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590 records – page 1 of 12.
Part Of
Toronto Cloakmakers Union fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Toronto Cloakmakers Union fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
8
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
[190-?]-1961
Physical Description
7 cm of textual records
5 photographs : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Toronto Cloakmakers Union was established in 1909 as an organized effort to assist and protect workers in the women's garment industry. Two years later they became affiliated with the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU) in Toronto and became Local 14. Today they are the oldest local still in existence and are now called Unite Here Canada.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of textual and graphic material documenting the activities and membership of the Toronto Cloakmakers Union and International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union. Included are ILGWU membership dues and strike cards issued to Sara Clodman; letters and cards announcing ILGWU meetings, celebrations, and other matters; an invitation to a dinner honouring A. Magerman's 25 years in the Cloakmaker's Union; copies of the Golden Jubilee Souvenir Journal and the 40th Jubilee Celebration book; a photocopy of the Constitution of the ILGWU; Toronto Cloakmakers Union Local 14 Minute Book in Yiddish; and five black and white photographs of union members, events, and committees.
Name Access
International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union
Toronto Cloakmakers Union
Subjects
Labor unions
Creator
Toronto Cloakmakers Union, 1909-
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1987-12-6
1979-10-1
1998-3-18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Maurice Solway fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 13; File 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Maurice Solway fonds
Level
File
Fonds
13
File
4
Material Format
textual record
Date
1926-1958
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
The file contains low quality photocopies from the original scrapbook. These are primarily of newspaper clippings regarding recitals and reviews from Toronto newspapers in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
Subjects
Scrapbooks
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Lipa Green fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 20
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Lipa Green fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
20
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
[190-]-1979
Physical Description
42 cm of textual records
69 photographs : b&w and sepia (23 negatives) ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Lipa (Louis) Green (1899–1976) was born on 15 April 1899 in Usupow, Poland. He immigrated to Toronto in 1910 and later began work as a bricklayer. In 1924, Lipa married Fanny Green and had three sons: Abraham (Al), Harold and Sam; and three daughters: Deana (Weiman), Rookie (Goldstein), and Shavy (Tishler). In 1948, with partner, Arthur Weinstock, he founded the Greenview Construction Company, later to be renamed Greenwin. Green's sons, Al and Harold, along with Weinstock's son-in-law Al Latner, later became involved in the business.
Green was a prominent Jewish communal leader and philanthropist in Toronto and was affiliated with organizations such as the Labor Zionists (Farband), the Jewish Vocational Service and the Jewish Public Library. He was a strong advocate of the Yiddish language and was involved with many Yiddish committees, both at the local and national levels. The current building for Jewish agencies in Toronto is named the Lipa Green Building for Jewish Community Services.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Lipa's son, Harold, before being donated to the OJA in January 1978.
Scope and Content
This fonds consists of records documenting Lipa Green's personal life as well as his professional and philanthropic endeavours. Included are financial documents, event invitations and programs, meeting minutes, photographs, personal, business and organizational correspondence, speeches and writings, a scrapbook, records on a cooperative Jewish summer resort near Pickering, Ontario, as well as some material produced by other organizations and collected by Green during the course of his life. Most of the personal correspondence, speeches and other writings are in Yiddish, including Green's reminiscences on his life in Poland and his Bar Mitzvah. The files have been grouped according to personal records, business records, organizational records and ephemera.
Name Access
Green, Lipa, 1899-1976
Subjects
Businesspeople
Immigrants--Canada
Philanthropists
Physical Condition
Some of the photographs are in very poor condition and require conservation work.
Related Material
See Gordon Mendly Fonds 18 for a portrait of Lipa Green.
Arrangement
The records had been previously arranged as MG6 A. Many of the files were kept or combined, but several new files were also created to better reflect the records in the fonds. Several files were also culled as they did not relate to the mandate of the OJA. See the accession record for further information on the culled materials.
Creator
Green, Lipa, 1899-1976
Accession Number
1978-1-4
2004-5-150
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Morris Norman collection
Level
Collection
ID
Fonds 22
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Morris Norman collection
Level
Collection
Fonds
22
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1856-1995
Physical Description
1.1 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Morris Norman (b. 1946) is a chartered accountant living and working in Toronto. He is an avid collector of Canadiana, specifically Judaica. He purchases lots at auction and donates them to the Ontario Jewish Archives, as well as other institutions.
Scope and Content
This collection consists of the individual items collected at auction by Morris Norman. The records relate to the Toronto Jewish community and Ontario Jewry and include textual documents, photographs, near-prints, publications, artifacts, posters and broadsheets, sound recordings, and ephemera. Most of the items relate to various Jewish organizations, businesses, synagogues and individuals, and to Christian missionary work in Toronto. The material has been described at the file level, or where appropriate, the item level.
There are also four distinct series of records which document Berul Sugarman, who was a concert violinist and orchestral leader; the Franklin family, who owned a large amount of property in Toronto in the late 1800s and early 1900s; radio and television scripts written by Wayne and Shuster, Henry Karpus and Russell Bradley; and a collection of Turofsky photographs.
Notes
Physical description note: Includes 49 objects, 25 photographs, 7 audio recordings and 4 prints.
Name Access
Norman, Morris
Norman, Jessie
Creator
Norman, Morris (1946-)
Accession Number
1995-9-3
1995-9-4
1995-9-8
1996-6-3
1996-7-3
1996-9-1
1997-7-1
1998-1-1
1998-3-44
1998-7-2
1999-10-1
2000-7-4
2000-12-3
2001-3-3
2001-4-3
2001-8-5
2001-10-6
2001-11-1
2002-4-1
2002-5-1
2002-7-1
2002-9-1
2002-10-5
2002-10-58
2002-12-3
2003-5-3
2003-10-6
2004-7-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Morris Norman collection
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 22; Item 94
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Morris Norman collection
Level
Item
Fonds
22
Item
94
Material Format
textual record
Date
1949
Physical Description
1 item
Subjects
Yeshivas
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 28
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
28
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
moving images
Date
1908-1979, predominant 1955-1976
Physical Description
7.4 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
The Zionist Organization of Canada (ZOC) (1921-1978) acted as the official voice of Zionism in Canada, promoting the aims of Zionism in communities across the country. The ZOC adhered to the principles of the Jerusalem Programme of the World Zionist Movement founded by Theodor Herzl in 1898 during the First Zionist Congress held in Basle Switzerland. These principles included: 1) the promotion of immigration to Israel; 2) raising funds to carry out the aims of Zionism; 3) encouraging investment in Israel; 4) fostering Jewish consciousness; and 5) mobilizing public opinion about Israel and the Jewish communities of the Diaspora.
The Federation of Zionist Societies of Canada (FZSOC) was founded in 1898 as the national collective of groups representing Zionist interests in Canada. In 1921 the organization changed its name and was incorporated as the Zionist Organization of Canada, becoming the primary umbrella organization for Zionist groups in Canada.
The ZOC was a broad-based organization that embraced an ideology of nationhood which attracted influential national leaders within the Jewish community as well as thousands of members across the country. ZOC's main office was located in Montreal until 1970, when it moved to the Toronto Zionist Centre on Marlee Ave, Toronto. ZOC provided smaller communities, which had few institutional supports, with vital linkages to the metropolitan centres through their programs that were run out of the regional offices and local Zionist councils. The Zionist Organization of Canada operated as an umbrella group that oversaw Zionist funds and administered the budgets of such organizations as Canadian Hadassah-Wizo, the Men's Zionist Organization of Canada and Young Judaea. ZOC programs promoted a stronger Jewish identity amongst Canadian Jews and familiarity with Hebrew through the periodical, Canadian Zionist. These programs included book clubs, lunch clubs, film exhibits, youth camps, travel offices, and two television programs during the 1970s on cable television in Montreal and Toronto.
