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Accession Number
2013-2-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-2-3
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
20 cm of textual records
ca. 100 photographs
Date
[190-]-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to three generations of the Ladovsky family and their restaurant, the United Bakers Dairy Restaurant. Also included is a small amount of material related to Jewish organizations in Toronto, such as the Kieltzer Society and B'nai Brith, as well as the Bakery and Confectionary Union. Records include family and business photographs, correspondence, newsclippings, UB menus and other ephemera, and records related to family simchas and celebrations.
Custodial History
The records were created and accumulated by Aaron Ladovsky, Herman Ladovsky and Ruthie Ladovsky.
Administrative History
Aaron Ladovsky was born in 1888 in Kielce, Poland. He immigrated with his wife Sarah to Toronto in 1906 at the age of 18. Soon after arriving, Aaron Ladovsky worked to help form a Jewish bakers’ union to advocate for collective rights among Jewish Bakers. In 1912 he opened the United Bakers Dairy Restaurant at Dundas and Bay Streets (known then as Agnes and Teraulay Streets respectively) in the heart of the Ward. That same year, the couple had twin sons Herman and Samuel, who were born on September 23, 1912.
Only a short time later, in 1920, Aaron moved the location of his restaurant to 338 Spadina Avenue, just north of Dundas. He and his family lived in an apartment upstairs. Herman and Samuel attended Hester How Elementary School until 1919, Lord Lansdowne Public School once the family moved to Spadina, and later Central Commerce. The twins worked in the family business in the 1920s delivering fresh breads and buns by horse cart.
Aaron Ladovsky was involved in a number of community organizations. He was instrumental in founding the Kieltzer Society of Toronto in 1913; a community based immigrant-aid association extending aid to Kielcers in Poland and around the world. Ladovsky remained an active member of the organization until his death on April 5, 1960 . His restaurant provided a welcome gathering place for the Jewish community, serving traditional dishes and maintaining a friendly open-door policy. Aaron Ladovsky was known for his generosity and claimed that no one, whether they had money or not, left his restaurant hungry. The United Bakers' menu was mainly based on Sarah’s original recipes, and continues to be so to this day.
During the Second World War, Herman served overseas as an electrician in the Canadian army show with comics Johnny Wayne and Frank Shuster. After returning from the war, he married Dora Macklin in 1947, a registered nurse from Regina. He also began to take over management of the family business. Later, his son Philip and daughter Ruth would follow in his footsteps, helping to run the restaurant with him and later taking over managment. United Bakers remained on Spadina Avenue for 66 years – until 1986 when it moved to its current location at 506 Lawrence Avenue West, off of Bathurst Street. Herman was an active fixture in restaurant until his death on January 6, 2002. He also supported and was involved in the work of the Ontario Jewish Archives over the years. Today, Philip and Ruth carry on the family tradition of running United Bakers Dairy Restaurant.
Descriptive Notes
To be integrated into the Ladovsky family fonds 83.
Subjects
Families
Restaurants
Name Access
Ladovsky, Herman
Ladovsky, Aaron
United Bakers Dairy Restaurant (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 83; File 9; Item 17
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
83
File
9
Item
17
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[192-]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 16 x 11 cm on matte 24 x 16 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of the Ladovsky family in Kielce, Poland. They are the relatives of Herman Ladovsky.
Notes
Originally cited as photo #3832.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Physical Condition
There are cacks at two corners of the matte.
Accession Number
1983-11-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 83; File 9; Item 13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
83
File
9
Item
13
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[191-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 10 x 14 cm on matte 15 x 23 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of the Ladovsky family, in Kielce, Poland. The family were relatives of Herman Ladovsky, of Toronto.
Notes
Originally cited as photo # 3833.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1983-11-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 83; File 9; Item 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
83
File
9
Item
1
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[190-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 14 x 9 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of members of the Ladovsky family, in Kielce, Poland. The family are relatives of Herman Ladovsky of Toronto.
Notes
Formerly cited as photo # 3834.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1983-11-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Hoffman family fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Hoffman family fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
6
Material Format
textual record
architectural drawing
moving images
Date
1946-1981
Physical Description
17 cm of textual records
10 architectural drawings
ca. 9 film reels : 16 mm
Admin History/Bio
Max and Celia Hoffman were married in 1958 in Hamilton and had two sons. Max was the owner of Hamilton Plumbing and Heating Supplies. Both were active in a number of Jewish community organizations in Hamilton such as the Council of Jewish Organizations, Adas Israel synagogue and the Union of Jewish Congregations of America, Ontario Region. They were also involved in fundraising on behalf of Yeshiva University, which is located in New York City. Max Hoffman died in 1964 and Celia moved to Toronto in 1966 when she married Sol Edell.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of correspondence, ledgers, publications, home movies and architectural drawings relating to the family life, business and community activities of Max and Celia Hoffman. There are three series: Business Series, Community Activities Series and Personal Series.
Name Access
Adas Israel Congregation (Hamilton, Ont.)
Council of Jewish Organizations
Federation
Hoffman (family)
Subjects
Families
Creator
Hoffman family
Places
Hamilton (Ont.)
Accession Number
2002-12-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Cowan family fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 102
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Cowan family fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
102
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1902-2002
Physical Description
90 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Saul Cowan (1910-2002) was the seventh of nine children born to Zvi Hirsh (Harris) Cohen (1872-1954) and Chana Leah (Annie) (née Gollom) Cohen (1873-1960). His siblings were Woolf Cowan (Colvin) (1896-1987), Kate Cowan (b.1898) (m. Wener), Jack Cowan (1900-1992), Rivka (Reva) Cowan (1902-ca.2002) (m. Lieberman), Moe Cowan (b.1904), Jeanne Cowan (b.1906) (m. Kallman), Norman Cowan (b. 1909) and Miriam Cowan (b. 1919) (m. Rose).
The Cowan family immigrated to Toronto from England with their six oldest children circa 1908. Harris worked as a tailor in England and as an operator in men's clothing factory Tip Top Tailors in Toronto.
Saul graduated from the University of Toronto in 1931 in honours philosophy.
In 1932, Cowan married Lillian Rosenthal (1910-1978), the daughter of Morris (1883-1967) and Nessie (Celia) (née Soren) Rosenthal (1881-1969). Together, they had two children, Michael (b. 1939) and Trudy (b. 1941). The Rosenthal family ran a boarding house on Hanlan's Point and had a place at Belle Ewart. In 1945, Morris and Celia purchased Wapaska Lodge on Muskoka Bay just outside Gravenhurst and ran it as a family resort from 1948-1965.
Lillian, who was a public school teacher, passed away in 1978 and the following year Saul married Libbie Aiken (d. 2006). Libbie had been the head physiotherapist at the Toronto General Hospital during the late 1940s.
Saul pursued a career with the North York Board of Education serving as both trustee and chairman from 1958 to 1976. He was also very involved with the Jewish community and the growing North York community. He was also involved with organizations such as B'nai Brith, Canadian Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (CPPNW), and the North York Social Planning Committee. He was a founder of the York Finch General Hospital.
Trudy studied physical and occupational therapy at the University of Toronto but changed career direction when she moved to Calgary in 1969 and became involved in historical organizations such as the Glenbow Museum, the Alberta Historical Resources Foundation, and the Lougheed House Conservation Society. She married Leonid Luker (b. 1937) in 1982.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the Cowan (Cohen) family and their connected branches including the Rosenthal, Soren, Gollom, Aiken, and Altshuller families. The records originated from Saul Cowan, his first and second wives, Lillian Rosenthal and Libbie Aiken, and his daughter, Trudy Cowan Luker. Records include photographs of family members at graduations, weddings, school, religious events, camping activities, and milestone celebrations. Textual records include traditional and email correspondence, marriage certificates, passports, immigration documents, family histories, theatre and concert programmes, and newspaper clippings. Many of the records document Saul Cowan's personal and professional activities. The majority of the material relates to the Cowan and Rosenthal families.
Notes
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION NOTE: Includes 386 photographs, 2 audiotapes, and 6 objects.
Four books from the collection have been removed and integrated into the OJA's library holdings. These include titles Have I Ever lied To You Before? by Jerry Goodis, My Outlook by Jack Cowan, When Partners Become Parents by Carolyn Pape Cowan and Philip A. Cowan, and Front Page Challenge: History of a Television Legend by Alex Barris.
Name Access
Cowan (family)
Subjects
Families
Accession Number
2008-6-11
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Scheuer family fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 47
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Scheuer family fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
47
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Date
[187-]-1959
Physical Description
6 folders of textual records
2 window plates : brass
58 photographs : b&w ; 25 x 20 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Scheuer family dates back to at least the eighteenth century in Germany to Moise Scheuer (1765-1846) and Esther Ackerman (1770-1847). Their son, Isaac Scheuer (1809-1889), married Hannchen (Johanna) Strauss (1815-1878) in 1843. Isaac and Johanna had six children: Gabriel (1844-1922), Camilla (1845-1916), Edmund (1847-1943), Emma (1853-1916), Ida (1855-1902), and Benno (Benjamin) (1857-1921).
While Gabriel, Emma, and Ida remained in Europe, Camilla, Edmund, and Benno immigrated to Canada in the late nineteenth century. Camilla came to Hamilton, Ontario after her marriage in 1866 to Herman Levy, co-founder of the Levy Brothers jewellery business. Edmund became a partner in the business when he first immigrated to Canada in 1871, and lived with Camilla and Herman. Camilla became the acknowledged leader of Jewish women in Hamilton. She served in organizations such as the Deborah Ladies' Aid Society, which eventually became an auxiliary of Temple Anshe Sholom, Canada's oldest Reform congregation, often referred to as the Hughson Street Temple. Edmund established the first Sabbath School in Ontario at Anshe Sholom in 1872 and served as president from 1873 to 1886.
After he was established in Hamilton, Edmund returned to Europe in 1873 to marry Oda Strauss (1854-1913) at Forbach, Lorraine, and then brought her back to Canada with him. The couple moved to Toronto in 1886, where he established a wholesale jewellery business on Yonge Street called Scheuer's under his company Edmund Scheuer Limited. Scheuer's was one of the oldest jewellery firms in Toronto and the oldest established wholesale diamond importer in Canada. Edmund's brother, Benno, also worked for the business as the accountant and then secretary-treasurer. Benno was married to Gatella Strauss (1859-1903) and they had three children: Eddie Jr. (1884-1967), Rhoda (1886-1963) and Isadore (1887-1969). Eddie Jr. and Isadore also worked for their uncle's business. Eddie Jr. started as a clerk and then became vice-president, while Isadore started out as a travelling salesman and jeweller. When their uncle retired in 1922, Eddie Jr. took over as president and his brother Isadore became vice-president of Scheuer's.
In addition to his jewellery business, Edmund Scheuer also taught and supervised the religious school at Holy Blossom Synagogue. He went on to serve in every official capacity at Holy Blossom, including vice-chairman and treasurer of the building committee for the Bond Street building. He also founded The Jewish Free School at 206 Beverley Street for Jewish girls and wrote his own textbook for the school, the first Jewish religious school book printed in Toronto. In 1892, he founded the first Jewish benevolent society in Toronto and was later president of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies. In 1927, the Beverley Street building, which housed Federation offices, was dedicated in his honour and named the "Scheuer House".
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the Scheuer family in Germany, Hamilton, and Toronto. The fonds is made up primarily of photographs of Scheuer family members and friends. It also includes some textual records, including correspondence, marriage certificates, a Toronto Jewish Free School text book, and Holy Blossom Temple Bulletins. Also included are two brass "Scheuer's" window plates which were likely from Edmund Scheuer's jewellery business of the same name.
Notes
Associated Material Note: See the CJC National Archives collection for Edmund Scheuer at: http://www.cjc.ca/template.php?action=archives&Type=1&Language=EN&Rec=253
Name Access
Scheuer (family)
Subjects
Families
Related Material
See OJA vertical file cabinet for "Scheuer, Edmund" and "Levy, Camilla"
See MG 3 A-1
See MG2 G1c
Arrangement
The textual records have been arranged in chronological order into five files. The objects have been described as one file. The fifty-eight photographs have been described as two files and thirty-nine items arranged chronologically
Accession Number
1989-4-2
2004-7-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Farb family fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 96
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Farb family fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
96
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1919-1944
Physical Description
21 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 26 cm
Admin History/Bio
Nathan Farb was one of the first Jews to arrive and settle in Pontypool, which was a popular summer resort spot for vacationing Jews from the 1940s until the 1960s. The area was relatively inexpensive and had a pond as its swimming spot. Kosher meals would often be brought in for the vacationers who arrived on two trains daily from Union Station.
Custodial History
The original photographs were loaned to the Archives for copying in 2005. They were subsequently returned to the donor.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of 21 copy photographs of the Farb family as well as the Bernsteins, Crystals, and other Jewish families who lived and owned resorts in the Pontypool area.
Name Access
Bernstein family
Crystal family
Farb (family)
Subjects
Recreation
Creator
Farb family (Pontypool, Ont.)
Places
Pontypool (Ont.)
Accession Number
2005-8-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gary family fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 97
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gary family fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
97
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1947-1967
Physical Description
10 photographs : b&w ; 9 x 15 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Joseph Gary and Goldie Gary (née Lawrence) married in 1921 in Rochester, New York. Shortly thereafter they moved to Toronto. Joseph and Goldie had three children: daughters Ethel (Halter) and Shirley (Cohen) and son Leslie. In 1950, after three years of visiting the region, Joseph and Goldie purchased a home on Amelia Street in Pontypool, Ontario. As the area was a popular summer resort spot for vacationing Jews from the 1940s to the 1960s, Joseph and Goldie decided to build 10 cottages on their land for rental, which they named Gary's Cottages. The cottages were sold around 1970 and are no longer in existence; however, their home is still standing.
Custodial History
The original photographs were loaned to the Archives for copying and were subsequently returned to the donor.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of 10 copy photographs documenting the Gary family and their cottages in Pontypool.
Name Access
Gary (family)
Gary, Goldie
Gary, Joseph
Subjects
Recreation
Creator
Gary family (Pontypool, Ont.)
Places
Pontypool (Ont.)
