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50 records – page 1 of 1.
Accession Number
2014-6-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-6-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
8 cm of textual records
Date
1997-2004
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting Cyrel Troster's involvement with UJA Federation's Cultural Services Planning and Allocation Committee, Cultural Planning and Allocation, and the development of cultural policy. Also included is a program book and silent auction catalogue for an exhibit held at the Chinese Cultural Centre of Greater Toronto.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Arts
Name Access
Troster, Cyrel
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-4
Material Format
textual record
object
Physical Description
4 cm of textual records
3 t-shirts
Date
2002-2008
Scope and Content
This accession consists of records related to the Board of Jewish Education's Educational Services Committee, the UJA Federation's Strategic Planning Committee, the Latner Library, the Bathurst Jewish Community Centre Board of Directors and the opening of the Pardes Shalom memorial garden. The records primarily consist of meeting minutes and reports. In addition, there are three Ashkenaz festival t-shirts.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-8-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-8-10
Material Format
textual record
sound recording
moving images
Physical Description
ca. 10 cm of textual records
1 audio disc : vinyl
1 DVD
Date
1977-2006
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting Cyrel's involvement in various Jewish organization's, including; Community Planning and Allocations (CP&A), Cultural Services Planning and Allocations Committee (CSPAC), the CJC Archives Committee (Ontario Jewish Archives), the UJA Federation (Toronto Jewish Congress) Board of Directors, the Latner Library (Jewish Public Library), and the Canadian Jewish Congress. Included are meeting minutes, reports, correspondence, a vinyl record issued by CJC and the Jewish Student Federation of York University entitled "Let my People Go", event invitations, and brochures.
Also included are Jewish Women's Forum newsletters, Ashkenaz festival brochures, a Pardes Shalom Memorial Garden video, a Leah Posluns Theatre production booklet, and event invitations for the Narayever Congregation.
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Name Access
Troster, Cyrel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-1-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-1-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
12 cm of textual records
Date
1991-1997
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting Cyrel Troster's activities on UJA Federation's Cultural Services Planning and Allocations Committee and its Fine and Dramatic Arts sub-committee, Jewish Theatre sub-committee, and Jewish music sub-committee. Included are meeting minutes, reports, financial records, correspondence, project proposals, flyers and brochures.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-12-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-12-8
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. (negative) ; 35 mm
Date
1983
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one negative depicting the Ontario Jewish Archives committee members in the former Beverley Street building, holding a wooden sign that reads: GENTILES ONLY.
Custodial History
Photograph was taken by a member of the Ontario Jewish Archives committee in 1983. The negative has been in the possession of Cyrel Troster since that time.
Administrative History
The sign was discovered by the committee at 152 Beverley Street in the basement hidden under the floorboards. A member of the committee used a crowbar to pull up the floor where it was discovered hidden in a hole. The physical sign was donated to the Ontario Jewish Archives.
Descriptive Notes
For a photograph of the sign, see image #6161.
For the physical sign, see artifact #714.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-3-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-3-3
Material Format
object
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual material
3 objects
Date
[196-?]-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two program books for the Toronto Jewish Film Festival, 1997 (at Bloor Cinema) and 2012, and two pins that belonged to Lillian Troster. One pin is fron B'nai Brith Women and the other is from the Federation of Zionist Organizations of Canada. Also included is one small menorah pin, possibly from B'nai Brith Women or Girls.
Name Access
Federation of Zionist Organizations of Canada
Troster, Lillian
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-5-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-5-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1993
Scope and Content
Accession consists of an itinerary for Jewish Women's Voices: Past and Present.
Places
Toronto, Ont
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-10
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
5 cm of textual records
Date
1988-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting Cyrel Troster's Jewish communal involvement, particularly with cultural planning for UJA Federation. Included are event inviations, program books, brochures, a postcard, meeting minutes, reports, and flyers. Records relate to the following agencies and projects: UJA Federation of Greater Toronto, the Tomorrow Campaign, Anshei Minsk Synagogue, Holy Blossom Temple, Shareeh Haim Synagogue, the Jewish Museum in Toronto, reports on Jewish education in Toronto, the Toronto Jewish Film Festival, the Holocaust Centre of Toronto, and the Koffler Centre. Of note is a copy of a study commissioned by UJA Federation for Frank Gehry, who was originally approached to design the Koffler Gallery.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Troster, Cyrel
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-4
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 8 cm of textual records
Date
1984-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records predominantly related to UJA Federation of Greater Toronto's Community Planning and Allocations Committee. Records include studies, meeting minutes, correspondence, budgets and reports, most related to the plans for redevelopment of the Bathurst JCC. Records also include Bar Mitzvah benchers and Ashkenaz Festival promotional materials.
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-4
Material Format
textual record
object
Physical Description
ca. 15 cm of textual records
1 leather hide
Date
1974-2009
Scope and Content
Accession consists of documents related to UJA Federation committees and the Ontario Jewish Archives. Documents include correspondence, reports, meeting minutes and agendas, promotional material, budgets, and newspaper clippings. Accession also includes a shoe leather hide from Edna Shoe Manufacturing Company Limited that was used at a shoe conference.
Administrative History
Cyrel's grandfather, Charles Troster, owned the Edna Shoe Manufacturing Company Limited, a shoe factory, in Toronto. Cyrel's father and all of her uncles worked there. Names on the shoes were as follows: Celina, Lady Edna, Avanti, Charles (Studio of Canada), and Edna.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Business
Fashion and clothing
Meetings
Name Access
Troster, Charles
Troster, Cyrel
Edna Shoe Manufacturing Company Limited (Toronto, Ont.)
Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-6
Material Format
textual record
object
graphic material
Physical Description
1 scrapbook
Date
1964
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one scrapbook of the Jordana Chapter of B'nai Brith Girls. Cyrel Troster was President during the time period documented in the scrapbook. Records include a corsage worn by Cyrel at her installation, Rosh Hashanah cards, letters and program materials, drawings, and one photograph.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-8
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Physical Description
2 folders of textual records
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 25 cm
1 pair of shoes
Date
1958-1994
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the activities of Cyrel Troster and the Edna Shoe Manufacturing Company Limited. Included are lists of elected officers and members for B'nai Brith Women (1970-1971), an invitation to a B'nai Brith Women Covenant Breakfast (1958), an issue of the Zionist student publication "masada" (1977), a schedule for High Holiday services at Darchei Noam (1994), an issue of the bulletin "The Window" of B'nai Israel Beth David Congregation (1977), and an issue of the newsletter "Shirayim" of the Canadian Union of Jewish Studies (1972). Also included are a pair of Edna shoes, a sketch of a shoe, a photograph of shoes, and two templates of shoes documenting the work of the Edna Shoe Manufacturing Company Limited.
Custodial History
Cyrel found the shoes at a secondhand store and purchased them.
