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129 records – page 1 of 3.
Part Of
Congregation Beth David fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 88
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Congregation Beth David fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
88
Material Format
multiple media
Date
[ca. 1916]-1996, predominant 1940-1996
Physical Description
38 cm of textual records (9v.) and other material
Admin History/Bio
The Brantford Hebrew Association, Congregation Beth David’s precursor, was founded in 1907 when Rabbi Backer officiated Brantford’s first public Jewish religious service in an upper hall on George Street. Services had previously taken place in the homes of Jewish families, who had begun settling in the area around the turn of the century. By 1911, services had moved to the old Conservative Hall at Dalhousie and King Street. In 1915, the congregation purchased a building at 33 Palace Street and remodeled it into a synagogue. This building was also used as a community centre and for the Congregation’s Hebrew school.
On October 13th, 1911 the congregation was incorporated, and the following year it purchased land for a cemetery in the northeast corner of Mount Hope Cemetery. Due to increasing membership, a new synagogue was built at 50 Waterloo Street in 1948. In January 1950, the congregation changed its name to Beth David in honour of member David Axler, who died during the Second World War while training as a pilot in the Royal Canadian Air Force.
The congregation was at its peak in the 1960s with 150 member families. However, membership drastically fell after the children of this generation moved to larger cities and their parents followed after retirement. By 1999, only 28 families remained as members and services were reduced to being held on the High Holidays and special occasions, such as, b'nai mitzvah. Dwindling resources and membership forced the congregation to close around 2001. Throughout its existence, over 30 rabbis served the congregation, including Rabbi Saul Wolfe Gringorten (ca. 1910-1923). Its cemetery continues to be looked after by Allan Norris, a past president of the congregation.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the acitivities, religious programs and services, membership, and finances of Congregation Beth David, as well as the recognition and honours awarded by and to Brantford's Jewish community. Included are meeting minutes, photographs, plaques, a key, a marriage register, general ledgers, ledgers and lists of membership dues and receipts, audited financial statements, budgets, correspondece, bulletins, office stationary, newsclippings, certificates, library book cards, bookplates, rabbi contracts, and surveys.
Fonds has been arranged into the following six series: 1. Meetings ; 2. Religious programs and services; 3. Finances & accounting ; 4. Administrative functions ; 5. Bulletins ; and, 6. Events.
Notes
Includes 10 microfiches of textual records, 5 architectural drawings, 11 photographs (4 negatives), 3 plaques, 1 mounted letter and 1 key.
Fonds was reduced from ca. 1 metre to ca. 45 cm. See accession 2001-10-3 for further information about the culled material.
Name Access
Congregation Beth David (Brantford, Ont.)
Subjects
Architecture
Communities
Synagogues
Physical Condition
The binding on some of the general ledgers is fragile and coming apart. They have been stored flat to reduce any strain.
The architectural drawings have some tears and should be flattened.
Related Material
Please see the Sadie Stren fonds 78 for other records documenting Brantford's Jewish community and the Beth David Congregation, including the synagogue's original letters of incorporation.
For other photographs documenting Congregation Beth David, see: accesssion 1976-6-5 (photo # 1133); accession 1976-6-6 (photos # 1138, 1137, 1136); accession 1976-6-13; accession 1986-2-2 (photos #3593-3595, 3856, 3889-3894), photo #918; and, photo #578.
For records related to Beth David's namesake, David Axler, and photographs of its cemetery, please see accession #2004-5-71.
For records of Rabbi Gringorten, see accession #2009-2-5 and 2008-11-3
For additional records related to Brantford families and other Jewish organizations, such as the Hadassah chapter and B'nai Brith lodge, please see accession #2001-10-3; MG 2J29a, #2009-7-1, 1978-11-4, 1977-8-16, 1992-8-3, 1980-1-14, 1978-1-2, 2008-7-1, photo# 109, photo# 755, and photo #758.
Arrangement
Fonds is arranged to the file-level, but only described to the series-level. Three file-level descriptions exist for files attached directly to the fonds. Photographs with existing item-level descriptions were also attached to the fonds.
Creator
Congregation Beth David (Brantford, Ont.)
Places
Brantford (Ont.)
Accession Number
2001-10-3
1978-11-4
1981-12-2 / MG3 B16
1976-6-8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
B'nai Brith Lodge No. 1154 fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 91
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
B'nai Brith Lodge No. 1154 fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
91
Material Format
multiple media
Date
31 Dec. 1931-[ca. 1974]
Physical Description
16 photographs and other material
Admin History/Bio
Brantford’s B’nai Brith Lodge No. 1154 was formed on December 31, 1931 with Max White as its first president. B’nai Brith is an international service organization that was first formed in New York in 1843 to unify the American Jewish Community. B’nai Brith lodges began appearing in Canada in the late 1800s and by 1981 Canadian membership in the organization had grown large enough for the establishment of a separate Canadian district, B’nai Brith Canada. As a member of B’nai Brith, the Brantford lodge shared its mandate of assisting those in need both at home and abroad, supporting the state of Israel, and promoting human rights. The Brantford lodge has not been active since 1974. Brantford’s Jewish community has been largely inactive since 2001, when the diminishing Jewish population finally forced the closure of Brantford’s synagogue, Congregation Beth David.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the founding, presidents, and charitable activities of Brantford's B'nai Brith lodge No. 1154. Included are photographs, certificates, banners, a bell, plaques, a chanukiah, a charity box, pins, and a medal. Records are arranged at the file-level, with two items attached directly to the fonds-level.
Notes
Includes 4 plaques, 4 certificates, 1 photo album, 6 objects, and 2 banners.
Photographers and photography studios are identified on the photographs.
Name Access
B'nai B'rith. Brantford Lodge, No. 1154
Creator
B'nai Brith Lodge No. 1154 (Brantford, Ont.)
Accession Number
2001-10-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Maurice Solway fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Maurice Solway fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
13
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1919-1989
Physical Description
11 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Maurice Solway (1906-2001) was a violinist, music teacher, composer, author and actor who lived and worked for most of his life in Toronto. Although he was highly respected as a musician in Toronto, and thoroughly immersed in the city’s musical culture from the 1920s until the 1980s, his greatest fame came to him later in life, as an actor in the Academy Award nominated NFB short film “The Violin”.
Maurice Solway's family lived at 164 York Street, Toronto, where he was born, in 1906. His parents, Jakob (b.1877) and Roza Solway (b.1877), had only just emigrated that year from Halofzen, Russia, where Jakob had been a musician and band leader. In Canada, Jakob adopted his father's trade and worked as a Kosher butcher, in Toronto’s St. John’s Ward. As a youth, Maurice played the violin in variety programmes with his sister, Dora, accompanying him on piano. His father was his first teacher, but he quickly showed enough promise to warrant private lessons with Harry Adaskin, and later with Dr. Luigi von Kunits, at the Canadian Academy of Music. He also studied at the Hambourg Conservatory in Toronto with Henri Czaplinsky and Geza de Kresz, starting in 1921.
Solway began his professional career with the New Symphony, which later became the Toronto Symphony Orchestra (TSO). During the 1920s, he also played in the Famous Players Cinema orchestras that accompanied silent films, and performed lunch concerts in Toronto hotel and department store orchestras, professional venues that would disappear by the 1930s.
From 1926 to 1928, Solway left Canada to study in Brussels with the highly regarded violinist, Eugène Ysaÿe. There he befriended other students of Ysaÿe, such as Nathan Milstein, William Primrose, Viola Mitchell, Robert Velton, and Joseph Gingold.
Upon his return to Toronto, Solway gave several recitals that were both critically and publicly well-received. Few such opportunities, however, existed in Canada at the time, and Solway was obliged to find work in-between solo concerts. He also suffered an injury to his left hand while moving a piano in 1929 that required him to adjust his technique for three fingers and interfered with his being able to play comfortably for a number of years.
He was married in 1930 to Anne Cass (1907-1994), and they had a son, Stephen. Facing his financial obligations to his new family, he opted for the more dependable income of orchestral playing versus the riskier and transitory life of a soloist. Besides classical music, he played with jazz groups like the Jolly Bachelor’s Orchestra, Oscar Peterson, Jerome Kern, and Percy Faith, and on numerous recordings for the CBC, CFCA, and CKGW radio stations. He also played chamber music with the Joyce Trio, founded by Simeon Joyce (piano) and featuring Charles Mathe (cello).
In 1952, Solway retired from the TSO, dedicating himself to his chamber playing and radio work. He founded the Solway String Quartet (SSQ) in 1947, with Marcus Adeney (cello), Nathan Green (viola) and Jack Groob (violin). The quartet played a mixed repertoire that included standard classical music with more widely recognized popular songs and new compositions, especially works by Canadian composers such as Howard Cable, John Weinzweig and Jean Coulthard. Sponsored by the Ontario Board of Education and the CBC, the SSQ played rural Ontario towns and broadcast concerts for a wide demographic of music listeners. In 1955, they performed the Canadian debut of the Castelnuovo-Tedesco Quintet for guitar and strings with Andres Segovia. The SSQ, with frequent changes in personnel, continued performing until 1968. Other players in the SSQ included Robert Warburton, Martin Chenhall, Murray Adaskin, Arthur Milligan, Charles Dobias, Eugene Hudson, Berul Sugerman, Joseph Pach and Ivan Romanoff.