Accession Number
2005-9-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 83; File 9; Item 12
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
83
File
9
Item
12
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[193-]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of a Ladovsky family wedding dinner, in Kielce, Poland. The family were relatives of Herman Ladovsky of Toronto.
Notes
Originally cited as photo # 3842.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1983-11-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 83; File 9; Item 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
83
File
9
Item
2
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[190-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 17 x 11 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of a male member of the Ladovsky family, taken in Kielce, Poland. The individual is a relative of Herman Ladovsky of Toronto.
Notes
Originally cited as photograph # 3835.
Name Access
Ladovsky (family)
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1983-11-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 83; File 9; Item 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
83
File
9
Item
4
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[190-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 17 x 11 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of three male members of the Ladovsky family, taken in Kielce, Poland. They are relatives of Herman Ladovsky of Toronto.
Notes
Originally cited as photo # 3837.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Physical Condition
A layer of a small section of the bottom of the cardboard backing has peeled off.
Accession Number
1983-11-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 83; File 9; Item 5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
83
File
9
Item
5
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[190-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 11 x 7 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of a female member of the Ladovsky family, taken in Kielce, Poland. She is a relative of Herman Ladovsky of Toronto.
Notes
Originally cited as photo # 3838.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1983-11-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Frankel and Draper family fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 104
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Frankel and Draper family fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
104
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1895-2009
Physical Description
21 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Gottschall Frankel (1832-1918) and his wife Mina Meyer (1841-1921) were born in Biblis (Hessen) and Aschaffenburg, Germany respectively. Gottschall died in Biblis and is buried in Alsbach, Germany. Mina passed away in Toronto and is interred in the old Holy Blossom Cemetery. Leo Frankel (1864-1933) was one of nine children born in Biblis, Germany to Gottschall and Mina. His siblings were Salmon (1874-1906), Benno (d. 1921), Ike (d. 1950), Louis (1879-1952), Maurice (1865-1935), Sigmund (1866-1936), Ida (1870-1952) (m. Levy) and Herman (1871-1939). Three of the siblings are buried in Montreal, and the rest in Toronto. Leo immigrated to Canada in 1881 at the age of seventeen and in 1886 established Frankel Brothers (scrap metal and processing) in association with his brothers. The siblings were eventually succeeded by several sons of the original partners. The company subsequently became Frankel Steel Ltd. and Steel Structures Corporation. Leo married Helena "Lena" Mayer of Florsheim, Germany on July 2, 1890 in New York City. They had three sons: Egmont Leo (1891-1964), Carl Milford (1894-1984), and Roy Hecker (1896-1983). The family lived at 504 Jarvis Street, the former Goodman residence in Toronto, from 1908. Carl married Dorothy Jacobs (1903-1987) who was born in St. Louis, Missouri. Her parents were Bernard Jacobs of Texas and Henrietta Altheimer of Arkansas. Carl and Dorothy had two daughters: Nancy Jean Frankel (b. 1928) and Carol Nina Frankel (1930-1999). Carl was a prominent member of the Toronto Jewish community, active in Holy Blossom Temple, several Masonic lodges, and was a founder of the North Toronto Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. His daughter Nancy attended Jarvis Collegiate Institute and was confirmed at Holy Blossom Temple. She married Darrell (Drapkin) Draper (1922-1992) of Fort William/Port Arthur in 1949. Darrell had studied at the University of Toronto and became a lawyer and judge. The couple's three children are Dr. Paula Jean Draper (b. 1953), a historian; Phillip Jacobs (b. 1954), a real estate lawyer; and Kenneth Lewis (b. 1957). Collectively the siblings have six children and several grandchildren. Nancy Draper has been a long time volunteer at the Ontario Jewish Archives. Nancy's sister Carol married Mandel Sprachman (1925-2002), the son of a renowned architect Abraham Sprachman of the firm Kaplan and Sprachman. Mandel followed his father into the profession, specializing in cinemas and theatres, including the award-winning restoration of the Elgin and Winter Garden Theatres (1985-1989). The Frankel family genealogy is wide in scope, extending from Germany and England to the United States and Canada. One notable ancestor with German lineage is Israel Beer Josephat who changed his name to Paul Julius Reuter and founded the Reuters News Agency.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the Frankel and Draper (Drapkin) families and their connected branches, such as the Jacobs (English in origin), Josephat, Meyer, and Altheimer (all German in origin) families. Records include: photographs of the exterior and interior of the Frankel home at 504 Jarvis Street, Toronto; formal individual and group photographs taken in Toronto and other cities of family members at various gatherings and of Nancy Frankel's confirmation class at Holy Blossom; pictures of Darrell Drapkin (later Draper) and his Sigma Alpha Mu fraternity brothers at the University of Toronto; group photographs of members of the Palestine Lodge of Masons, of which Carl and his brother Egmont were members; and a variety of candid shots in many locations including outside the Frankel family home in Biblis, Germany.
Textual records include: essays and programs concerning Holy Blossom, publications from Camp Wabi-Kon and Jarvis Collegiate yearbooks, and material from the Ulyssean Society at Hart House, the Oakdale Golf and Country Club, and the Carmel Chapter of Hadassah documenting Nancy's involvement with these organizations.
Objects include a souvenir matchbook from the wedding of Darrell Draper and Nancy Frankel and a membership coin and badge in a leather case documenting Carl Frankel's involvement with Masonic lodges.
Notes
Physical description note: Includes 250 photographs, 3 objects,1 CD, and 1 video cassette.
Name Access
Draper (family)
Draper, Nancy (1928-)
Frankel (family)
Subjects
Families
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Levine and Cass family fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 25
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Levine and Cass family fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
25
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Date
[188-]-1973
Physical Description
188 photographs : b&w, some sepia toned ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
3 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
Aaron and Sarah (née Snider) Levine (1832-1915) were from Minsk. Sarah immigrated to Toronto with her children in 1887. In 1892, Abraham (1940-1897) and Rachel Cass (1838-1903) came to Toronto with their younger chilldren, following their elder children who had immigrated before them.
The Levine children consisted of the following individuals: Annie (m. Salamansky) (1861-1931); Moses (Moishe) Joseph (1864-1919); Michael (1869-1918); Abraham; Sam; and Rebecca (m. Samuels) (b. 1875).
The Cass children consisted of: Fayge (m. Sax) (1861-1942); Anna (Hannah) (m. Segel) (1863-1930); Martha (m. Soskin) (1866-1946); Dave Cass (1869-1959); Dora (m. Levy) (b.1870); Sarah (m. Levine) (1876-1978); Annie (m. Smith) (1880-1952); Bill Cass; and Phillip Cass.
Sarah Snider Levine lived with her son, Moses, and daughter-in-law Sarah for thirteen years. The couple first lived on Chestnut Street and then moved to Centre Avenue. They later relocated to Spadina Avenue near Dundas around 1903, and finally, moved to 224 Beverley Street near College.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of family photographs that document the Cass and Levine families of Toronto. The records were donated by Mary Soskin, who was the daugher of Moses and Sarah (née Cass) Levine. The records document the donor's matriarchal and patriarchal families. In turn, the records also include photographs of her own family, as well as families related to her or her parents through marriage, such as: the Salamansky (Salem), Thuna, Bliss, Samuels, Soskin, Cass, Segel, Sax, Weiner, Levy, and Rosenbes families. The photographs date from the late nineteenth century to the middle of the twentieth century. The fonds also contains one file of textual records
The fonds has been arranged into 18 series by family, as well as one series for photographs that cannot be linked to an individual family and another for images that could not be identified. The series consist of the following: Series 1, Moses Levine family; Series 2, Michael Levine family; Series 3, Abraham Levine family; Series 4, Abe Levine family; Series 5, Harry Levine family; Series 6, Salamansky (Salem) family; Series 7, Thuna family; Series 8, Bliss family; Series 9, Samuels family; Series 10, Soskin family; Series 11, Cass family; Series 12, Segel family; Series 13, Sax family; Series 14, Weiner family; Series 15, Levy family; Series 16, Rosenbes family; Series 17, Miscellaneous family members; Series 18, Unidentified photographs.
The items have been arranged chronologically within each series.
Name Access
Cass (family)
Levine (family)
Subjects
Families
Related Material
1982-8-3
AC 1: Soskin, Mary (Levine)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Family and Child fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 79
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Family and Child fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
79
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1933-2011
Physical Description
ca. 4.8 m of texutal records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Jewish Family & Child was established in 1943 from the amalgamation of a variety of different social agencies formed as early as 1868. These included the Ladies Benevolent Fund, the Free Burial Society, Jewish Family Welfare Bureau, Jewish Children’s Bureau, Big Brothers and Big Sisters, and the Ladies Maternal Aid Society. Much of its funding and support after its inception came from the United Jewish Welfare Fund.
The first executive director of the agency was Dora Wilensky. She was a trained social worker who served for twenty-eight years, until her untimely death from cancer in 1959. Jerome Diamond took over in 1960 and Gordon Wolfe succeeded him in 1981. Ron Levin briefly replaced Wolfe after his retirement in 2003, and was succeeded in 2006 by Dr. Richard Cummings who then retired in 2015. As of 2017, Brian Prousky is the organization’s current executive director.
During the early years, fees were established, but the agency never refused to assist clients because of their inability to pay. JF&CS became one of the first agencies to rely on trained social workers. It was also the first social agency in Canada to become unionized.
Over the years the agency’s role has changed and it has expanded significantly, in terms of its staff and services. After the Second World War it played a pivotal role supporting the Holocaust orphans who came to Canada as refugees, particularly in the area of locating foster parents for these children. By 1957, the agency hired its first counsellor and became a member of the United Community Fund of Greater Toronto. The year 1968 marked the start of JF&CS’ new program involving the use of a mobile treatment centre to reach out to Jewish street kids and in 1974 they established the Jerome D. Diamond Adolescent Centre.
In 1981, JF&CS was mandated by the Province of Ontario as a Jewish children’s aid society responsible for the care and protection of all Jewish youth in the GTA. In 1983 they established the Just-A-Second Shop at 3101 Bathurst Street, which took in used goods from the community to pass on to needy families. Two years later they established the Henry G. Goodman Home for developmentally challenged children on Wilmington Avenue. The following year marked the opening of the Elm Ridge Group Living Residence for elderly people. In 1988, they opened a special shelter for abused women and children, and in 1994, they introduced their Homework Club for kids.
The current mission of Jewish Family & Child is to support the healthy development of individuals, children, families, and communities through prevention, protection, counselling, education, and advocacy services, within the context of Jewish values. Their services include counselling, rehabilitation and support, foster care, family services, and community services. These services are offered in a host of different languages including Hebrew, Yiddish, Russian, French, and English.
JF&CS is an independent organization that receives its funding from a variety of different sources such as UJA Federation of Greater Toronto, United Way Toronto and York Region, the Government of Ontario, and individual donations.
As of 2017, JF&CS has nearly 130 staff providing more than thirty community services with a budget of almost $20 million. Their main office is located in the Lipa Green Centre for Community Services at 4600 Bathurst Street. They also maintain offices and run services out of their downtown branch at 35 Madison Avenue, their York Region branch inside UJA’s 1 Open Door at the Lebovic JCC, and their Jerome D. Diamond Adolescent Centre in midtown Toronto.
Name Access
Jewish Family and Child
Wilensky, Dora, 1902-1959
Wolfe, Gordon
Diamond, Jerome D.
Subjects
Charities
Children
Families
Nonprofit organizations
Access Restriction
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director and head of Jewish Family and Child prior to accessing the records.
Related Material
See also: Jewish Child Welfare Association fonds (fonds 86); Jewish Family Welfare Bureau fonds (fonds 87); Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds (fonds 66); and, United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds (fonds 67).
Creator
Jewish Family and Child (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
2004-5-101
2004-1-8
2002-10-38
2006-6-7 (Shelf 03-6,Orphan index cards)
2009-12-9
2010-4-1 (Shelf 34-1)
2010-10-5
2015-8/11
2015-9/1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 83; File 9; Item 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
83
File
9
Item
3
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[190-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 17 x 11 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of a member of the Ladovsky family, taken in Kielce, Poland. The woman is a relative of Herman Ladovsky of Toronto.
Notes
Originally cited as photo # 3836.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1983-11-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 83; File 9; Item 6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
83
File
9
Item
6
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[190-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w : 18 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of four female members of the Ladovsky family, taken in Kielce, Poland. They are relatives of Herman Ladovsky of Toronto.
Notes
Originally cited as photo # 3839
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1983-11-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 83; File 9; Item 7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
83
File
9
Item
7
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[190-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w : 18 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of a female member of the Ladovsky family, taken in Kielce, Poland. She is a relative of Herman Ladovsky of Toronto.
Notes
Originally cited as photo # 3840.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1983-11-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2012-10-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-10-13
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
11 photographs : b&w and col. (2 negatives) ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Date
1917-1956
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to Aaron Ladovsky. Included is an urgent memo from Kielce asking for relief money and the accompanying receipt from Anshel Wise's steamship agent office for the remittance of the requested money (1939), a letter to Ladovsky c/o of the United Jewish Relief Conference from the CJC (1944), a Kieltzer Sick Benefit Society of Toronto dues booklet (1917), a Kieltzer Landmanshaften in Israel pamphlet (1953), and a receipt from the Standard Theatres Ltd. for payment of $60 for Ladovsky. This payment was made two months after the theatre first opened in 1921 and was likely payment for seats. The photographs depict Aaron Ladovsky with family in Kielce (1928), the dedication of a monument to the Kielce martyrs at a Jewish cemetery in Paris (between 1945 and 1950), a negative of a Canadian Jewish Congress meeting (1943), the exhumation of Kielce Jews who were murdered in the Holocaust, a photo of Ruthie, Herman and Philip Ladovsky at United Bakers, (1990s), and an exterior view of United Bakers on Spadina Avenue (1956).
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 87
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
87
Material Format
textual record
architectural drawing
Date
1928-1943
Physical Description
67 cm of textual records
1 architectural drawing
Admin History/Bio
Sometime around 1919, the Family Welfare Committee was set up within the newly created Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto (FJPT) to perform social welfare work with Jewish families. Around 1931, the Committee was reorganized as an independent member agency of the FJPT and renamed the Jewish Family Welfare Bureau (JFWB). At the same time, Dora Wilensky (1902-1959), a professionally-trained social worker, was hired as the agency’s executive director. Throughout its existence, most of its funding came from the FJPT (later the United Jewish Welfare Fund).