Administrative History
Cyrel's grandfather, Charles Troster, owned the Edna Shoe Manufacturing Company Limited, a shoe factory, in Toronto. Cyrel's father and all of her uncles worked there.
Subjects
Business
Fashion and clothing
Occupations
Name Access
Troster, Cyrel
Troster, Charles
Edna Shoe Manufacturing Company Limited (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-4-15
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-4-15
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 8 cm of textual records
Date
1964-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting the involvement of Cyrel Troster and her mother Lillian Troster in the Jewish community of Toronto and Richmond Hill. Included is a Shareeh Haim Synagogue high holiday ticket, a B'nai Brith Youth Organization (BBYO) fall conclave booklet (1964), Ashkenaz Festival programs (2012, 2014), an issue of the Toronto Jewish Directory (2000), and UJA Federation studies and reports. The UJA reports include: Greater Toronto Jewish Community Study: A First Look (1991), Needs Assessment of York Region's Jewish Population (2002), and Centre for Jewish Knowledge and Learning Workshop : Planning Materials (2004).
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-12-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-12-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1966
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one B'nai B'rith Girls Life Member card issued to Cyrel Troster as a leader in BBG leadership training, dated April 1966.
Subjects
Children
Name Access
Troster, Cyrel
B'nai Birth Youth Organization
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-4-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-4-6
Material Format
object
sound recording
textual record
Physical Description
22 audio cassettes
3 cm textual of records
2 artifacts
Date
1973-1979
Scope and Content
Accession consists of recorded interviews with Yekil Silverman, Joshua Gershman, Mrs. Berenberg, Dave Biderman, Arthur Cohen, Victor Sefton, Sammy Taft, Joshua Altman, Esther Volpe, J.B. Salsberg, Baruch Noy, Norman Naislin (x2), Mrs. Langner, [Silverstein?] Workmen's Circle, Ted Blooms the son of Max Antlick, and concerts at the Kiever Synagogue in 1974. Two artifacts are included: a USSR Prisoner of Conscience necklace and a ring that says NNB31. Textual records include interview transcripts with Benjamin Brown, Annie Zeidman, Mary Levy and Mrs. Arbus; newspaper clippings related to NCSY, Kensington Market, Spadina Ave., walking tours, Honest Eds, and David Troster; letters and addresses regarding the Jewish Archives Committee; a constitution of the Congregation Rodfei Sholem Anshe Kiev (Kiever Synagogue) in English and Yiddish; a proposal for a National Jewish Historical Society; a Toronto Jewish Historical Society letter re: A Sense of Spadina walking tour, an invitation to the historical designation of the Congregation Knesseth Israel; a Canadian Jewish Congress Archives Procedure Manual prepared for the First Conference on Archives at the Toronto Zionist Centre, March 17, 1974; records related to the Jewish Historical Society of Canada exhibit Journey into our Heritage 1978-1979; copies of The Window (B'nai Israel Beth David Congregation) for September 1976 and Passover 1978; and a Hillel program card.
Use Conditions
Credit to be given to Susan Cohen and Cyrel Troster—coordinators of the Local Initiatives Project in 1973—and to interviewer(s) and transcribers when using tapes or transcribed interviews.
Descriptive Notes
RELATED MATERIAL NOTE: See accession 2018-6-7 for related sound recordings. Some may be duplicates.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-6-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-6-7
Material Format
textual record
sound recording
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
6 cassette tapes
Date
1973-2005
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Cyrel Troster's involvement with various Jewish committees and organizations. Included are: transcripts of oral histories with prominent Jewish Torontonians that were conducted as part of an oral history project in 1973; correspondence between Cyrel Troster and interviewees; index cards listing the dates of the oral history interviews; promotional materials for Jewish arts festivals; public proposal document for the new Shaarei Shomayim Synagogue; and documents and records from Cyrel's involvement in various Jewish organizations. Also included are Local Initiatives Program application forms (1973), lists of presidents of various Jewish organizations, a map of the Jewish York Region (1999), issues of Exodus Magazine in both English and Russian from May 2018, and two issues of the Wilson Heights High School yearbook The Torch (1962-63).
The six tape cassettes are as follows: Cantor Paul Kowarsky Live in Concert (no date); Highlights from the 1994 Toronto Jewish Storytelling Festival; interview with Esther Volpe (two cassette tapes); interview with Samuel Harris; and one cassette marked "Dov Noy copy of Library tape" (Dov Noy was a Jewish folklorist).
The accession contains transcripts for the following interviewees: Mrs. Arbus, David Biderman, Benjamin Brown, Benjamin Sherman, Arthur Cohen, Mrs. Draimin, Max Federman, Morris Flicht, Joshua Gershman, Samuel Harris, Ben Heisel, Rose Heisel, Mr. Lean, Mary Levy, Harry Pullan, J. B. Salsberg, Yekil Silverman, A. S. Socol, Nathan Strauss, Esther Volpe, and Annie Zeidman.
The accession contains records related to Cyrel's involvement in the following committees and organizations: Committee for Yiddish (1997-2004); Cultural Services and Planning Committee (1990-2005), Jewish Public Library (2005); Canadian Jewish Congress, Orthodox Division (1982-1984); Holocaust Centre (1979-2004); Limmud (2000); Ontario Jewish Archives (1973-2004); Jewish Theatre (1996-2002); Jewish Arts Council (2000-2004); Jewish Toronto Tomorrow (1994-2004); Ashkenaz (1997-2004); UJA Federation (1978, 1984, 1990-2004).
Use Conditions
Credit to be given to Susan Cohen and Cyrel Troster—coordinators of the Local Initiatives Project project in 1973—and to interviewer(s) and transcribers when using tapes or transcribed interviews.
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
RELATED MATERIAL NOTE: See accession 2017-4-6 for related sound recordings. Some may be duplicates.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Committee for Yiddish (Toronto, Ont.)
Limmud Toronto
Ontario Jewish Archives
Troster, Cyrel
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-10
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
7 folders
Date
1977-2006
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Cyrel Troster's involvement in the Jewish community.
Included are: a copy of Jewish Life in Greater Toronto: leadership development materials (197-?), materials pertaining to the Second Encounter Holocaust-themed event series (ca. 1977-ca. 1979), a folder of source material for Jewish exhibitions (1979-1987), a copy of the 1992 Jewish Directory of Greater Toronto, a copy of The Jewish Community of Toronto: Part I Basic Demographics (2001), a copy of The Jewish Community of Toronto: Part III the Jewish Elderly (2001), and a copy of A Survey of the Attitudes and Behaviours of Greater Toronto's Jewish Community (2006).
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Exhibitions
Population
Name Access
Troster, Cyrel
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-8-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-8-1
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
7 cm of textual records
Date
[197-]-2003
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Cyrel Troster's involvement in the Jewish community, especially her involvement in the Canadian Jewish Congress Central Committee/Toronto Jewish Congress Archives.
