following her mother's death in May 2017.
Administrative History
Debby Cecil Speyer was born on 18 Aug. 1918 to Boris Speyer and Etta Speyer (née Prager). Debby's father worked as an insurance broker in Toronto. Years later when he became ill, Etta went into real estate, becoming Toronto's first female commercial and industrial real-estate agent in 1935. Debby was one of three children, having two brothers: Mark and Lloyd. Lloyd died in 1943 fighting in the Second World War.
Debby's connection to Hadassah-WIZO goes back to an early age. She attended the first Hadassah-WIZO Bazaar in 1924, for example, when she was five years old. As a youth, she attended the Goel Tzedec Congregation's religious school and later the Toronto Normal Model School, receiving her diploma in June 1933. She went on to marry Gabriel Alter, with whom she had two children: Bonnie and Lloyd (named after his late uncle). Their daughter, Bonnie, was entered in a lovely child photo-contest as part of the annual Hadassah Bazaar.
In 1969, Debby was named chairman of the Women's Division of 1969 State of Israel Bonds in Toronto. By that point, she had been a member of Toronto Hadassah's executive board for years. Debby remained involved in Hadassah until her later years, attending the very last Bazaar in 2008, where she was honoured along with other long-time volunteers at a special cake-cutting ceremony. She passed away at her home on Friday, 12 May 2017. A service was held at Holy Blossom Memorial Park the following Sunday. She is survived by her two children, two children-in-law, and three grandchildren.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Name Access
Alter, Debby, 1918-2017
Hadassah Organization of Toronto
Hadassah-WIZO Organization of Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-4
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1977
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one invitation to a Y.M.H.A. youth Chanukah candle lighting ceremony, one Lubavitch Youth Organization flyer, and one Toronto Committee for Soviet Jewry worldwide solidarity flyer.
Subjects
Habad
Hanukkah
Human rights
Youth
Name Access
Dorenman, Alexander
Young Men's Hebrew Association (Toronto, Ont.)
Toronto Committee for Soviet Jewry
Lubavitch Youth Organization
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Montague Raisman
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
11 July 1982
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Montague Raisman
Number
AC 064
Subject
Nonprofit organizations
Human rights
Antisemitism
World War, 1939-1945
Interview Date
11 July 1982
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Jack Lipinsky
Total Running Time
064: 39 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
Low sound quality
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Montague Raisman came to Canada from England in 1926. He was actively involved in B'nai Brith Toronto Lodge and held positions of office. He served as the Commanding Officer for the B'nai Brith Air Cadet Squadron in Toronto during the Second World War. He was instrumental in the formation of the Joint Public Relations Committee, a united Jewish voice in response to pro-Nazi activity.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Raisman, Montague
B'nai Brith
Lipinsky, Jack
Canadian Jewish Congress
Geographic Access
Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Montague describes the formation of the B'nai Brith Air Cadet Squadron during the Second World War. He discusses the recruitment and training of the officers and cadets. He explains how this squadron was instrumental in changing recruitment qualifications to allow entry of new immigrants and black cadets.

In this clip, Montague Raisman discusses the events leading up to an association between B

Part Of
Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
Publicity photographs of people and events series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 28; Series 6; File 12
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
Publicity photographs of people and events series
Level
File
Fonds
28
Series
6
File
12
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1970
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 9 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
The file consists of a portrait photograph of Asher ben Natan.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Executive director series
Teacher files sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 2-4; File 32
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Executive director series
Teacher files sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
2-4
File
32
Material Format
textual record
Date
1962-1974
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Access Restriction
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Quebec synagogues series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 64; Series 1; File 54
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Quebec synagogues series
Level
File
Fonds
64
Series
1
File
54
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Date
1978
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
41 photographs : col. slides, (7) b&w prints, (4 negatives) ; 35 mm and 12 x 9 cm
Subjects
Synagogues
Places
Montréal (Québec)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Name
Kalmen Kaplansky
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
September 20, 1985
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Kalmen Kaplansky
Number
AC 109
Subject
Antisemitism
Human rights
Immigrants--Canada
Labor
Labor unions
Refugees--Canada
Interview Date
September 20, 1985
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Phyllis Platnick
Total Running Time
109A: 60 minutes 109B: 6 minutes
Conservation
Not copied. Need 120 minute tape.