In 1973, Solway was invited to act in a short children’s film “The Violin,” co-produced by George Pastic and Andrew Walsh. Solway also contributed the original music to the film, which was nominated for an Academy Award in 1975. Following the success of the film, Solway also appeared on television, making guest appearances with Sharon, Lois and Bram, on the Elephant Show and Mr. Dressup. During this time, his wife Anne traveled with him and managed his appointments.
Solway was also a violin teacher throughout his career. In 1989, he published a preparatory book, Fiddling for Fun: the Visual and Aural Art of Violin Playing, in which he outlined a new theory for violin practice that proposed an easy to use visual system for familiarizing students with intervals and fingerboard positions.
He also wrote an autobiography, Recollections of a Violinist, in 1984, and continued to lecture and speak about music. In 1981 and 1983 he devised a lecture performance series to commemorate Ysaÿe, the proceeds of which went to the establishment of a music scholarship at the Royal Conservatory. As he began to play less frequently in the 1980s, he also began to compose more regularly, completing more than one hundred compositions, primarily works for solo violin and for violin and piano. As a composer, he returned frequently to folk themes and completed a series of songs based on his travels around the world. Among his folk themes are songs inspired by his visits to such diverse countries as Norway, Maui, Japan, Israel and Spain.
Maurice Solway was affiliated with the Beth Tzedec Synagogue and frequently contributed to charity concerts and fundraising efforts for organizations such as the Inner City Angels, a cultural society for disadvantaged children. He died in 2001 in Toronto.
Scope and Content
The Solway fonds is arranged into twelve files. The documents relate to Solway's professional activities as a musician, educator, composer, actor and author. These include printed texts, photographs, original music scores, promotional materials, programmes, audio cassettes, articles, correspondence, radioscripts and a video.
Notes
Includes 31 photographs, 2 v. of text, 1 videocassette (VHS) and 17 audio cassettes.
Name Access
Solway, Maurice, 1906-2001
Subjects
Musicians
Related Material
Fonds 25, Series 11, Item 9: Photo cabinet, photo #179 (oversized)
Photo cabinet, photo #501
Two titles in the archives library collection (1984-12-6) (1 title missing 15 Aug. 2006)
A vertical file has been created for Maurice Solway.
Creator
Solway, Maurice, 1906-2001
Accession Number
1988-10-9
1991-3-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Maurice Solway fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 13; File 6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Maurice Solway fonds
Level
File
Fonds
13
File
6
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1974-1985
Physical Description
1 videocassette (ca. 25 min.) : duplicate, col. VHS and other material
Admin History/Bio
"The Violin" was a short film by Andrew Welsh and George Pastic, released in 1974, and featuring Maurice Solway as the old man. The producers approached Maurice Solway about being in their film while making initial casting inquiries among Solway's students in regard to the children’s roles in the film. Eventually, they persuaded Solway to star in the film, shot on Ward Island, Toronto, in 1972 and 1973. Solway also wrote the original music and became the film's principle promoter, speaking in schools and at screenings of the film. The film promotes peace and understanding through the power of music and the exchange of knowledge and friendship between the old and the young. In 1975 it was nominated for an Academy Award. The spin-off book was published in 1976. Solway, with the managerial assistance of his wife, Anne, took on the role of promoting the film and saw it as his crowning achievement, the expression of what he wanted to be remembered for, after a career in music and education. The film was made for $25,000 and eventually grossed over $700,000. It was broadcast frequently on CBC in Canada, and CBS in the United States. It was even given a special screening for the 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal.
Scope and Content
This file includes a VHS copy of the original short video of "The Violin" , the accompanying book, correspondence, and promotional materials related to Maurice Solway's speaking tours in promotion of the film. These materials include a picture postcard and numerous posters and programmes for specific speaking and performance engagements associated with the release and screenings of the film. Also included are two hand-coloured children's illustrations of violins with accompanying letters to Solway, from children who had seen the film and wrote to express their appreciation. "The violin: a children's story" (McGraw-Hill: 1976) also uses stills from the film. The text was written by Robert Thomas Allen, from the story by Pastic and Welsh. Solway's score for the film is reproduced in the back of the children's book.
Notes
Includes 1 videocassette (VHS), 1 v. of text, 1 folder of textual records, and 3 graphic images (2 illustrations, 1 picture postcard).
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Morris Norman collection
Level
Collection
ID
Fonds 22
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Morris Norman collection
Level
Collection
Fonds
22
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1856-1995
Physical Description
1.1 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Morris Norman (b. 1946) is a chartered accountant living and working in Toronto. He is an avid collector of Canadiana, specifically Judaica. He purchases lots at auction and donates them to the Ontario Jewish Archives, as well as other institutions.
Scope and Content
This collection consists of the individual items collected at auction by Morris Norman. The records relate to the Toronto Jewish community and Ontario Jewry and include textual documents, photographs, near-prints, publications, artifacts, posters and broadsheets, sound recordings, and ephemera. Most of the items relate to various Jewish organizations, businesses, synagogues and individuals, and to Christian missionary work in Toronto. The material has been described at the file level, or where appropriate, the item level.
There are also four distinct series of records which document Berul Sugarman, who was a concert violinist and orchestral leader; the Franklin family, who owned a large amount of property in Toronto in the late 1800s and early 1900s; radio and television scripts written by Wayne and Shuster, Henry Karpus and Russell Bradley; and a collection of Turofsky photographs.
Notes
Physical description note: Includes 49 objects, 25 photographs, 7 audio recordings and 4 prints.
Name Access
Norman, Morris
Norman, Jessie
Creator
Norman, Morris (1946-)
Accession Number
1995-9-3
1995-9-4
1995-9-8
1996-6-3
1996-7-3
1996-9-1
1997-7-1
1998-1-1
1998-3-44
1998-7-2
1999-10-1
2000-7-4
2000-12-3
2001-3-3
2001-4-3
2001-8-5
2001-10-6
2001-11-1
2002-4-1
2002-5-1
2002-7-1
2002-9-1
2002-10-5
2002-10-58
2002-12-3
2003-5-3
2003-10-6
2004-7-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2003-8-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2003-8-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
6.6 m of textual records and graphic materials
Date
[198-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records relating to Markson's design work for the Holocaust Centre, for Jewish Family & Child Services, and for the film, Growing up in America. These records include textual records, slides, negatives, photographs, films, and sound recordings in various formats.
Use Conditions
Donor retains copyright. Material can be made available for viewing and reference at the OJA. Researchers who require copies for personal use or publication must obtain permission from donor first.
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Name Access
Markson, Morley
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-3-16
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-3-16
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
81 photographs and other material
Date
[ca. 1937]-1998
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records relating to the life and weightlifting career of Bill Gryfe. The textual records are photocopies of correspondence, clippings and certificates from a family album. The photographs are scanned copies from this same album and include images of Bill with various individuals and images of weightlifting teams and individuals that he had coached. There are two trophies: one is a Grand Order of Israel bowling award and one is an award presented to Bill in 1979 by the JCC for over 50 years of service. There is also a CD with Bill Gryfe's memoirs and some additional photographs of Bill at a young age, and of him at various weightlifting events and on vacation.
Administrative History
Bill Gryfe was an early member of the Y.M.H.A. He began as a weightlifter and in 1931 became a bar bell coach of the Y.M.H.A. weightlifting team.
He coached at many national and international competitions such as the Canada games, the Commonwealth Games, the Pan-American Games and the Maccabean Games. He also officiated and refereed at national and international competitions including the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal.
Throughout his life, Bill was devoted to the promotion of physical fitness and competitive weightlifting. He was a founder of the Ontario Weightlifting Association and its first president in 1968. Over the years, he received numerous awards and citations, including a nomination for the Order of Canada in 1982. Bill died in 2005 at the age of 95.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes 3 cm of textual records, 2 items, and 1 electronic record.
Name Access
Gryfe, Bill
Y.M.-Y.W.H.A.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-4-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-4-4
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w (tif)
5 documents (tif)
1 folder of textual records
1 DVD
1 videocassette
Date
1941-2004
Scope and Content
Accession consists of copies of electronic copies of photographs, postcards and telegrams as well as newsclippings, a video and a DVD documenting the career of Sam Shapiro in the RCAF and his time as a Prisoner of War at Stalag Luft 3 in Poland.
Administrative History
Sam Shapiro enlisted as a pilot in the Royal Canadian Air Force in September 1940. He received his wings in Brantford and was sent overseas in April 1941 as a sergeant pilot. He was in Squadron ten and flew eight successful missions before his plane was shot down over Holland in August 1941, killing two of the crew.
Shapiro was captured by German forces on 17 August 1941 and was taken to Stalag Luft 3 camp in Poland, where the "Great Escape" took place. Shapiro was not part of the breakout, but did help dig the tunnel that allowed seventy-six of his fellow prisoners to escape.