Included are: A copy of a Brief Guide to Pesach by Rabbi A. Y. Bartfield (197-?); archives-related press releases (197-?); materials pertaining to the Toronto Jewish Historical Society's Kensington Market walking tour (1974?); a copy of Fraternally Yours: Official Publication of the New Fraternal Jewish Association Vol. 19 No. 4(161) (Nov. 1978); a study of Toronto's Jewish population (Jan. 1979); a list of the officers and board of directors of the Israel Frankel Jewish Public Library of Toronto (Jan. 1979); archives-related ephemera (1979-1984); a report regarding program, budget, and priority process for the archives (Aug. 1981); member lists for the archives committee (1983), archives-related correspondence (1983-1986, 2002), archives budgets (1983-1985, 2003); meeting minutes for the archives committee (1984); a directory of local synagogue artists (1999); and a programme for a Frances Mandell tribute dinner (1999).
Subjects
Archives
Name Access
Troster, Cyrel
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-10-14
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-10-14
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
7 cm of textual records
Date
1964-2018
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting different public and Jewish organizations in Toronto. Included are: 1964 and 1965 issues of the William Lyon Mackenzie Collegiate Institute's Advocate yearbook; a record of the Eglinton chapter of B'nai Brith Women of Canada's opening meeting on 16 September 1992; a booklet with short profiles of the 1998-99 UJA Federation Board of Directors; a 2013 commemorative booklet celebrating Darchei Noam's fortieth anniversary and Rabbi Tina Grimberg's ten-year anniversary at the synagogue; a program for the 8th Annual Symposium in Germanic Studies University of Toronto, which was titled Global Yiddish Culture, 1938-1948; various materials from the 2018 Ashkenaz Festival; newspaper clippings; and informational material for the Canadian Jewish Congress/Toronto Jewish Congress' Heritage-in-a-Box project
Subjects
Festivals
Public schools
Synagogues
Name Access
Ashkenaz Festival
B'nai Brith Women of Canada
Canadian Jewish Congress. Central Region
Congregation Darchei Noam (Toronto, Ont.)
Grimberg, Tina
Toronto Jewish Congress
Troster, Cyrel
University of Toronto
William Lyon Mackenzie Collegiate Institute
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2004-11-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2004-11-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
[1966-1988]
Scope and Content
This accession consists of one copy of "The Hillelite" (1966-67), copies of the architectural plans for the Shaareh Haim Synagogue and School (1988), the Charles Diamond report of the Library Study Committee to the Toronto Jewish Congress (July 1986), Cultural Services Planning and Allocations Committee meeting minutes (1988), Cultural Services Planning Committee summary of recommendations (1987-88) and Jewish Public Library correspondence (1987)
Custodial History
Records were kept by donor
Administrative History
Cyrel Troster is an active member on the Cultural Services Planning and Allocation Committee and the Archives Committee
Name Access
Troster, Cyrel.
Cultural Services Planning and Allocation Committee.
Hillel.
Shaareh Haim Synagogue.
Diamond, Charles.
Jewish Public Library.
Toronto Jewish Congress.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-3-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-3-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1986-2004
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material relating to the Latner Jewish Public Library and the Cultural Services Study Committee. Included is a report of the Cultural Services Study Committee (1986); 5 sets of meeting minutes of the Latner Jewish Public Library Board of Directors (2002-2004); a report on the library produced by Clare Lawton Beghtol, a professional library consultant (1988); two reports on restructuring and revisioning the library (2003); and a response to the restructuring report (2004).
Name Access
Albert and Temmy Latner Jewish Public Library.
Cultural Services Study Committee.
Beghtol, Clare Lawton.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-3-14
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-3-14
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
12 cm of textual records
Date
1990-1999
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual documents relating to the Executive Board of the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto, UJA Federation and the Toronto Jewish Congress; the Cultural Services Planning and Allocations Committee; the Koffler Gallery and the Leah Posluns Theatre; Ashkenaz festival and the Toronto Jewish Film Festival. Records include reports, proposals, promotional material, and financial documents.
Custodial History
Records were in the possession of the donor Cyrel Troster until they were donated to the archives on 2006-03-29.
Name Access
Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto.
UJA Federation.
Toronto Jewish Congress.
Cultural Services Planning and Allocations Committee.
Koffler Gallery.
Leah Posluns Theatre.
Ashkenaz.
Toronto Jewish Film Festival.
Troster, Cyrel.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-7-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-7-4
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
6 cm of textual records
Date
1973-2003
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual material relating to the Ontario Jewish Archives, the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto, Pardes Shalom Cemetery, the Latner Library and the Social Planning Committee. The bulk of the material is correspondence relating to various archival projects and grants between former Director of the Ontario Jewish Archives, Steve Speisman and former chair of the Archives Committee, Cyrel Troster.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-3-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-3-7
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
4 cm of textual records
Date
1972, 1993-2009
Scope and Content
Accession contains programs from arts and culture events in the Jewish community. They include: the Ashkenaz Festival of Yiddish Culture (1995, 2004); the Toronto Jewish Film Festival (2007, 2009); the Second Annual Succah-by-the-Water held by the New Israel Fund of Canada (1993); and an exhibition outline and list from 'On the Minsk Pinsk Line: An Exhibition of Uncommon Objects' at York Quay Centre, Harbourfront, 1995. Also in the accession was the November 1972 edition of Masada.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-5-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-5-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
[ca. 1977] - 2009
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one copy of the first issue of the Jewish Life: A New Generation newspaper (1993), membership invitations for the Narayever Congregation Egalitarian serivice and the Israel Frankel Jewish Public Library of Toronto, a Canadian Jewish Congress community news bulletin promoting the "Sense of Spadina" tour, a folder of records for a UJA Federation Board of Directors consultation (2009), and brochures and other records relating to The Second Encounter committee.
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Neville and Ruth Sischy
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
17 Nov. 2016
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Neville and Ruth Sischy
Number
AC 439
Subject
Canada--Emigration and immigration
Jews--South Africa
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Interview Date
17 Nov. 2016
Interviewer
Miriam Borden
Total Running Time
AC 439 part 1: 37 min.
AC 439 part 2: 7 min.
AC 439 part 3: 7 min.
Biography
Neville and Ruth were born toward the beginning of apartheid rule in South Africa. Indeed, Neville was born the same year the National Party returned to power and formalized the system of apartheid. Because of their young age, Neville and Ruth were largely unaware of the political developments taking place in their country. By the time they left South Africa in the mid-1970s, the government had devolved into a police state. For them, the Canada of Pierre Elliott Trudeau was a welcome contrast to the injustice of apartheid South Africa.