Located at 179 Beverley Street, the JFWB’s core activities included: relief provision; helping families meet basic needs, such as medical care, heating and clothing; housekeeping assistance; counseling; and case work. The JFWB’s major concerns shifted over time from a rise of immigration and desertion cases in the 1920s to the dramatic increase of wife abuse, suicide, and unemployment cases during the Great Depression of the 1930s. After the outbreak of the Second World War, the JFWB sought ways of assisting soldiers and their families, such as, investigating special government grants to soldiers.
In an attempt to meet community needs, the JFWB initiated various programs, such as a Homemaking Club to teach women house management skills, and a Clothing Centre to provide families with inexpensive household goods. It also partnered with other local Jewish organizations in the early 1940s in the Liaison Project for troubled Jewish youth. In the 1930s, the Jewish Employment Service and Hebrew Free Burial Society became departments of the JFWB and, in 1941, the JFWB began guaranteeing loans for clients through the Hebrew Free Loan Association. In the same year, the Jewish Big Sister Committee became affiliated with the agency and the Jewish Big Brother Movement followed soon after.
In 1936, the JFWB became one of the first unionized social agencies in Canada when it formed the Staff Association with the Jewish Child Welfare Association (JCWA), another member of the FJPT. Although the JFWB’s focus was work with families and the JCWA’s focus was work with children, both agencies found it necessary at times to work with both children and families. In order to prevent service duplication and reduce confusion over casework responsibility, the Joint Application Bureau was set up within the FJPT to review all case work applications and determine the appropriate agency to provide assistance. However, a merger between the agencies was still believed necessary to improve service to the community and ease confusion. Discussions regarding the co-ordination of services between the JCWA and the JFWB began as early as 1935 and in February 1943, the JCWA and JFWB merged to form the Jewish Family and Child Services (JF & CS).
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of textual records and one architectural drawing documenting the programs, operation, finances, and special studies of the Jewish Family Welfare Bureau as well as its relationships with other organizations. Included are reports, meeting notices, agendas and minutes, correspondence, memos, budgets, statistics, theatrical scripts, newsclippings, and one architectural blueprint. A number of the records relate to special short-lived committees and projects that the JFWB participated in with other agencies, such as the Jewish Big Sister Committee, Jewish Big Brother Committee, Jewish Child Welfare Association, the Jewish Community Centre Association, the Young Men's and Women's Hebrew Association, and the Jewish Old Folks' Home.
Records have been arranged into the following 19 series: 1. Board of Directors; 2. Executive Director; 3. Jewish Federation Communal Council; 4. United Jewish Welfare Fund Men's and Women's Service Council; 5. Case Committe; 6. Joint Meetings and Committees; 7. Joint Application Bureau; 8. Homemaking Club; 9. Clothing Centre; 10. Liaison Project; 11. Operational statistics; 12. Finance and accounting; 13. Human Resources; 14. Special projects and studies; 15. Publicity; 16. Liaison with other social welfare organizations; 17. Canadian Association of Social Workers; 18. Welfare Council of Toronto; and, 19. Conferences.
Notes
Associated material note: for related records held at the City of Toronto Archives, see also: Welfare Council of Toronto records in the University Settlement House fonds (fonds 1024, series 658); and, Department of Public Welfare records in the Former City of Toronto fonds (fonds 200).
Name Access
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau
Jewish Community Centre Association
Young Men's-Young Women's Hebrew Athletic Association (Toronto, Ont.) (subject)
Jewish Old Folks Home (Toronto, Ont.)
United Jewish Welfare Fund (Toronto, Ont.) (subject)
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto (subject)
Wilensky, Dora, 1902-1959
Subjects
Charities
Children
Families
Nonprofit organizations
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director and the head of Jewish Family and Child prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
See also: Jewish Child Welfare Association fonds (fonds 86); Jewish Family and Child Services fonds (fonds 79); Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds (fonds 66); and, United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds (fonds 67).
Arrangement
Records relating to programs, committees and liaison with other organizations that continued after the formation of JF & CS are arranged with that fonds.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Thelma Harris Rose Family fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 115
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Thelma Harris Rose Family fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
115
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Date
1880-2017
Physical Description
1040 photographs (2 vol.) : b&w, sepia and col. (168 negatives)
5 cm textual records
13 artifacts
Admin History/Bio
Thelma Harris Rose was born in 1922 in Toronto. Her parents were Samuel Aaron Harris (1888-1982) and Rose Geldzaeler Harris (1892-1966). Thelma had one sibling, Sydney Harris (1917-2009). Samuel Aaron’s parents, Samuel (1869-1936) and Sarah Ruben Harris (1869-1940) immigrated to North America from Lithuania and Belarus respectively during the 1880s. They met in Michigan and married in 1892 in Detroit. The couple raised Sarah’s son from a prior relationship, Samuel Aaron, and had two more boys, William (1895-1955) and Louis (1906-1986). The Harris family moved to Toronto around 1900 and opened up the first Jewish delicatessen in the city at 233 Queen Street West. They constructed a purpose-built deli across the street from that location and relocated to the new shop at 178 Queen St. West in 1910. A couple of years later, Samuel purchased the tobacco store next door to their business, operating it from around 1913 until his death. Samuel Aaron worked with his parents in the deli for a number of years, and after marrying Rose in 1916, he ventured into the clothing industry and later sales. His brothers William and Louis went on to become successful local doctors and respectively married Tillie Shayne and Helen Gallander.
Rose’s parents, Yetta Shumer Geldzaeler (1870-1952) and Mark Geldzaeler (1862-1932), hailed from Galicia and married in Toronto in 1890. The Geldzaeler’s had 5 children who survived to adulthood: Ben (1891-1974) who married Hortense Cohen; Rose (1892-1966); Rachel (1897-1941) who married Isidore W. Ruskin; Alfred (1901-1918); and Frances (1907-2002) who married Simon Ramm. Tragically, Solomon (1899-1902) passed away as a young child and Alfred perished of the Spanish flu during the great pandemic at the end of the First World War. Mark was a religious instructor who also served as the assistant chazan and the shamus at Holy Blossom Synagogue on Bond Street. During that period, the family lived in accommodations behind the shul. Because of his religious expertise and position, Mark Geldzaeler commanded tremendous respect within the Jewish community.
Rose and Samuel Aaron Harris lived at 107 Yorkville Avenue, across from the early Mount Sinai Hospital. Thelma married Albert Rose (1917-1996) in June, 1942. The couple eventually had two sons and a daughter. Thelma earned an undergraduate degree and an M.Ed. at the University of Toronto. Albert was gold medallist in Political Science and Economics at the University of Toronto and pursued his graduate studies at the University of Illinois, receiving his PhD in macroeconomics and statistics in 1942. He then enlisted in the Canadian Army and served in the Intelligence Corps until he was demobbed at the end of 1945. During most of his career, he was a professor and later Director of the School of Social Work at the University of Toronto, ultimately becoming the first Dean of their Faculty of Social Work. Albert Rose was an expert in and advocate for public housing and social welfare, as well as a prominent community leader who was actively involved in variety of municipal and Jewish organizations.
Thelma’s older brother, Sydney Harris, completed a law degree at Osgoode Hall Law School, and married Enid Perlman in November, 1949. The couple eventually had two sons. Sydney engaged in the general practice of law for three decades before being appointed Judge of the Ontario Provincial Court (Criminal Division) in 1976. He retired in 1992 but went on to serve as a Small Claims Court Judge, referee for the LSUC and lay appointee of Council for the Association of Ontario Land Surveyors. He was also active in Jewish causes and organizations, primarily the Canadian Jewish Congress, of which he was national president from 1974 to 1977, and the Canadian Council of Reform Congregations. He was also a civil liberties activist who promoted legislation aimed at eradicating hate speech and literature, along with capital punishment. Sydney Harris was also an active supporter of the civil rights movement in the United States during the 1950s and 1960s.
For more details about the many families documented within this fonds along with their respective businesses, careers and achievements, please consult the biographical and published reference materials in box 8.
Custodial History
The records in the fonds were assembled by the donor, Jeff Rose, from accumulations created and/or collected by Rose and Samuel Aaron Harris, Thelma Rose, Sydney and Enid Harris, Ruthe Rosenberg, Frances Ramm, Alfreda Henry, Tillie Harris, Marion Harris with permission, and by the donor himself. The donor hired Heritage Professionals to conduct the archival work – appraisal, selection, processing, preservation, arrangement and description – of the records. There was some specialized preservation and digitization work conducted on the photo albums to protect them and enhance their longevity. Finally, two conservators were commissioned to produce around ten high quality archival prints from the negatives and repair one of the artifacts.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records relating to the Rose, Harris, and Geldzaeler families, and some of their connected branches, including the Perlman, Ruskin, Ruben, Shumer, Shayne, Spiegel, and Rothbart families. The fonds is mainly comprised of loose photographs, photo prints, negatives and two photo albums documenting the different branches of the donor’s family. There are also some textual records and thirteen artifacts. One of the artifacts has been housed with the textual records. The remaining twelve artefacts are located in boxes 6 and 7. The two photo albums have been scanned for preservation purposes and are available in digital form.
The photographs mainly document the Harris and Geldzaeler families, and to a lesser extent, other branches of the family. The images capture the families’ lives and activities in Toronto and surrounding areas from the late nineteenth century to the early 2000s. The visuals include individual and family portraits, photobooth strips, and informal images of the family engaged in a variety of activities. Examples of the activities include: family get togethers, children playing outdoors, outings to the park or other Toronto locales, graduations, and military images. There are also many images capturing family vacations to the cottage, Bobcaygeon, Wasaga Beach, Niagara Falls, and Washington D.C. Finally, the fonds includes a photograph of Sydney Harris with Martin Luther King, Jr. in Chicago. Some of the files in the fonds contain negatives that were mostly grouped with and correspond to the photographs.
The fonds is arranged into twelve series: 1. Harris family, 2. Geldzaeler family, 3. Ruben family, 4. Shayne family, 5. Shumer family, 6. Perlman family, 7. Ruskin family, 8. Rose family, 9. Spiegel family, 10. Photo Albums, 11. Artifacts, 12. Reference materials. The first nine series are arranged by family and the last three pertain to special types of materials within the fonds. The sub-series are arranged by individual family member, couple, or family within each branch of the family.
Notes
ACCESS RESTRICTION NOTE: The records are open to the public except for series 1-3, file 4; and series 1-4, file 2. Researchers interested in viewing these files require permission from the donor. The photo albums are restricted for preservation purposes. The albums have been digitized and researchers can review the PDF copies of those records. There is also a family portrait of the Geldzaeler children in series 2-1, file 2 that is encased in glass and very fragile. It has been preserved and protected and a corresponding copy print is available and can be viewed by the public.
ATTRIBUTION NOTE: When citing records from this fonds, the full name of the fonds – Thelma Harris Rose Family Fonds – must be used by all parties and for all purposes as part of the reference.
Access Restriction
Conditional Access. Researchers must receive permission from the donor prior to accessing the records. Please contact the OJA for more information.
Physical Condition
The records are in good condition except for a small number of photographs that have some mirroring and tears. Some of the metal artifacts are also slightly tarnished.
Related Material
For other fonds and records documenting Sydney Harris, please see accessions 1976-7-1, 2015-4-3, 2008-8-10, 2008-11-14, 2016-3-56 and fonds 17 (CJC) and fonds 75 (JVS). For records relating to Mark Geldzaeler, Yetta Shumer Geldzaeler, Benjamin Geldzaeler and the Shumer family, see accession 1977-2-1 (items 1229, 1228, 1230, 1231, 1232). For additional records documenting Mark Geldzaeler's writing, see accession 2014-6-5. For records relating to the Harris family there are photo albums in accession 1986-7-6 and a photo of the Harris Delicatessen in accession 1982-6-5 (item 3283). For documentation relating to Albert Rose’s activities within the Jewish community one can consult the following fonds: 9 (JIAS), 14 (Baycrest), 61 (JCC), 67 (UJWF) and 75 (JVS). Finally, there is also a portrait of Albert Rose from the 1940s in item 748.
Arrangement
The fonds is arranged in series, sub-series and files. Artifacts are described at the item level.
Creator
Rose, Jeff
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 83; File 9; Item 31
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
83
File
9
Item
31
Material Format
graphic material
Date
April 19, 1952
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 9 x 13 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of Eleazer Ladovsky and his family in Israel. There are Hebrew or Yiddish writing on the verso of the photograph. Eleazer is a cousin of Herman Ladovsky of Toronto.
Notes
Originally cited as photo # 3846.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Accession Number
1983-11-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 83; File 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Level
File
Fonds
83
File
1
Material Format
textual record
Date
1936-1953
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of a collection of letters sent to Aaron Ladovsky requesting help through his work with the Kieltzer Society.
Accession Number
1983-11-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 83; File 9; Item 15
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
83
File
9
Item
15
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1920]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w ; 24 x 18 cm on matte 32 x 24 cm
Scope and Content
Item is 2 copies of a portrait of Aaron Ladovsky seated in a chair.
Notes
Photograph by Famous Photo Studios, G. Mendlevich, Prop., 402 Spadina Ave., Toronto
Originally cited as photo # 6222.
Subjects
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1999-11-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 83; File 9; Item 9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
83
File
9
Item
9
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1910]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 17 x 8 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Aaron Ladovsky in a suit and bowler hat.
Notes
Original photo by Michlethwaite, 243 Yonge St., Toronto.
Originally cited as photo #1618.
Name Access
Ladovsky, Aaron
United Bakers
Subjects
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1978-12-7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 83; File 9; Item 10
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
83
File
9
Item
10
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1910]]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 13 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of brothers Jack Ladovsky and Aaron Ladovsky with Shia Moshenberg. Jack is on the left, Aaron in the middle, and Shia on the right.
Notes
Originally cited as photo # 1619.