While a Prisoner of War, Shapiro was promoted to Warrant Officer. He was liberated on 16 April 1945 and arrived in England five days later. Shortly after arriving home in 1945, Shapiro received the YMCA sports badge for his conduct in the POW camp and the Canadian Volunteer Service medal. He married his fiance Geraldine Perlman in 1945.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Shapiro, Sam.
Stalag Luft 3
Perlman, Geraldine
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-12-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-12-4
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
0.3 m. of textual records and other material
Date
1973-2005
Scope and Content
The records in this accession consist of early minutes of the Executive Committee, high holiday sermons, sidureem (booklets) that were produced by the synagogue for Shabbat and the holidays, a cassette containing instructions for bar/bat mitzvah children, a CD of music entitled "Solel Sings "Kids" Songs!", and a videotaped recording of the 25th Anniversary celebration of the shul.
Custodial History
The records were donated to the OJA from their archives committee. This committee will be responsible for overseeing future transfers and for helping to establish an information management program within the synagogue.
Administrative History
Solel Congregation was established in1973. It is a reform synagogue, situated in Mississauga, that currently has a membership of 300 families.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
Solel Congregation (Mississauga, Ont.)
Places
Mississauga (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-7-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-7-10
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
19 photographs : b&w
1 folder of textual records
2 books
1 CD
1 vest and 1 hat
Date
1938-1986
Scope and Content
This accession consists of material documenting the donor's family, particularly her father, Nathan Rivelis. The items include a vest and hat worn by her father during the late 1950s as part of the Lion's Club. It also consists of an oral history of her father conducted in 1983; his school primer and English reader; photographs of the business and Hebrew classes; certificates; and finally, newspaper clippings.
Identified photographs are as follows:
01. Nate Rivelis with Rivelis staff, ca. 1982.
02. Lions club executive, ca 1955.
03. Rivelis storefront, [195-].
04. Rivelis interior, [195-].
05. Rivelis storefront, 1986.
Administrative History
The Rivelis family owned a large clothing store in North Bay from 1926 until 1986 called Rivelis. They sold men's and women's mid-range clothing and became famous in town for their annual sale held on November 16th. The business grew from a small family-run store to a large department store with twelve employees.
In addition to running the business, Nate Rivelis was also involved in the local Lion's Club and was the president of this organization from 1957-1958. He was the only Jewish member at that time. In addition, he also served as the president of the Hebrew school during the 1940s.
Subjects
Communities
Business
Name Access
Rosen, Rheta
Rivelis, Nathan
Places
North Bay (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-9-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-9-2
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
architectural drawing (electronic)
Physical Description
37 photographs : b&w and col. (jpg) + 2 identification keys
16 documents (28 jpgs)
2 architectural drawings (jpg)
Date
[189-]-2004
Scope and Content
Accession consists of scanned copies of original records documenting the Jewish community in Cornwall. The records relate to various individuals in the community, including the donor, as well as organizations such as B'nai Brith, Hebrew Ladies' Aid Society, and the Beth-El Congregation. The items include scans of cemetery plans, burial certificates, photographs, meeting minutes, memorial books and various legal documents.
Photographs are as follows:
01. 60th Anniversary of D-Day Programme.
02. Abe and Rose Goldhamer, Long Sault Rapids before the seaway, ca. 1941.
03. Al Burnes in uniform. Al lived in Cornwall and moved to Toronto, [between 1939 and 1945].
04. Archie Dover, first person buried in the new cemetery, pg. 1, 1962.
05. Archie Dover, first person buried in the new cemetery, pg. 2, 1962.
06. Beth El Synagogue, exterior, nd.
07. Beth El Synagogue, interior, nd.
08. Birdie Phillips Miller.
09. B’nai Brith, ca. 1961. [obverse]
10. B’nai Brith, ca. 1961. [reverse]
11. B’nai Brith entertaining seniors from Glen Stor Dun Lodge, 1964.
12. B’nai Brith girls temporary charter, 1967.
13. B’nai Brith Youth Organization temporary charter, 1967.
14. Boys playing hockey behind the shul, 1930s. Back row, left to right: unidentified, Jack Abrugov, Murray Berns, Julius Kolomier. Front row, left to right: unidentified, Jack Goldhamer, unidentified, unidentified, unidentified.
15. Braham Goldhamer on piano.
16. Cemetery plan from office of LP Stidwill, civil engineer and Ontario land surveyor, April 18 1958.
17. Cemetery plan, nd.
18. Construction of the St. Lawrence Seaway, Robert Saunders Dam, 1957.
19. B’nai Brith emergency meeting minutes, 1967.
20. Entertainer, Helen Goldhamer and her father, Julius Miller.
21. General meeting regarding building of the synagogue, pg. 1, Oct. 5, 1924.
22. General meeting regarding building of the synagogue, pg. 2, Oct. 5, 1924.
23. B’nai Brith Cornwall Lodge, 1961. [obverse] Pictured are, Standing left to right: Moe Helperin, Peter Solway, Oscar Niduvitch, Louis Dubinsky, Alex Abugor, Sam Nyman, Moe Schulman, Bernard Miller, I. Martin, Saul Schulman. Seated left to right: Mark Goldhamer, Sam Smolkin, Saul Kaye, Mrs. Eddie Cantor (guest speaker), Rabbi Matts, Julius Miller.
24. B’nai Brith Cornwall Lodge, 1961. [reverse]
25. Hebrew School, ca. 1958.
26. Helen, Mark and Brham Goldhamer, ca. 1958.
27. Helen Goldhamer on the St. Lawrence just west of Cornwall.
28. Helen Goldhamer speaking.
29. Helen Goldhamer thanking guest speaker.
30. Joel Horovitz, Bar Mitzvah programme, 1954.
31. Julius Miller and daughter Helen Goldhamer with father Moses Miller (seated) and grandson Braham Goldhamer at age 2.
32. Julius Miller and wife Birdie in front of their furniture company’s first truck, ca. 1946.
33. Julius Miller Grove invitation to ceremony, 1969.
34. Julius Miller Grove letter, 1969.
35. Julius Miller Grove plaque, ca. 1969.
36. [Phillips family?], ca. 1900.
37. Annette Phillips and Mary Phillips, ca. 1948.
38. Julius Miller presented with a pin by Mrs. Eddie Cantor at an Israel Bonds drive, 1961.
39. Nathan Phillips with unidentified boy.
40. Left to right: Annette Phillips, Mary Phillips, Birdie Phillips Miller and Riva Phillips, 1940s.
41. Left to right: Archie Dover, Julius Miller and Rabbi Lewin at the Memory Board dedication.
42. Left to right: Helen Goldhamer, Sarah Vineberg, Mrs. M. Phillips, Birdie Phillips Miller, Annette Phillips, ca. 1938.
43. Succot. Left to right: Margot Miller, Jack Miller and Braham Goldhamer, ca. 1956.
44. Left to right: Mark Goldhamer, Iruim Thaw, Saul Schulman and guest speaker, ca. 1961.
45. Nathan and Sam Phillips, ca. 1920.
46. Legal letter regarding the deed to the cemetery, pg. 1, 1929.
47. Legal letter regarding the deed to the cemetery, pg. 2, 1929.
48. Markus Goldhamer RCAF discharge papers, pg. 1, 1945.
49. Markus Goldhamer RCAF discharge papers, pg. 2, 1945.
50. Markus Goldhamer RCAF photo, Second World War.
51. Mary Phillips, life member of Hadassah-WIZO card, April 5, 1954.
52. Memorial book, pg. 1, 1926.
53. Memorial book, pg. 2, 1926.
54. Memorial book, pg. 3, 1926.
55. Memorial book, pg. 4, 1926.
56. Memory board.
57. Moses Miller.
58. Original minutes forming the B’nai Brith chapter in Cornwall, pg. 1, 1934.
59. Original minutes forming the B’nai Brith chapter in Cornwall, pg. 2, 1934.
60. Original minutes forming the B’nai Brith chapter in Cornwall, pg. 3, 1934.
61. Original minutes forming the B’nai Brith chapter in Cornwall, pg. 4, 1934.
62. Part of crowd at the annual dinner in Beth El Synagogue hall.
63. Photocopy of Hebrew Ladies’ Aid meeting minutes, pg. 1, Nov. 29, 1922.
64. Photocopy of Hebrew Ladies’ Aid meeting minutes, pg. 2, Nov. 29, 1922.
65. President of B’nai Brith Mark Goldhamer speaking. Helen Goldhamer seated to his left.
66. Riva Phillips beside Julius Miller Furniture shop, 1950s.
67. Thank you card to Mark Goldhamer, pg. 1.
68. Thank you card to Mark Goldhamer, pg. 2.
69. [Phillips family?], ca. 1900.
Custodial History
The original records are in the possession of the donor. The OJA was granted permission to scan the records in September 2007, as part of the Ontario Small Jewish Communities initiative. These copies were then donated to the Archives on 2007-09-04.