In 1967, ZOC became a constituent member of the new Federated Zionist Organization of Canada (FZOC), along with Canadian Hadassah-Wizo, the Labour Zionist Movement of Canada, Mizrachi Hapoel Hamizrachi Organization of Canada, Zionist Revisionist Organization of Canada, Achdut Avoda, and Friends of Pioneering Israel (Mapam). In 1972, FZOC became the Canadian Zionist Federation (CZF). During the 1970s, ZOC's functions were gradually absorbed by the Canadian Zionist Federation, the CZF Central Region based in Toronto, and by the Toronto Zionist Council. By 1978, the Zionist Organization of Canada had ceased to function as an organization.
Scope and Content
The Zionist Organization of Canada (ZOC) records span a 70 year period between 1908, with the formation of the Toronto Zionist Council (and its affiliated corporation, the United Zionists of Toronto) and the creation of the Zionist Organization of Canada in 1921, until 1978. The bulk of the records in the fonds were created after 1950.
The fonds is organized into two sous-fonds and eight record series. The sous-fonds contain records of the ZOC Central Region and the Toronto Zionist Council, which exercised considerable autonomy in their work under the ZOC umbrella. The record series include records relating to: ZOC's executive bodies, the National Administrative Council and Executive Board, and their predecessor, the Executive Committee of the Federation of Zionist Societies of Canada (1919-1976); the National Camps Association, responsible for overseeing the administration of summer camps owned by ZOC (1961-1968); Canadian Young Judaea, the youth wing of ZOC which was also responsible for the operation of ZOC summer camps (1957-1978); the ZOC Department of Education and Culture's cable television programme, Shalom (1971-1977); ZOC national conventions (1946-1975); the Federated Zionist Organization of Canada, of which ZOC became a member organization on its formation in 1967 (1972-1978); and the 28th World Zionist Congress held in 1972. The fonds also includes a series of subject files, the primary recordkeeping system for ZOC's administration, and a series of photographs of prominant persons and events maintained by ZOC for its public relations work.
Notes
Physical description note: Includes: ca. 1100 photographs (b&w and col.; some negatives), 24 embossed prints, 3 film reels (col., Super 8 mm), and 1 videocassette (col., VHS).
Associated material note: Additional records of the Zionist Organization of Canada can be found at the Canadian Jewish Congress National Archives (Montreal), Library & Archives Canada (Ottawa), and the World Zionist Organization's Central Zionist Archives (Jerusalem)
Name Access
Zionist Organization of Canada
Subjects
Zionism
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Creator
Zionist Organization of Canada (1921-1978)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 259
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
259
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1932]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of members of the Labour League.
Notes
Photograph has a signature and an inscription in Yiddish.
Name Access
Labor League (Toronto, Ont.)
Winchevsky Centre (Toronto, Ont.)
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 260
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
260
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1931
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 21 x 26 cm and 11 x 13 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of a graduation diploma from the Jewish Folks' Shule.
Notes
The diploma is written in Yiddish.
Name Access
Jewish Folks' Shule
Labour Zionist Alliance
Subjects
Diplomas
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Creator
Labour Zionist Alliance
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 32
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
32
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1930]-1975
Physical Description
50 cm of textual records
48 photographs : b&w ; 25 x 103 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Harry Wolf Clairmont (1907-1977) was a Toronto labour activist, involved for many years in the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU). Clairmont was born in Chmielnik, in the province of Kielce, Poland, and moved to Canada in December, 1923. He began working in the garment industry as an operator's helper at the J. and G. Cloak Shop in Toronto, and soon became involved in the labour movement and the ILGWU. Claimont held many positions with the ILGWU, including recording secretary of the Operators' Local 14 and business agent of Sportswear Local 199. He was also an active member of the Jewish Workers' National Alliance, the Young Communist League and the Canadian Trotskyist movement. He was married and had two children. He passed away in 1977.
Scope and Content
The fonds documents Harry Clairmont's involvement in the Canadian labour movement, as well as his interest in socialism and communism. Included are publications of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, the Arbeiter Club, the Communist League of America, and the Revolutionary Workers' Party, and records relating to Clairmont's involvement in these organizations and union locals. These records include correspondence, membership cards, pamphlets, clippings, newsletters, anniversary books, bulletins, journals, speeches, financial reports, minute books, and photographs. The small notebook, which only has a few filled page, consists of minutes from the meetings of the Unzer Kamf Worker's Club. The larger notebook, which is completely full, consists of minutes from the meetings of "Local 14." The first page of the latter (starting from the Yiddish side) is a list of the executive in English.
Name Access
Clairmont, Harry, 1907-1977
Subjects
Communism
Labor movement
Socialism
Physical Condition
Most records are in good condition.
Several photographs have been rolled and cannot be flattened.
One photograph is partially attached to glass and will need to be separated by a conservator.
Related Material
See also MG2 E1a
Creator
Clairmont, Harry, 1907-
Accession Number
1979-11-18
1984-1-6
2004-6-3
1998-3-7 [old accession #]
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 6101
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
6101
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1926
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 9 x 6 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of Miriam Zucker (m. Rubin), daughter of Chia Rochel Zucker Bialystok, Warasaw, 1926.
Notes
Inscription in Yiddish on verso with date.
Name Access
Bialystok, Chia Rochel Zucker
Rubin, Miriam
Zucker, Miriam
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Poland
Accession Number
1984-8-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Research Records sub-series
War Crimes and Criminals sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
5-4-7
File
21
Material Format
textual record
Date
1964
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consist of correspondence, reports and newspaper clippings regarding alleged war criminals living in Canada.
Notes
Previously processed and cited as part of MG8 S.
Subjects
War criminals
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds
Jewish Old Folks' Home series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 14; Series 6; Item 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds
Jewish Old Folks' Home series
Level
Item
Fonds
14
Series
6
Item
3
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[192-?]
Physical Description
4 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 26 x 21 cm
Scope and Content
Item is three copy photographs of a poster depicting the exterior of 29 and 31 Cecil Street and the portraits of three residents: Toltze Slaman, B.M. Pozner, and Sarah Arbes. The signs on the building were added to the image after the photograph was taken.
Notes
Previously cited as photo #253
Name Access
Arbes, Sarah
Pozner, B. M.
Slaman, Toltze
Subjects
Architecture
Posters
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Cecil Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds
Jewish Old Folks' Home series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 14; Series 6; Item 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds
Jewish Old Folks' Home series
Level
Item
Fonds
14
Series
6
Item
4
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[192-?]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 26 x 21 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a copy photograph of a poster depicting the exterior of 29 and 31 Cecil Street and the portraits of three residents: Toltze Slaman, Rebecca Simpson, and Sarah Arbes. The signs on the building were added to the image after the photograph was taken. The photograph has been plaque mounted.
Notes
Previously cited as photo #252
Name Access
Arbes, Sarah
Simpson, Rebecca
Slaman, Toltze
Subjects
Architecture
Posters
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Cecil Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds
Jewish Old Folks' Home series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 14; Series 6; Item 5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds
Jewish Old Folks' Home series
Level
Item
Fonds
14
Series
6
Item
5
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[192-?]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 26 x 21 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a copy photograph and negative of a poster depicting the exterior of 29 and 31 Cecil Street. Staff and residents are pictured from a distance standing in front of the home. The signs on the building were added to the image after the photograph was taken. The photograph has been plaque mounted.
Notes
Previously cited as photo #251
Subjects
Architecture
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Cecil Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds
Publications and publicity series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 14; Series 10
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds
Publications and publicity series
Level
Series
Fonds
14
Series
10
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1957-2011
Physical Description
35 cm of textual records
1 postcard
Scope and Content
Series consists of textual records and graphic material documenting the Baycrest Centre's various publications and publicity activities. Included is a meeting notice and minutes, a memo, a postcard, articles, a news release, brochures, newsletters, magazines, and bulletins.