Neville and Ruth grew up in traditional Jewish homes, in which their grandparents spoke Yiddish and were treated with deference. Neville met Ruth while attending medical school in Johannesburg. He was twenty-one at the time; she was eighteen. The two married on the condition that they leave South Africa and, after a positive look-see, came to Canada in 1975. Initially, Neville had trouble finding work as a general practitioner but was eventually able to open a clinic, where he has worked for forty years. Ruth, meanwhile, quickly found work in the nursery department of Holy Blossom Temple, the latter serving as a launching pad for their integration into Canadian society.
Although there were challenges along the way, Neville and Ruth have never regretted their decision to immigrate to Canada. They have four children, all of whom have made friends with the children of their Holy Blossom friends, and hope to see those friendships continue into the third generation.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Sischy, Neville
Sischy, Ruth
Geographic Access
Benoni (South Africa)
Cape Town (South Africa)
Germiston (South Africa)
Toronto (Ont.)
Vancouver (B.C.)
Original Format
Digital file
Copy Format
Digital file
Transcript
Part 1:
00:35 Ruth discusses her parents' immigration history. Her father came to Benoni, South Africa from Lithuania and Latvia at age fifteen. Her mother came to Cape Town from Lithuania as an infant with her mother.
03:40 Ruth discusses her Jewish home life growing up. Yiddish was the primary language spoken by her grandmothers and between her grandparents and her parents. She describes her parents' home as traditional but not religious.
05:04 Ruth discusses her education. She attended a public school. She describes her brothers' Jewish education. She did not have any formal Jewish education.
05:42 Ruth continues to describe her home life.
06:55 Neville discusses his family's immigration history. His father came from Sveskna, Lithuania to live with an aunt in South Africa at age sixteen in 1927. He eventually bought a men's clothing business in Germiston, where Neville was born. His mother was born in South Africa. His maternal grandfather came to South Africa from Lithuania at the turn of the twentieth century, leaving behind a wife and child. He was able to bring them to Johannesburg, South Africa thirteen years later.
09:23 Neville explains that he lived in Germiston until 1971, when he moved to Johannesburg to go to medical school. He met Ruth while he was attending medical school. He explains that he and Ruth were married knowing they would leave South Africa.
10:29 Neville discusses the factors that contributed to his decision to leave South Africa.
11:49 Neville considered moving to England after he did an elective there during medical school. He explains why he decided to come to Canada instead. Neville discusses the circumstances that led to two of his father's cousins to leave South Africa and come to Canada.
13:24 Neville and Ruth explain why they decided to settle in Toronto rather than Vancouver, their initial destination. Ruth discusses the challenges of leaving her family. She recalls her first Rosh Hashanah in Toronto and how she found comfort from a sense of community.
17:23 Ruth notes that she chose Toronto over Vancouver thinking she would have a greater chance of seeing family. Paradoxically, her family immigrated to Oregon.
18:21 Ruth discusses the reaction of friends and family to their decision to emigrate.
19:12 Neville and Ruth discuss a look-see visit to Canada in 1974. They relate a humorous incident involving trying to get to the Canadian embassy in Rome.
21:04 Ruth describes the homesickness she felt as a new immigrant to Canada. She highlights the poor communication at the time: slow mail; postal strikes; sending mail via Buffalo, New York; expensive and complicated long-distance phone calls.
23:06 Neville discusses some of the challenges he encountered when he first arrived.
24:38 Neville and Ruth discuss the support they received from the Jewish community. They identify support from their colleagues.
26:10 Neville and Ruth explain the factors that directed them to choose their first neighbourhood.
27:12 Ruth discusses her adjustment to Canadian winter.
28:31 Ruth comments on her surprise of being able to practice Judaism openly in Toronto.
30:44 Ruth contrasts open conversations about the Holocaust in Canada with minimal discussion in Johannesburg. Neville discusses the impact of the Holocaust on his family.
32:25 Ruth discusses the role their household staff played in her life in South Africa.
33:11 Neville recounts an anecdote demonstrating the prevalence of domestic help in white South Africa.
34:08 Neville contrasts the oppressive society of South Africa with the open, welcoming Canadian governance and society.
35:11 Neville discusses why the military was glorified in South Africa.
36:02 Ruth discusses her professional career.
Part 2:
00:47 Neville's sister and family and parents immigrated to Canada a year-and-a-half after their arrival. Ruth's family immigrated to the United States.
01:25 Neville and Ruth have four children, all born in Canada.
02:01 Both Neville and Ruth strongly identify as Canadian. Neville recalls he felt Canadian when she took his children to school. Ruth distinguishes between her "childhood life" in Africa and her "adult life" in Canada.
04:16 Ruth explains when and why she returned to South Africa for visits.
05:07 Neville discusses a desire to help young children and families in South Africa.
07:17 Neville notes the similarities between Ruth and his backgrounds (e.g. living with a grandmother, Yiddish spoken in the home).
Part 3:
00:22 Ruth explains why she is grateful for coming to Toronto.
00:47 Neville discusses a social group in Toronto comprised of former Jewish residents from Germiston. He notes that he has a large extended family in Toronto.
01:38 Ruth notes that most of their close friends tend to be South African.
02:01 Neville discusses his cousin, Ben Sischy, who had been a political activist in South Africa.
02:30 Ruth notes her awareness of South African politics became stronger after she immigrated to Canada.
03:15 Neville relates stories about black medical students in his medical school class.
04:24 Neville and Ruth explain that they visited Israel but did not consider moving there.
04:57 Neville and Ruth discuss their limited involvement with Zionist youth movements and reminisce about fundraising as children for Jewish organizations.
Source
Oral Histories

Loneliness

Basic Human Needs

Two Very Distinct Lives

Name
Dr. Vivian Rakoff
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
24 Nov. 2016
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Dr. Vivian Rakoff
Number
AC 440
Subject
Canada--Emigration and immigration
Jews--South Africa
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Interview Date
24 Nov. 2016
Interviewer
Naomi Raichyk
Total Running Time
AC 440 part 1: 31 min.
AC 440 part 2: 3 min.
AC 440 part 3: 2 min.
AC 440 part 4: 21 min.
Biography
Vivian was born in 1928 in Cape Town, but was quickly whisked off to Port Nolloth, a small town on the northwest coast of South Africa, where he spent his earliest years. And while Port Nolloth was home to less than a dozen Jewish families, his mother would still braid challah every Friday night.
The family moved to Cape Town when Vivian was six. At age eleven, he had a bruising encounter with apartheid that left a strong impression on him. Having innocently boarded a bus set aside for black South Africans, he was thrown off by the conductor who told him, “You can’t come here!” Afterwards, he told his aunt he was not going to live in South Africa.
After completing a degree at the University of Cape Town, Vivian set sail for England, where he was planning to study English at Oxford. Instead, he followed friends down to Marseilles where he met Yiddish-speaking Holocaust survivors waiting to set sail for Israel. The encounter was a pivotal one and led Vivian to journey to Israel, where he lived on kibbutz for a year.