Subjects
Communities
Cemeteries
Name Access
Goldhamer, Mark
Places
Cornwall, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-4-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-4-4
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
10 cm of textual records and other material
Date
[191-]-1973
Scope and Content
This accession consists of material related to the Moses, Smith and Pullan families. The records include newspaper clippings, family correspondence, photographs, records related to the Girl Guide movement, an armed forces prayer book, a matzah cover, pamphlets, two silk top hats worn by the Pullan family to High Holy Day services, one audiocassette of a Hadassah choir, and fourteen home movies.
Custodial History
The records were in the custody of the donor before being transferred to the Archives on 2008-04-02.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes 14 film reels, 8 photographs, 3 objects, 1 audio cassette and 1 DVD.
Name Access
Moses, Hascal
Smith, Nathan
Smith, Lillian
Moses, Aubrey
Pullan, Elias
Pullan, Harry
Sudbury
Beth Tzedec
Toronto Hebrew Free School
Girl Guides
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-8-23
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-8-23
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
5 cm textual records
22 photographs : b&w (4 jpg)
Date
ca.1928-1994
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records and photographs pertaining to the interrelated Bogomolny and Greenspan families of Niagara Falls. Included is correspondence and speeches relating to Hadassah, a 1957 Sisterhood cookbook, a Hadassah-WIZO 75th anniversary Commemorative Book, a syngagogue yearbook 1960-1961, B'nai B'rith certificates of Abe Bogomolny's, programmes and invitations to special events, two picture postcards and other family photographs, newspaper clippings relating to the Bogomolnys, and immigration documents from 1928. Also included is a senior undergraduate research paper written by Gerald Enchin (originally of Kitchener), entitled, "A Locational Analysis of the Kitchener-Waterloo Jewish Community," 1971.
Custodial History
Many of these records were collected and created by Jennie Greenspan Bogomolny, mother of the donor. They were passed to Brenda upon Jennie's death and kept until they came to the OJA.
Administrative History
Brenda Bogomolny Enchin is the daughter of Jennie Greenspan and Abe Bogomolny. Jennie was 8 years old in 1928 when she came to Canada with her mother and three brothers. Jennie's mother, Faige Bracha Pomerantz, posed as a widow coming to marry Morris Greenspan, even though they were already married. Morris had come ahead to Ontario where his brother Samuel was already settled. The accession includes documents from the rabbi in Poland attesting to Faige's widowed status so that she could get into Canada. Jennie's older brother was Joseph (father of Eddie and Brian Greenspan). Her younger brother, Abram, is living in Dundas as of 2008. The youngest child was Samuel, who was born in Sept. 1927 just a month after Morris had left Poland, so he met his youngest son a year later. Samuel died at age 48 in 1975.
Brenda’s mother Jennie married Abraham Bogomolny in 1946. He came to Niagara Falls in the 1930s, and with his brother Hymie opened the Niagara Rug Company, with braided and woven rugs. They were the biggest suppliers to department stores like Woolworths and Eaton’s. There was a fire in May 1968. Jennie was an elementary school teacher, she taught at Memorial School where the Greenspan children went, and Battleford Elementary School, which now gives out the Jennie Bogomolny Citizenship Award every year.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-9-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-9-7
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records and other material
Date
1952-1997
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the Jewish community of Sudbury, Ontario, and specifically to Rabbi Rosenthal. The records include a delegates list for the 61st semi-annual conference of the Eastern Canadian Council of B'nai Brith, as well as a delegate's badge belonging to Rabbi Rosenthal; one piece of correspondence; two dinner invitations with the Mayor of Sudbury; a Survivors of the Shoah tribute booklet, as well as a photograph of Rabbi Rosenthal with Dr. Chomsky, and two photographs of children at a Chanukah party at the Shaarei Shomayim Synagogue in Sudbury. There is also a sound recoring of Cantor David Bagley with the Beth Sholom Synagogue choir in Toronto.
Identified individuals in the photographs include: Dorothy Greenspoon, Claudia Greenspoon, Annabelle Grimson, Lynne Waisberg, Sally Ann Braverman, Miriam Rosenthal, Rochelle Jaffe, Goldie Greenspoon, Alexis Singer, Judy Kahn, Hana Suk, Lilian Rosenthal, Jonathan Spiegel, Pauline Rottenberg, Arthur Moses, Stanley Jaffe, Mitchell Spiegel, Leslie Rosenthal, Victor Greenspoon and Jack Greenspoon.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of the donor, who is the daughter of Rabbi Rosenthal, until they were donated to the Archives on Sept. 16, 2008.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: records include 3 photographs, 1 badge and 1 sound recording.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-6-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-6-7
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
6.82 m of textual records and other material
Date
1935-2008
Scope and Content
Accession contains records documenting the administration, programs and events of Beth Jacob Synagogue in Kitchener, from 1935 to 2008. Non-textual records include photographs, architectural drawings, artifacts, and a couple of books. The textual records include newsletters, correspondence, financial ledgers, community directories, event programmes, membership lists and dues ledgers. There is considerable material on the Talmud Torah, including teaching materials, curricula, student guides, notes on parent meetings, and correspondence. There are approximately 40 photographs in the accession, of which 25 are from one 1985 shul event. Other records relate to the cemetery, memorial plaques, adult education, nursery school, Sisterhood, youth programs, bar and bat mitzvots, clubs and chevra kadisha. There are several artifacts: Rabbi Rosensweig's quill pen, athletic trophies and medallions, I.D. bracelets, Tree of Life plaques, a Hadassah Convention name tag with ribbon from 1951, and an (empty) copper mezuzzah. Records of the Kitchener-Waterloo Hebrew Day School will form a second fonds when the accession is described (see accession file folder for proposed arrangement scheme). The Hebrew Day School records include parents and staff handbooks, procedure manual, teaching materials, certificates, correspondence, governance documents, student records and attendance books with class lists.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Cemeteries
Synagogues
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-10-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-10-4
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
6 m of textual records and other material
Date
1939-2000
Scope and Content
The accession consists of records and artifacts created or collected by Rabbi Monson during his career. This includes his annual journals, marriage registers (1939-2000), newspaper clippings, photographs, awards, certificates, letters, a vinyl record, and several artifacts. The artifacts include objects of recognition from Shaare Zedek Medical Centre in Jerusalem and from a Negev Tribute in 1977, and items of regalia clothing from the Order of the Masons. There are also two scrapbooks of clippings: one documents Beth Sholom Synagogue in the 1940s, and the other is about the University of Waterloo in the 1960s.
Administrative History
Rabbi Monson was born in Ottawa in 1917. He was educated at Yeshiva University and later was ordained by the Rabbinical College of Canada of Montreal in 1939.
He served as a rabbi for Shaarei Shomayim Synagogue in Toronto from 1939 until 1943. During the war, he served as a Chaplain with the Canadian military until 1945. After his return to Toronto, he founded Beth Sholom Synaogogue and served as rabbi there until his retirement in 1985. During his tenure, he officiated his first Bat Mitzvah in 1953, introduced a mixed choir to the service, and allowed men and women to sit together in the sanctuary.
Rabbi Monson was a founding member of the Canadian Council for Christians and Jews. Over the years, he served on the Ontario Police Services Commission and many other government committees. He also helped establish Or Yehuda, a community centre for underprivileged Iraqi and Romanian children in Israel. As well, he was also instrumental in the establishment of the University of Waterloo. He organized the Hebrew Association of the Blind, and was named by the Prime Minister John Diefenbaker to the Board of the Canada Council. He was also active in the Order of the Masons. Finally, Rabbi Monson was a great supporter of Jerusalem’s Shaare Zedek Medical Centre. Through his persistent efforts, the small hospital he first visited during the Six Day War was transformed into a modern, state-of-the-art facility.
During his career he became widely known as the "people's rabbi", due to his ability to connect with community members from all branches of Judaism as well as non-Jews. He died on July 28, 2008, at 91 years of age. His wife Susan predeceased him and he left behind one child, Judith Waldman.
Descriptive Notes
Associated material note: Library and Archives Canada possesses 30 cm of records created by Rabbi Monson as well.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-6-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-6-7
Material Format
architectural drawing (electronic)
Physical Description
5 architectural drawings (pdf)
Date
[1992?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of five pdf files of architectural drawings for the Bathurst Jewish Community Centre. Three files show the floorplans for the 3 floors of the Centre, and two files show the renovations to the building.
Custodial History
The original plans are in the possession of Makrimichalos Cugini Architects.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-3-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-3-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 300 photographs and other material
Date
1906-1983
Scope and Content
The accession includes records documenting the family of Sharon Abron Drache. This includes both sides of her family: the Abramowitz/Abrons and the Levinters. The material consists of two beta home movie tapes, three DVDs, several photo albums, four artifacts (as well as newspaper clippings), correspondence, certificates, and other material. The donation also includes a book entitled Window on Toronto, a certificate for the Jewish Colonial Trust, examples of Murray Abron's photographs, and a recording of a speech Abba Eban gave at the UN.
Custodial History
The records were in the custody of Sharon Abron Drache. She has interherited the family photos and documents from both sides of her family.