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Kalmen was born January 5, 1912 in Poland. He worked in Montreal as a typesetter and linotype operator. He was active in the labour and human rights movements in Canada. Kalmen served as the director of the Jewish Labour Committee in 1945. In collaboration with the Canadian Jewish Congress, the Canadian government and trade unions the Jewish Labour Committee helped Jewish displaced persons immigrate to Canada by securing them employment. Kalman sat on the Refugee Status Advisory Committee for the federal government.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Kaplansky, Kalmen
Platnick, Phyllis
Jewish Labour Committee
Geographic Access
Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Kalmen Kaplansky discusses some of the obstacles to the relocation of displaced Jews to Canada after the Second World War. He describes a tripartite proposal involving consultation and cooperation among trade unions, management and government that enabled the immigration project.

In this clip, Kalmen Kaplansky explains that bribery, corruption and perjury were a way of life after the Second World War. He relates anecdotes as illustration.

Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Research Records sub-series
Civil and Human Rights Legislation sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
5-4-1
File
152
Material Format
textual record
Date
1972
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of correspondence related to the Ontario Human Rights Commission, including documentation of complaints of racial discrimination. There are also documents regarding the situation of Jews in Syria, including a "rebuttal" from the Federation of Arab Canadian Societies.
Notes
Previously processed and cited as part of MG8 S.
Name Access
Federation of Canadian Arab Societies
Ontario Human Rights Commission
Subjects
Human rights
Jews--Syria
Race discrimination
Source
Archival Descriptions
Address
346 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Established in 1913 by Henry Dworkin and Sam Easser, the Labor Lyceum Association sought to advance the interests of the city's Jewish trade union movement. Through the sale of $5.00 stock certificates, the community purchased two houses at 344 and 346 Spadina in 1924, adding a new front and meeting rooms in 1929.
Address
346 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1924-1971
Scope Note
Established in 1913 by Henry Dworkin and Sam Easser, the Labor Lyceum Association sought to advance the interests of the city's Jewish trade union movement. Through the sale of $5.00 stock certificates, the community purchased two houses at 344 and 346 Spadina in 1924, adding a new front and meeting rooms in 1929.
History
The Labor Lyceum operated as the headquarters for the non-Communist unions of the primarily Jewish garment district. The seasonal nature of the textile industry meant that workers had time to socialize and strategize during slow work periods. The Labour Lyceum also served as an important cultural centre for various Jewish societies and fraternal organizations. It hosted a range of activities from lectures and rallies to dances, plays, and concerts. The provincial Cooperative Commonwealth Federation held conventions here in the 1940s. The importance of the Labor Lyceum lessened as the Jewish community began to move out of the Spadina Avenue area, however it remained significant to the continued labour activism taken up by newer immigrant groups. In 1971, the building was sold and the Labor Lyceum moved to Cecil Street.
Category
Political
Source
Landmarks
Accession Number
2017-2-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-2-12
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
45 cm of textual records and other material
230 photographs : sepia and b&w ; 23 x 30 cm and smaller
8 sound recordings (50 wav files; 1 microcassette)
1 artifact
Date
1937-2004
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records, photographs and audio recordings documenting the lives of Dick Steele, his wife Esther and friend Bill Walsh. The materials are mostly correspondences between Dick and Esther during his internment at the Don Jail and Ontario Reformatory in Guelph, and from Dick and Bill's military service overseas during the Second World War. They also include correspondences between Esther and Bill, Bill and Anne Walsh, "Jack" and Esther, and other family and friends. Some of the letters show evidence of being censored. There are news clippings in English and Yiddish about the family from various newspapers including the Canadian Tribune (a Communist Party paper). There is a letter Esther wrote to campaign for Dick's release from internment, part of women's activism in this period. There is also a photocopy of a memoir written by Moses Kosowatsky and Moses Wolofsky "From the Land of Despair to the Land of Promise" ca. 1930s. The photographs include Dick and Bill in the army during the Second World War, a signed picture of Tim Buck addressed to Esther and the twins and a photo of Dick delivering a speech related to the Steel Workers. Also included is a recording of edited sound clips of Bill and Esther talking about Dick, Esther speaking about the letters, (how she received letters and flowers from Dick after he had already been killed), Bill reading a letter Dick wrote to Esther that he left with friends in England to send her in the case that he was killed (which he was), recordings of "Bill Walsh Oral history" Vols.1 and 2 compiled by Leib Wolofsky's (Bill's nephew), and 5 audio recordings by Adrianna Steele-Card with her grandparents Bill and Esther. There is also a microcassette labelled "Joe Levitt." The accession also includes the stripe of a German corporal that Bill captured as a prisoner, peace stamps and an early copy of Cy Gonick's A Very Red Life: The Story of Bill Walsh, edited by Bill.