After losing his passport, Vivian returned to South Africa, where he completed a master’s degree in psychology. He then traveled to England, this time staying for more than eight years. He studied medicine at University College London and enjoyed the city’s theatres and museums. After completing his degree, he decided it was time to see his parents so he returned once more to South Africa.
While in South Africa, Vivian met a friend who suggested he enroll in McGill University’s psychiatry program. Vivian thus set sail yet again, this time with wife and ten-month-old baby. After an eighteen day journey, the family arrived in Montreal, where Vivian did his residency. Residency complete, he accepted a job offer in Toronto, where he stayed for the rest of his career, serving as chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto and as the namesake for the Rakoff Centre for Positron Emission Tomography. In 2015, the Government of Canada appointed him a member of the Order of Canada in recognition of his contributions to psychiatry as well as for his role in founding the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Rakoff, Vivian, 1928-
Geographic Access
Cape Town (South Africa)
Montréal (Québec)
Port Nolloth (South Africa)
Toronto (Ont.)
Original Format
Digital file
Copy Format
Digital file
Transcript
Part 1:
00:29 Vivian discusses the immigration of his father's family to South Africa. His grandfather left Lithuania around the turn of the twentieth century. His grandmother and her children joined him in South Africa. Vivian lists the members of the family.
04:24 Vivian discusses the immigration of his mother's family. His mother, who was born in Chicago, came to South Africa in 1914.
05:00 Vivian's family settled in Port Nolloth. Vivian discusses the economy of the region. He discusses his father's businesses and marriage to his mother, Bertha. Vivian is one of four children.
06:48 Vivian was born on 28 April 1928 and lived in Port Nolloth for his first six years.
07:35 Vivian shares memories of growing up Jewish in Port Nolloth. He recounts anecdotes concerning his father's Zionist leanings.
09:40 Vivian describes his family's Jewish observance and shares memories from his youth.
12:30 Vivian discusses the impact of Zionism in his personal life. He describes his involvement with HaShomer HaTzair and travelling to Israel.
13:13 Vivian describes synagogues in Cape Town. He discusses his Jewish education after his family moved to Cape Town when he was six.
14:26 Vivian discusses the Jewish lives of his grandparents in Lithuania. He discusses the influence of the Haskalah (Jewish Enlightenment) and the rise of Zionism.
17:17 Vivian discusses the impact of South African politics on his life. He recalls a poem he wrote for his Zionist youth magazine. He recalls how an incident from his childhood that highlights the oppressive nature of the apartheid regime. The incident influenced his decision to leave South Africa.
21:04 Vivian describes the circumstances that triggered his decision to go to Palestine in 1947. His plan to study in England was interrupted when he decided to join a group of displaced persons in Marseilles who were travelling to Palestine. He remained there for a year.
24:26 Vivian describes his educational studies in South Africa and England.
25:27 Vivian expounds on living in London for eight years.
28:15 Vivian discusses his decision to come to Canada to study Psychiatry at McGill University.
29:18 Vivian describes his journey by steamship to Canada with his wife and ten-month-old baby.
30:13 Vivian discusses his impressions of South Africa when he returned from England.
Part 2:
00:13 Vivian discusses early memories of living in Montreal and how reality differed from expectations. He worked as a psychiatry resident at the Jewish General Hospital, but his wife, also a doctor, was unable to work. He describes a feeling of disappointment when they were not invited for High Holidays.
Part 3:
00:00 Vivian explains that he had decided to leave Montreal in 1967. He discusses Expo 67 and their many visitors.
Part 4:
00:00 Vivian discusses how his first job offer in Toronto at St. Michael's Hospital in 1967 was retracted due to antisemitism. He was then offered a position as director of postgraduate education in the psychiatry department.
01:00 Vivian describes some of the early challenges faced by his family when they arrived in Canada such as financial challenges and antisemitism.
02:28 Vivian and family move to a home on Ridgewood Road where they remain for twenty-three years.
03:00 Vivian contrasts his early experiences in Toronto with those in Montreal.
04:07 Vivian's children attended Bialik Hebrew Day School.
04:16 Vivian describes his family's Jewish observance.
04:52 Vivian explains that his primary connection to the South African Jewish community in Toronto is through relatives.
05:25 Vivian continues to discuss his Jewish observance.
06:25 Vivian discusses some of his family members who came to Toronto.
08:00 Vivian discusses his research concerning the challenges faced by children of Holocaust survivors. He continues to discuss his professional and literary writing.
09:5 Vivian outlines his professional positions: director of postgraduate education, chief of psychiatry at St. Michael's Hospital, chief of psychiatry and professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto.
10:25 Vivian highlights a personal achievement concerning bringing a positron emission scanner to the Clark Institute (CAMH).
11:50 Vivian discusses his interest in art.
13:17 Vivian discusses some of the challenges encountered by new immigrants.
14:30 Vivian addresses his own decision to immigrate to Canada.
15:41 Vivian addresses his Canadian identity.
15:58 Vivian describes a trip with his grandchildren to Port Nolloth.
17:36 Vivian shares some of his lasting memories of Cape Town.
19:08 Vivian discusses the common destinations for South African Jewish immigration.
20:12 Vivian discusses his experience as an immigrant of Canada.
Source
Oral Histories

Braiding challah with my mother

Montreal was Hostile

On Survivors

Receiving the Order of Canada

Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Chronological correspondence and memoranda series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 6; File 28
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Chronological correspondence and memoranda series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
6
File
28
Material Format
textual record
Date
Nov. 1989
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Chronological correspondence and memoranda series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 6; File 50
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Chronological correspondence and memoranda series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
6
File
50
Material Format
textual record
Date
Nov. 1990
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Chronological correspondence and memoranda series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 6; File 64
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Chronological correspondence and memoranda series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
6
File
64
Material Format
textual record
Date
Nov. 1991
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2011-10-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-10-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
2 m of textual records and other material
Date
1982-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the activities and the membership of the Pomegranate Guild of Judaic Textiles, Toronto. Included are meeting minutes, agendas, newsletters, program and event materials, slides, and audio-visual materials documenting Guild events.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Harriet Liebman, the Guild's archivist. They were donated to the archives by the immediate past president, Rikki Blitt.
Administrative History
The Pomegranate Guild of Judaic Textiles was formed in 1982 for those interested in studying and creating textile art and needlework based on Jewish themes. The Guild charges a yearly membership, which supports its programming, exhibits, and newsletter entitled "The Pomegramme".
Use Conditions
Full citation crediting the Pomegranate Guild of Judaic Textiles, Toronto must appear in all publications alongside the OJA's required caption.
Descriptive Notes
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION NOTE: Includes approx. 500 slides (col.), 5 VHS, 1 DVD, 1 audio cassette.