Administrative History
Murray Abramowitz was born in 1912 in Toronto. His parents were David Abramowitz (1884-1963) and Sarah Abramowitz (née Winfield) (1885-1955). David arrived in Toronto in 1906. Sarah and her parents, Jacob and Anna, settled in Scranton, Pennsylvania around 1880. Jacob worked as a grocer and relocated his family to Toronto around 1894. Sarah and David were married at the McCaul Street Synagogue in Toronto on March 6, 1906. They resided at 159 York Street after their nuptials. The couple had three children: Rose (1907-2001), Oscar (1910-1986), and Murray (1912-2005). David's father, Shevach, served as the lay cantor at the First Roumanian Hebrew Congregation (now Adath Israel). David owned the men’s shop in Union Station. His sister, Sophie Abramowitz, ran the ladies' shop. The shops were located on the east end of the Great Hall, beneath the composite glass windows. Rose Abron Lahman became a physician, specializing in obstetrics and gynecology. Initially, she practised in Toronto; later, she practiced in Atlanta, Georgia. Rose graduated from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto when there were quotas for both women and Jews.
Murray married Edythe Levinter (m. Abramowitz) on June, 8, 1941. The event took place at the bride's family's home above their furniture store, J. Levinter Ltd, at 1169 Bloor Street West. The couple had one child, Sharon Abron Drache. Murray began using the Abron surname during the 1940s, changing it legally in the 1950s.
During his life, Murray worked as an hotelier and ran several businesses. These included the Rex Hotel in Toronto, Tent City at Lake Simcoe (ca. 1935-1945), and the St. Lawrence Hotel in Port Hope (1949-1955). When Murray managed the Rex Hotel he was a fifty-fifty partner with his mother's brother-in-law, Leo Hertzman. Leo owned and managed the store, United Clothing, which fronted the Rex Hotel on Queen Street at the south side of the beverage room. When Leo’s son Harold Hertzman returned from military service in 1945, Leo bought out Murray’s share in the business for Harold. Jack Ross and Morris Meyers purchased the hotel from the Hertzmans in 1951. Murray was also a co-owner of the Tent City business with his father, David Abramowitz, coinciding with his Rex Hotel years. During the late 1950s he worked as a real estate broker in Toronto and Florida. From the 1960s to the early 1970s, he worked in his mother-in-law’s furniture business, J. Levinter Ltd. After Murray retired from the furniture business, he became a stock broker. His hobbies included fishing, photography, and storytelling. He died on October 10, 2005.
The Levinter family was headed by Samuel Levinter and Rebecca Levinter (née Godfried). They were both born in Austria (Galicia) and came to Canada in their teens. After their marriage in 1890, they resided in St. John's Ward. The couple had seven children: Jacob (b. 1892), Etta (b. 1894), Manny (b. 1895), Isadore (b. 1898), Molly (b. 1900), Rose, and Dolly. Isadore became a prominent Toronto lawyer and was the first Jew appointed as a bencher at the Law Society of Upper Canada.
Samuel established Levinter Furniture in 1890. The business was initially located at 401-405 Queen Street. By 1925 Samuel had relocated his store to 287 Queen Street West, and his son Jacob had opened a second location at 1169 Bloor Street West. Jacob later expanded his location to 1171 Bloor Street West. Samuel died on April 30, 1942. Rebecca died in 1952. Jacob married Sara Kamin (b. 1894, Lodz, Poland) on June 25, 1916. They had six children: Edythe (1918 -2011), Alfred (1919-1919), Evelyn (1922-2006), Murray (1925-), Molly (1926 -), and Florence (b. 1930-). Jacob died of a heart attack in 1944. After his death, Sara took his place as owner and manager of the family business, grooming her son Murray to succeed her. Sara’s daughter Molly had an early career as a concert pianist in Toronto and New York. Sara died in Toronto in 1990.
Sharon Abron Drache attended Forest Hill Collegiate, graduating in 1962, and then completed an undergraduate degree and post-graduate diploma in psychology at the University of Toronto, the latter from the Institute of Child Study. She was enrolled as a special student in the Department of Religion at Carleton University from 1974-78. She has published four books of adult fiction: the Mikveh Man, Ritual Slaughter, the Golden Ghetto, and Barbara Klein Muskrat – Then and Now. She has also published two children's books: the Magic Pot and the Lubavitchers are Coming to Second Avenue. She has also worked as a literary journalist and book reviewer for several newspapers and journals including the Globe and Mail, the Ottawa Citizen, Books in Canada, the Glebe Report, and the Ottawa and Western Jewish Bulletins.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION NOTE: Includes 4 objects, 2 videocassettes (beta-tapes), 3 DVDs, 1 book, and 1 folder of textual records.
ASSOCIATED MATERIAL NOTE: Please see Sharon Drache's fonds at Library and Archives Canada and at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto for material related to her literary career. Please see Sharon Drache's fonds at the Ottawa Jewish Archives for material related to her journalism career. Finally, for additional material related to Sharon's family please see her fonds at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto.
RELATED MATERIAL NOTE: See accessions #2010-12/8 and # 2013-7/15 for addtional records donated by Sharon Abron Drache.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-3-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-3-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
88 photographs (44 jpgs): b&w ; 12 x 20 cm or smaller and other material
Date
[1922?]-1950
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records, photographs and films that document the Laufer family and Gordon Laufer's military service during the Second World War. Records include an ISCOR program from the Minsker Synagogue, newspaper clippings relating to Gordon's military service, photographs of Gordon's grade school classes at Lansdowne Public School, early life growing up in the countryside, wedding, and military service overseas, including one of a passover dinner for military personnel. The verso of the scanned photographs were also scanned to show the annotations and dates on the originals. The scanned photographs and documents were originally maintained together in an album. The two parchments likely document Isaac Goldman's membership in the Beizetchiner mutual benefit society. Finally, the films document the wedding of Gordon Laufer's step sister Sylvia Snider to Abe Sapoznik (1950), a passover family dinner (1947) and a family trip to Crystal Beach (1949).
Administrative History
Fanny Laufer, daughter of Isaac and Esther Goldman, was born in Toronto in 1920. Her parents immigrated to Toronto in 1903 from Poland after coming here on their honeymoon. Upon arriving in Toronto, Isaac worked for Eaton’s, but soon opened a dry cleaning and pressing store on Teraulay Street, which moved to 469 Dundas Street West in 1922. Fanny married Gordon Laufer (1915-1981) on January 25, 1946 at the Henry Street shul.
Gordon served in the Irish Regiment of Canada during the Second World War. He originally found work as a furrier, but later worked for the liquor board. Together, he and Fanny had two daughters; Gloria (b. 1947) and Sandy (b.1950). Gordon passed away in 1981 and Gloria passed away in recent years.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Descriptive Notes
Physical Description Note: Includes 5 scanned documents (jpg), 2 parchments, 3 film reels (ca. 20 min.), and 1 folder of textual records.
Language note:Parchments are in Yiddish
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-6-22
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-6-22
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1.55 m of textual records and other material
Date
1958-[ca.2009]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the operations, programs and events of the Lions Club of Forest Hill. Non-textual records include photographs, a VHS tape of the closing affair memorial service (June 1996), a floppy disk, Club vests with pins and metal badges. The textual records include newsletters, correspondence, brochures, member lists, certificates of duty, organizational charts, receipts, meeting minutes and agendas. Textual records also include announcements and financial records from charity and fundraising events put on by the Lions Club and a book titled, "The Toronto Lion" about different club histories in Toronto.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes 2 vests, ca. 50 pins, ca. 50 photographs, 1 floppy disk, and 1 VHS tape
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-7-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-7-8
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
31 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1950-1991
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the operations of the Shield's family bicycle business. Non-textual materials include a leather wallet and a metal key chain, both with the Shields name on them. The textual records include catalogues for bike parts and accessories, price lists, stationary, invoices, order forms, stickers, employee requirements, management reports, receipts, meeting minutes, insurance certificates and letters about operations, profit margins, requests and proposals. Other textual material includes correspondence between family members. There is also one poster for Peugeot Cycles, which were distributed by Shields.