Administrative History
Richard (Dick) Kennilworth Steele is the name adopted by Moses Kosowatsky. He was born in 1909 in Montreal to Samuel Kosowatsky and Fanny Held. He lived in a laneway off Clark Street below Sherbrooke where his father collected and recycled bottles. He grew up with his siblings Joseph, Mortimer, Matthew, Gertrude and Edward. Bill Walsh (Moishe Wolofsky) was born in 1910, to Sarah and Herschel Wolofsky, the Editor of the Keneder Adler (Montreal's prominent Yiddish newspaper). He attended Baron Byng and then Commercial High School where he met Dick Steele. Bill recalled that Dick denounced militarism in the school when a teacher tried to recruit students to be cadets. Bill moved to New York City in 1927. His brother, who was living there, helped him get a job as a messenger on Wall Street. He also worked in the drug department at Macy's while attending courses at Columbia University in the evening. Dick worked on a ship for a year and then joined Bill in New York City in 1928. Dick worked at a chemical plant called Linde Air Products while also studying in the evenings at Columbia University. In 1931 Dick and Bill boarded a ship together in New York bound for Copenhagen. Together they travelled across Europe, witnessed a Nazi demonstration in Breslau, Germany and found work in Minsk and Moscow, Russia. This trip inspired them to become Communists. In 1933 Bill's father was on a Canadian trade mission to Poland, which he left to "rescue" his son from the Bolsheviks. Bill agreed to return to Canada after being advised to do so by the Comintern. He then changed his name to Bill Walsh to protect his family. In 1934 Bill moved to Toronto. He worked as the Educational Director for the Industrial Union of Needle Trade Workers and the Communist Party where he met Esther Slominsky/Silver, the organization's office manager. Dick joined Bill in Toronto soon after. Bill introduced Dick and Esther who then married. In 1940, Esther gave birth to twin sons Michael and John Steele. Esther was born in Toronto in 1914 to Joseph Slominsky and Fanny (Blackersany?). Her siblings were Bella, Eileen, Morris and step-sister Eva. Her father Joseph was a cloak maker and Esther also worked in the garment industry. Her mother Fanny passed away in 1920 at the age of 26 from tuberculosis. Dick was a metal worker and became a union organizer in the east end of Toronto. He was the head organizer of the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) and the Steel Workers Organizing Committee of Canada (SWOC) until 1940 when he was dismissed for being a Communist. Bill helped organize Kitchener's rubber workers into an industrial union and was also an organizer for the United Auto Workers of Windsor, Ontario. Jack Steele, an alias for Dick's brother Mortimer, fought with the Mackenzie-Papineau Brigade in the Spanish Civil War. Jack Steele was recalled to Canada in October 1937 to rally support for the efforts in Spain, returned to the front in June 1938 and was killed in action in August. Some of Dick's letters to his wife Esther are signed "Salud, Jack" and were likely written in 1940 when the Communist Party (CP) was banned by the Canadian Government under the War Measures Act. In November 1941, after Mackenzie King's call for enlistment, Dick wrote to the Department of Justice to ask permission to join the army. He never received a reply. On 1 April 1942 Dick's home was raided and he was interned at the Don Jail until September 1942 when he was moved to the Ontario Reformatory in Guelph. Esther wrote a letter to Louis St. Laurent, Minister of Justice to appeal on his behalf. Major public campaigning by communists and the wartime alliance with the USSR after 1941 shifted public opinion toward the CP and the Canadian Government slowly began releasing internees in January 1942. Dick was released in October 1942 and enlisted at the end of the month. Dick died on August 17, 1944 in Normandy, France. He was a tank driver in the Canadian Army. Bill was similarly arrested in 1941, spending time in jail and then an internment camp with other members of the CP. He joined the Canadian army in 1943 and fought in Holland and Belgium. Bill was first married to Anne Weir who died of a brain hemorrhage in 1943 just before he enlisted. The family believes this may have been due to drinking unpasteurized milk. Encouraged by Dick Steele to take care of his family should he pass in the war, Bill married Esther Steele in 1946. They had a daughter named Sheri and were members of the United Jewish People's Order. For 20 years Walsh worked for the Hamilton region of the United Electrical Workers (UE). Bill remained a member of the CP until 1967 when we was expelled for criticizing another union leader. He died in 2004. Esther passed away in 2010 at age 96.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
RELATED MATERIAL NOTE: Library and Archives Canada has the William Walsh fonds and MG 28, ser. I 268, USWA, vol.4, SWOC Correspondence, has various letters from Dick Steele ca. 1938. Museum of Jewish Montreal has an oral history with Leila Mustachi (daughter of Max Wolofsky, Bill's brother) where she speaks about Bill, Dick and Esther. USE CONDITION NOTES: For "Bill Walsh Oral history" Vols.1 and 2, some contributors stipulate that recordings are restricted to personal use only and must not be used for any commercial purpose.