Name Access
Ladovsky, Jack
Ladovsky, Aaron
Moshenberg, Shia
Subjects
Brothers
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1978-12-7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Maurice Solway fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Maurice Solway fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
13
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1919-1989
Physical Description
11 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Maurice Solway (1906-2001) was a violinist, music teacher, composer, author and actor who lived and worked for most of his life in Toronto. Although he was highly respected as a musician in Toronto, and thoroughly immersed in the city’s musical culture from the 1920s until the 1980s, his greatest fame came to him later in life, as an actor in the Academy Award nominated NFB short film “The Violin”.
Maurice Solway's family lived at 164 York Street, Toronto, where he was born, in 1906. His parents, Jakob (b.1877) and Roza Solway (b.1877), had only just emigrated that year from Halofzen, Russia, where Jakob had been a musician and band leader. In Canada, Jakob adopted his father's trade and worked as a Kosher butcher, in Toronto’s St. John’s Ward. As a youth, Maurice played the violin in variety programmes with his sister, Dora, accompanying him on piano. His father was his first teacher, but he quickly showed enough promise to warrant private lessons with Harry Adaskin, and later with Dr. Luigi von Kunits, at the Canadian Academy of Music. He also studied at the Hambourg Conservatory in Toronto with Henri Czaplinsky and Geza de Kresz, starting in 1921.
Solway began his professional career with the New Symphony, which later became the Toronto Symphony Orchestra (TSO). During the 1920s, he also played in the Famous Players Cinema orchestras that accompanied silent films, and performed lunch concerts in Toronto hotel and department store orchestras, professional venues that would disappear by the 1930s.
From 1926 to 1928, Solway left Canada to study in Brussels with the highly regarded violinist, Eugène Ysaÿe. There he befriended other students of Ysaÿe, such as Nathan Milstein, William Primrose, Viola Mitchell, Robert Velton, and Joseph Gingold.
Upon his return to Toronto, Solway gave several recitals that were both critically and publicly well-received. Few such opportunities, however, existed in Canada at the time, and Solway was obliged to find work in-between solo concerts. He also suffered an injury to his left hand while moving a piano in 1929 that required him to adjust his technique for three fingers and interfered with his being able to play comfortably for a number of years.
He was married in 1930 to Anne Cass (1907-1994), and they had a son, Stephen. Facing his financial obligations to his new family, he opted for the more dependable income of orchestral playing versus the riskier and transitory life of a soloist. Besides classical music, he played with jazz groups like the Jolly Bachelor’s Orchestra, Oscar Peterson, Jerome Kern, and Percy Faith, and on numerous recordings for the CBC, CFCA, and CKGW radio stations. He also played chamber music with the Joyce Trio, founded by Simeon Joyce (piano) and featuring Charles Mathe (cello).
In 1952, Solway retired from the TSO, dedicating himself to his chamber playing and radio work. He founded the Solway String Quartet (SSQ) in 1947, with Marcus Adeney (cello), Nathan Green (viola) and Jack Groob (violin). The quartet played a mixed repertoire that included standard classical music with more widely recognized popular songs and new compositions, especially works by Canadian composers such as Howard Cable, John Weinzweig and Jean Coulthard. Sponsored by the Ontario Board of Education and the CBC, the SSQ played rural Ontario towns and broadcast concerts for a wide demographic of music listeners. In 1955, they performed the Canadian debut of the Castelnuovo-Tedesco Quintet for guitar and strings with Andres Segovia. The SSQ, with frequent changes in personnel, continued performing until 1968. Other players in the SSQ included Robert Warburton, Martin Chenhall, Murray Adaskin, Arthur Milligan, Charles Dobias, Eugene Hudson, Berul Sugerman, Joseph Pach and Ivan Romanoff.
In 1973, Solway was invited to act in a short children’s film “The Violin,” co-produced by George Pastic and Andrew Walsh. Solway also contributed the original music to the film, which was nominated for an Academy Award in 1975. Following the success of the film, Solway also appeared on television, making guest appearances with Sharon, Lois and Bram, on the Elephant Show and Mr. Dressup. During this time, his wife Anne traveled with him and managed his appointments.
Solway was also a violin teacher throughout his career. In 1989, he published a preparatory book, Fiddling for Fun: the Visual and Aural Art of Violin Playing, in which he outlined a new theory for violin practice that proposed an easy to use visual system for familiarizing students with intervals and fingerboard positions.
He also wrote an autobiography, Recollections of a Violinist, in 1984, and continued to lecture and speak about music. In 1981 and 1983 he devised a lecture performance series to commemorate Ysaÿe, the proceeds of which went to the establishment of a music scholarship at the Royal Conservatory. As he began to play less frequently in the 1980s, he also began to compose more regularly, completing more than one hundred compositions, primarily works for solo violin and for violin and piano. As a composer, he returned frequently to folk themes and completed a series of songs based on his travels around the world. Among his folk themes are songs inspired by his visits to such diverse countries as Norway, Maui, Japan, Israel and Spain.
Maurice Solway was affiliated with the Beth Tzedec Synagogue and frequently contributed to charity concerts and fundraising efforts for organizations such as the Inner City Angels, a cultural society for disadvantaged children. He died in 2001 in Toronto.
Scope and Content
The Solway fonds is arranged into twelve files. The documents relate to Solway's professional activities as a musician, educator, composer, actor and author. These include printed texts, photographs, original music scores, promotional materials, programmes, audio cassettes, articles, correspondence, radioscripts and a video.
Notes
Includes 31 photographs, 2 v. of text, 1 videocassette (VHS) and 17 audio cassettes.
Name Access
Solway, Maurice, 1906-2001
Subjects
Musicians
Related Material
Fonds 25, Series 11, Item 9: Photo cabinet, photo #179 (oversized)
Photo cabinet, photo #501
Two titles in the archives library collection (1984-12-6) (1 title missing 15 Aug. 2006)
A vertical file has been created for Maurice Solway.
Creator
Solway, Maurice, 1906-2001
Accession Number
1988-10-9
1991-3-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Mimi Wise fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 16
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Mimi Wise fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
16
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Date
[ca. 1915]-1994
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
15 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
8 artifacts
Admin History/Bio
Mrs. Mimi Wise (1920-2004) was a native Torontonian and an active member and supporter of the city's Jewish community. She volunteered her time with a number of Jewish and non-Jewish organizations, such as the Jewish Book Fair, the Reena Foundation, the Heart and Stroke Foundation and the North York Harvest Food Bank. She was known and respected for her many years of work and involvement with Hadassah-Wizo. Her primary focus was on education, with specific emphasis placed on the promotion of Israel within Canada. Mimi travelled to Israel many times during her life, often working as a trip co-coordinator.
Mrs. Mimi Wise was born in Toronto in 1920 to Joseph Marin and Sonia (Stern) Marin. She had an older sister Ruth (Steiner) and a younger brother Jay. The family lived across from the Woodbine Racetrack in the east end of Toronto known as the Beach, until 1928, when they moved to the Christie Street and Davenport Road area. Joseph Marin was one of the founders of the Beach Hebrew Institute and the family were active members of the shul. Mimi's parents were ardent Zionists and their home was often used as a meeting place for Zionists around the world, which included a visit from Golda Meir. Sonia Marin was a supporter of Hadassah-Wizo and of Pioneer Women.
Mimi attended McMurrich Public School and then Oakwood Collegiate High School. In 1938, she met her future husband, Dr. Sydney Wise, and the following year, Sydney began his medical internship at the Columbus Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. Mimi stayed behind in Toronto and continued her studies at the University of Toronto. In 1941, she graduated with a degree in physiotherapy, although she never practiced. In 1942, Sydney and Mimi married and Mimi joined her new husband in the United States. In 1944, Sydney was sent overseas with the United States army and Mimi returned to Toronto and began work with the Combined Palestine Appeal. Upon his return to Toronto, Sydney became a pediatrician and opened his own practice. The couple later had two children, Mark and Joel.
In 1948, Mimi became the founding president of the Rishon Chapter of Hadassah-Wizo. During the 1950s and 1960s, she became further involved with Hadassah as the director of the Education Department, from 1957 to 1959, first vice-president from 1959 to 1961, and president of Hadassah Wizo of Toronto, from 1961 to 1963. Mimi also held the position of national co-chairman of the 1972 national convention in Toronto, and in 1973, organized the week-long "Shalom Israel" fair at Yorkdale Shopping Centre on the occasion of Israel's 25th anniversary.
In 2003, Mimi received the Ontario Volunteer Service Award from the Province of Ontario, in honour of her commitment to volunteerism. Mrs. Mimi Wise passed away in 2004.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Mimi's husband, Dr. Sydney Wise, who donated them to the Archives in 2003, 2004 and 2006.
Scope and Content
This fonds consists of records related to Mimi Wise's personal life and organizational activities. It includes photographs, textual records and artifacts. The textual records relate to Mimi's work with Hadassah, including her installation speech as president, certificates, programs for conventions and luncheons, an invitation to meet Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion and several speeches. There is also an electronic copy of a 1944 memorial card for Joseph Marin.
The artifacts include two pairs of Pierre Cardin silk stockings given to Mrs. Wise in 1967 by the Baroness Alix de Rothschild; a president's pin set with pearls, given to Mimi in 1963 at the end of her term; a gold maple leaf pin worn by participants on a Hadassah trip to Israel; a pin given to Mimi inscribed with Guardian of Youth Aliyah, given in exchange for a monetary donation; a pin given to Mimi inscribed with MDA, which is the Mogen Dovid Adom ambulance service; and a Canadian Hadassah-Wizo diamond jubilee gold medallion given to Mimi in Jerusalem in 1977.
There are item level descriptions for all fifteen photographs, which include images of the Rishon Chapter and the National Executive of Hadassah-Wizo, family photographs, and portraits of Mimi.
Name Access
Wise, Mimi, 1920-2004
Subjects
Volunteers
Creator
Wise, Mimi, 1920-2004
Accession Number
2003-6-6
2003-9-3
2004-5-118
2006-3-13
2006-4-6
2006-7-2
2006-8-2
2006-8-14
2006-9-7
2010-1-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
18
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1955]-1973
Physical Description
1453 negatives ; b&w and col. ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Gordon Mendly (1904–1998) was born Gordon Gimpel Mendlevich in Kielce, Poland on 3 May 1904. He was the son of Israel and Masha Mendlevich. He immigrated to Canada in 1924 as a photographic apprentice and immediately began working out of his home at 305A Queen Street West. This first studio was called International Studio. In 1932, he started Famous Studios, which was located at his residence at 285 College Street. His final studio was at 3145 Bathurst Street, which he sold to fellow photographer Nir Bareket, upon his retirement in 1977. Mendly was married to Sarah (née Rawet) Mendly. He died on 5 January 1998, at the age of ninety-three.
As a studio photographer, Mendly photographed many members of the Jewish community in Toronto. He was also commissioned for weddings and special occasions, along with various events organized by Jewish organizations and agencies. In particular, it is the latter of these commissions that are most illustrative of the Toronto Jewish community. These include events such as the Zionist Organization of Canada's conventions, Cloakmaker Union rallies, and Jewish Old Folks’ Home bingo nights. His work has won awards in both Canada and the United States.
Mendly was also involved in many of the organizations that he photographed. He was the past president of the Herzl Zion Club; an executive member of the Canadian Jewish Congress Central Region, JIAS and Toronto B’nai Brith Central Region; board member of the Jewish Home for the Aged and Baycrest Hospital; vice-president of the Men’s Service Group of the Jewish Home for the Aged; on the executive of the Judaea Lodge, Knights of Phythias No. 52 and the Keltzer Sick Benefit Society; chairman of Jewish National Fund; affiliated with the Brunswick Avenue Talmud Torah and the American Society of Photographers; and co-chairman of the 1956-1961 UJA Metropolitan Division.
Scope and Content
This fonds consists of approximately 1449 black and white and colour cellulose acetate negatives, dating from circa 1955 to 1973. The negatives consist of individual and group portraits, Toronto Jewish businesses, special events, meetings and conferences held by various Jewish organizations and agencies in Toronto, and a small sampling of commissioned wedding, anniversary and Bar Mitzvah portraits. The fonds has been arranged into the following series: Portraits, Events and organizations, Businesses, and Weddings, anniversaries and Bar Mitzvahs. The series have been described to the file and/or item level.
Name Access
Mendly, Gordon, 1904-1998
Subjects
Photographers
Physical Condition
Approximately 100 negatives, predominantly from the 1950s, are suffering from vinegar syndrome, as is evident from the odour emanating from them, as well as the general visual conditions. These negatives have been segregated from the rest of the collection and have been housed in boxes CS14-CS16
Some of the negatives are also suffering from “bluing” or “silver mirroring” -- the consequence of oxidative-reductive deterioration. Although this is a slow process, eventually the silver ions will create a fogged effect on the photograph, drastically reducing the quality of the image.
Creator
Mendly, Gordon, 1904-1998
Accession Number
2005-2-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Lipa Green fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 20
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Lipa Green fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
20
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
[190-]-1979
Physical Description
42 cm of textual records
69 photographs : b&w and sepia (23 negatives) ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Lipa (Louis) Green (1899–1976) was born on 15 April 1899 in Usupow, Poland. He immigrated to Toronto in 1910 and later began work as a bricklayer. In 1924, Lipa married Fanny Green and had three sons: Abraham (Al), Harold and Sam; and three daughters: Deana (Weiman), Rookie (Goldstein), and Shavy (Tishler). In 1948, with partner, Arthur Weinstock, he founded the Greenview Construction Company, later to be renamed Greenwin. Green's sons, Al and Harold, along with Weinstock's son-in-law Al Latner, later became involved in the business.
Green was a prominent Jewish communal leader and philanthropist in Toronto and was affiliated with organizations such as the Labor Zionists (Farband), the Jewish Vocational Service and the Jewish Public Library. He was a strong advocate of the Yiddish language and was involved with many Yiddish committees, both at the local and national levels. The current building for Jewish agencies in Toronto is named the Lipa Green Building for Jewish Community Services.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Lipa's son, Harold, before being donated to the OJA in January 1978.
Scope and Content
This fonds consists of records documenting Lipa Green's personal life as well as his professional and philanthropic endeavours. Included are financial documents, event invitations and programs, meeting minutes, photographs, personal, business and organizational correspondence, speeches and writings, a scrapbook, records on a cooperative Jewish summer resort near Pickering, Ontario, as well as some material produced by other organizations and collected by Green during the course of his life. Most of the personal correspondence, speeches and other writings are in Yiddish, including Green's reminiscences on his life in Poland and his Bar Mitzvah. The files have been grouped according to personal records, business records, organizational records and ephemera.