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Frankel and Draper family fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 104
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Frankel and Draper family fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
104
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1895-2009
Physical Description
21 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Gottschall Frankel (1832-1918) and his wife Mina Meyer (1841-1921) were born in Biblis (Hessen) and Aschaffenburg, Germany respectively. Gottschall died in Biblis and is buried in Alsbach, Germany. Mina passed away in Toronto and is interred in the old Holy Blossom Cemetery. Leo Frankel (1864-1933) was one of nine children born in Biblis, Germany to Gottschall and Mina. His siblings were Salmon (1874-1906), Benno (d. 1921), Ike (d. 1950), Louis (1879-1952), Maurice (1865-1935), Sigmund (1866-1936), Ida (1870-1952) (m. Levy) and Herman (1871-1939). Three of the siblings are buried in Montreal, and the rest in Toronto. Leo immigrated to Canada in 1881 at the age of seventeen and in 1886 established Frankel Brothers (scrap metal and processing) in association with his brothers. The siblings were eventually succeeded by several sons of the original partners. The company subsequently became Frankel Steel Ltd. and Steel Structures Corporation. Leo married Helena "Lena" Mayer of Florsheim, Germany on July 2, 1890 in New York City. They had three sons: Egmont Leo (1891-1964), Carl Milford (1894-1984), and Roy Hecker (1896-1983). The family lived at 504 Jarvis Street, the former Goodman residence in Toronto, from 1908. Carl married Dorothy Jacobs (1903-1987) who was born in St. Louis, Missouri. Her parents were Bernard Jacobs of Texas and Henrietta Altheimer of Arkansas. Carl and Dorothy had two daughters: Nancy Jean Frankel (b. 1928) and Carol Nina Frankel (1930-1999). Carl was a prominent member of the Toronto Jewish community, active in Holy Blossom Temple, several Masonic lodges, and was a founder of the North Toronto Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. His daughter Nancy attended Jarvis Collegiate Institute and was confirmed at Holy Blossom Temple. She married Darrell (Drapkin) Draper (1922-1992) of Fort William/Port Arthur in 1949. Darrell had studied at the University of Toronto and became a lawyer and judge. The couple's three children are Dr. Paula Jean Draper (b. 1953), a historian; Phillip Jacobs (b. 1954), a real estate lawyer; and Kenneth Lewis (b. 1957). Collectively the siblings have six children and several grandchildren. Nancy Draper has been a long time volunteer at the Ontario Jewish Archives. Nancy's sister Carol married Mandel Sprachman (1925-2002), the son of a renowned architect Abraham Sprachman of the firm Kaplan and Sprachman. Mandel followed his father into the profession, specializing in cinemas and theatres, including the award-winning restoration of the Elgin and Winter Garden Theatres (1985-1989). The Frankel family genealogy is wide in scope, extending from Germany and England to the United States and Canada. One notable ancestor with German lineage is Israel Beer Josephat who changed his name to Paul Julius Reuter and founded the Reuters News Agency.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the Frankel and Draper (Drapkin) families and their connected branches, such as the Jacobs (English in origin), Josephat, Meyer, and Altheimer (all German in origin) families. Records include: photographs of the exterior and interior of the Frankel home at 504 Jarvis Street, Toronto; formal individual and group photographs taken in Toronto and other cities of family members at various gatherings and of Nancy Frankel's confirmation class at Holy Blossom; pictures of Darrell Drapkin (later Draper) and his Sigma Alpha Mu fraternity brothers at the University of Toronto; group photographs of members of the Palestine Lodge of Masons, of which Carl and his brother Egmont were members; and a variety of candid shots in many locations including outside the Frankel family home in Biblis, Germany.
Textual records include: essays and programs concerning Holy Blossom, publications from Camp Wabi-Kon and Jarvis Collegiate yearbooks, and material from the Ulyssean Society at Hart House, the Oakdale Golf and Country Club, and the Carmel Chapter of Hadassah documenting Nancy's involvement with these organizations.
Objects include a souvenir matchbook from the wedding of Darrell Draper and Nancy Frankel and a membership coin and badge in a leather case documenting Carl Frankel's involvement with Masonic lodges.
Notes
Physical description note: Includes 250 photographs, 3 objects,1 CD, and 1 video cassette.
Name Access
Draper (family)
Draper, Nancy (1928-)
Frankel (family)
Subjects
Families
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Toronto Hadassah-WIZO fonds
Annual Bazaar series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 71; Series 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Toronto Hadassah-WIZO fonds
Annual Bazaar series
Level
Series
Fonds
71
Series
1
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1924-2006
Physical Description
90 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
In 1924 the first official Toronto annual Hadassah Bazaar was held at the Masonic Temple at Davenport and Yonge. Over the years, venues changed with increasing demands for space as the popularity of the event grew. These locations included Varsity Stadium (1945-1948), the Automotive Building at the CNE (1949-1999), and currently the CNE’s National Trade Centre (Direct Energy Centre).Toronto pioneered the mammoth volunteer-run bazaar concept and was followed by other cities – Montreal (ca.1932), Vancouver (1951) and a number of smaller communities.
Admission fees were documented from 25 cents in 1934 to $4 in the 1990s.In most instances throughout the years, reduced or free admission was offered to preschoolers and seniors.
The early bazaars sold used clothing, hand sewn articles and home cooked kosher specialties. The 1930s saw the introduction of “carnival elements” such as fortune telling and bingo, and social events that included dinners, floor shows and dancing to the music of well known bands. The “Beautiful Child Photography Contests”, fashion shows, art exhibits, and the Hadassah Exposition and Bazaar Cooking Schools were inaugurated during the same decade.
During the Second World War, the Red Cross and war efforts were incorporated into bazaar activities. In the 1950s auctions were introduced.1963 saw the first Eilat Lighthouse – a colossal advertising pyramid. From the 1970s to the 1990s, new features such as clothes boutiques, mini-stores, and disco contests appeared.
Proceeds from the fairs and bazaars from the Bazaar’s inception until recent years rose exponentially from a thousand or so dollars to hundreds of thousands. These funds have generally been directed to medical and welfare services for needy women and children in Israel. From 1939-45, some of the monies were directed to war projects in Palestine, England, and Egypt. Recent beneficiaries include Asaf Harofe Rehabilitation Hospital, Nahalal (a co-educational secondary school focusing on farming technology), and medical research at the Hebrew University.
Enthusiastic crowds of up to 60,000 continue to line up at 6 am on the last Wednesday of October every year. The City of Toronto has recognized the Bazaar since 1989 with it’s proclamation of “Hadassah – Wizo Bazaar Day”.
From modest beginnings, Toronto’s Hadassah Bazaar has evolved into what is billed as the “largest one day bazaar in the world”.
The 84th was the last bazaar held in October 2008.
Scope and Content
The series consists of records in the form of textual documents, photographs, posters, scrapbooks and audio- visual recordings that document the history of the Toronto Hadassah Bazaar from 1924-2006.These include activities such as social events, meetings, rallies, as well as records including press clippings, memorabilia, correspondence, and financial reports.
Photo Captions:
028 - [Unidentified], Ella Fleischmann, [Unidentified], Israel Booth at Hadassah Bazaar, Exhibition Place, Toronto, Ontario [ca. 1965].
Notes
Physical description note: Includes 2472 photographs, 3 posters, 2 audio recordings, 4 video recordings, 2 artifacts, and 8 scrapbooks.
Subjects
Bazaars (Charities)
Arrangement
The textual records are aranged in chronological order and then by activity such as planning, correspondence and publicity.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Toronto Hadassah-WIZO fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 71
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Toronto Hadassah-WIZO fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
71
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1924-2006
Physical Description
11 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
The first Canadian chapter of Hadassah was established in Toronto in 1916. Subsequent chapters emerged in other large Canadian cities thereafter. In 1919 several chapters organized to form the Hadassah Organization of Canada. And in 1921, Hadassah Canada joined the Women’s International Zionist Organization (WIZO), and subsequently changed its name to Hadassah-WIZO. The original goal of Hadassah was to raise funds for refugees in Eastern Europe. Later on, their mandate shifted to that of providing money and support for the Jews in Israel. Although it spent a great deal of time and resources raising funds for this cause, Hadassah-WIZO was a philanthropic organization that encouraged productivity rather than charity.
Today, Hadassah-WIZO is the largest organization of Jewish women in Canada. In addition to providing Jewish women with an opportunity to liaise with other women from the community and volunteer for a worthy cause, this organization also promotes some important national and international goals. These goals include: encouraging Jewish and Hebrew culture in Canada; extending the material and moral support of Jewish women in Canada to the people of Israel who require assistance; and cooperating with other organizations in the promotion of Canadian ideals of democracy.
The records in this fonds were created by the Toronto chapter of Hadassah-WIZO. The Toronto chapter is not only the oldest, but also one of the largest and most active affiliates of the 304 Hadassah-WIZO chapters in Canada. Some of the activities that it sponsors include the famous annual bazaar, which was started in 1924 and is one of the largest in North America. They also contribute to the support of a host of Canadian Hadassah-WIZO initiatives in Israel which include: the Nahalal School, the Netanya Technological High School, the Hadassim Children and Youth Village, several day care centres, women’s and youth clubs, the Hadassah-WIZO Canada Research Institute, and two medical centers. The Toronto chapter in particular sponsors youth aliyah, and raises funds and honours important volunteers through the organization of tribute dinners, golf tournaments, and other events. Finally, this chapter is also responsible for producing the Hadassah Reporter, which is the newsletter that documents the activities of the Toronto chapter.
Custodial History
The records were acquired from the main Hadassah office on Sheppard Ave.
Scope and Content
The records in this fonds document the activities of Toronto Hadassah-WIZO. They include the Hadassah magazine the Reporter as well as the national publication Orah. The fonds also consists of photographs, minutes of meetings, certificates, press clippings, correspondence, audio-visual material, posters and scrapbooks.
Notes
Associated material note: The Library and Archives of Canada also possesses material created by members of Toronto Hadassah.