Series is arranged into four sub-series: 1. Baycrest News ; 2. Baycrest Bulletins; 3. Baycrest Breakthroughs; and, 4. Attach Your Name to Baycrest.
Related Material
See the Baycrest Centre's website for electronic copies of current issues of Baycrest's publications, including: Baycrest Matters newsletters, the Joseph E. and Minnie Wagman Centre newsletters, and Baycrest Bulletins. A link to the website is here: http://www.baycrest.org/publications-18.php
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds
Publications and publicity series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 14; Series 10; File 9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds
Publications and publicity series
Level
File
Fonds
14
Series
10
File
9
Material Format
textual record
Date
1982
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Admin History/Bio
The Multilingual Magazine was a creative project of the residents of Baycrest Terrace and members of the Jospeh E. and Minnie Wagman Centre. Published twice a year in four languages, the magazine contains stories and memories of the residents and members.
Scope and Content
File consists of the first issue of the Multilingual Magazine.
Name Access
Terraces of Baycrest (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds
Publications and publicity series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 14; Series 10; File 15
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds
Publications and publicity series
Level
File
Fonds
14
Series
10
File
15
Material Format
textual record
Date
1972-1979
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Admin History/Bio
The Baycrest Bulletins were issued and written by the residents of the Jewish Home for the Aged. Articles covered such topics as, Baycrest activities and events, fond memories, and Jewish culture. most editions also have an advice column called "Dear Lena". Each issue has an English and Yiddish section.
Scope and Content
File consists of issues of the Baycrest Bulletin.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 14
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
14
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Date
1917-2011
Physical Description
2.82 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
As early as 1916 the Ezras Noshem Society (a mutual benefit society for Jewish women) started to raise funds to purchase and renovate what would become The Toronto Jewish Old Folks' Home (Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care’s forerunner) after its members recognized the need for a home in Toronto where the Jewish elderly could receive kosher meals and communicate with staff in their own language. Property at 31 Cecil Street was purchased in 1917 and sometime between September 1918 and January 1920 the Home officially opened there. The Home was run by a small staff and the women of Ezras Noshem who volunteered their time to make beds, cook kosher meals, do laundry and sponsor fundraising events. By 1938 the Home had expanded into its neighboring houses at 29, 33, and 35 Cecil Street and was caring for 115 residents. It provided residents with synagogue services, a hospital ward and social activities. At this time the Home also became a member of the United Jewish Welfare Fund.
In 1946, the need for a larger and more modern building prompted a fundraising campaign, which was headed by Abe Posluns, to purchase and build a new facility. In December 1954, the new building opened at 3650 Bathurst Street and consisted of two new institutions: The Jewish Home for the Aged and Baycrest Hospital. This location continued to expand over the years, including a new building for residents in 1968, an apartment building for seniors called the Baycrest Terrace in 1976, and a community centre known as The Joseph E. and Minnie Wagman Centre in 1977. These additions enabled Baycrest to expand its programs to include a day care program, recreational programs, and a Sheltered Workshop which was run in cooperation with the Jewish Vocational Service and provided residents with employment. In 1986 a new Baycrest Hospital was erected, and in 1989, the Rotman Research Institute, which is also affiliated with the University of Toronto, opened to create a research facility where top researchers could study and find new treatment methods for the elderly.
In recent years, Baycrest’s services and programs have continued to expand. In 2000, the Apotex Centre, the Jewish Home for the Aged and the Louis and Leah Posluns Centre for Stroke and Cognition opened to help residents with progressive dementia caused by vascular disorders. In 2001 a condominium building opened at 2 Neptune Drive for seniors, and in 2003 the Sam and Ida Ross Memory Clinic was established to provide out-patient services for seniors with memory disorders. Baycrest Centre also provides numerous cultural and religious programs for the inhabitants and the greater community, including a heritage museum, art exhibits and a Holocaust program.
Custodial History
Records were donated to the OJA in a series of accessions from a variety of sources, including the Baycrest Women's Auxiliary and the Multicultural Historical Society of Ontario.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the history, governance, and activities of the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care. Included are meeting notices, agendas and minutes, correspondence, reports, speeches, photographs, artifacts, constitutions, publications, press releases, financial records, event invitations, programs, a scrapbook, a poster, lists, theatrical scripts, newspaper clippings, brochures and booklets, flyers, a land deed, certificates, schedules, annual calendars, cards, questionnaires, and lists.
Fonds is arranged into eleven series: 1. Board of Directors and Executive Committee; 2. Annual General Meetings and Annual Reports; 3. Committees and meetings; 4. Women's Auxiliary; 5. Men's Service Group; 6. Toronto Jewish Old Folks Home; 7. Programs and services; 8. Religious services; 9. Fundraising; 10. Publications and publicity; and, 11. Events. Records are described to the file level with some item level descriptions.
Notes
Physical description note: Includes 1102 photographs, 4 coins, 2 posters, 1 badge, 1 pin, 1 key chain, 1 postcard, and 1 pen.
Associated material note: related material at Library and Archives Canada includes a small Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds, and the Eric Exton fonds. For architectural records see the Irving D. Boigon fonds 243 at the City of Toronto Archives (Boigon was an architect who designed many of Baycrest's buildings between the 1970s and 1990s). Contact Baycrest Centre's Heritage Museum for committee records from the 1930s, and consult Baycrest's website to access electronic copies of current issues of Baycrest's publications.
Name Access
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care
Baycrest Hospital
Ezras Noshem Society (Toronto, Ont.)
Jewish Home for the Aged (Toronto, Ont.)
Jewish Old Folks Home (Toronto, Ont.)
Subjects
Hospitals
Old age homes
Related Material
See Gordon Mendly Fonds 18, series 3-4; Jewish Vocational Services of Toronto fonds 75; United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds 67; accession # 2009-6-2; Dora Till Fonds 52; J. Irving Oelbaum Fonds 24; Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds 61, series 1-1; Gilbert Studios fonds 37; Ben Kayfetz fonds 62, series 3, file 3; JFWB fonds 87, series 6, files 5 and 6; JIAS fonds 9, series 7, file 1; Harold S. Kaplan fonds 27, series 1-4, and Morris Norman fonds 22.
Creator
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, 1917-
Accession Number
1982-11-1
1983-11-2
1988-2-7
1979-9-17
1979-9-23
1987-9-7
2004-5-50
MG 2 O 1A
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 17
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
17
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1936-1992
Physical Description
47 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
By 1919 the plight of post-war eastern European Jewry and the need for a united community voice for Canadian Jewry led to the creation of the Canadian Jewish Congress. Its founding meeting was held on March 16, 1919 in Montreal. Though it briefly maintained a tiny regional office in Toronto, the CJC remained inactive until 1933, when it fully reconvened by opening offices in Winnipeg, Montreal, and Toronto. Egmont L. Frankel was the first president of the new central division in Toronto. While the national office in Montreal focused on the overarching issues of the social and economic rights of European Jewry, assistance for Jewish immigrants, and combating prejudice in Canada, the Toronto office dealt with local, violent anti-Jewish demonstrations as well as continuing discrimination both in employment and in access to public recreational facilities. The structure was based on regular national biennial plenary conferences, at which policies were delineated and national and regional executives were elected. Between plenary sessions, national and regional councils were in charge. These were augmented by the following standing committees: administrative, officers, fersonnel, financial, publications, and educational and cultural. Special committees were created to deal with issues such as: youth, community loans, kashruth, fundraising, Israel, Russian Jewry, and various emergency issues such as refugees, immigration, and housing.
During the 1930s the central division office moved several times and occupied offices in the following locations: Yonge Street, the Bond Street Synagogue, Scheuer House, the Zionist Building, and its long-term home at 150-152 Beverley Street, where it remained until its July 1983 move to the Lipa Green Building in North York.
