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4 records – page 1 of 1.
Part Of
Benjamin Brown fonds
Jewish community building plans and drawings series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 49; Series 1; File 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Benjamin Brown fonds
Jewish community building plans and drawings series
Level
File
Fonds
49
Series
1
File
1
Material Format
architectural drawing
Date
1940
Physical Description
12 architectural drawings : pencil on tracing paper ; 48 cm length or smaller and 7 cm diam.
Admin History/Bio
Founded in the 1920s, Camp Yungvelt was originally situated on Lake Wilcox. Two years later it moved to Pickering, where it operated until it closed in the 1950s. It was established by the Workmen's Circle, as a Yiddish summer camp for Jewish children. Camp Yungvelt was known for accepting the children of poor immigrants for a small fraction of the regular fee.
Scope and Content
File consists of architectural drawings of several new buildings that were erected at Camp Yungvelt. Floor plans, a foundation plan, and several elevation drawings are included.
Subjects
Camps
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Pickering (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Benjamin Brown fonds
Jewish community building plans and drawings series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 49; Series 1; File 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Benjamin Brown fonds
Jewish community building plans and drawings series
Level
File
Fonds
49
Series
1
File
2
Material Format
architectural drawing
Date
1919-1922
Physical Description
136 architectural drawings : pencil, some hand col., watercolour, on linen weave and tracing paper ; 100 x 90 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Henry Street Beth Jacob Synagogue was founded by Toronto‚Äôs Polish-Jewish Community, as the successor of an older, smaller synagogue on Elm Street. It was the first synagogue in Toronto that was designed by a Jewish architect, Benjamin Brown. Located at 23 and 23 ½ Henry Street, the synagogue was dedicated in 1922, at a cost of $156,000, and could accommodate up to eight hundred worshippers. It was built in Romanesque style and was notable for its stained glass windows and retractable roof that was used on Sukkoth. It also contained a vaulted ceiling capped by a large dome and four smaller ones. The building was eventually sold and converted into a church. It is the current site of the Holy Trinity Russian Orthodox Church.
Scope and Content
File consists of architectural drawings of Beth Jacob Synagogue. Contained within are basement, floor, stairwell and roof plans, load plans, sections, and elevation drawings. Also included are detailing of windows, the Ark, entrances and other structures and objects.
Notes
Most of the drawings are stored in four rolls, the remainder are encased in five sheets of Melinex. Due to the fragility of these drawings, the medium, extent and sizes of them are based on the descriptions compiled by Steve Speisman. It is recommended that a conservator examine these drawings.
Name Access
Beth Jacob Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Subjects
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Physical Condition
Some drawings are frayed and torn.
Places
Henry Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Benjamin Brown fonds
Jewish community building plans and drawings series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 49; Series 1; File 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Benjamin Brown fonds
Jewish community building plans and drawings series
Level
File
Fonds
49
Series
1
File
4
Material Format
architectural drawing
Date
[ca. 1924]
Physical Description
9 architectural drawings : pencil, 6 hand col. pastel, 7 on tracing paper ; 36 x 50 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Brunswick Avenue Talmud Torah Day School was established in 1907 and was originally situated on Simcoe Avenue. In 1922 the school received a charter from the Province of Ontario and relocated to Brunswick Avenue the same year. The new school opened in 1925 as a non-denominational afternoon school. It was the precursor to the Associated Hebrew Schools of Toronto.
Scope and Content
File consists of Benjamin Brown's designs for the Brunswick Avenue Talmud Torah. Contained within are sketches of various entrances and frontages for the Brusnwick Avenue Talmud Torah. Designs of the Ark are also included.
Physical Condition
Drawings are fragile, several are torn.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Benjamin Brown fonds
Commercial building plans and drawings series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 49; Series 3; File 37
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Benjamin Brown fonds
Commercial building plans and drawings series
Level
File
Fonds
49
Series
3
File
37
Material Format
architectural drawing
Date
[ca. 1946]
Physical Description
2 architectural drawings : blueprints ; 40 cm length or smaller and 4 cm diam.
Admin History/Bio
Percy Hermant was born in Mogilev, Russia in 1882. In 1897, he immigrated to Canada, arriving in New Brunswick, where he began working as a drygoods peddler. In 1900, he founded the Imperial Optical Company, the first prescription lens business in the Maritimes. This company eventually grew to be the largest company of its kind in the British Commonwealth. The head office was located in the Hermant Building (named for Percy) at 21 Dundas Square. In addition to his successful business, Mr. Hermant served as the director of both the Mount Sinai and Runnymede hospitals. He was also a member of the Toronto Board of Trade and other established societies such as the Primrose, and Empire Clubs.
Mr. Hermant was very active in philanthropy and involved in the funding and establishment of the Young Men's Hebrew Association (YMHA), and in the funding of the Associated Hebrew Universities. Mr. Hermant also established several scholarships at the University of Toronto, including the Percy Hermant Fellowship in Ophthalmology for graduates of Medicine who wish to pursue ophthalmology as a profession. Mr. Hermant died in 1959 and was survived by his wife Dorothy, son Sydney and four grandchildren.
Scope and Content
File consists of two block plans for a storage building at 179 Ontario Street for Percy Hermant.
Notes
Benjamin Brown's office was also located in the Hermant building during the 1940s.
Related Material
See File 49-3-97 for the architectural drawings of the Hermant Building.
See File 49-3-106 for the architectural drawings of the Hermant Annex.
See File 49-3-58 for the architectural plans of a factory for Imperial Optical Co. at 270 Ontario Street and for an administrative history of Imperial Optical.
See File 49-3-63 for the architectural plans of alterations to the ground floor of the Hermant Building.
See File 49-3-100 for architectural drawings of Montgomery's Tavern, located on the ground floor of the Hermant Building.
See File 49-3-93 for the architectural drawings of a factory for Imperial Optical at the S.W. corner of Dundas and Ontario Streets.
Places
Ontario Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
4 records – page 1 of 1.