Name Access
Toronto Hadassah-Wizo
Creator
Toronto Hadassah-Wizo (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
2003-3-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Family and Child fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 79
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Family and Child fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
79
Material Format
multiple media
Admin History/Bio
Jewish Family & Child was established in 1943 from the amalgamation of a variety of different social agencies formed as early as 1868. These included the Ladies Benevolent Fund, the Free Burial Society, Jewish Family Welfare Bureau, Jewish Children’s Bureau, Big Brothers and Big Sisters, and the Ladies Maternal Aid Society. Much of its funding and support after its inception came from the United Jewish Welfare Fund.
The first executive director of the agency was Dora Wilensky. She was a trained social worker who served for twenty-eight years, until her untimely death from cancer in 1959. Jerome Diamond took over in 1960 and Gordon Wolfe succeeded him in 1981. Ron Levin briefly replaced Wolfe after his retirement in 2003, and was succeeded in 2006 by Dr. Richard Cummings who then retired in 2015. As of 2017, Brian Prousky is the organization’s current executive director.
During the early years, fees were established, but the agency never refused to assist clients because of their inability to pay. JF&CS became one of the first agencies to rely on trained social workers. It was also the first social agency in Canada to become unionized.
Over the years the agency’s role has changed and it has expanded significantly, in terms of its staff and services. After the Second World War it played a pivotal role supporting the Holocaust orphans who came to Canada as refugees, particularly in the area of locating foster parents for these children. By 1957, the agency hired its first counsellor and became a member of the United Community Fund of Greater Toronto. The year 1968 marked the start of JF&CS’ new program involving the use of a mobile treatment centre to reach out to Jewish street kids and in 1974 they established the Jerome D. Diamond Adolescent Centre.
In 1981, JF&CS was mandated by the Province of Ontario as a Jewish children’s aid society responsible for the care and protection of all Jewish youth in the GTA. In 1983 they established the Just-A-Second Shop at 3101 Bathurst Street, which took in used goods from the community to pass on to needy families. Two years later they established the Henry G. Goodman Home for developmentally handicapped children on Wilmington Avenue. The following year marked the opening of the Elm Ridge Group Living Residence for elderly people. In 1988, they opened a special shelter for abused women and children, and in 1994, they introduced their Homework Club for kids.
The current mission of Jewish Family & Child is to support the healthy development of individuals, children, families, and communities through prevention, protection, counselling, education, and advocacy services, within the context of Jewish values. Their services include counselling, rehabilitation and support, foster care, family services, and community services. These services are offered in a host of different languages including Hebrew, Yiddish, Russian, French, and English.
JF&CS is an independent organization that receives its funding from a variety of different sources such as UJA Federation of Greater Toronto, United Way Toronto and York Region, the Government of Ontario, and individual donations.
As of 2017, JF&CS has nearly 130 staff providing more than thirty community services with a budget of almost $20 million. Their main office is located in the Lipa Green Centre for Community Services at 4600 Bathurst Street. They also maintain offices and run services out of their downtown branch at 35 Madison Avenue, their York Region branch inside UJA’s 1 Open Door at the Lebovic JCC, and their Jerome D. Diamond Adolescent Centre in midtown Toronto.
Name Access
Jewish Family and Child
Wilensky, Dora, 1902-1959
Wolfe, Gordon
Diamond, Jerome D.
Subjects
Charities
Children
Families
Nonprofit organizations
Access Restriction
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director and head of Jewish Family and Child prior to accessing the records.
Related Material
See also: Jewish Child Welfare Association fonds (fonds 86); Jewish Family Welfare Bureau fonds (fonds 87); Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds (fonds 66); and, United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds (fonds 67).
Creator
Jewish Family and Child (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
2004-5-101
2004-1-8
2002-10-38
2006-6-7 (Shelf 03-6,Orphan index cards)
2009-12-9
2010-4-1 (Shelf 34-1)
2010-10-5
2015-8/11
2015-9/1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sammy Luftspring fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 82
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sammy Luftspring fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
82
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1922-2000
Physical Description
2 scrapbooks : 65 x 48 cm and 34 x 30 cm
Admin History/Bio
Sammy Luftspring was born on May 14, 1916 in "The Ward" in Toronto. His parents were working-class Jews who emigrated from Eastern Europe. Sammy began training as a youth at the Brunswick YMHA. He lived in Kensington Market and attended B'nai Brith summer camp as a youngster. In 1932 he started entering boxing matches. He competed in 105 fights and only lost five bouts, capturing the Golden Glove tournaments in the weight classes ranging from bantamweight to welterweight. Sammy became famous for his fighting prowess as well as his Jewish pride, always sporting a Star of David on his boxing shorts.
By 1933, he became the Ontario lightweight champion, representing the Elm Grove boxing club. That same year, he took part in the Christie Pits riot. Because of his accomplishments in the ring and his contribution to his community, he became a highly respected athlete within the Jewish community.
In 1936, he was selected for the Canadian team to take part in the Berlin Olympics that year. Although he was eager to compete, his parents and the community pressured him to boycott the games in protest over the Nazis' treatment of Jews in Germany. Luftspring and "Baby Yak," another famous local Jewish boxer, decided to participate instead in the alternate games in Barcelona, Spain, called the People's Olympics. After making the trip to Europe by ship, the two faced the disappointment of having the event cancelled after the Spanish Civil War broke out on the eve of the opening ceremonies.
After his return to Toronto, Luftspring began to box professionally. In 1938, he won the Canadian welterweight championship after a 15-round fight where he defeated Frank Genovese. He held the title for two years. During a fight in New York against Steve Belloise, Luftspring was poked in the eye, resulting in a detached retina. This injury left him blind in one eye, ending his boxing career.
By 1948, he began a new career as a boxing referee. He refereed for several decades, overseeing some of the most celebrated fights of that time. He also ran a nightclub in Toronto called the Mercury Club with three partners. It attracted famous entertainers such as Henry Youngman, Vic Damone, and Tony Bennett. He subsequently ran other nightclubs such as the Tropicana.
In addition to his boxing career, Sammy was also a devoted family man. He married his wife Elsie in 1938 at the McCaul Street synagogue. Three hundred and fifty people attended and hundreds waited outside of the synagogue to wish them well. They had two children: Brian and Orian.
His biography, Call Me Sammy, was published in 1975. Luftspring was given the great honour in 1985 of being inducted into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. He passed away on September 27, 2000.
Custodial History
The scrapbooks were created by Sammy Luftspring. He kept them at his house and when he passed away they were safegaurded by his son Brian.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of two scrapbooks that reflect Sammy Luftspring's personal life and various careers as a boxer, referee, author, and nightclub manager and owner. Scrapbooks contain correspondence, ephemera, newspaper clippings, brochures, autographs, coins, and approximately 700 photographs.
Personal records include photographs of Sammy and his family during his childhood, family weddings, trips and vacations, and other family events, such as birthday parties and his son's bar mitzvah. There are also letters and cards from Sammy's wife, children, grandchildren and friends, and other ephemeral items Sammy collected, such as ticket stubs from baseball games.
Professional records include images of Sammy training for upcoming boxing matches, portraits of Sammy posing in his boxing attire, images from the grand opening of the Mercury Club, photographs of Sammy as a referee, as well as photographs of Sammy at various celebrity boxing matches. There is also correspondence and a brochure documenting Sammy's incorporation into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame and some correspondence regarding the publication and promotion of his book. Finally, there are numerous newspaper clippings relating to all of Sammy's professional endeavours.
Name Access
Luftspring, Sammy, 1916-2000
Subjects
Boxers (Sports)
Physical Condition
The scrapbooks are in poor condition. Many of the photographs, documents and clippings were glued to the pages and the pages have almost all fallen out of the bindings.
Related Material
1981-1-7
Arrangement
The scrapbooks have been kept intact and no arrangement has been done. However, some of the key images have been scanned and item level descriptions have been completed for them.
Creator
Luftspring, Sammy, 1916-2000
Accession Number
2009-10-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 67
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
67
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1936-1991, predominant 1938-1976
Physical Description
10 m of textual records
5541 photographs, 25 x 20 cm and smaller, and other media
Admin History/Bio
The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto was incorporated in Ontario in March 1917 to coordinate the fundraising activities of Jewish charitable, philanthropic, and social service agencies in Toronto. In 1918, ten separate agencies were funded by the FJPT. By 1937, fourteen agencies were funded. The Great Depression of the 1930s and the development of several newer Jewish aid, education, and medical care organizations created both increased need for resources and growing competition for ever-more scarce dollars. Within a very few years this funding crisis forced a major review of the organization.
During 1936 a series of special meetings of leading individuals were held to examine the income and expenditures of all Toronto Jewish agencies and also to speculate about the need for a new Toronto Jewish "Community Chest" as the sole fund-raising organization for a federation of all Jewish agencies including the FJPT. In 1938, the new United Jewish Welfare Fund was formally constituted. Added to the FJPT's previous list of Toronto client agencies in 1938 were: the Canadian Jewish Congress, the Hebrew National Association, the Jewish Immigrant Aid Association, the Mizrachi Society, the Toronto Free Loan Association, the Geverkshaften, and Old Folks Home, and the United Palestine Appeal, raising the total number of agencies to 22.