Name Access
Green, Lipa, 1899-1976
Subjects
Businesspeople
Immigrants--Canada
Philanthropists
Physical Condition
Some of the photographs are in very poor condition and require conservation work.
Related Material
See Gordon Mendly Fonds 18 for a portrait of Lipa Green.
Arrangement
The records had been previously arranged as MG6 A. Many of the files were kept or combined, but several new files were also created to better reflect the records in the fonds. Several files were also culled as they did not relate to the mandate of the OJA. See the accession record for further information on the culled materials.
Creator
Green, Lipa, 1899-1976
Accession Number
1978-1-4
2004-5-150
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 32
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
32
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1930]-1975
Physical Description
50 cm of textual records
48 photographs : b&w ; 25 x 103 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Harry Wolf Clairmont (1907-1977) was a Toronto labour activist, involved for many years in the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU). Clairmont was born in Chmielnik, in the province of Kielce, Poland, and moved to Canada in December, 1923. He began working in the garment industry as an operator's helper at the J. and G. Cloak Shop in Toronto, and soon became involved in the labour movement and the ILGWU. Claimont held many positions with the ILGWU, including recording secretary of the Operators' Local 14 and business agent of Sportswear Local 199. He was also an active member of the Jewish Workers' National Alliance, the Young Communist League and the Canadian Trotskyist movement. He was married and had two children. He passed away in 1977.
Scope and Content
The fonds documents Harry Clairmont's involvement in the Canadian labour movement, as well as his interest in socialism and communism. Included are publications of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, the Arbeiter Club, the Communist League of America, and the Revolutionary Workers' Party, and records relating to Clairmont's involvement in these organizations and union locals. These records include correspondence, membership cards, pamphlets, clippings, newsletters, anniversary books, bulletins, journals, speeches, financial reports, minute books, and photographs. The small notebook, which only has a few filled page, consists of minutes from the meetings of the Unzer Kamf Worker's Club. The larger notebook, which is completely full, consists of minutes from the meetings of "Local 14." The first page of the latter (starting from the Yiddish side) is a list of the executive in English.
Name Access
Clairmont, Harry, 1907-1977
Subjects
Communism
Labor movement
Socialism
Physical Condition
Most records are in good condition.
Several photographs have been rolled and cannot be flattened.
One photograph is partially attached to glass and will need to be separated by a conservator.
Related Material
See also MG2 E1a
Creator
Clairmont, Harry, 1907-
Accession Number
1979-11-18
1984-1-6
2004-6-3
1998-3-7 [old accession #]
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ralph Hyman fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 35
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ralph Hyman fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
35
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
[193-?]-[1982?]
Physical Description
71 cm of textual records
ca. 25 photographs : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Ralph Hyman (1906–1989) was a Toronto journalist who also played an active role in Jewish community organizations. He was born in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1906, the son of Russian parents, Sarah and Hyman Radutsky. The name was changed to Hyman in Scotland. Several years after his birth, the family immigrated to Wellington, New Zealand, where they stayed until Ralph was seventeen. In 1924, they moved again, this time to Los Angeles. There, Ralph began his journalism career with the Glendale Times. In 1925, the family moved to Toronto, where Ralph got a job as a reporter for the Toronto Star. In 1928, he moved to the Mail and Empire. When the Mail and Empire merged with the Globe to form the Globe and Mail in 1936, he became a reporter and a political and feature writer. Ralph remained at the Globe and Mail unitl his retirement in 1971. A few months after his retirement, he returned to work as editorial consultant to the Canadian Jewish News. In 1972, he was appointed editor of that publication, a position he filled until his final retirement in 1980.
Ralph Hyman was active in the Joint Community Relations Committee, the Toronto Newspaper Guild and the Toronto Men's Press Club. He was married to Edith Etigson, and they had two children: Gerald David and Roger Leslie.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of records relating to the life and career of journalist and news editor, Ralph Hyman. The records include newspaper articles and books written by Ralph Hyman, correspondence, scrapbooks, photographs, periodicals, and ephemera.
Name Access
Hyman, Ralph, 1906-1989
Subjects
Editors
Journalists
Physical Condition
Newspaper articles are in poor condition.
Creator
Hyman, Ralph, 1906-1989
Accession Number
1990-6-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Simon fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 23
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Simon fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
23
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1931-[198-]
Physical Description
25 cm of textual records
17 photographs (6 negatives)
Admin History/Bio
Harry Simon (1909-1993) was born in Russia on 15 July 1909 and immigrated to Canada with his parents and two younger brothers in 1923. In 1930, he married Eva Millman and together they had two sons, Morris and Norman. Simon was involved in a number of labour unions and organizations during his lifetime, namely the Fur Workers' Union, the AFL-CIO, the Canadian Labour Congress and the Labour Zionist Movement.
In 1926, at the age of 17, Simon left his schooling in Toronto and went to work in a fur factory. He joined the International Fur Workers' Union and at the age of 20, Simon held the distinction of being the youngest business agent elected to a union in Canada. He joined the Canadian Commonwealth Federation (CCF) in 1933 and ran as a political candidate in the 1937 provincial election for the St. Andrew riding in Toronto.
Simon also served as the Canadian representative for the American Federation of Labour from 1944 to 1956. In 1956, he was appointed to the Canadian Labour Congress, becoming the CLC's Ontario regional director of organization until his retirement in 1974. Simon also held the position of national chairman of the Jewish Labour Committee of Canada and as president of the Labour Zionist Movement of Canada. He was also a member of the national executive of the Canadian Jewish Congress.
After his retirement Simon often spoke about labour issues at various functions and events when requested. He died on 22 December 1993 at the age of 84.
Scope and Content
This fonds consists of the records related to the professional career of Harry Simon. This includes meeting minutes, general correspondence, speeches, posters, flyers, booklets, programmes and photographs. The bulk of the material is in the form of correspondence sent to or from Harry Simon. There is also a small amount of biographical material and a number of photographs, which have been described at the item level.
Name Access
Simon, Harry, 1909-1993
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Labor leaders
Physical Condition
Some photographs require conservation work.
Arrangement
The files were originally arranged by Harry Simon according to organization. This original order has been maintained by the archivist.
Creator
Simon, Harry, 1909-1993
Accession Number
1988-5-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
William Stern fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 33
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
William Stern fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
33
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Date
[ca. 1913]-1984
Physical Description
264 photographs (98 negatives) : b&w and col. ; 28 x 35 cm or smaller
2 folders of textual records
Admin History/Bio
William (Bill) I. Stern (1921-2007) was born Izick Stern in Toronto on 24 February, 1921, to Moishe (Morris) Shternshis (ca. 1893-1976) and Fanny Rumianek (ca. 1896-1991). He was an active and respected member of both the Toronto and Hamilton Jewish communities.
Bill began his education in Toronto at Grace Street and Givens Street elementary schools. He later attended the Central Technical Institute for chemistry. In the late 1930s, Bill left Central Tech to work for his father, but eventually returned to school until the start of the Second World War. At this time, Bill enlisted in the Royal Canadian Airforce and served as a Leading Aircraftsman for three years in France, Belgium and Germany. At the end of the war, he returned to Central Tech and completed his junior matriculation (grade 12) in January of 1946. In December 1946, Bill married his first wife, Toronto-born Laura Rubinstein (1923-1963). The couple had two children, Hershel (1953-) and Sheila (1957-1996).
From 1946 to 1951, Bill studied social work at the University of Toronto through a government sponsored program for war veterans. When he graduated, he practiced social work at several community institutions such as the Children's Aid Society, the University Settlement House and St. Christopher House, in Toronto. In 1956, he was offered a position as director of activities for the Hamilton Jewish Community Centre (JCC). He remained in Hamilton at this post until 1960 and then returned to Toronto as a divisional director of the United Jewish Welfare Fund, where he initiated the fund's Social Planning Department. In 1963, upon the death of his wife Laura, Bill returned to Hamilton as the director of the JCC, and later the executive director of the Hamilton Council of Jewish Organizations (CJO), a position which he held for nine years from 1964 until 1973.
After two years with the United Jewish Welfare Fund of Buffalo, Bill returned to Toronto in 1975 and briefly served two years as the executive director of the Canadian Zionist Federation, Central Region. He then returned to private practice, working as a community consultant and later as a job placement coach at the University of Toronto's School of Social Work.
Bill was an active supporter of the Toronto Jewish Film Festival and the author of "You Don't Have to Be Jewish", a book on Jewish film. He held several positions with philanthropic organizations such as the United Jewish Welfare Fund, the Jewish Home for the Aged and Baycrest, and the Canadian Society for the Weizmann Institute of Science. He was also a volunteer at the Ontario Jewish Archives. Bill lived in Toronto with his second wife of more than thirty years, Elizabeth Uptegrove (1952-), until his passing on 18 April 2007.
Custodial History
Records were in the possession of Bill Stern until they were donated to the Archives.
Scope and Content
This fonds consists of photographs documenting the Stern and Rumianek families, individuals and organizations from the Hamilton and Toronto Jewish communities, as well as Bill Stern and his fellow servicemen during the Second World War.
The fonds has been arranged into the following series: Family photographs; Military photographs; Hamilton Jewish community photographs; Toronto Jewish community photographs; and Camp photographs. The photographs have been described at the item level and have been arranged chronologically. The textual material consists of two files containing records related to Bill Stern's professional and philanthropic career, as well as some family invitations.
Name Access
Stern, William, 1921-2007
Subjects
Communities
Families
World War, 1939-1945
Related Material
See "Stern family" clipping file
Creator
Stern, William, 1921-2007
Accession Number
1980-2-1
1981-9-4
1985-6-6
1986-1-8
1991-5-5
1991-5-6
1994-1-4
2004-5-96
2004-5-135
2004-5-141
2005-5-2
2005-5-9
2006-2-8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Benjamin Brown fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 49
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Benjamin Brown fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
49
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1902-1949
Physical Description
ca. 1500 architectural and technical drawings
6 photographs : b&w ; 38 x 30 cm or smaller
16 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
Benjamin Brown (ca. 1888-1974) was the first practicing Jewish architect in Toronto. Born in what is now Lithuania, he arrived in Toronto at an early age and soon after, quit school to take a job in a garment manufacturing factory to help out his impoverished family. Not finding this career to his liking, Brown enrolled in the Ontario School of Art and Design with the intention of becoming an artist. When this profession proved financially unfeasible, Brown decided to pursue a career in architecture. After completing his high school equivalency, he enrolled in the University of Toronto architectural program, graduating in 1913. Soon after, Brown opened up a practice with fellow architect Robert McConnell, which lasted until the early 1920s. After the partnership ended, Brown set up an independent practice, which he maintained until his retirement in 1955.
Scope and Content
The fonds documents Brown’s design work and renovations of existing buildings through his original drawings, renderings, and building blueprints. The fonds consists of approximately 1500 drawings that are organized into about 150 projects. These projects include single-family residences, apartment buildings, commercial and industrial buildings, as well as synagogue and other community buildings. Many of Brown's buildings were designed in the Art Deco style, with some containing Georgian, Craftsman, Colonial Revival, Tudor and Romanesque elements.
Brown's most important commissions include the Beth Jacob Synagogue located on Henry Street, which was one the largest synagogues in Toronto, and the Balfour Building, an office tower built in the Art Deco style. The designs of Mendel Granatstein’s mansion, which contained a retractable roof for Sukkoth, and a colour sketch of the Primrose Club, which is currently the University of Toronto Faculty Club, may also be of interest to researchers. The fonds also includes some of Brown's files containing articles and illustrations from architecture and design journals of the early twentieth century, which he used as a resource to assist him with his work.
Fonds includes six photographs, one of the Balfour Building, one of Cumberland Hall, and four of Brown as a young man.
Notes
Architectural plans of a lead mine in Burnt River Ontario have been sent to the Kawartha Lakes Archives.
Name Access
Brown, Benjamin, 1890-1974
Subjects
Architects
Creator
Brown, Benjamin, 1890-1974
Accession Number
1975
1987-9-3
1989-10-6
2004-5-109
2004-5-139
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dora Till fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 52
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dora Till fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
52
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1921-1986
Physical Description
1.4 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Dora Till (1896-1987) was a leading member of the Toronto Jewish community. She helped found and served on the executives and boards of many organizations, including the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto, the United Jewish Welfare Fund (UJWF), the Candian Jewish Congress Central Region, and the Baycrest Hospital Women's Auxiliary. She was honoured numerous times in her life with awards and tributes for her contributions to the Jewish community.
Till was born in New York City on 20 March 1896, one of six children of Max and Yeta Tobias. Her parents had emigrated from Poland prior to 1892. When Dora was four, the family moved to Toronto where Max Tobias worked as a tailor. In her teens, Till was an active member of two social clubs for girls, the Boot and Shoe Society (for mothers and children in need) and the Herzl Girls Club.
Dora Tobias married Morris S. Till on 21 May 1916, in Toronto. They had two children, Sigmund and Cecile, both of whom she outlived. Sigmund died tragically at the age of 11 after a sudden illness. Cecile married Frank Goldhar and they had two children, Sheila Anne and Meyer Garson.
In 1918, Till joined the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society and she served as its vice-president for the next fifteen years. This was the beginning of a lifetime career in family welfare, health care and services for the aged. Till helped found and was the first president of the Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home located in Bronte and then Tollandale, which provided mothers and children in need with a two-week holiday in the country.
From the 1920s until the 1940s, Till served on several boards including the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto, and the United Jewish Welfare Fund, as well as the Welfare Fund's Women's Division and Women's Service Council. In 1950, she became the first woman to be named honourary vice-president of the UJWF. In 1955, after many years affiliation with the Jewish Home for the Aged, Dora Till organized the newly built Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care's Women's Auxiliary, becoming its first president. She also served for 40 years on the executive board of the Family and Child Service Bureau, the precursor to Jewish Family & Child Services. Till was an active member of many other Jewish organizations, including the Naomi Chapter of Hadassah and the National Council of Jewish Women, B'nai Brith Women, the Mount Sinai Women's Auxiliary, the Jewish Camp Council, and Toronto United Community Appeal - Community Chest. She was also a member of Goel Tzedec Congregation and its successor, Beth Tzedec Congregation.