The CJC's activities expanded to include taking responsibility for Jewish educational standards, but by 1941 its main efforts shifted to support for Canada’s war effort. Immediately after the end of the war, the focus again shifted to Jewish immigration projects and the maintenance of Jewish identity in small communities. By 1950, the CJC’s use of the title “division” was changed to “region” to accommodate internal operational divisions within each region. Also, by then, the central region was busy expanding its programs for all Ontario Jewish communities, creating a province-wide council of youth groups, and working with the newly-created Bureau of Jewish Education (later Board of Jewish Education, now Mercaz). Standardization of kashruth rules in Ontario was implemented. As well, regular educational conferences and cultural events were held throughout the province, while province-wide fundraising efforts in support of Moess Chittin for relief projects in Israel and for local Congress activities were expanded. Many of its educational and cultural responsibilities necessitated working with other Jewish organizations such as the United Jewish Welfare Fund, Jewish Immigrant Aid Society (JIAS), Hadassah, the Canadian Legion, B’nai Brith, the World Jewish Congress, the American Jewish Congress, and the many landsmenshaften (Jewish mutual benefit societies, each formed by immigrants originating from the same Eastern European community).
During the 1960s, the central region began sending Moess Chittin relief shipments to Cuban Jews unable to acquire kosher foods for Passover. Its lobbying efforts included participation in the Royal Commissions on Hate Propaganda, and its greatest success came with the introduction and implementation of Ontario’s fair employment and fair accommodation practices legislation, an achievement in which Congress played a pivotal role.
From 1971 to 1989 the major focus became international and national lobbying for, and providing support to, Soviet Jewry. Virtually all local and Canadian efforts to assist the Soviet Jewish “refusniks” were organized and coordinated in Toronto by the Ontario region office, which provided staff and funding for the many lobbying activities and public demonstrations that characterized this successful effort.
As of November 1975, the central region’s responsibilities in Toronto were radically altered. To improve cost efficiency in Toronto, CJC educational and social service program activities were merged with similar programs already provided by Toronto’s United Jewish Appeal. The UJA assumed sole responsibility for these amalgamated programs in Toronto and was renamed Toronto Jewish Congress. The central region still retained province-wide responsibilities for Ontario’s smaller Jewish communities, and its office remained in Toronto. Also, following this reorganization, its name was changed to Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region. Although CJC no longer provided direct social and educational programs to Toronto, the TJC’s senior executive was, at the time, still obliged to continue to keep it notified about developments concerning previous Congress responsibilities.
From 1983, the Ontario Region's offices were located in the Lipa Green Building at 4600 Bathurst Street. It continued its work of financially supporting various Israeli institutions and fostering Canada-Israel relations. It also spearheaded the movement to support and protect Jews in Arab lands, especially in Syria. Funding for the CJC came from the Canadian Council for Israel and Jewish Advocacy, which restributed a portion of the funds raised by the local Jewish federations across Canada.
The CJC dissolved in 2011. Today, the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs (CIJA) acts as the Jewish community's primary lobby group.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of the records of the Ontario Region office of the Canadian Jewish Congress. Of primary importance in documenting this organization’s history are its minutes of the Executive and Administrative Committees and the various standing, and short-term committees such as Community Organization, Finance, Fund Raising, Educational and Cultural, Research, Immigration, War Efforts, and Jewish Education. Most of these records are still managed all together within Fonds 17, Series 1. Fonds 17, Series 2 contains the general subject and correspondence files of these committees. Records in both series require further processing.
Records now found in Series 3 document the efforts of the Committee for Soviet Jewry in coordinating the activities of the many Toronto and Ontario organizations involved in assisting Soviet Jewry during the 1971 to 1989 period.
Series 4 consists of administrative and committee records of the United Jewish Refugee and War Relief Agencies in Toronto from 1938 through 1967. These document its work rescuing the survivors of European Jewish communities, settling as many as possible in Ontario, and providing assistance to those attempting to obtain restitution payments.
Series 5 consists of the records of the Community Relations Committee (1938-1976). Responding to depression-era anti-Semitism in Canada, the Canadian Jewish Congress and B’nai Brith together established in 1938 a new joint committee. Since then this Committee has documented racist threats in Canada; initiated advocacy activities to work for improved civil rights; promoted legislation combating hate; worked to ensure equality of access to employment, education and accommodation; and investigated specific incidents of discrimination. The Committee, for example, played a key role in achieving the Anti-Discrimination Act of 1944, and the Fair Employment Practices Act of 1951, key steps leading to Canada’s current Human Rights Code. Although originally named Joint Public Relations Committee in 1938, a series of name changes later occurred; s follows: Joint Community Relations Committee, Central Region (1962-1978), Joint Community Relations Committee, CJC, Ontario Region (ca. 1978-ca. 1991) Community Relations Committee, CJC, Ontario Region (ca. 1991-present) Records in this series were reorganized into 5 sub-series and a further 9 sub-sub-series during the 2009 to 2011 period. For further details please view the database records for Fonds 17, Series 5. Although this series will eventually hold all CRC records up to 1992, only those prior to 1979 are currently fully processed.
Notes
Physical description note: Includes 1839 photographs, 89 audio cassettes, 11 videocassettes, 4 drawings, and 6 microfilm reels (16 mm).
Processing note: Processing of this fonds is ongoing. Additional descriptive entries will be added in future.
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Congress. Ontario Region
Subjects
Pressure groups
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the Archivist prior to accessing some of the records
Arrangement
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the Archivist prior to accessing some of the records.
Creator
Canadian Jewish Congress. Ontario Region (1919-2011)
Places
Ontario
Source
Archival Descriptions
Name
Fanny Gertzbein
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
2 Oct. 1984
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Fanny Gertzbein
Number
AC 033
Subject
Charities
Immigrants--Canada
Interview Date
2 Oct. 1984
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Morris Silbert
Total Running Time
AC 033: 27:34 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003.
Notes
Language: Fanny often speaks Yiddish with Morris Silbert providing a translation.
Related group of records external to the unit being described: Accession 2019-7/2 includes comments by Gella Rothstein on this oral history.
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Conditional access. Researchers must receive permission from the interviewee or his/her heir prior to accessing the interview. Please contact the OJA for more information.
Biography
Fanny Gurtzbein (née Goldhar) immigrated from Poland to Toronto in 1903. Fanny lived with her parents and siblings in Toronto's Ward district. Although raised in poverty, Barney, Fanny's brother, went on to become a successful furrier; Fanny's mother, Tzyerl Goldhar, became the organizer of the Mothers and Babes Summer Rest Home.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
Yiddish
English
Name Access
Goldhar, Myer
Goldhar, Tzeryl
Goldhar, Barney
Gurtzbein, Fanny
Geographic Access
St. John's Ward (Toronto, Ont.)
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\AC 033, Fanny Gurtzbein\AC 033 transcript.pdf
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Toba Fluxgold
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
1975
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Toba Fluxgold
Number
AC 008
Subject
Bakeries
Immigrants--Canada
Interview Date
1975
Quantity
1 cassette (1 copy) 2 WAV files
Interviewer
Sheldon Steinberg
Total Running Time
1:02 min.
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Digitized December 2014
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Conditional access. Researchers must receive permission from the interviewee or his/her heir prior to accessing the interview. Please contact the OJA for more information.
Biography
Toba Fluxgold was born in Warsaw, Poland and immigrated to Toronto with her father, older brother and sister. Toba's father ventured into the bakery business and in the early 1920s opened his own kosher bakery in Toronto. Following her father's death in 1929, Toba’s brother Morris expanded and modernized the bakery and later sold it to Carmel Bakery. After her marriage in 1925, Toba moved to Arthur, Ontario and returned to Toronto after the birth of her first child.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
English
Yiddish
Geographic Access
Toronto (Ont.)