Subjects
World War, 1939-1945
Politics and government
Labour and unions
Name Access
Steele, Michael
Steele, Dick
Walsh, Bill
Walsh, Esther Steele
Places
Guelph, Ont.
Toronto, Ont.
Hamilton, Ont.
Oshawa, Ont.
Ottawa, Ont.
Montreal, Que.
Fort William/Thunder Bay, Ont.
Germany
England
Holland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-69
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-69
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1950-1991
Scope and Content
Accession consists of interviews with various persons concerning their link with Goel Tzedec and its successor synagogue, Beth Tzedec. The interviews were primarily conducted by Ben Keyfetz and Jack Orenstien, the latter serving as the Executive Director of Beth Tzedec, at that time. Persons interviewed included Carl Keyfetz, N.N. Levine, Meyer Axler, and Bert Godfrey. There is also other information in the file concerning Cantors and Rabbis who served at Goel Tzedec, including Julius Price, Bernard Wladowsky, Jacob Gordon, and Samuel Sachs. There is a document from Bert Godfrey, undated but with a reference to 1950, titled 'Report of Construction Sub-Committee'. This presumably preceded the construction of the building housing the Beth Tzedec Synagogue on Bathurst Street. Also included is a 1955 publication of the Ne'ilah Service of Beth Tzedec to take place on February 6, 1955, concluding a half century of worship at the synagogue on University Avenue. Lastly, there are several pages of notes concerning the synagogue and its history.
Custodial History
There is no information on the acquisition of this material.
Subjects
Committees
Synagogues
Rabbis
Name Access
Kayfetz, Benjamin, 1916-2002
Places
Toronto, Ontario
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Protest activities sub-series
Kosygin demonstration file
Level
Item
Fonds
17
Series
3-5
File
7
Material Format
graphic material
Date
Oct. 1971
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 19 x 24 cm
Notes
Photograph is by Gadi Hoz.
Subjects
Demonstrations
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Nathan Phillips Square (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 2444
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
2444
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1937
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Scope and Content
Photo is a group shot of campers and staff at Camp Yungvelt with posters which read: "War is murder, the promoters - murderers" and "We want our fathers with us and not in war."
Name Access
Workmen's Circle
Camp Yungvelt
Arbeter Ring
Arbeiter Ring
Subjects
Demonstrations
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Pickering (Ont.)
Accession Number
1979-4-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Protest activities sub-series
Level
Sub-series
ID
Fonds 17; Series 3-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Protest activities sub-series
Level
Sub-series
Fonds
17
Series
3-5
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1967-1988
Physical Description
70 cm of textual records
1238 photographs : b&w ; 20 x 25 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Activities undertaken by the Committee for Soviet Jewry in Ontario and its affiliated partner organizations included political lobbying, telephone and letter-writing campaigns, product boycotting, symposiums, public rallies, petitions, marches and demonstrations. Among the highest profile activities were the annual Simcha Torah rallies in October and the annual commemorations of the execution of twenty-four Soviet Jewish writers and intellectuals, which had occurred on August 12, 1952 at Moscow's Liubianka prison. As well as organizing public protest activities, the Committee for Soviet Jewry established, in the 1980s, the Ida Nudel Humanitarian Award which emphasized the humanitarian work of a number of prominent Canadian women. Other non-protest activities included bar/ bat mitzvah twinning, family and prisoner sponsorships, and holiday greetings, all programmes that tied the daily lives of Soviet Jews to their Canadian counterparts.
Scope and Content
Sub-series consists of records documenting the wide range of above-listed protest activities in which the CJC and various affiliated organizations participated. The files include numerous photographs of mass rallies and group demonstrations, planning notes, correspondence, event notices and other promotional materials.
