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4 records – page 1 of 1.
Accession Number
2018-1-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-1-5
Material Format
textual record
object
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
3 objects
Date
[190-?]-1967
Scope and Content
Accession consists of materials documenting the Grosman family, in particular Max Grosman. Included are Max's certificate of naturalization, various Polish-language documents including Max's Polish passport, an old age security application, and an insurance book. The accession also includes a pin commemorating the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union's fortieth anniversary and two rings that belonged to Max.
Custodial History
Max Grosman's son, Wilfred Grosman, came into possession of the records constituting Accession 2018-1-5 following the death of his father. He donated the records to the Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre on 17 January 2018.
Administrative History
Max Grosman was born 25 March 1884 in Novoradomsk, Poland. He became a naturalized British subject in 1914. Max's wife, Minnie "Majja" Grosman (née Bocian), came to Canada in 1913. Together, they had four sons: Jack, Morris, Samuel, and Wilfred. Max made his living as a tailor. He passed away on 17 October 1960 at the age of seventy-seven.
Descriptive Notes
LANGUAGE: Accession contains records in both English and Polish.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Bocian, Majja
Bocian, Minnie
Grosman, Majja
Grosman, Minnie
Grosman, Max
Grosman, Wilfred
International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union
Places
Canada
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-5-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-5-3
Material Format
textual record
object
Physical Description
ca 104 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1952-2017
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting General Wingate Branch 256 of the Royal Canadian Legion. Included are member records of Jewish Second World War veterans and others; thank you cards written by students to members of the veterans; a pamphlet titled Portraits of Bravery that contains portraits of veterans, a short history of the branch, and a brief biography of Major General Orde Charles Wingate (1903-44); a certificate issued by the Royal Canadian Legion establishing a ladies' auxiliary within its General Wingate Branch; and a certificate issued by the Canadian Legion establishing General Wingate Branch, Ontario No. 2561.
Administrative History
The Jewish Brigade was a member of the Great War Association in the 1920s. After its first president was installed in the early 1930s, the Royal Canadian Legion granted a charter for a Jewish veterans' branch. The brigade was renamed the General Wingate Branch in the mid-1940s after the British army officer Major General Orde Charles Wingate, DSO. Although Major Wingate was not Jewish, he was a passionate Zionist, hence the name.
At first, the branch met at a veteran’s hall at Crawford and College Streets in Toronto, but later purchased its own house at 1610 Bathurst Street. In 1968, the branch moved to Eglinton Avenue West. It was then located at the Zionist Centre on Marlee Avenue.
The branch held an annual memorial march and service at the Mt. Sinai Cemetery, and distributed poppies to raise funds for veterans and their families, hospitals and medical research. Members also gave speeches at schools on Remembrance Day. It closed in September 2018 after more than eighty years.
Subjects
Jewish veterans--Canada
Name Access
Royal Canadian Legion. General Wingate Branch 256
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-5-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-5-9
Material Format
object
Physical Description
2 objects
Date
[between 1940 and 2019]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two flags that belonged to Royal Canadian Legion General Wingate Branch 256. The first is a flag of Israel. The second is a blue ensign bearing the name of the branch. (The blue ensign is a blue flag with the Union Jack in the top corner next to the flagpole; it is similar to the red ensign, which was the flag of Canada until 1965, when it was replaced by the maple leaf.)
Administrative History
The Jewish Brigade was a member of the Great War Association in the 1920s. After its first president was installed in the early 1930s, the Royal Canadian Legion granted a charter for a Jewish veterans' branch. The brigade was renamed the General Wingate Branch in the mid-1940s after the British army officer Major General Orde Charles Wingate, DSO. Although Major Wingate was not Jewish, he was a passionate Zionist, hence the name.
At first, the branch met at a veteran’s hall at Crawford and College Streets in Toronto, but later purchased its own house at 1610 Bathurst Street. In 1968, the branch moved to Eglinton Avenue West. It was then located at the Zionist Centre on Marlee Avenue.
The branch held an annual memorial march and service at the Mt. Sinai Cemetery, and distributed poppies to raise funds for veterans and their families, hospitals and medical research. Members also gave speeches at schools on Remembrance Day. It closed in September 2018 after more than eighty years.
Subjects
Flags--Canada
Flags--Israel
Jewish veterans--Canada
Name Access
Royal Canadian Legion. General Wingate Branch 256
Places
Canada
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-5-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-5-13
Material Format
textual record
object
graphic material
Physical Description
7 cm of textual records and other material
3 objects
Date
[194-]-[201-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Nathan Isaacs. Included are letters, photographs, service records, a sight log, a book with photographs of fighter planes active in the Second World War, and telegrams congratulating Nathan's family on Nathan coming home. Also included are a number of objects: Nathan's dog tags, navigator wings, and crest; a flask with Nathan's initials on it; another item with Nathan's initials that he received upon enlisting in 1942 and which would have held a mirror, nail file, and possibly a comb; a cigarette lighter made from an empty shell by ground crew; and, finally, a Bomber Command bar that was issued to Nathan in 2013.
Administrative History
Nathan Isaacs (né Isaacovitch) was born on November 20, 1922. He enlisted on August 5, 1942. After training, Nathan worked in the kitchen at a Royal Canadian Air Force base in Aylmer, Ontario, while awaiting deployment to Europe. After being flown to Yorkshire, England, Nathan went on to fly thirty-five missions. He was twenty-one when he flew his first.
Following the war, bombers like Nathan received little in the way of recognition on account of the heavy civilian casualties caused by bombing. In 2013, Julian Fantino, minister of veterans affairs, gave out the Bomber Command bar to recognize Second World Bombers, including Nathan. That same year, thanks to a photograph that accompanied a Toronto Star article about Second World War bombers, Nathan was reunited with John Mulholland, the pilot with whom he flew his final mission.
Descriptive Notes
Availability of other formats: Six of the photographs and four of the textual records have been scanned and are available as JPEG, TIFF, and/or PDF files.
Subjects
Bomber pilots
Jewish veterans--Canada
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Isaacs, Nathan, 1922-
Places
Canada
Europe
Source
Archival Accessions
4 records – page 1 of 1.