St. John's Ward (Toronto, Ont.)
Poland
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
Transcript exists for this oral history.
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Rabbi Shemen
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
July 1991
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Rabbi Shemen
Number
AC 284
Subject
Salsberg, J. B. (Joseph B.), ca. 1903-1998
Interview Date
July 1991
Quantity
1
AccessionNumber
2004-1-4
Total Running Time
60 min or less
Biography
Rabbi Nachman Shemen was a Talmudic scholar, journalist, scholar, teacher, “mediator par excellence” and the author of more than 20 books. His contribution to Jewish scholarship included interpretations on Biblical, Talmudic, rabbinic and literary studies. The two volumes, published in Tel Aviv In Yiddish, discuss issues that date back to the creation and the Book of Genesis, up to more recent current day controversial issues as conversion and assimilation.
The rabbinic scholar was born in Chodel, Poland, a small town near Lublin, just before the outbreak of the First World War. Shemen's great-grandfather was a disciple of the founder of Chassidism in Poland, the “Seer of Lublin.” Both his parents were descendants of chassidism and scholars. When he was just over 17 years old, he received rabbinic ordination, and In 1930, moved to Canada with his family.
A founder of COR the Kashruth supervisory body, Shemen made COR one of the largest and most respected kosher organizations in North America. For over 40 years, Shemen served as director of the Kashruth Council and Rabbinical Vaad Hakashruth of the Canadian Jewish Congress and the Toronto Jewish Congress. He was one of the founders of Congregation Torah V’Avoda and was associated with the Eitz Chaim Schools where he taught for over 25 years. He was a longtime contributor to Yiddish newspapers and wrote many articles, sometimes using the pseudonym “A Reporter,” on Jewish issues and about the early Jewish community of Toronto. He died in 1993.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
Yiddish
Name Access
Shemen, Nachman
Original Format
Audio cassette
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Brenda and Colin Baskind
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
16 July 2015
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Brenda and Colin Baskind
Number
AC 423
Subject
Canada--Emigration and immigration
Jews--South Africa
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Interview Date
16 July 2015
Interviewer
Lisa Newman
Total Running Time
1 hr. 52 min.
Biography
Brenda met Colin on a blind date while attending teacher’s college in Johannesburg. The two dated for one year before getting married at the Pine Street Shul in 1967. Together, they raised three children—Stacey, Alana, and Cliff—and helped bring up the nephew of their maid, whom they regarded as family.
Around 1976, Colin and Brenda began thinking about emigrating as a result of the country’s worsening political situation. At first, their daughter was unwilling to move, but after a riot broke out at her university, she declared she had had enough. Initially, the family considered moving to Australia, but soon settled upon Canada, immigrating in 1987. Although they found the prospect of starting over intimidating, they received a warm welcome from both the South African Jewish community and the larger community.
Brenda and Colin purchased a khaloupe (a fixer-upper) that they transformed into a beautiful home, planting trees in its large garden. Brenda found employment with Holy Blossom Synagogue while Colin became president of the Southern African Jewish Association of Canada. In their free time, they took up running, a hobby that introduced them to many friends. By 2015, they had participated in eleven marathons.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Yiddish
Name Access
Baskind, Brenda, 1944-
Baskind, Colin, 1941-
Geographic Access
Johannesburg (South Africa)
Port Elizabeth (South Africa)
Toronto (Ont.)
Original Format
Digital file
Transcript
00:13 Brenda (née Bebrow?) was born 29 October 1944 in Port Elizabeth, South Africa. Brenda discusses her parents’ divorce and the death of her brother from polio in 1956.
01:25 Brenda explains the reasons her mother sent her to boarding school in Grahamstown.
02:12 Brenda’s father drowned in the ocean in Port Elizabeth at age eleven.
03:41 Brenda’s mother worked as a bookkeeper in Johannesburg.
03:50 Brenda discusses her limited Jewish education and practice while living in Grahamstown.
05:40 Brenda reminisces about her experience at boarding school.
06:43 Brenda discusses how she was able to cope while dealing with her parents’ divorce, followed by the deaths of her brother, father, and grandmother.
07:36 Brenda’s maternal grandparents and great-grandmother were from Russia. They were observant Jews.
09:12 Brenda moved to Johannesburg at age eighteen to attend teacher’s college. She describes living with her great-aunt, great-uncle, and cousin.
10:21 Brenda describes how she met her husband, Colin.
11:37 Colin was born on 20 April 1941 in Johannesburg, South Africa. He lived with his parents and younger sister.
12:03 Colin reminisces about his early years. He discusses his friends and interest in sports.
13:50 Colin’s father was a butcher. His mother assisted his father.
14:18 Colin discusses the high quality of his education.
15:32 Colin’s father practiced Orthodox Judaism.
16:26 Colin discusses his Jewish education. He reminisces about his bar mitzvah.
18:43 Colin describes how he helped with his father’s business.
20:21 Colin’s father was born in Lithuania at age 11. His mother was born in Latvia. Both came to South Africa in the 1920s.
21:39 Colin attended university in Johannesburg.
23:21 Colin discusses work experience.
25:12 Colin and Brenda reminisce about their initial meeting, courtship, and marriage.
29:30 Colin and Brenda’s eldest daughter Alana was born.
29:36 Colin and Brenda discuss their close relationship with their nanny and her family. They describe the living conditions for nannies in general.
33:23 Colin and Brenda recount how they helped raise the baby of their nanny’s sister.
36:50 Brenda’s mother remarried a third time.
39:18 Brenda discusses her work as a nursery school teacher in Johannesburg and Toronto.
41:06 Colin and Brenda explain the reasons that triggered their decision to emigrate. They describe the Soweto riots in 1976.
45:08 Colin explains how they chose and were accepted to immigrate to Canada. Colin and Brenda discuss the distinct advantages of living in Canada relative to South Africa and Australia.
52:33 Colin only considered leaving South Africa after his parents passed away.
53:10 Colin and Brenda discuss their children’s points of view about leaving South Africa.
55:23 Colin and Brenda describe how they got ready for the move to Canada. They discuss what they were and were not allowed to bring out of South Africa.
57:27 Colin explains how some South Africans left the country without going through the steps of formal immigration.
57:26 Brenda describes her fears concerning the move and explains the reasons some of her friends have remained in South Africa.
1:00:04 Brenda shares early memories of moving to Toronto: buying a house and a car.
1:03:09 Colin and Brenda contrast the quality of living between Johannesburg and Toronto.
1:05:04 Colin and Brenda discuss how they formed their early social connections.
1:07:46 Colin discusses how he maintained interest in sport, both as a participant and as a spectator. Sport was another means of making friends.
1:10:0 Colin volunteered with the Jewish Immigrant Aid Services (JIAS) for five years and became involved with the Southern African Jewish Association of Canada (SAJAC).
1:10:40 Colin discusses his involvement with SAJAC.
1:12:44 Brenda and Colin discuss some of the language and cultural challenges they encountered when they arrived in Canada.
1:16:17 Colin and Brenda discuss the achievements of their children.
1:20:42 Colin and Brenda discuss their daughter Stacy’s decision to be a single mother. Brenda discusses their involvement with baby Lily’s care and their decision to buy a house with private quarters to share with Stacy and Lily.
1:28:18 Brenda discusses two trips back to South Africa to care for her mother in 1998.
1:32:28 Brenda discusses the changes she noted in South Africa during her visit.
1:34:43 Colin discusses his volunteer work with JIAS, SAJAC, Jewish Family & Child (JF&CS) and JVC. He explains his desire to enable others to prepare themselves for and find work.
1:43:33 Colin discusses some of the challenges faced by his sister.
1:46:50 Colin and Brenda share their views on the current and future situation in South Africa.
Source
Oral Histories

The Way Things Were

A khaloupe!