Subjects
Demonstrations
Arrangement
Records of protest activities in this sub-series have been organized chronologically and by event. Indicated date ranges at the file level are of the documents themselves and are not necessarily indicative of the dates of specific events, such as rallies or marches, though such dates are noted in the file description where known.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Anti-Semitism Cases sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 5-3; File 16
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Anti-Semitism Cases sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
5-3
File
16
Material Format
textual record
Date
1970
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of one news clipping documenting a rally held by John Beattie (leader of the Canadian National Socialist Party or Nazi Party of Canada) and one letter written by Beattie to apply for a salesclerk job.
Notes
Previously processed and cited as part of MG8 S.
Subjects
Demonstrations
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
1979-9-32
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-32
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
2 folders of textual records
1 photograph : b&w ; 26 x 21 cm
Date
1917-1948
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a certificate of membership to the Independent Order of Foresters, membership dues slips from the Adoniram Council of the Masonic Lodge, and a photographic reproduction of a certificate of membership in the Pride of Israel Sick Benefit Society. Accession also includes business correspondence and newsclippings.
MG_RG
MG 6 E 3
Subjects
Clippings (Books, newspapers, etc.)
Freemasonry--Lodges
Societies
Name Access
Independent Order of Foresters
Pride of Israel Sick Benefit Society
Eisen, Solomon
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Refusnik cases sub-series
Individual Refusnik cases sub-sub series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
3-6-1
File
136
Material Format
textual record
Date
[ca. 1976]
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Refusnik cases sub-series
Individual Refusnik cases sub-sub series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
3-6-1
File
221
Material Format
textual record
Date
[ca. 1976]
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2015-4-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-1
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
6 yearbooks
Date
1988-1993
Scope and Content
Accession consists of six yearbooks from Solomon's school years.
Administrative History
Dara Solomon was born in Toronto in 1975 to Joseph and Maureen (Kokotow) Solomon. Her sister is Alida Solomon. In 2004, she married Jay Rosenthal of Natick, MA in San Francisco, CA. Solomon attended Bialik Hebrew Day School (1980-89), Arlington Senior Public School (1989), CHAT (1990), and Forest Hill Collegiate Institute (1991-93). She went on to the University of Toronto where she received her BA and to the School of the Art Institute of Chicago where she received her Masters in Arts Administration. She worked in museums in the San Francisco Bay Area for 11 years before returning to Toronto with her family in 2012. Since 2012, she has been the director of the Ontario Jewish Archives. She has a daughter named Stella Rosenthal and a son named Cy Rosenthal.
Subjects
Children
Education
Name Access
Solomon, Dara, 1975-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-6
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
17 photographs : b&w (tiffs)
Date
1958-1970
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 17 scanned photographs from Joe Solomon's time as a camper and tripper at Camp Timberlane, an overnight camp founded in 1957 by Barry and Philomena Lowes on Lake of Two Islands in the Haliburton Highlands. Since it's founding, Camp Timberlane has catered to Jewish campers from Toronto. There is a finding aid in the folder with the scanned photos.
Administrative History
Joseph Nathan Solomon was born on September 4, 1944 to Myer and Sarah (nee Grafstein) Solomon. He is their middle son. He has two brothers David (deceased 2013) and Robert. Solomon attended Forest Hill Collegiate Institute, University of Toronto for his Bachelors and Osgoode Law School. A highlight of Solomon's life is being a tripper at Camp Timberlane for over 15 years. Solomon practiced law with his father Myer Solomon for the firm Solomon & Solomon and independendly following Myer's retirement and death in the late 1980s. Solomon married Maureen (nee Kokotow) Solomon from Kirkland Lake, ON in 1968. They have two daughters Alida Solomon and Dara Solomon, who started serving as the director of the Ontario Jewish Archives in 2012. Alida Solomon is a chef and restaurant owner.
Subjects
Children
Camps
Name Access
Solomon, Joseph, 1944-
Camp Timberlane
Places
Haliburton, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-4
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
moving images
Physical Description
6 VHS tapes
1 folder of textual records
16 photographs
Date
1940-1978
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs and videos documenting the Solomon family, descendents of Harry and Dora Solomon. There are 6 videos. One video has been transferred to DVD and a finding aid has been created. A finding aid has been created for the photos. There is also a Toronto Life article, "Meet a Slumlord" about Harry Solomon, 1968. There is also a Rosh Hashana (New Years Card) and a baby Record for Stanley Solomon.