Subjects
Arts
Name Access
Pomegranate Guild of Judaic Textiles, Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-2-6 [Processed]
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-2-6 [Processed]
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
2.7 m of textual records
Date
2002-2010
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the operations and activities of the Koffler Center of the Arts. Records include programming and exhibitions materials and catalogues; records related to the Jewish Book Awards; prombotion material in print and AV and assembled into media binders; meeting minutes and general correspondence.
Custodial History
These records were left for the Archives when Koffler moved from the Prosserman JCC to the Artscape Youngplace.
Subjects
Arts
Name Access
Koffler Centre of the Arts
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Director of school finances series
Chronological correspondence and memoranda sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 3-1; File 68
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Director of school finances series
Chronological correspondence and memoranda sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
3-1
File
68
Material Format
textual record
Date
Oct. 1995-Nov. 1995
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Chronological correspondence and memoranda series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 6; File 66
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Chronological correspondence and memoranda series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
6
File
66
Material Format
textual record
Date
Jan. - Nov. 1993
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2012-1-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-1-2
Material Format
textual record
object
Physical Description
8 cm of textual records
1 matchbook
Date
1958-1993, predominant 1958-1966
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting Lillian Troster's role as president of the Eglinton Chapter B'nai Brith and as the Israel Bonds chairman for B'nai Brith District One. Included are meeting minutes, correspondence, membership lists, The Tattler newsletters, certificates, fundraising material, convention proceedings, flyers, invitations, speeches, and one match book of the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario.
Custodial History
Records were donated by Lillian's daughter, Cyrel Troster.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-1-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-1-1
Material Format
moving images
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
3 film reels (ca. 12 min.) : col., si. ; 8 mm
7 photographs
1 folder of textual records
Date
1939-1993, predominant 1939-1962
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the activities of Cyrel Troster and her family. Included is a Coronet Club invitation to an annual charity ball in aid of German refugees (1939), a fyler advertising the 100th anniversary of Beth Tzedec synagogue, a brochure for a Jewish Women's Voices conference (1993), and photographs of a Brownie group celebrating Purim at Clanton Park synagogue, a talent show at Camp Timberlane, and campers at Camp New Moon and Camp Shalom. Also included are home movies of a Jewish Cub Scout parade featuring Joel Troster and visiting day at Camp Tamarack and Camp Shalom. Identified in the photographs are: Cyrel Troster and Larry Troster. The home movies were filmed by Cyrel's father, Jack Troster.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-4-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-4-4
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1945-1946
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting Lillian Troster's activities. Included is a beer ration booklet from the Second World War, a clipping likely from a B'nai Brith publication, congratulatory wedding telegrams, and a sing song sheet from the Muskoka Lodge (music directed by Lou Herman).
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-11-11
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-11-11
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1959
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a program booklet for a dinner and dance reception held by the B'nai Brith Eglinton Chapter No. 771 on April 19, 1959. The program includes the dinner menu. Lillian Troster was installed as President at the event.
Custodial History
The material was donated by Cyrel Troster, Lillian's daughter.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1994-10-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1994-10-1
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
6 photographs : b&w (3 negatives) ; 13 x 18 cm and 13 x 10 cm
Date
1943-1945
Scope and Content
Accession consists of copy photographs documenting Lt. Jack Troster's second world war military service as a machine gunner with the Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa. Included is an image of a group of servicemen in Nymegen, Holland in January 1945, an image of Jack in his uniform (July 1943), and an image of Jack and another servicemen holding up a picture of Hitler possibly in Germany (1945?).
Identified in the photographs are: Jack Troster, Capt. Butler, Lt. W. Sharp, Major MacPherson, Lt. R. Ashman, Lt. Col. R. Ross, Capt. J. Woodward, and Pipe Major Scott.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
World War, 1939-1945
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Koffler Centre of the Arts fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 100
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Koffler Centre of the Arts fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
100
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1967-2013
Physical Description
1.9 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
The Koffler Centre of the Arts was established in 1977, as part of the Bathurst Jewish Community Centre at Bathurst Street and Sheppard Avenue, to enrich the cultural life of Toronto through arts education and exhibitions. The Koffler exists to encourage and develop the creative and artistic potential of the diverse community it serves. The Koffler Gallery as a public gallery and member of the Ontario Association of Art Galleries exhibits, interprets, and documents works of excellence in the visual arts with a focus on contemporary Canadian art, including the work of visual artists, emerging artists, and programming of special interest in the Jewish community.
The Koffler has offered an array of programmatic, education, and learning programs, including national and international art exhibitions, educational tours, and workshops, literary arts programs, art classes, lectures, concerts, film screenings, and theatre performances. The Koffler has also served public and private school students and their teachers through Koffler Gallery exhibition tours and workshops.
The Koffler Centre is governed by an executive board and standing and ad-hoc committees and is funded by endowments, donations, and sponsorhips as its primary sources of funding. The Koffler also receives annual operating support from the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto and all levels of government, including the City of Toronto, the Ontario Arts Council, and the Canada Council. The staff consists of an executive director, curators, and administrative support staff.
In 2013, after five years of off-site programs, the Koffler Centre of the Arts opened its administrative offices and the new Koffler Gallery at Artscape Youngplace on Shaw Street in downtown Toronto. The Artscape Youngplace facilities showcase Koffler Gallery exhibitions, public programs, and expanded school and education programs, as well as Koffler cross-disciplinary programs: literary events, theatre readings and performances, concerts, workshops, and more.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the activities and functions of the Koffler Centre of the Arts and its role in bringing Jewish-inspired visual, dance, dramatic and musical arts to the community. Included are records related to its board of directors and committees, its former affiliation with the Bathurst Jewish Community Centre and the YM-YWHA, building campaigns, financial operations, art exhibitions, the Jewish Book Fair and Bookmark Project, educational programming, performances, and special events. Records include meeting minutes, memoranda, correspondence, committee reports, budget and financial statements, press clippings and reviews, program guides, art exhibition catalogues, artist statements and CVs, promotional material, photographs, architectural drawings, a sound recording, and moving images. The fonds is arranged into the following ten series: Board of directors, Committees, Planning and development, Financial and administrative, Public relations, Educational programming, Book fair, Art exhibitions, Performances and events, and the Bookmark Project.
Notes
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION NOTE: Includes 672 photographs, 3 architectural drawings, 1 sound recording, and 7 moving images.
Name Access
Koffler Centre of the Arts
Subjects
Art centers
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 946
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
946
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1927
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 13 x 18 cm
Scope and Content
Copy photograph of Borochov Young Poale Zion Executive Committee, taken in New York, 1927. Left front, Morris Lofsky, Toronto.
Name Access
Borochow Young Poale Zion Executive Committee
Lofsky, Morris
Subjects
Committees
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
New York (N.Y.).
Accession Number
1975-12-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds
Committees and meetings series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 14; Series 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds
Committees and meetings series
Level
Series
Fonds
14
Series
3
Material Format
textual record
Date
1953-1985
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
Scope and Content
Series consists of records documenting the various committees and ad hoc meetings of Baycrest Centre as well as its participation on joint committees with other agencies. Included are meeting notices, agendas and minutes, reports, correspondence and lists.