A Scholarship Based on Need

Part Of
William Stern fonds
Family photographs series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 33; Series 1; Item 11
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
William Stern fonds
Family photographs series
Level
Item
Fonds
33
Series
1
Item
11
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1925]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 14 x 9 cm
Admin History/Bio
Lebil Shternshis was Bill Stern's paternal grandfather. His aunt Peah was brought to Canada by his father Mosihe in 1927, while his aunt Rivka was brought in 1930. Peah later married a Tepperman and Rivka married Phillip Greenspan.
Scope and Content
This item is a postcard photo of the Shternshis family in Lagov, Poland. Pictured from left to right is Rivka, Lebil and Peah. There is writing in Yiddish on the verso of the card.
Name Access
Shternshis family
Shternshis, Lebil
Shternshis, Peah
Shternshis, Rivka
Subjects
Postcards
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Poland
Accession Number
2004-5-96
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dora Till fonds
Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home Association series
Programming and events sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 52; Series 1-5; File 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dora Till fonds
Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home Association series
Programming and events sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
52
Series
1-5
File
1
Material Format
textual record
Date
[192-]-[193-], 1953
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 poster
Scope and Content
Of particular interest in this file is a cardboard poster outlining the rest home's schedule and routine, written in Yiddish.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 2; File 951
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
2
File
951
Material Format
textual record
Date
[195-?]
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of a six page typescript of a speech given by the Rt. Hon. Vincent Massey, Governor-General of Canada to members of the Canadian Jewish Congress, to which is appended typed excerpts of stories and songs in English and Yiddish of early Canadian Jewish immigrants.
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Accession Number
2005-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee meeting agendas, minutes, reports and correspondence series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 1; File 613
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee meeting agendas, minutes, reports and correspondence series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
1
File
613
Material Format
textual record
Date
[194-?]
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of one sheet of meeting minutes from the Women's Committee, presumably regarding Moess Chittim.
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Accession Number
2005-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 2504
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
2504
Material Format
graphic material
Date
26 Oct. 1916
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 21 x 26 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of a poster for a Toronto Yiddish Theatre Company performance, which happened at the I.O.O.F. Temple at 41 Gore Street in Hamilton. The poster is written in Yiddish.
Name Access
Toronto Yiddish Theatre Company
Subjects
Theatrical posters, Yiddish
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Hamilton (Ont.)
Accession Number
1980-7-7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 2505
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
2505
Material Format
graphic material
Date
17 April 1928
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 21 x 26 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of a poster for a performance by Isaac Nelson's New York Free Yiddisher Folk Theatre, which happened at the I.O.O.F. Temple at 41 Gore Street in Hamilton. The poster is written in Yiddish.
Name Access
Isaac Nelson's New York Free Yiddisher Folk Theatre
Subjects
Theatrical posters, Yiddish
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Hamilton (Ont.)
Accession Number
1980-7-7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3966
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3966
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1928
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 9 x 14 cm
Admin History/Bio
Founded in the 1920s, Camp Yungvelt was originally situated on Lake Wilcox. It later moved to Pickering, where it operated until it closed in the 1950s. It was established by the Workmen's Circle, as a Yiddish summer camp for Jewish children. Camp Yungvelt was known for accepting the children of poor immigrants for a small fraction of the regular fee.
Scope and Content
This item is an original postcard that features an image of the children's bungalow at Camp Yungvelt in Pickering, Ontario. The image depicts a few children standing on the front porch. There is Yiddish type on the postcard that reads: a bungalow for small children in the Arbeiter Ring Camp Yungvelt.
Name Access
Camp Yungvelt
Subjects
Camps
Postcards
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Pickering (Ont.)
Accession Number
1986-4-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3967
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3967
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1929
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 9 x 14 cm
Admin History/Bio
Founded in the 1920s, Camp Yungvelt was originally situated on Lake Wilcox. It later moved to Pickering, where it operated until it closed in the 1950s. It was established by the Workmen's Circle, as a Yiddish summer camp for Jewish children. Camp Yungvelt was known for accepting the children of poor immigrants for a small fraction of the regular fee.
Scope and Content
This item is an original postcard that features an image of the swimming area in Duffins Creek at Camp Yungvelt in Pickering, Ontario. The image depicts a large group gathered on the shore of the creek as well as several swimmers in the water and standing on the docks. There is Yiddish type on the postcard which reads: the swimming pool in the Arbeiter Ring Camp Yungvelt where the children bathe.
Name Access
Camp Yungvelt
Subjects
Camps
Postcards
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Pickering (Ont.)
Accession Number
1986-4-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3965
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3965
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1927
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 9 x 14 cm
Admin History/Bio
Founded in the 1920s, Camp Yungvelt was originally situated on Lake Wilcox. It later moved to Pickering, where it operated until it closed in the 1950s. It was established by the Workmen's Circle, as a Yiddish summer camp for Jewish children. Camp Yungvelt was known for accepting the children of poor immigrants for a small fraction of the regular fee.
Scope and Content
This item is an original postcard that features an image of a clean-up day at Camp Yungvelt in Pickering, Ontario. The image depicts a row of tents being inspected by two young girls. There is Yiddish type on the postcard which reads: the cleaning committee controlling the cleanliness of the sleeping quarters and beds in Arbeiter Ring Camp Yungvelt.
Name Access
Camp Yungvelt
Subjects
Camps
Postcards
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Pickering (Ont.)
Accession Number
1986-4-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
United Jewish Relief Agencies, Toronto (UJRA) series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 17; Series 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
United Jewish Relief Agencies, Toronto (UJRA) series
Level
Series
Fonds
17
Series
4
Material Format
textual record
Date
1938-1974
Physical Description
6 m of textual records
Admin History/Bio
The United Jewish Refugee and War Relief Agencies (UJR&WRA) was formed on October 26, 1939 with the assistance of Samuel Bronfman. It was spurred by the persecution of Jews in Europe. In 1938 Canadian Jewish Congress had formed the Canadian Coordinating Committee for Refugees. This committee was extended in 1939 to form the UJR&WRA, joining with the Canadian Organization for Rehabilitation through Training (ORT Federation), the Federation of Polish Jews, the Jewish Peoples’ Relief Committee, and the Joint Distribution Committee. The UJR&WRA facilitated the entry into Canada of as many refugees as possible and provided assistance to those admitted. After the war came a massive effort to assist the millions of Displaced Persons in Europe, as the UJR&WRA provided food, medical care and rehabilitation services and assisted people emigrating to Israel and Canada. Following the war, the name of the organization was changed to the United Jewish Relief Agencies (UJRA).
The UJRA operated as “an arm of Congress,” sharing a President and Director, submitting its budget to Congress’s Executive Committee, yet remaining an autonomous arms-length agency since its function was to oversee organizations rather than carry out the actual work, as other Congress committees did. Its role in the 1940s and 1950s was to coordinate the myriad agencies in Ontario involved in immigrant assistance, including the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society, Jewish Vocational Service, Jewish Child and Family Service, Mothers and Babes Rest Home, Young Men’s Hebrew Association, and United Restitution Organization. Though many of its committees were temporary in nature, others, such as the Loan Committee (whose cases were later taken over by the Toronto Jewish Free Loan Cassa), evolved into bodies that became independent of Congress but continued to carry out their functions.
In 1967 the UJRA was incorporated with recognized status as a charitable organization whose main purpose was relief of poverty. By this time the organization's aid activities in Israel were extensive, including support for homes for the aged, technical and vocational training for newcomers, and hospitals. In Canada, UJRA continued to provide assistance to new immigrants, including the continuing loan program. A national Board of Directors worked in tandem with a committee of Canadians in Israel to manage, control and supervise the UJRA's activities and projects.