Custodial History
Stanley Solomon is the son of Alex and Gert Solomon, and was in possession of the records prior to donating them.
Administrative History
Stanley Solomon is the son of Gert and Alex Solomon. His brother is Leslie. Alex was the eldest son of Harry and Dora (nee Rogow) Solomon. Dora's parents were Sorita and Itche Rogowitch, eventually shortened to Rogow. There were 5 brothers: Alex (Gert), Joe (Ceal), Mike (Sarah Grafstein), Abe (Muriel), and Max (Lillian) and two sisters named Rose (m. Friedman) and Ida (m. Wagman). There was another brother named Sam who died young. Harry was a landlord and the owner of a scrapyard. A number of his sons worked with him in the family business. The family lived on Shaw Street between Dundas and Queen. In the 1930s, he began spending time in Miami, Florida. Harry died in 1972 and Dora died a few months later. Most of the films were shot by Joe Solomon.
Descriptive Notes
There is related material in accession 1980-11-2.
Name Access
Solomon, Stanley, 1939-
Places
North Bay, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Refusnik cases sub-series
Individual Refusnik cases sub-sub series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
3-6-1
File
8
Material Format
textual record
Date
1977
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Executive director series
Teacher files sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 2-4; File 408
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Executive director series
Teacher files sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
2-4
File
408
Material Format
textual record
Date
1967-1968
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Access Restriction
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Executive director series
Teacher files sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 2-4; File 303
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Executive director series
Teacher files sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
2-4
File
303
Material Format
textual record
Date
1957-1963
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Access Restriction
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Passenger Names
Kersh, Solomon
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Kersh, Solomon
Page Number
374
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Keshen, Solomon
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Keshen, Solomon
Page Number
732
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Solomon, Joseph
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Solomon, Joseph
Page Number
410
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Solomon, P.
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Solomon, P.
Page Number
643
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Williams, Solomon
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Williams, Solomon
Page Number
223
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Wilner, Solomon A.
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Wilner, Solomon A.
Page Number
620
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Zadic, Solomon
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Zadic, Solomon
Page Number
682
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Zoddic, Solomon
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Zoddic, Solomon
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 17; Series 5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Level
Series
Fonds
17
Series
5
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1938-1978, 1991
Physical Description
6.5 m of textual records
15 photographs
Admin History/Bio
The Joint Community Relations Committee was created in 1938 by the Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region and the Toronto Lodge B’nai Brith. It was originally named the Joint Public Relations Committee and was responsible for combating antisemitism in Ontario. Public statements, by agreement, were made only by the Canadian Jewish Congress as B’nai Brith recognized the uniqueness of its national constitution. The committee was led by lay leaders from the community and a staff representative from the CJC. Shortly thereafter, similar committees were set up in Montreal and in Western Canada, and soon a National Joint Community Relations Committee was established.
The committee played a key role in achieving the early anti-discrimination act of 1944, and the Fair Employment Practices Act of 1951, leading to the Human Rights Code of today. It was prominent in the action against the spread of sectarian religious teachings in the public schools and took the lead in pressing for legislation against the dissemination of racial hatred. It acted for the preservation of religious and human rights and worked with numerous religious, fraternal and ethnic organizations in the wider community. The committee also investigated and acted upon all complaints of discrimination, antisemitism and other such incidents. They supplied Jewish and secular schools with educational materials including pamphlets and books, and conducted intercultural and inter-religious work in the community through organized lectures, seminars, institutes, and plenary sessions.
The committee was composed of equal representation from both the Canadian Jewish Congress, and the B’nai Brith. The money for the operation of the Committee was first provided by both organizations, however, in a 1947 agreement between the National CJC and B’nai Brith Canada, the parties stated that the finances for the committee would be raised in the name of the CJC, with B’nai Brith agreeing to make “token” contributions and co-operate with Congress’ fundraising campaign. As well, the professional staff and support persons for the committee, along with their salaries, came solely from the Central Region CJC.
The executive director (also referred to as the executive secretary) was the primary staff person responsible for carrying out the policy and activities of the JPRC, which included preparing press releases, liaisoning with affiliated groups, organizations, individuals, journalists, government representatives and any others wanting or needing information on issues relating to the JPRC’s work. The executive director acted as the recording secretary at all committee meetings and was the keeper of all official documents.