Dora Till was honoured with several awards and tributes in her lifetime for her contributions to Jewish life, health and welfare in Toronto. In 1956, the Dora and Morris Till Bungalow at the Mothers and Babes Summer Rest Home was dedicated. In 1969, she was the first woman to recieve UJWF's Ben Sadowski Award for Jewish Community Service. As well, in 1977, she received the Queen's Silver Jubilee medal for outstanding community service. In 1983 a Baycrest Centre tribute dinner was held in her honour and in 1984, the top floor of the Baycrest Centre was dedicated to her. This was the culmination of a lifetime devoted to social welfare and community service, and it came just a few years before Till's death, on 22 November 1987.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Dora Till's granddaughter, Mrs. Sheila Gottlieb, until they were donated to the OJA in 1987.
Scope and Content
This fonds consists of records documenting the personal and philanthropic activities of Dora Till, including her ongoing involvement with the Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home, the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care Women's Auxiliary, the United Jewish Welfare Fund, and to a lesser extent other organizations that she was involved or affiliated with. Till's records of the Mothers' and Babes' Rest Home are some of the few to have survived from this important social service organization.
The organizational records in the fonds include minutes, correspondence, reports, speeches, financial records, newsclippings, pamphlets, brochures, invitations, architectural drawings, and photographs, primarily of the Mothers and Babes Rest Home and the Baycrest Centre. As well, there are two artifacts: a Baycrest Centre pin and a gold shovel from the groundbreaking ceremony. The personal records in the fonds include family photographs and portraits, writings, newsclippings and general correspondence.
The fonds has been arranged into eight series: 1. Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home Association. 2. Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care Women's Auxiliary. 3. Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care Heritage Museum Committee. 4. Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care Furnishings Committee. 5. Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care : other committees. 6. United Jewish Welfare Fund. 7. Other organizations. 8. Personal. The records have been described to the file level, while a selection of photographs have been scanned and described at the item level.
Notes
Physical description note: includes 197 photographs (54 negatives), 9 architectural drawings, and 2 objects
Name Access
Till, Dora, 1896-1987
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
For related material on the Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home, please see: Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds 61, Federation of Jewish Philanthropies fonds 66, United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds 67, Ida Lewis Siegel fonds 15, and the Rebecca Kamarner family fonds 11.
For related material on the Baycrest Centre Women's Auxiliary, please see: Pat Joy Alpert fonds 77 and fonds 14.
For related material on National Council of Jewish Women please see fonds 38.
Arrangement
This fonds had previously been arranged and described as MG6 H. The current arrangement was implemented by the archivist in 2010 and as a result, several files from the former MG were culled or merged. Therefore, the former MG finding aid is no longer accurate.
Creator
Till, Dora, 1896-1987
Accession Number
1987-1-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ethel Mehr fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 68
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ethel Mehr fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
68
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Date
[ca. 1898]-1965
Physical Description
70 photographs
1 folder of textual records
Admin History/Bio
Ethel Mehr (1901-1975) was born in Toronto in March 1901, the daugther of Mendel and Bessie Mehr. She attended Bishop Strachan School in Toronto. On December 15, 1925, Ethel married Henry Greisman (1897-1950) who was a partner in the Balfour Building Company and later owned the Lady Ellis chain of clothing stores. They had two children, John Richard and Sally Barbara. After Henry Greisman's death, Ethel married Myer Brenner, whom she had first met as a young women.
Ethel had four siblings, Pincus, Leonard, Lucille (Warshavsky) and Bernice (Dunkelman).
Custodial History
The materials in this fonds were donated to the Archives in 1988 by Sally (Greisman) Brenzel, the daughter of Ethel Mehr.
Scope and Content
This fonds consists of photographs and a small amount of textual records documenting the Mehr, Greisman and Brenner families. The photographs include images of the Mehr family and friends, including individual members of the Greisman and Brenner families, and images of the Lady Ellis Shops in Toronto, Stratford, Ottawa and Windsor. The textual records include Ethel Mehr's confirmation diploma from Holy Blossom Temple as well as a personal letter and a Bishop Strachan domestic science workbook.
Name Access
Mehr, Ethel, 1901-1975
Subjects
Children
Education
Creator
Mehr, Ethel, 1901-1975
Accession Number
1988-12-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 62
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
62
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1919-2001
Physical Description
93 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Benjamin Gershon Kayfetz was born on December 24, 1916 in Toronto, graduating from the University of Toronto in 1939, with a B.A. in modern languages. Between the years 1941 and 1943, he worked as a high school teacher in Huntsville and Niagara Falls. In 1943, he joined the war effort, working for the Department of National Defense in Postal Censorship and was responsible for reviewing prisoner of war mail. After the war, Kayfetz traveled to British Occupied Germany where he worked as a censor of telecommunications with the Control Commission until 1947.
Upon returning to Toronto, he was hired as the National Director of Community Relations by the Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC), and as the Executive (National) Director of the Joint Community Relations Committee (JCRC), a CJC - B'nai B'rith cooperative organization. He also served as the Central Region Executive Director of the CJC between 1973 and 1978. During his tenure, he worked with various churches, unions and minority groups to develop anti-discrimination laws and for the protection of minority and religious rights. Kayfetz was also actively involved in promoting the welfare of Jewish Communities worldwide, and made visits to Cuba in 1962 and 1965, and Russia in 1985, to study and report on the state of these Jewish Communities. After his retirement in 1985, he was awarded the Samuel Bronfman Medal by the Canadian Jewish Congress. In recognition of his efforts to promote Human Rights, he was also awarded the Order of Canada in 1986.
In addition to his professional activities, Kayfetz wrote articles for various Jewish publications under both his own name and the pseudonym, Gershon B. Newman, and gave a weekly radio address on CHIN radio addressing various contemporary Jewish issues. He was also actively involved in the Toronto Jewish Historical Society (serving as its president), Canadian Jewish Historical Society and Yiddish Luncheon Circle. Ben Kayfetz died in 2002.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of materials produced or acquired by Ben Kayfetz in both his personal and professional capacity. It includes biographical materials, minutes, correspondence, recorded CJC and JCRC meetings, memorabilia, transcripts and recorded versions of CHIN radio broadcasts he delivered, as well as various interviews, speeches, articles, book reviews and works he composed. Fonds also consists of minutes, agendas and other records of various Yiddish and historical associations Mr. Kayfetz was involved in.
Notes
Physical Description note: includes 20 photographs, 107 audio cassettes, 1 Beta video cassette and 1 object.
Fonds includes audio tapes 1-5, 7-32, 35-37, 39-42, 44-45, 47-50, 53-56, 58-64, 66-67, 70-85, A1-A5, A7-A9, A12-A14, A16-A20, A23-A28, A30, A32-A38 and A40-A43.
Name Access
Kayfetz, Ben, 1916-2002
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
Audio tapes AC 246-AC 275 belonged to Ben Kayfetz and are related to this fonds.
Creator
Kayfetz, Ben, 1916-2002
Accession Number
1975-012, 1976-10-4, 1980-12-13, 1982-2-2, 1983-6-2, 1985-4-2, 1987-2-3, 1996-5-4, 1998-3-22, 2000-11-4, 2004-3-1, 2004-5-20, 2006-2-9, 2006-8-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 64
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
64
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1859-1980, predominant 1977-1979
Physical Description
ca. 5178 photographs and other material
Admin History/Bio
The “Shuls Project” was the work of three University of Toronto architecture students, who in 1977 wrote a research paper on the eight Toronto synagogues built before World War II. Concerned at the lack of resources on these synagogues, Sidney Tenenbaum, Lynn Milstone and Sheldon Levitt foresaw the loss of communities’ recorded history as membership dwindled and elders passed on. The students conceived a project that would photograph and document every synagogue in Canada, gathering visual evidence, memorabilia, plaques and stories before they disappeared and history was lost. The students’ goal was to document synagogues’ architecture, art, and historical development through research, interviews and site visits.
The students secured a large portion of the required funding for the project from the Samuel and Saidye Bronfman Family Foundation in Montreal, funding which was matched by the Canadian Jewish Congress. This financial support enabled Levitt, Milstone and Tenenbaum to begin their study, named “Shuls… A Study of Canadian Synagogue Architecture.” They began in the summer of 1977, traveling through the Western provinces. The next summer, they visited eight Maritime cities, Montreal and other Quebec communities. Financial support in the project’s second year was again provided by the Bronfman Family Foundation, along with the Canadian government and donations in kind from businesses, including Benjamin Photo Finishers in Toronto, and Polaroid. The summer of 1979 was spent in Ontario, with an added grant from Wintario. In total, the Shuls project team traveled over 24,000 kilometres, taking thousands of photographs and conducting several hundred interviews. Photographs were taken by Tenenbaum, with Levitt and Milstone assuming primary responsibility for researching synagogues’ history and gathering historic records. Interviews were conducted by all three researchers, in both English and Yiddish.
With no handy index of every shul in Canada, the researchers located small shuls by word of mouth. They spread word of their project and solicited assistance using press releases, letters to known communities, and slideshow presentations as they traveled. They would first examine a building to get an idea of a community’s character and heritage, then conduct interviews with designers, architects, rabbis and other prominent community members.
With the research and photographs created, the team compiled three catalogues of the Western, Eastern/Quebec, and Ontario phases of the project. These catalogues have entries on each synagogue that include historical summaries highlighting the founding, growth, mergers and decline of Jewish communities, their changing needs, changing architectural expressions and trends, and the evolving uses of synagogues over the course of the twentieth century. There are also building descriptions, some with critical comments by the authors, and lists of the photographs and slides produced.
The compilation of materials and preparation of these catalogues took place at the Project’s offices at 26 Ava Road in Toronto, and continued through the summer of 1980 when the Ontario catalogue was completed. In 1985, Tenenbaum, Milstone and Levitt published a book highlighting their work, called Treasures of a People: The Synagogues of Canada.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of the records created and collected by the team of students conducting the Shuls study from 1977 to 1980. The majority of the fonds is made up of graphic material, in the form of 35mm colour slides and black-and-white Polaroid prints and (print-size) negatives. There are approximately 5110 photographs in the fonds. Fonds also consists of notes and inventory forms of buildings' architectural features. There are no interview transcripts, but the fonds does include three audio cassettes with recorded interviews and shul tours. Reference materials used in researching the history of the shuls include dedication and anniversary commemorative books and programmes, newsletters, articles and newspaper clippings. In addition the fonds contains 47 blueprints, the majority from Montreal synagogues. The fonds is arranged in the following series: 1. Quebec synagogues; 2. Ontario synagogues; 3. Western Canada synagogues; 4. Eastern Canada synagogues; 5. Reference.
Notes
Physical description note: includes 92 cm of textual records, 42 architectural drawings, 3 audio cassettes, and 1 drawing.
Physical extent note: many of the slides were culled because they were felt to be reproductions. Some of the synagogue images in the research book may therefore not be included in the fonds.
Name Access
Shuls Project
Subjects
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Creator
Levitt, Sheldon
Milstone, Lynn
Tenenbaum, Sidney T.
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Moscoe fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 69
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Moscoe fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
69
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1939-1947
Physical Description
25 cm of textual records
9 photographs : b&w ; 20 x 25 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Harris Reuben Moscoe (1905-1987) was born in London, England on December 1, 1905. He was the second child of Nathan Moscovitch and Esther Kaufman whose other children were Herman and Rebecca. The family immigrated to Toronto via Halifax, where they arrived on December 20, 1913. The Moscovitch family then included Nathan’s second wife (also named Esther) and her four children: Millie, Harry, Albert, and Phillip. As there were now two Harrys in the family, they gave Harris the middle name of Reuben and he thus became known in Toronto as “Ruby.”
In the 1920s the family changed their name to Moscoe, except their father, Nathan Moscovitch, who kept his original family name. Nathan had been a hat and cap manufacturer in England and established a similar business in Toronto operating under the name of “London Hat and Cap Ltd.” The business prospered, with the family moving from 43 Grace Street to 513 Palmerston Avenue, a large, single family home on this prestigious street.
Harris attended Grace Street Public School and Harbord Collegiate, from which he graduated in 1926. He graduated from Osgoode Hall Law School and was admitted to the Bar of Ontario in September 1930. From 1931 through 1934, Harry and his brother Herman practiced law together as the firm of Moscoe and Moscoe, situated at 100 Adelaide St. West.
In Toronto, Nathan Moscovitch had become an active member of the Hebrew Men of England Congregation. During the 1920s and 1930s he served in many official capacities, including president. After admission to the Bar, Harry followed in his father’s footsteps, joining the synagogue board of governors along with his brother Herman. Later he also served as secretary-treasurer.
In 1935, frustrated by Toronto’s depressed economy, brother Herman moved his law practice to Schumacher, a suburb of Timmins, in northern Ontario. At that time Timmins had a growing Jewish community and a boom in the gold mining industry. Herman then convinced Harry to move to Kirkland Lake, which by then also had a booming mining industry and a growing Jewish community. On February 28, 1936, Harry moved to Kirkland Lake with his wife Adele and son Sydney. He immediately set up a one-man legal practice and became actively involved with the 125-family Jewish community and its synagogue and rabbi. In 1937, a second son, David, was born to the Moscoe family. Their daughter would be born in 1943.
In 1941 the United Mine, Mill and Smelters Workers Union began a strike at all of Kirkland Lake’s mines. The mine owners then allowed the mines to flood. The town’s economy collapsed, as did Harry’s law practice. In early 1942, he moved to Montreal and began working for the Canadian Jewish Congress, Eastern Region. There he became the executive director of the CJC Eastern Region War Efforts Committee.
In June 1944, Harry resigned from the committee and moved his family back to Kirkland Lake. The economy had not, however, fully recovered. The Jewish population had shrunk to around 95 families. The rabbi stayed, but the only kosher butcher left within the year, forcing residents to order all kosher food from Toronto. Harry became active, once again, in both the Jewish and general community. He was, for many years, secretary of the Adath Shalom Synagogue board and also very active in B’nai B’rith. He also became active politically, working for the local Liberal member of parliament, Walter Little. Harry was appointed a part-time prosecutor under the Wartime Price and Trade Board Act Regulations, and also appointed both Chief Returning Officer for the federal elections for the District of Timiskaming and also chief census officer for the district.