Subjects
Committees
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 17; Series 5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Level
Series
Fonds
17
Series
5
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1938-1978, 1991
Physical Description
6.5 m of textual records
15 photographs
Admin History/Bio
The Joint Community Relations Committee was created in 1938 by the Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region and the Toronto Lodge B’nai Brith. It was originally named the Joint Public Relations Committee and was responsible for combating antisemitism in Ontario. Public statements, by agreement, were made only by the Canadian Jewish Congress as B’nai Brith recognized the uniqueness of its national constitution. The committee was led by lay leaders from the community and a staff representative from the CJC. Shortly thereafter, similar committees were set up in Montreal and in Western Canada, and soon a National Joint Community Relations Committee was established.
The committee played a key role in achieving the early anti-discrimination act of 1944, and the Fair Employment Practices Act of 1951, leading to the Human Rights Code of today. It was prominent in the action against the spread of sectarian religious teachings in the public schools and took the lead in pressing for legislation against the dissemination of racial hatred. It acted for the preservation of religious and human rights and worked with numerous religious, fraternal and ethnic organizations in the wider community. The committee also investigated and acted upon all complaints of discrimination, antisemitism and other such incidents. They supplied Jewish and secular schools with educational materials including pamphlets and books, and conducted intercultural and inter-religious work in the community through organized lectures, seminars, institutes, and plenary sessions.
The committee was composed of equal representation from both the Canadian Jewish Congress, and the B’nai Brith. The money for the operation of the Committee was first provided by both organizations, however, in a 1947 agreement between the National CJC and B’nai Brith Canada, the parties stated that the finances for the committee would be raised in the name of the CJC, with B’nai Brith agreeing to make “token” contributions and co-operate with Congress’ fundraising campaign. As well, the professional staff and support persons for the committee, along with their salaries, came solely from the Central Region CJC.
The executive director (also referred to as the executive secretary) was the primary staff person responsible for carrying out the policy and activities of the JPRC, which included preparing press releases, liaisoning with affiliated groups, organizations, individuals, journalists, government representatives and any others wanting or needing information on issues relating to the JPRC’s work. The executive director acted as the recording secretary at all committee meetings and was the keeper of all official documents.
Around 1978, due in part to the earlier creation of the B’nai Brith’s League for Human Rights in 1970, the Canadian Jewish Congress and the B’nai Brith terminated their joint relationship with the committee. At the time, the CJC felt that B’nai Brith was playing a dual role in advocacy through the League and through the JPRC. B’nai Brith, in turn, felt that the CJC was shutting out the B’nai Brith’s voice. Nevertheless, the “Joint” was not dropped from the name until around 1991.
In 2011 the Community Relations Committee ceased to exist when the CJC Ontario office was closed and the functions of the CJC were folded into the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs (CIJA).
Committee name changes were: Community Relations Committee, CJC, Ontario Region (ca. 1991-2011) Joint Community Relations Committee, CJC, Ontario Region (ca. 1978-ca. 1991) Joint Community Relations Committee, Central Region (1962-1978) Joint Community Relations Committee, (1938-1962)
Scope and Content
Series consists of five sub-series. Sub-series 1 contains the agendas, minutes and associated documentation supporting meetings of the Community Relations Committee. Sub-series 2 contains speeches , publications, press releases and reports presented and/or distributed by the Committee. Sub-series 3 consists of case files documenting the Committee's activities of combating specific antisemitism and Holocaust-denying activities in Canada. Extensive documentation about Ernst Zundel is included Sub-series 4 contains 9 sub-sub-series documenting various categories of research files accumulated by the Committee. Sub-series 5 contains the general office records of the Committee and includes correspondence and memos of the Executive Director and records providing insight to the internal organization and management of the Committee's internal functions.
For more details see descriptions within the scope and contents notes at the sub-series and sub-sub-series levels
Notes
Previously processed and cited a MG8 S
Physical extent note: when originally listed in 1988, this series contained about 20.5 metres of textual records. When partial processing and reorganization had been completed in 2013, 14 metres had been culled because those documents were duplicates, newspaper clippings, created by outside agencies or maintained in other agencies.
Associated material note:Library and Archives of Canada holds the records for the National B’nai Brith which does contain 30cm of material on the National Joint Community Relations Committee. The Canadian Jewish Congress National Archives in Montreal holds the records for the National Joint Community Relations Committee, which contains some files on the Ontario Region, as they reported to the National office. The whereabouts of the B’nai Brith records pertaining to the Central Region activities are currently unknown.
Subjects
Committees
Arrangement
Because records in this series had been previously organized in a manner that proved difficult for use by archivists and researchers, the records, during 2010 and 2011, were totally rearranged and described to comply with RAD standards, to provide ease of access by researchers, and to fully reflect the activities and organizational history of the Community Relations Committee of the Canadian Jewish Congress during and after the period when it was a joint committee with the B'Nai Brith.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Simon fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 23; File 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Simon fonds
Level
File
Fonds
23
File
3
Material Format
textual record
Date
1960-1966
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
Scope and Content
This file consists of textual records relating to Harry Simon's work as Chairman of the Jewish Labour Committee. The records include correspondence, event invitations and flyers and activity summaries.
Subjects
Committees
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Simon fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 23; File 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Simon fonds
Level
File
Fonds
23
File
4
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1967-1972
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 26 x 21 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
This file consists of records relating to Harry Simon's work as Chairman of the Jewish Labour Committee. The records include correspondence, event invitations and flyers, activity summaries, press releases, speeches and one photograph.
Subjects
Committees
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Simon fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 23; File 5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Simon fonds
Level
File
Fonds
23
File
5
Material Format
textual record
Date
1973-1975
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
Scope and Content
This file consists of textual records relating to Harry Simon's work as Chairman of the Jewish Labour Committee. The records include correspondence, event invitations and flyers, press releases and meeting minutes.
Subjects
Committees
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Simon fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 23; File 6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Simon fonds
Level
File
Fonds
23
File
6
Material Format
textual record
Date
1976-1984
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
Scope and Content
This file consists of textual records relating to Harry Simon's work as Chairman of the Jewish Labour Committee. The records include correspondence, event invitations and flyers, and press releases.