Around 1978, due in part to the earlier creation of the B’nai Brith’s League for Human Rights in 1970, the Canadian Jewish Congress and the B’nai Brith terminated their joint relationship with the committee. At the time, the CJC felt that B’nai Brith was playing a dual role in advocacy through the League and through the JPRC. B’nai Brith, in turn, felt that the CJC was shutting out the B’nai Brith’s voice. Nevertheless, the “Joint” was not dropped from the name until around 1991. Today, the committee functions under the sole direction of the CJC as the Community Relations Committee, Ontario Region and continues to perform many of the same functions in the community.
In 2011 the Community Relations Committee ceased to exist when the CJC Ontario office was closed and the functions of the CJC were folded into the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs (CIJA).
Committee name changes were: Community Relations Committee, CJC, Ontario Region (ca. 1991-2011) Joint Community Relations Committee, CJC, Ontario Region (ca. 1978-ca. 1991) Joint Community Relations Committee, Central Region (1962-1978) Joint Community Relations Committee, (1938-1962)
Scope and Content
Series consists of five sub-series. Sub-series 1 contains the agendas, minutes and associated documentation supporting meetings of the Community Relations Committee. Sub-series 2 contains speeches , publications, press releases and reports presented and/or distributed by the Committee. Sub-series 3 consists of case files documenting the Committee's activities of combating specific antisemitism and Holocaust-denying activities in Canada. Extensive documentation about Ernst Zundel is included Sub-series 4 contains 9 sub-sub-series documenting various categories of research files accumulated by the Committee. Sub-series 5 contains the general office records of the Committee and includes correspondence and memos of the Executive Director and records providing insight to the internal organization and management of the Committee's internal functions.
For more details see descriptions within the scope and contents notes at the sub-series and sub-sub-series levels
Notes
Previously processed and cited a MG8 S
Physical extent note: when originally listed in 1988, this series contained about 20.5 metres of textual records. When partial processing and reorganization had been completed in 2013, 14 metres had been culled because those documents were duplicates, newspaper clippings, created by outside agencies or maintained in other agencies.
Associated material note:Library and Archives of Canada holds the records for the National B’nai Brith which does contain 30cm of material on the National Joint Community Relations Committee. The Canadian Jewish Congress National Archives in Montreal holds the records for the National Joint Community Relations Committee, which contains some files on the Ontario Region, as they reported to the National office. The whereabouts of the B’nai Brith records pertaining to the Central Region activities are currently unknown.
Subjects
Committees
Arrangement
Because records in this series had been previously organized in a manner that proved difficult for use by archivists and researchers, the records, during 2010 and 2011, were totally rearranged and described to comply with RAD standards, to provide ease of access by researchers, and to fully reflect the activities and organizational history of the Community Relations Committee of the Canadian Jewish Congress during and after the period when it was a joint committee with the B'Nai Brith.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 946
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
946
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1927
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 13 x 18 cm
Scope and Content
Copy photograph of Borochov Young Poale Zion Executive Committee, taken in New York, 1927. Left front, Morris Lofsky, Toronto.
Name Access
Borochow Young Poale Zion Executive Committee
Lofsky, Morris
Subjects
Committees
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
New York (N.Y.).
Accession Number
1975-12-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Simon fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 23; File 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Simon fonds
Level
File
Fonds
23
File
3
Material Format
textual record
Date
1960-1966
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
Scope and Content
This file consists of textual records relating to Harry Simon's work as Chairman of the Jewish Labour Committee. The records include correspondence, event invitations and flyers and activity summaries.
Subjects
Committees
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Simon fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 23; File 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Simon fonds
Level
File
Fonds
23
File
4
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1967-1972
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 26 x 21 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
This file consists of records relating to Harry Simon's work as Chairman of the Jewish Labour Committee. The records include correspondence, event invitations and flyers, activity summaries, press releases, speeches and one photograph.
Subjects
Committees
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Simon fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 23; File 5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Simon fonds
Level
File
Fonds
23
File
5
Material Format
textual record
Date
1973-1975
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
Scope and Content
This file consists of textual records relating to Harry Simon's work as Chairman of the Jewish Labour Committee. The records include correspondence, event invitations and flyers, press releases and meeting minutes.
Subjects
Committees
Source
Archival Descriptions
50 records – page 1 of 1.

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