By 1951, Kirkland Lake’s gold mines were depleted and the Jewish population had shrunk to 65 families. In 1952 Harry took on a case for a family whose son had been fatally shot by a local policeman. The trial was before a Supreme Court judge whose court found the police at fault, but could only award a maximum of $500 to the family. The local police chief was very upset with the result and thereafter, whenever Harry appeared in the local magistrates’ court, he always lost his cases. The chief finally told Harry that he could never win another case in Kirkland Lake. “We don’t need your kind of people here," he stated.
By the spring of 1955 Harry was forced to move his family back to Toronto. He found employment with Joseph Newman, Q.C.,whose office was at 4 Albert St. After six months he leased space from another lawyer, Carl M. Herlick, Q.C. In 1956, Herlick, one of Toronto’s first Jewish lawyers, retured and turned over the remainder of his cases to Harry.
Harry also reconnected with the Hebrew Men of England Congregation, where he did manage to pick up a few clients. In 1958, he convinced his oldest son Sydney, who was still articling, to join him. They shared an office in Herlick’s suite at the Manning Chambers, a four-story building on the southwest corner of Queen and Bay Streets. In 1959, both Moscoes moved their office to 88 Richmond Street West, bringing Mr. Herlick along with them. Sadly, Mr. Herlick died soon after building problems forced a further move next door to the Victory Building at 80 Richmond Street West. The Moscoe's practice prospered for the following twenty years until Harry’s retirement.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of textual and photographic records accumulated by Mr. Harry Moscoe during the 1940 to 1947 period. The majority of these records document Mr. Moscoe's activities as executive director of the Canadian Jewish Congress, Eastern Region, War Efforts Committee. A few files also document examples of his personal, financial, and legal office activities, while still living in Kirkland Lake and later in Montreal.
War Efforts Committee records focus on the CJC's responsibilities for: Servicemen's Centres in Halifax, Montreal, Moncton and St. John, Red Cross blood drives, tracking Jewish officers, Jewish casualties, and regular meetings of the War Efforts Committee. Also here are extensive newspaper clippings documenting Jewish servicemen' activities, casualties, heroics and decorations.
Of special note is a 20 x 25 cm b&w photograph within File 18, "Jewish Chaplains". The image features seven uniformed Canadian Jewish chaplains who served during the Second World War. They are: Rabbi Abraham Babb, Rabbi David Monson, Rabbi Oscar Fassman, Rabbi Charles Bender, Rabbi Samuel Cass, Rabbi Jacob Eisen and Rabbi Morrris Casriel Katz.
Name Access
Moscoe, Harry, 1905-1987
Canadian Jewish Congress (Subject)
Arrangement
Records have been maintained in their original files, but most of the files have been re-titled in order to more accurately reflect their contents.
Creator
Moscoe, Harris Reuben, 1905-1987
Accession Number
1979-10-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Samuel Posluns fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 70
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Samuel Posluns fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
70
Material Format
cartographic material
graphic material
textual record
Date
1925-1984
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
91 photographs : b&w ; 25 x 20 cm or smaller
1 map : 46 x 65 cm
Admin History/Bio
Samuel Posluns (1910-1994) was born in Toronto to Abraham Isaac Poslaniec (1870-1922) and Sheindel Saltzman (1872-1960). He had three brothers and three sisters: Joseph, Louis, Abe, Gertrude Miriam, Anne, and Sarah. His father Abraham established the family run clothing firm Superior Cloak Company in 1916. In 1934, it was bankrupted and closed after a lengthy strike. In 1936, Samuel opened his own business, Popular Cloak Company. In 1967, the Posluns family purchased Tip Top Tailors, in partnership with entrepreneur Jimmy Kay. A year later they incorporated their new venture under the name of Dylex as a holding company for the Tip Top chain of stores.
During the Second World War, Samuel Posluns served as a member of the air force reserves. After the war, he was elected president of the United Jewish Welfare Fund in 1947. That same year, in collaboration with the Canadian Jewish Congress and the Jewish Labour Committee, Posluns helped lead the Tailor Project along with Max E. Enkin, which was aimed at helping Jewish displaced persons immigrate to Canada by securing them employment as tailors. A commited advocate for Jewish education, Posluns also served as the first president and founding chair of the Board of Jewish Education (BJE) in 1949. He remained honorary president for life and continued to attend meetings until health problems held back his participation in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Posluns was also a founding board member of the North York General Hospital.
Samuel Posluns died in Toronto in 1994.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records related to the Posluns family and their clothing business, Popular Cloak Company. The records include correspondence, financial records, periodicals and newsletters, photographs, certificates and personal identification. The fonds also includes textual documents and photos documenting Samuel Posluns' involvement in the Tailor Project.
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Congress
Enkin, Max E.
Jewish Labour Committee
Popular Cloak Company
Posluns, Samuel, 1910-1994
Subjects
Clothing trade
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Immigrants--Canada
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Creator
Posluns, Samuel, 1910-1994
Accession Number
1997-7/6
2004-5/79
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 51
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
51
Material Format
multiple media
Date
[192-]-1990
Physical Description
1.35 metres of textual records (20 vols.) and other material
Admin History/Bio
Philip Gerard Givens (1922-1995) was a municipal, provincial and federal politician, a judge, a police commissioner and an active Jewish communal leader. He is largely remembered as the 54th Mayor of Toronto.
Phil Givens was born in Toronto on April 24th, 1922, the only son of Hyman and Mary Gevertz (Gewercz). As a youth, he attended Harbord Collegiate and graduated from the University of Toronto in political science and economics in 1945 and from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1949. In 1947, he married Minnie "Min" Rubin (born February 7th, 1924) and together they had two children, Eleanor and Michael.
Givens graduated as a lawyer from Osgoode Hall; however, shortly thereafter he decided to enter politics, running as a municipal school board trustee in 1950. In 1951 he was elected as alderman for Ward 5, serving in this capacity until 1960, when he was subsequently elected as a city Controller.
Givens was appointed Queen’s Counsel in 1962.
Following the sudden death of Mayor David Summerville in 1963, Givens was appointed by City Council as the Mayor of Toronto and was officially elected to the position in 1964, winning a close race against the former mayor, Allan Lamport. As mayor, Givens was automatically a member of the Metropolitan Toronto Executive and Council, the Metropolitan Toronto Police Commission, the Consumer’s Gas Company Executive, the Toronto Hydro Commission and the governing boards of Toronto’s major hospitals.
Givens was publicly seen as an affable and populist mayor but his tenure was not without controversy. His support for the construction of the St. Lawrence Centre for the Arts and his decision to acquire Henry Moore’s bronze sculpture “the Archer” for the new Nathan Phillips Square were both highly controversial during his term in office. In particular, the Moore sculpture sparked intense controversy and public debate amongst council members and citizens alike. Although ultimately purchased with private solicited donations, the controversy surrounding the statue’s purchase was still partly to blame for Givens’ 1966 election defeat to William Dennison.
In 1967 Givens entered national politics for the second time, the first being a failed 1957 bid in Toronto’s Spadina riding, winning a seat as a Liberal in Toronto’s York West riding. In 1971 he stepped down before the end of his term to campaign for a seat in the Provincial Legislature. Again running under the Liberal banner, Givens won his seat in York-Forest Hill and after the elimination of this riding in 1975, was re-elected in the new riding of Armourdale. In 1977 he retired from politics. He also worked briefly as a current affairs commentator for local radio broadcaster CHUM 1050 AM.
In 1977, Givens was appointed as a provincial court judge and chairman of the Metropolitan Toronto Police Commission, serving in both capacities until 1985, when he left the Commission but continued in the judiciary as a civil trial judge until officially retiring from public life in 1988.
An ardent Zionist, Givens was also a prominent leader of several Jewish communal organizations. He was the founder and first president of the Upper Canada Lodge of B’nai Brith and sat on the executives of the Canadian Jewish Congress, the United Jewish Welfare Fund, the Talmud Torah Eitz Chaim, the Zionist Organization of Canada, the Toronto Zionist Council, Jewish National Fund, State of Israel Bonds and the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care. He was chairman of the United Israel Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund in 1967 and the United Jewish Appeal-Israel Special Fund in 1968. From 1973 to 1985 he was the national president of the Canadian Zionist Federation and in the 1990s was the national chairman of the Canadian Jewish Congress’ Committee for Yiddish.
Givens was honoured by Jewish community organizations, including the Jewish National Fund’s Negev Award in 1968 and the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews’ Human Relations Award in 1969. As well, in 1972, he received the Award of Honour from the Toronto Regional Council of B’nai Brith.
Givens was also known to be a passionate sailor and was a member of both the Royal Canadian and the Island Yacht Clubs in Toronto. He died on November 30th, 1995 at the age of 73.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Phil Givens until they were donated to the Archives in September 1990 by his wife.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the personal, professional and communal activities of Phil Givens. The bulk of the material is graphic and most of the photographs relate to his tenure as Mayor of Toronto and to his Jewish communal work. The records also include general correspondence, speeches, campaign material, scrapbooks, cartoons, certificates and awards, biographical writings, audio and visual materials and artifacts. The records have been arranged into nine series representing Givens’ various roles and activities and have been described to the file level and item level when necessary. These series are: 1. Personal life; 2. City of Toronto Alderman; 3. City of Toronto Controller; 4. City of Toronto Mayor; 5. Metropolitan Toronto Police Commissioner; 6. Provincial politics; 7. National politics; 8. Legal career; 9. Jewish communal service.
Notes
Physical Description Note: Includes ca. 915 photographs, 14 drawings, 1 print, 1 presentation piece, 27 objects, 4 DVD’s, 4 videocassettes and 1 audiocassette.
Physical Extent Note: Fonds was reduced from 5.5 m of records to 2.6 m of records. Please see accession record for further details regarding the records that were culled.
General Note: Previously cited as MG6 B
Associated material note: City of Toronto Archives: “Philip Givens fonds” (fonds 1301) and Series 363, Sub-series 2 “Mayor' Office journals” (fonds 200). Library and Archives Canada: “Correspondence and subjects” series (R4942-1-1-E) in the Stuart E. Rosenberg fonds (R4942-0-X-E); Henry S. Rosenberg fonds (R3946-0-9-E); Jewish National Fund of Canada fonds (R4347-0-1-E), “Subject series: Givens, Judge Philip G. – Toronto” (R4347-7-4-E); “Correspondence, memoranda, minutes, reports” series (MG31-H67), Zdzislaw Przygoda fonds (R6257-0-0-E) [Sir Casimir Gzowski monument committee records –chaired by Phil Givens]; B'nai Brith Canada fonds (R6348-0-9-E); Canadian Zionist Federation fonds (R9377-0-6-E).
Name Access
Givens, Phillip, 1922-1995
Givens (nee Rubin), Min
Subjects
Law
Politicians
Related Material
See Fonds 2: Benjamin Dunkelman fonds
See Fonds 18: Gordon Mendly fonds
See Fonds 28: Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
See Fonds 37: Gilbert Studios fonds (Negev dinners series, Zionist Building series, Portraits series).
Creator
Givens, Philip, 1922-1995
Accession Number
1990-9-7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
David Vanek fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
David Vanek fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1906-1999
Physical Description
12 cm of textual records
10 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
David Vanek (1915-2008) was born on a farm in Whitchurch Township, York County, Ontario in 1915. He was the sixth of seven children born to Jacob and Jesse Vanek, Jewish-Russian immigrants from the Ukraine who immigrated to Canada in 1913. The family lived in the Newmarket-Oak Ridges area, where they owned a farm and the Vanek Grocery and Confectionary Store in Oak Ridges. The family also owned Cedarholm Park in Lake Wilcox, which had a bandstand and cottages and sold refreshments. They opened the park specifically for Jews who were being excluded from other nearby social venues. The family also lived in Toronto.
Vanek completed his elementary school education at Annette Street Public School and attended Richmond Hill High School and Harbord Collegiate. He was admitted to the honour law course at the University of Toronto. In 1936, he graduated with a bachelor of arts in honour law and went on to law school at Osgoode Hall. While in law school he worked for Carswell’s Canadian Law Abridgement and was editor of the Obiter Dicta student publication at Osgoode Hall. He received his LLB in 1939.
During the Second World War Vanek served in the Canadian Intelligence Corps and Field Security in England from 1943 to 1945. Following his military service he returned to Toronto where he tried private practice briefly before beginning a new career as a lecturer in the newly created Faculty of Law at the University of Toronto. He taught a variety of subjects, including legal bibliography, real property, and public international law.
A community activist, Vanek was the founder of the Lawrence Manor Ratepayers Association. In 1963, he ran for the Ontario Provincial Legislature as a Conservative candidate, but failed to win the seat. He was the founder of the Credit Counselling Service of Metropolitan Toronto, which was established in 1965. Vanek was also actively involved in the new Reform congregation Temple Sinai and served as its third president.
In September 1968, Vanek was appointed to the magistrates' court. A few months later, the Provincial Courts Act came into being and he became a judge of the provincial court, criminal division. Vanek presided over and wrote judgements in many significant cases including Weightman and Cunningham, involving the residual power of a trial judge to stop unfair prosecution, and Squires, involving the lawful exclusion of cameras from the courtroom. His best known case was that of Susan Nelles, a nurse who was charged with the death of four babies at Toronto’s Hospital for Sick Children in the early 1980s. He also served as president of the Ontario Provincial Judges' Association. In 1989, after twenty-one years on the bench, David Vanek retired. A decade later he published his autobiography, Fulfilment : Memoirs of a Criminal Court Judge, which documents his life and career.
David Vanek married Joyce Lester in 1942 and the couple had three children. Vanek died in 2008.
Custodial History
The records were donated to the Ontario Jewish Archives by David Vanek in July 2000. The records were used to help with the researching of his autobiography.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of textual records and graphic material that document Vanek's family history and career as a prominent lawyer and provincial court judge in Ontario. The fonds includes family records from Russia, newspaper articles, correspondence and documentation relating to his military service during the Second World War, and press clippings and photographs of his family and community activities. The fonds has been arranged into the following series: Personal records, Military service records, Occupational records, and Community organizations.