Subjects
Committees
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2017-8-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-8-10
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
3 photographs : b&w ; 13 x 9 cm and smaller
1 DVD
Date
[ca. 1920]-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the history of the Dora Wilensky Salsberg Memorial Fund at Jewish Family and Child. Included are: a Canadian Jewish News feature ("Legacy of Life") on Dora Wilensky; a Dora Wilensky Memorial Fund pamphlet; correspondence from J.B. Salsberg regarding Sharyn’s ongoing role with the Jewish Communal Service Graduate Studies Scholarship Program; correspondence regarding the Fund between Sharyn Salsberg Ezrin and Richard Cummings, Ron Levin, Gordon Wolfe, and Sam Helfenbaum; fund and endowment statements regarding the Dora Wilensky Memorial Fund; and correspondence between Sharyn and the Toronto Jewish Congress Endowment Fund. Also includes: records documenting the J.B. Salsberg Tribute Dinner held at Beth Sholom Synagogue on November 13, 1991; Canadian Jewish News and Toronto Life profiles of J.B. Salsberg; an interview of J.B. Salsberg by Sandy Naiman; J.B. Salsberg's eulogy by Irving Abella; and one DVD of a J.B. Salsberg video tribute. Also includes three photographs of J.B. Salsberg and Dora Wilensky, and four issues of various JF&CS publications.
Administrative History
Dora Wilensky Salsberg was one of Toronto’s earliest professionally trained Jewish social workers and a leader in the Canadian social work field. She was born in Russia on July 28, 1902 to Hyman and Mary Wilensky. She had three younger sisters: Bertha (b. 1903) Jenny (b. 1905), and Fagel (b.1910). In 1907, the family immigrated to Toronto where Hyman worked at a cap factory.
Dora had the highest marks in the province of Ontario upon graduating from high school and graduated as a gold medalist in modern history from McMaster University in Toronto. She initially pursued a career in teaching, but had difficulty securing a job due to discrimination. When her only job offer from Oshawa was given on the condition that she change her last name, Dora decided to become a social worker.
After studying at the New York School for Social Work and working briefly in Chicago, Dora returned to Toronto and took up the position as Executive Director of the Jewish Family Welfare Bureau in 1931. When the JF&CS was formed in 1943 she served as its first Executive Director. Under her leadership, JF&CS gained a reputation as being one of the most advanced and progressive agencies in Toronto. She was among the first to hire a psychiatric social worker and to introduce play therapy as part of treatment; she remained on top of advances being made in the field in other countries and encouraged her staff to regularly engage in professional development activities.
Dora attempted to enter the United States for professional development in the fall of 1948. She was refused entry by the commissioner of immigration and naturalization. Her aim was to attend a postgraduate course in social work at the University of Pennsylvania. In spite of numerous official letters of endorsement, her application for admission was denied.
Dora was also actively involved in various professional organizations. She was a member of the National Board of the Canadian Association of Social Workers, served on the Board of Governors and various committees of the Canadian Welfare Council, and was active on the Social Planning Council (formerly the Welfare Council of Toronto). In addition, she was instrumental in the establishment of the University of Toronto’s post-graduate course in social work. For her service to the field, she earned both the King George V and Coronation medals.
In 1927, Dora married J. B. Salsberg. Although she legally adopted his name, she always used her maiden name professionally. They did not have any children. On March 20, 1959, Dora passed away from cancer at the age of 56.
Subjects
Charities
Charities
Name Access
Salsberg, J. B. (Joseph B.), ca. 1903-1998
Wilensky, Dora, 1902-1959
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Sam Lipshitz
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
May 28, 1991
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Sam Lipshitz
Number
AC 285
Interview Date
May 28, 1991
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Ben Kayfetz
AccessionNumber
2004-1-4
Total Running Time
90 min. or less
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
Apparently dates from the same time as #284 (based on handwriting on label)
Recording is distorted for the first few minutes of side A.
Use Restrictions
Conditional access. Researchers must receive permission from the interviewee or his/her heir prior to accessing the interview. Please contact the OJA for more information.
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Sam Lipshitz (journalist, editor, typesetter, and political activist) was born in Radom, Poland, on 14 February 1910, and was sent by his parents to live with an aunt in Montreal after graduating from high school. He joined the Jewish Cultural Club of Montreal, where several young members promoted communism, based on the belief that the growth of Yiddish literature, schools, and other social institutions in Russia offered new equality for Jews. Sam was drawn to these views by Manya Cantor, who later became his wife. Sam joined the Young Communist League in 1928 and later worked full-time with the Communist Party of Canada (renamed the Labor-Progressive Party in 1941 after the party was banned the previous year by the federal government), becoming editor of its newspaper, "Der kamf," by 1932. He later edited "Vochenblatt" ("Canadian Jewish weekly"). He was appointed secretary of the party's Anti-Fascist Committee in 1933, became head of the Jewish National Committee soon after, and sat on the party's Central Committee from 1943 to 1946. His prominent role in the illegal party led to a warrant issued for his arrest and life in hiding until the communists supported the war after Germany's invasion of Russia in June 1941, and Sam spent several days in the Don Jail with other party leaders in 1942. Sam joined the executive of the Canadian Jewish Congress in 1943, representing the UJPO along with Joseph Baruch Salsberg. His most important work for the Congress occurred in 1945, when he was sent to Poland with Hanane Meier Caiserman to report on the condition of the Jews who had been liberated from Nazi concentration camps just months earlier, and the fate of those who had not survived the experience. Lipshitz wrote and lectured extensively on this experience. Following the exposure of Soviet brutality and antisemitism under Joseph Stalin by Nikita Khrushchev in 1956, a bitter rift over the Canadian communist party's response to these admissions led to the resignation of hundreds of Jews including the Lipshitzs and Salsberg in 1957. Resignation from the party meant an end to employment for the Lipshitzs (Manya as a Jewish teacher, Sam as a political organizer), but Sam found work as a linotype operator. He founded Trade Typesetting in 1964, and did work for many Jewish organizations in Toronto until his retirement in 1975. The dispute carried over to the work of the UJPO, which was led by members of the communist party. Three years of bitter and occasionally violent argument between factions led to approximately 30 percent of the membership, led by Sam Lipshitz and Morris Biderman, leaving the UJPO in 1960. Two hundred of the membership, including Sam founded the New Jewish Fraternal Association the same year. After taking in an evening course in journalism at the University of Toronto in 1959, Sam assumed the role of editor for the association's magazine, "Fraternally yours," from March 1960 until his death in 2000. Sam also edited "Voice of Radom," the periodical of the United Radomer Relief for the United States and Canada and was a member of the Yiddish committee of the United Jewish Appeal Federation of Greater Toronto for 25 years, served on the Yiddish Committee of the Canadian Jewish Congress, and wrote more than 170 bi-weekly columns in Yiddish for the "Canadian Jewish news" until he resigned from this post in September 1999. He suffered a massive stroke only two days after completing the Rosh Hashonah issue of "Fraternally yours," and died in Toronto two weeks later on 14 September 2000.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Salsberg, J. B. (Joseph B.), ca. 1903-1998
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories
Level
Item
ID
Item 681
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
681
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[193-]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of Mrs. Sadie Feinberg and Red Cross Workers.
Name Access
Feinberg, Sadie
Red Cross
Subjects
Charities
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Source
Archival Descriptions
50 records – page 1 of 1.

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