Scope and Content
Series consists of administrative and committee records of the United Jewish Relief Agencies in Toronto, spanning the years 1938 through 1974. Records include minutes, correspondence, reports, case files, agendas, notices of meetings, subject files, lists, and administrative forms. The series is arranged into 12 sub-series: 1-CJC Committee for Refugees (the precursor to UJRA); 2-Executive Committee; 3-Administrative and subject files; 4-Administrative committees; 5-Housing Committee; 6-Loan Committee; 7-European Youth Scholarship Committee; 8-Collections Committee; 9-Committee on Deportations; 10-Restitution Claims Committee; 11-Refugee case files; and 12-Immigration and Location Service case files.
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Arrangement
The series has been re-arranged by the archivist from former Record Groups 201, 286, 292, 293, 294, 295 and 296.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
United Jewish Relief Agencies (UJRA) series
Immigration and Location Service case files sub-series
Level
Sub-series
Fonds
17
Series
4-12
Material Format
textual record
Date
1941-1951, predominant 1947-1949
Physical Description
96 cm of textual records
Scope and Content
Sub-series contains communication case files on immigrants and their sponsors, maintained by the Immigration and Location Service of UJRA. The files date from 1941 to 1951, but most were created in the years right after the war. The records document the interaction between social services agencies and sponsors in the process of locating missing relatives and facilitating the immigration to Canada of known relatives. Records include incoming and outgoing letters, memoranda and telegrams exchanged between the UJRA, sponsoring individuals in Ontario, and Jewish aid organizations such as: the American Joint Distribution Committee in its various European centres; the United Service for New Americans in the United States; the World Jewish Congress; and others. They reflect the administrative process of being a sponsor. Sponsors agreed to keep and support their relatives upon their arrival, but some letters reflect their reluctance, or inability, to provide any aid beyond that. For a short time in 1947, Displaced Persons were admitted regardless of their relationship to their sponsor, but beginning in September 1947, permits were limited to first-degree relatives only. Having employment lined up in Canada was only sufficient where special projects existed: for farmers, miners, lumbermen and D.P.s in camps in Germany and Austria.
Some thicker files document transactions over a period of time; some contain forms such as the letter of authorization granted by the American Joint Distribution Committee; and some letters outline the case history of immigrants, telling their story. The majority of files, however, have just one or two letters dealing with the common administrative activities of the UJRA: dealing with the entrance of relatives, in terms of asking an individual to be a sponsor, passing along messages from the Joint Distribution Committee overseas, or being a go-between to locate sponsors and give them information and instructions. Many letters pertain to the requirement that sponsors pay the travel expenses of their immigrating relatives, or pay for administrative fees for the application process. UJRA in Canada also helped the United Service for New Americans in New York City to locate refugees or those who moved to Canada after their arrival.
The files in this sub-subseries are arranged as they were by UJRA, in alphabetical order by sponsor surname.
Notes
This sub-series is composed of former RG 294, which was separated into case files and administrative files.
Access Restriction
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 62
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
62
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1919-2001
Physical Description
93 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Benjamin Gershon Kayfetz was born on December 24, 1916 in Toronto, graduating from the University of Toronto in 1939, with a B.A. in modern languages. Between the years 1941 and 1943, he worked as a high school teacher in Huntsville and Niagara Falls. In 1943, he joined the war effort, working for the Department of National Defense in Postal Censorship and was responsible for reviewing prisoner of war mail. After the war, Kayfetz traveled to British Occupied Germany where he worked as a censor of telecommunications with the Control Commission until 1947.
Upon returning to Toronto, he was hired as the National Director of Community Relations by the Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC), and as the Executive (National) Director of the Joint Community Relations Committee (JCRC), a CJC - B'nai B'rith cooperative organization. He also served as the Central Region Executive Director of the CJC between 1973 and 1978. During his tenure, he worked with various churches, unions and minority groups to develop anti-discrimination laws and for the protection of minority and religious rights. Kayfetz was also actively involved in promoting the welfare of Jewish Communities worldwide, and made visits to Cuba in 1962 and 1965, and Russia in 1985, to study and report on the state of these Jewish Communities. After his retirement in 1985, he was awarded the Samuel Bronfman Medal by the Canadian Jewish Congress. In recognition of his efforts to promote Human Rights, he was also awarded the Order of Canada in 1986.
In addition to his professional activities, Kayfetz wrote articles for various Jewish publications under both his own name and the pseudonym, Gershon B. Newman, and gave a weekly radio address on CHIN radio addressing various contemporary Jewish issues. He was also actively involved in the Toronto Jewish Historical Society (serving as its president), Canadian Jewish Historical Society and Yiddish Luncheon Circle. Ben Kayfetz died in 2002.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of materials produced or acquired by Ben Kayfetz in both his personal and professional capacity. It includes biographical materials, minutes, correspondence, recorded CJC and JCRC meetings, memorabilia, transcripts and recorded versions of CHIN radio broadcasts he delivered, as well as various interviews, speeches, articles, book reviews and works he composed. Fonds also consists of minutes, agendas and other records of various Yiddish and historical associations Mr. Kayfetz was involved in.
Notes
Physical Description note: includes 20 photographs, 107 audio cassettes, 1 Beta video cassette and 1 object.
Fonds includes audio tapes 1-5, 7-32, 35-37, 39-42, 44-45, 47-50, 53-56, 58-64, 66-67, 70-85, A1-A5, A7-A9, A12-A14, A16-A20, A23-A28, A30, A32-A38 and A40-A43.
Name Access
Kayfetz, Ben, 1916-2002
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
Audio tapes AC 246-AC 275 belonged to Ben Kayfetz and are related to this fonds.
Creator
Kayfetz, Ben, 1916-2002
Accession Number
1975-012, 1976-10-4, 1980-12-13, 1982-2-2, 1983-6-2, 1985-4-2, 1987-2-3, 1996-5-4, 1998-3-22, 2000-11-4, 2004-3-1, 2004-5-20, 2006-2-9, 2006-8-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Personal series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 62; Series 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Personal series
Level
Series
Fonds
62
Series
1
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1933-1999
Physical Description
5 cm of textual records and other material
Scope and Content
Series consists of biographical materials and memorabilia relating to Ben Kayfetz and his family. Materials include newspaper articles, a taped interview, certificates, awards, university examinations, personal memorabilia from his service in Germany and materials relating to the Bronfman Medal and Order of Canada he received. This series also contains the video "The Life and the Times of Ben Kayfetz".
Notes
Audio tape A14 is part of this series.
Physical description note: includes 1 photograph, 1 audio tape and 1 Beta video cassette.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Speeches series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 62; Series 5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Speeches series
Level
Series
Fonds
62
Series
5
Material Format
textual record
sound recording
Date
1962-1999
Physical Description
2 cm of textual records
2 audio cassettes
Scope and Content
Series consists of transcripts, drafts and audio recordings of addresses delivered by Ben Kayfetz to various audiences and organizations as well as a brochure for a speech he gave at a Brotherhood breakfast.