Name Access
Vanek, David, 1915-2008
Subjects
Judges
Lawyers
Creator
Vanek, David, 1915-2008
Accession Number
2000-7-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Shirley Baine fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Shirley Baine fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
3
Material Format
textual record
Date
1936-1991
Physical Description
8 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
Shirley (Gertzbein) Baine (1910-2005) was born in Lithuania in 1910. She came to Toronto to live with her extended family during the 1930s. She later married Arthur Baine, a widower who had two children. Together, they had three additional children of their own.
Soon after her arrival in Canada, Shirley Baine became very involved in the Mizrachi organization. She was first a member of the Bruria Girls, during the late 1930s, and then joined the Etzion women's chapter later in her life. The role of both groups was to raise funds and provide support for Palestine (and later Israel). In 1972, she was honoured by this chapter with an inscription of her name into their Golden Book. She died in Toronto in 2005.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting Shirley Baine's activites in the Mizrachi movement as well as other initiatives. The fonds includes minutes of meetings, a dance program, a list of members from the Etzion chapter, correspondence, speeches, and a yiskor book.
Name Access
Baine, Shirley, 1910-2005
Subjects
Religious Zionism
Related Material
For related material on the Mizrachi movement, please see MG2 J1A.
Arrangement
By activity and chronological
Creator
Baine, Shirley, 1910-2005
Accession Number
2003-3-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
4
Material Format
multiple media
Date
[ca. 1900]-2010
Physical Description
3.1 metres of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Sol Edell (1919-2000) was a prominant member of the Toronto Jewish community who initially pursued a career as a pharmacist and was later founder and president of the property development company, Elmdale Investments. He held positions as board member or chair in a wide variety of religious, educational and social service organizations and institutions both in Canada and Israel. In Toronto, these included: Clanton Park Synagogue, Adas Israel Synagogue, Jones Avenue Cemetery, Canadian Jewish Congress and the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto (formerly Toronto Jewish Congress, and now the United Jewish Appeal Federation of Greater Toronto).
Edell was born in Toronto on 5 March 1919, the son of Pesach and Molly Edell. He attended Harbord Collegiate and graduated from the Toronto College of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, in 1943 while on leave of absence from the army. He was enlisted in the Canadian Armed Forces during the Second World War and served in the signal corps.
After he completed his army service, he opened Edell’s Drug Store at 1978 Queen Street in Etobicoke in 1948, the first shomer Shabbat drug store in the city. He operated a second store at 494 Spadina Avenue in the late 1940s. In 1955 the Queen Street location was expropriated by the City of Toronto. Subsequently, Edell founded Elmdale Investments, the company which built and managed the Elmhurst Plaza in Etobicoke. He reopened the drug store, which was renamed Elmhurst Drugs in the plaza. He also invested in two retail textile stores, Deltex Drapery and Dodd’s Drapery which had been founded by group of businessmen including his cousin Israel Edell.
In 1952 he married Dolly Weinstock, the daughter of Moishe and Sylvia Weinstock. They lived in the newly developed suburb of North York with their four children: Ethel, Simcha, Malka and Joseph. After 10 years of marriage, Dolly died and in 1966, he married Celia Rogen Hoffman.
Sol Edell was a founding member and first president of the Clanton Park Congregation. He was actively involved in the construction of the synagogue and its development. He continued to be affiliated with Shomrai Shabbos where his grandfather Rabbi Yosef Weinreb had been the rabbi. He was also involved with Adas Israel, the synagogue in Hamilton where his wife Celia had been an active member.
He was chair of the Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region -- Toronto Jewish Congress Archives Committee, which subsequently became the Ontario Jewish Archives. During his tenure, the archives was responsible for the reconstruction of the Kiever Synagogue which had been built in the early 1900s but had fallen into a state of disrepair by the 1960s.
Sol Edell was also involved in a number of Zionist organizations. He was the founding chair of the Aliyah Support Committee of the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto, whose mandate was to assist Torontonians who had moved to Israel and ease their transition into Israeli society. He was also an active member of the Mizrachi organization and its affiliated institutions. Another one of Sol Edell’s interests was ensuring the preservation of local cemeteries. He was president of the Jones Avenue Cemetery and on the board of Pardes Shalom and the Bathurst Lawn Cemetery, Clanton Park section.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting Sol Edell's business activities, community involvement and personal life. Included is correspondence, meeting minutes, photographs, financial records, legal records, publications, audio-visual material, invitations, newspaper clippings, artifacts, lists, reports, speeches, and architectural drawings.
The fonds is organized into the following eleven series: Personal; Edell's Drug Store and Elmhurst Pharmacy; Elmdale Investments; Deltex Drapery and Dodd's Drapery; Adas Israel Synagogue; Clanton Park Synagogue; Shomrai Shabbos; Aliyah; Cemetery and funeral home; Historical materials; and, Activities and organizations.
Notes
Physical description note: includes 739 photographs, 232 architectural drawings, 11 audio cassettes, 9 audio reels, 13 film reels, 7 videocassettes, 4 slides, 1 plaque, 4 badges, and 1 key.
Name Access
Edell Solomon, 1919-2000
Clanton Park Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Edell, Dolly
Edell, Celia
Edell's Drug Store
Elmhurst Pharmacy
Jones Avenue Cemetery
Canadian Jewish Congress/ Toronto Jewish Congress Archives
Aliyah Support Committee
Subjects
Business
Pharmacists
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Physical Condition
The bulk of the architectural drawings are currently being stored rolled up. They should be flattened and encapsulated in melinex.
Film and sound reels should be digitized.
Related Material
See fonds #5 for material related to Paul Edell.
See accession #2012-10/9 for material related to the Edell family.
Creator
Edell, Solomon, 1919-2000
Accession Number
2002-12-2
2008-8-29
2011-5-4
2012-10-9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Paul Edell fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Paul Edell fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
5
Material Format
textual record
Date
[191-]-1978
Physical Description
13 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
Paul Edell (1882-1966) was the owner of a Toronto printing business and a prominent member of Shomrai Shabbos Congregation.
Edell was born in Poland and emigrated to Toronto in 1910. He married Molly Weinreb in 1915 and they had 5 children: David, Sol, Ethel, Connie and Sara. When he arrived in Canada he found work as a clerk and salesman. He later apprenticed as a printer and in 1921, he opened his own business, Royal Printing, at 113 Elizabeth Street in Toronto. Edell continued to work at the business until his retirement in the 1960s. His customers included many Jewish businesses, institutions and organizations. Edell was also involved in a number of community activities, mostly centered around religious matters. He served as president of Shomrai Shabbos Congregation for many year and was also involved in the maintenance of the Jones Avenue cemetery. He passed away in 1966.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of records related to Paul Edell's business and community activities. Included is business and synagogue correspondence, property documents, certificates and a ledger book.
Name Access
Edell, Paul, 1882-1966
Royal Printing
Shomrai Shabbos
Subjects
Businesspeople
Immigrants--Canada
Synagogues
Physical Condition
Ledger book is in poor condition and requires conservation work.
Related Material
For records related to Paul Edell's son, please see the Solomon Edell fonds 4.
For further records on the Edell and Weinreb families, see accession 2012-10-9.
Creator
Edell, Paul, 1882-
Accession Number
2002-12-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Melamed fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Melamed fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
7
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1900]-1939
Physical Description
30 photographs : b&w (4 negatives) ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Gordon Melamed (6 Apr. 1927-16 Nov. 2004) was born to Morris and Zena Melamed. The Melamed family was originally from Russia. Morris Melamed served in the Russian army during the Russo-Japanese War. He was married to Zena Melamed and they had eleven children, Gordon being the only boy. Morris Melamed owned a dry goods store and the family were active members of the Toronto Jewish community.
Custodial History
Although signed agreements exist for the acquisition of this material, much of this fonds was never assigned an accession number as it was one of the very first donations to the Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region Archives on 11 Dec. 1973, 9 July 1974 and 13 March 1979.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of photographs documenting the extended Melamed family and their friends.
Name Access
Melamed, Gordon, 1927-2004
Creator
Melamed, Gordon, 1927-2004
Accession Number
1979-3-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Brenda Richards fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 26
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Brenda Richards fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
26
Material Format
graphic material
object
textual record
Date
1965-1980
Physical Description
37 photographs and other material
Admin History/Bio
Brenda Richards was born in Toronto, attended Ryerson Public School and Harbord Collegiate, and then enrolled in Central Technical School to study commercial art. Brenda was later employed as an art teacher at Humewoood Public School and continued teaching and assisting until she retired at age 60. Her husband Alfred or "Alf" managed a George Richards men’s clothing store.
Following the death of their 21 year old son, the Richards wished to assist other young men and became involved in the Scouting movement. They became the leaders of the 159th 'B' Cub Pack, which met at Shaarei Shomayim Synagogue in Toronto on Wednesday evenings. In the terminology of Scouting, using characters from Rudyard Kipling’s “Jungle Book’, Alfred, the Cubmaster, was known as “Akela” and Brenda, the Assistant Cubmaster was “ Baloo” (the Bear). At its peak, the Cub pack had approximately 36 members but dissolved in 1970. During Brenda’s career in the Cub movement, she was awarded several “Good Service” medals by the Scouting Council of Canada.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of personal records and artifacts accumulated by Brenda Richards during her service as Assistant Cubmaster of the 159th 'B' Toronto Cub Pack. These include Cub and Cub leader regalia and memorabilia, a collection of photographs of the Cub pack and two scrapbooks documenting their activities. The scrapbooks include photographs, poems and other writings by cub members, news clippings and lists of badges earned by various cubs. Also of note are 4 original drawings by Richards.
Notes
Physical description note: Includes 1 folder of textual records, 2 scrapbooks, 4 drawings, 6 badges, 5 pins, 2 medals, 1 whistle, and 1 woggle.
Fonds is part of the Ontario Jewish Archives' project to acquire material created by the 159th Cub Pack, which was a Jewish troop. The project also includes an oral history interview with Brenda Richards conducted by Martin Wolfish.
Name Access
Richards, Alfred
Richards, Brenda
Shaarei Shomayim Congregation (Toronto, Ont.)
Creator
Richards, Brenda
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
2003-5-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Folks Farein fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 105
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Folks Farein fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
105
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
architectural drawing
Date
1914-1977
Physical Description
3.07 m of textual records
110 photographs : b&w and col. (hand-tinted) ; 51 x 41 cm or smaller
6 architectural drawings : 70 x 36 or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Folks Farein, also known as the Hebrew National Association, was established in 1914 by a group of Toronto Jewish immigrants as a society dedicated to anti-missionary and educational outreach. They were first located at 23 Cecil Street and moved to 37 Cecil Street around 1940.
In the early years of the Folks Farein's existence, Christian missions and a number of Jewish converts to Christianity sought to exploit the situation of poor Jews in the community through the distribution of direct relief, services of doctors and midwives and by street-corner preaching and proselytizing. To counteract the work of the Toronto missionaries the Folks Farein offered a number of services including welfare for working mothers, a reading room, English language classes and translation services for Yiddish immigrants.
When the threat from missionary activity was no longer an issue, the Folks Farein transformed itself into a philanthropic society. Under its revised mandate the society looked after the sick and needy in hospitals, sanatoriums, mental health institutions and in their homes, and arranged for free doctor services, translation services, medicine, dentures, eyeglasses, orthopedic shoes and medical appliances. The Folks Farein guaranteed the full or partial payment of medical bills by maintaining a fund in several hospitals for the benefit of Jewish patients in need of assistance. They provided assistance to seniors applying for old age pensions, to widows and mothers applying for benefits, assisted needy families and patients with kosher meals, provided cash relief during Passover, and fed and billeted the unemployed and homeless at their premises at 37 Cecil Street.
In the course of their work, the Folks Farein collaborated with many Jewish organizations and societies such as the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society, Jewish Family Welfare Bureau, Relief Unemployment Fund, Jewish Joint Application Bureau, Jewish Children's Bureau, the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto, Canadian Jewish Congress and the Toronto Hebrew Free Loan Association.
Its basis of revenue came from its large membership, house-to-house contributions from the public and from special events such as its annual ball, Moes Chittin campaign, Purim ball, and beauty contests.
In addition to its regular activities the Folks Farein assumed responsibility for providing aid to refugees of the Second World War: the first group arriving from Europe in 1945 and in 1948 to a group of Jewish tailors liberated from the DP camps of Germany. In 1947, the Folks Farein established Hachnoses Orchim, a temporary shelter to accommodate refugees and displaced persons. The shelter was located at 37 Cecil Street.
The Folks Farein's first officers were Mr. J. Graner (president), Mr. J. Meisniker (vice-president), Mr. Meyer Littner (superintendent), Chuna Mosoff and Mr. W. Welman (trustees), Miss Weiner and Mr. Cohen (board of education), Mr. A. Kaminsky (recording secretary) and Mr. Cohen (treasurer). Mr. Epstein referred to as "Grandfather" was one of the founders of the Folks Farein.
Other pioneers included Moshe Oelbaum, and M. Spiegel (1st vice-president), J. Hurwitz (1st vice-president and president), Abraham Sher, S.M. Shapiro Shlesinger, Joseph Grenner, Mrs. Minna Winter (president of the Women's Auxiliary) and Kalman Wagner. In 1930, David Green assumed the position of president of the Folks Farein and served as its exclusive president from 1934 until his passing on 13 May 1977. Sam Cohen was then elected the new president of the Folks Farein.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the Folks Farein's philanthropic activities in the Toronto Jewish community from 1914 to 1977. Records include meeting minutes and agendas of the executive board and committees, resolutions of board of directors, newspaper clippings in both Yiddish and English, publicity material, photographs, general correspondence, architectural drawings, cemetery deeds, legal documents, records relating to David Green's personal interests, financial and fundraising records, wills and bequests, and client case files. The records have been arranged into nine series: Meeting minutes; Scrapbooks; Executive services; Celebrations and events; Building and operations; David Green; Finance and fundraising; and Case files.
Notes
Formerly cited as MG2 O1N.
Name Access
Folks Farein
Hebrew National Association (Toronto, Ont.)
Subjects
Charities
Source
Archival Descriptions
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