Notes
Audio tapes A16 and A20 are part of this series.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Associations series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 62; Series 7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Associations series
Level
Series
Fonds
62
Series
7
Material Format
textual record
sound recording
Date
1980-1995
Physical Description
4 cm of textual records
30 audio cassettes
Scope and Content
Series consists of correspondence, minutes and other materials accumulated by Ben Kayfetz during his involvement with various organizations, including the Toronto Jewish Historical Society, Canadian Jewish Historical Society, Learned Society and Yiddish Luncheon Circle.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Published and unpublished works and research series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 62; Series 8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Published and unpublished works and research series
Level
Series
Fonds
62
Series
8
Material Format
textual record
sound recording
Date
1974-2000
Physical Description
26 cm of textual records
34 audio cassettes
Scope and Content
Series consists of articles, book reviews and works written in Yiddish and English by Ben Kayfetz for various publications, including the Jewish Western Bulletin, Jewish Standard, Fraternally Yours and others. This series also consists of biographical and autobiographical works he composed and translated. These include a first person account of the Kielce pogrom as experienced by Moses Kwasnievski and a biographical work on J.B. Salsberg. Also included in this series are various interviews conducted by Kayfetz with members of the Jewish community, many of which he used as source material to compose his written works.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Correspondence series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 62; Series 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Correspondence series
Level
Series
Fonds
62
Series
2
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1942-1996
Physical Description
13 cm of textual records
1 photograph
Scope and Content
Series consits of incoming and outgoing correspondence between Ben Kayfetz and various individuals and organizations, and includes correspondence during his service in British-occupied Germany. Correspondence relating to Canadian Jewish Congress/Joint Public Relations Committee and correspondence relating to the various societies and associations Ben Kayfetz belonged to, are located in their respective series.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Collected materials series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 62; Series 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Collected materials series
Level
Series
Fonds
62
Series
3
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Date
1919-1970
Physical Description
11 cm of textual records
18 photographs
1 object
Scope and Content
Series consists of various materials collected by Ben Kayfetz. It includes various items from Nazi Germany including a Jewish yellow star and number on a badge, Nazi hymn book and a service book of a Nazi Stormtrooper. Among the other materials are photographs of the Bronfman family, World War II enlistment posters, Peretz School Composition books and Jewish Old Folks Home Committee minutes.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Speeches series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 62; Series 5; File 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Speeches series
Level
File
Fonds
62
Series
5
File
2
Material Format
textual record
Date
1962-1999
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of various speeches delivered by Ben Kayfetz in both Yiddish and English. These were delivered on such topics as his retirement from the CJC, antisemitism, the development of Ontario's Jewish community, anti-hate legislation, the Jewish press in Toronto, Jewish immigration to Canada and others.
Subjects
Speeches, addresses, etc
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Associations series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 62; Series 7; File 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Associations series
Level
File
Fonds
62
Series
7
File
3
Material Format
textual record
Date
1980-1995
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of meeting notices, correspondence and a membership list of the Yiddish Luncheon Circle, of which Ben Kayfetz was a founding member.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Personal series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 62; Series 1; File 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Personal series
Level
File
Fonds
62
Series
1
File
2
Material Format
textual record
Date
[1985?]
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Collected materials series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 62; Series 3; File 8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Collected materials series
Level
File
Fonds
62
Series
3
File
8
Material Format
textual record
Date
July 1919
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Collected materials series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 62; Series 3; File 14
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Collected materials series
Level
File
Fonds
62
Series
3
File
14
Material Format
textual record
Date
1947
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File contains issues no.12 and 18 of Unzer Sztyme (sometimes spelled Unzer Sztime), a Yiddish periodical expressing the concerns of post-WWII Jewish refugees. Unzer Sztyme was published in the Bergen-Belsen Displaced Persons camp after the Second World War.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Published and unpublished works and research series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 62; Series 8; File 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Published and unpublished works and research series
Level
File
Fonds
62
Series
8
File
1
Material Format
textual record
Date
[n.d.]
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File contains articles written by Moses Kwasnievski, describing his account of the Kielce Pogrom, and his experiences in World War 2 Poland. The articles were translated by Ben Kayfetz.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Published and unpublished works and research series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 62; Series 8; File 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Published and unpublished works and research series
Level
File
Fonds
62
Series
8
File
2
Material Format
textual record
Date
1985-1998
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File contains several articles written in Yiddish and English, regarding the life of J.B. Salsberg written by Ben Kayfetz. Also included are interview transcripts, and other related research materials.
Name Access
Salsberg, J. B. (Joseph B.), ca. 1903-1998
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Published and unpublished works and research series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 62; Series 8; File 31
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Published and unpublished works and research series
Level
File
Fonds
62
Series
8
File
31
Material Format
textual record
Date
[n.d.]
Physical Description
1 cm of textual records
Scope and Content
File contains articles and book reviews written by Ben Kayfetz which were either unpublished or the publisher is unknown.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 64
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
64
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1859-1980, predominant 1977-1979
Physical Description
ca. 5178 photographs and other material
Admin History/Bio
The “Shuls Project” was the work of three University of Toronto architecture students, who in 1977 wrote a research paper on the eight Toronto synagogues built before World War II. Concerned at the lack of resources on these synagogues, Sidney Tenenbaum, Lynn Milstone and Sheldon Levitt foresaw the loss of communities’ recorded history as membership dwindled and elders passed on. The students conceived a project that would photograph and document every synagogue in Canada, gathering visual evidence, memorabilia, plaques and stories before they disappeared and history was lost. The students’ goal was to document synagogues’ architecture, art, and historical development through research, interviews and site visits.
The students secured a large portion of the required funding for the project from the Samuel and Saidye Bronfman Family Foundation in Montreal, funding which was matched by the Canadian Jewish Congress. This financial support enabled Levitt, Milstone and Tenenbaum to begin their study, named “Shuls… A Study of Canadian Synagogue Architecture.” They began in the summer of 1977, traveling through the Western provinces. The next summer, they visited eight Maritime cities, Montreal and other Quebec communities. Financial support in the project’s second year was again provided by the Bronfman Family Foundation, along with the Canadian government and donations in kind from businesses, including Benjamin Photo Finishers in Toronto, and Polaroid. The summer of 1979 was spent in Ontario, with an added grant from Wintario. In total, the Shuls project team traveled over 24,000 kilometres, taking thousands of photographs and conducting several hundred interviews. Photographs were taken by Tenenbaum, with Levitt and Milstone assuming primary responsibility for researching synagogues’ history and gathering historic records. Interviews were conducted by all three researchers, in both English and Yiddish.
With no handy index of every shul in Canada, the researchers located small shuls by word of mouth. They spread word of their project and solicited assistance using press releases, letters to known communities, and slideshow presentations as they traveled. They would first examine a building to get an idea of a community’s character and heritage, then conduct interviews with designers, architects, rabbis and other prominent community members.
With the research and photographs created, the team compiled three catalogues of the Western, Eastern/Quebec, and Ontario phases of the project. These catalogues have entries on each synagogue that include historical summaries highlighting the founding, growth, mergers and decline of Jewish communities, their changing needs, changing architectural expressions and trends, and the evolving uses of synagogues over the course of the twentieth century. There are also building descriptions, some with critical comments by the authors, and lists of the photographs and slides produced.
The compilation of materials and preparation of these catalogues took place at the Project’s offices at 26 Ava Road in Toronto, and continued through the summer of 1980 when the Ontario catalogue was completed. In 1985, Tenenbaum, Milstone and Levitt published a book highlighting their work, called Treasures of a People: The Synagogues of Canada.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of the records created and collected by the team of students conducting the Shuls study from 1977 to 1980. The majority of the fonds is made up of graphic material, in the form of 35mm colour slides and black-and-white Polaroid prints and (print-size) negatives. There are approximately 5110 photographs in the fonds. Fonds also consists of notes and inventory forms of buildings' architectural features. There are no interview transcripts, but the fonds does include three audio cassettes with recorded interviews and shul tours. Reference materials used in researching the history of the shuls include dedication and anniversary commemorative books and programmes, newsletters, articles and newspaper clippings. In addition the fonds contains 47 blueprints, the majority from Montreal synagogues. The fonds is arranged in the following series: 1. Quebec synagogues; 2. Ontario synagogues; 3. Western Canada synagogues; 4. Eastern Canada synagogues; 5. Reference.
Notes
Physical description note: includes 92 cm of textual records, 42 architectural drawings, 3 audio cassettes, and 1 drawing.
Physical extent note: many of the slides were culled because they were felt to be reproductions. Some of the synagogue images in the research book may therefore not be included in the fonds.
Name Access
Shuls Project
Subjects
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Creator
Levitt, Sheldon
Milstone, Lynn
Tenenbaum, Sidney T.
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Descriptions
590 records – page 1 of 12.

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