When the State of Israel was established in 1948, the UJWF's annual fundraising campaign was combined with the CJC's United Palestine appeal to form a new, combined campaign named the United Jewish Appeal (UJA). In 1967, the UJA name was legally changed to the United Jewish Appeal of Metropolitan Toronto.
In mid-1976, the organization's public name was changed to the Toronto Jewish Congress. Although initially thought of as a merger between the UJWF and the CJC, the actual result was the expansion of the UJWF responsibilities to include local education and welfare services previously shared with the Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region. The UJWF, however, remained the legal senior entity.
In 1991 the public name was again changed to the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto and in 1999, to UJA Federation of Greater Toronto. By this date, over 30 beneficiary and affiliated agencies, 49 affiliated schools and five Federation departments were fully or partly funded by the UJA Federation.
In June, 2010, the organization altered its legal structure, with the senior legal entity becoming the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of 25 series: Annual Meetings, Annual Reports, Board of Directors, Constitution Committee, Executive Committee, Officers Committee, Budget and Finance Committee, Administration Committee, Social Planning Committee, Committee on Capital Needs and Planning, Central Committee on Scholarships in Aid, Joint Committee of the BJE and UJWF Study on Jewish Education, Nominations Committee, Pension Fund Committee, Coordinating Committee, Special Ad Hoc and Temporary Committees, Annual Campaign, Client Agencies, Joint Committee of the CJC and the UJWF, Committee on Community Organization, Sub-Committee on Construction and Administration of Community Schools, Joint Committee on Fundraising, Personnel Committee, Community Leadership Development Council, and Israel at Fifty Community Celebration.
Over 4500 photographs and a variety of other media are managed within Series 17, Campaign records.
Notes
For exact details about the contents of individual series and sub-series, please review their scope and contents notes.
Name Access
United Jewish Welfare Fund
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto
United Jewish Appeal
Toronto Jewish Congress
Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Subjects
Charities
Fund raising
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
For records of the predecessor of the UJWF, see Fonds 66, the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds.
Further detailed documentation of the proposed merger between the UJWF and the CJC (creation of the TJC) may be found in Fonds 67, Sub-sub-series 5-5-1, Files 171 and 221.
Further documentation on the United Jewish Welfare Fund may be found within Fonds 9, Series 7, records of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society.
For further detailed records of a key community leader's involvement with the UJWF see Accession 1982-8-8, the records of Samuel Godfrey, 1943-1972.
Creator
United Jewish Welfare Fund (1938-)
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Level
Sub-series
ID
Fonds 67; Series 17-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Level
Sub-series
Fonds
67
Series
17-1
Material Format
multiple media
Date
[197?]-2008
Physical Description
1.8 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
UJA Federation’s Walk with Israel was first held in May 1970, when it was called the UJA Walkathon. The first Walk was organized quickly with no advance publicity, yet it still raised $55,000. In the early years, funds raised in the Walk went into UJA’s Israel Special Fund. Since then, the money has supported particular projects in Israel that often involve children, since children are the main fundraisers in the event. The Walk with Israel has grown into the largest event in the Toronto Jewish community, with over 20,000 people participating as volunteers or walkers, and funds raised reaching as high as $400,000. The event has had several name changes since 1970: Walk for Israel (1978-1993); Community March for Israel (1994-1996); Israel Funwalk (1998-2002); and the current name, Walk with Israel.
The Walk with Israel is one of the programs mounted by the Annual Campaign department of UJA Federation. It is planned by a Cabinet Committee, with one or two laypeople as chairs, and numerous sub-committees. The main UJA staff undertaking the planning and execution is the Walk Coordinator. Each year, sub-committees are formed for recruitment, logistics, marketing and public relations, the Festival, food, entertainment, etc. The Walk also involves many outside entities: companies approached for prizes, donations or sponsorship; entertainment groups; the Toronto police force, which provides traffic control, marshalling and a parade permit; city government, for park use permits and outdoor signage; community groups mounting displays; costumed character rental companies; and manufacturers of the t-shirts, hats and buttons produced each year for Walk participants.
In addition to being a major fundraiser, the Walk fashioned itself initially as a fitness challenge to children and athletes, with a route as long as 31 kilometres in 1976. Over the years, this length has been reduced significantly, with the event evolving into a more manageable and family-oriented event. In the last decade, with periods of tension overseas, it has been framed as a demonstration of solidarity with Israel. Alongside the main event, alternative fundraisers such as a large Raffle, Dance-a-thon, Aerob-a-thon and Learn-a-thon for Eitz Chaim day schools, have been held in some years to encourage more people to contribute. Incentives for those who collect sponsors have grown over the years, from free t-shirts to a succession of prizes depending on the amount of funds raised. The grand prize draw for many years was two El Al airline tickets to Israel.
The location of the Walk has moved from the Bathurst Street 'corridor' of the Jewish community, to a downtown route that for some years went through the historic Jewish neighbourhood of Kensington Market and more recently, begins and ends at Coronation Park by the lakeshore and winds around the downtown streets. There is now also a kick-off party at the Walk’s starting point. Since 1984, the Walk has culminated in a big festival, featuring rides, petting zoos, a barbecue, musical entertainment, clowns and other attractions. This was usually held in a park or the BJCC parking lot. When the Walk route moved downtown, the Festival shifted to Ontario Place, and more recently, it has taken place on the CNE grounds by the lakeshore. Since 2007, the Festival has been sponsored by RioCan, and 'yogen fruz' became a major sponsor of the Walk in 2008. Other Walk sponsors have included Roots Canada (supplier of t-shirts), Shopper’s Drug Mart, Henry’s camera centre, Canada Trust, National Bank Financial Group, and the Canadian Zionist Federation.
Scope and Content
Sub-series contains records that document the planning and coordination of the Walk for Israel each year, as well as photographs and other records from the day itself and post-walk evaluation and wrap-up activities. The records include meeting notices, agendas and minutes, information sheets, lists, schedules, sitemaps, correspondence, school presentations, permits, press releases, design work, invoices, flyers, and photographs. Materials distibuted to participants include walker passports that had to be verified at each checkpoint, sponsor books, collection envelopes, tickets and other ephemera.
Most of the records have been arranged by year, broken down by function, in the following order: Walk oversight (the Walk Committee and chairs); recruitment of participants; volunteers; logistics such as route and police/security coverage; publicity and public relations, design of memorabilia (i.e. hats); sponsorship and prizes; financial management; the Walk event itself; the Festival; related fundraisers, particularly the Eitz Chaim Day Schools Learnathon; and post-event evaluation. The Festival records document the planning of food, entertainment, displays, amusements, and volunteers, and include photographs taken on the day of the event.
Sub-series 17-1 also includes individual files containing photographs from ranges of years. These were added to this series after the major portion of the "Walk" records had already been processed.
Notes
Physical description note: Includes ca. 4513 photographs (1948 negatives, 431 jpgs), 8 videocassettes, 4 optical discs (videos), 12 posters, 13 t-shirts, 4 buttons, 2 shoelaces, 1 jacket and several hats.
Reproduction restriction note: Though there is no textual evidence indicating ownership of copyright, it is believed that all rights to the Graphic Artists negatives in this sub-series were transferred to UJA Federation (Communications department), since they were the ultimate possessors of the negatives. Copyright for photographs by Stephen Epstein remains in his possession. Other UJA staff photographs by Eve Marks are the physical and intellectual property of UJA Federation.
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Repro Restriction
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Maurice Berg fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 41
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Maurice Berg fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
41
Material Format
multiple media
Date
[191-]-[ca. 1989]
Physical Description
29 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Maurice "Moishe" Berg (1913-1993) was a Toronto businessman who devoted much of his life to Jewish communal work and particularly to Zionist work. He was born on July 29th, 1913 in Russia to Rachel and Jacob Hochberg. He came to Canada in 1920, with his mother, two brothers, and one sister.
Berg was educated in Toronto and became president of Maple Leaf Press, a printing and office furniture company that was founded in 1945. He was also an active member and leader of Canadian Young Judaea and past president of Ajalon Lodge. He became president of the Central Region of Young Judaea, and later, national president. He was also chairman of the Regional Young Judaea Committee and chairman of the Biluim Committee. Berg was instrumental in starting up Camp Shalom. He also served on the Board of Directors of the YM & YWHA and was active with many other Jewish groups and organizations. He was affliliated with Adath Sholom Congregation. Maurice Berg died on February 27th, 1993.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of records related to the personal and professional life of Maurice Berg and his involvement with various Zionist organizations. These organizations include Ajalon Lodge and Canadian Young Judaea. The records include scrapbooks, correspondence, photographs, certificates, programmes, ephemera, clippings, bulletins, and an award certificate.
Notes
Includes 111 photographs : b&w and col., 3 scrapbooks, 1 album of philatelic records, and 1 artifact (Artifact #291).
Name Access
Berg, Maurice, 1913-1993
Subjects
Zionism
Physical Condition
Good.
Related Material
See also photo #4627, 4628, and 4650
See also fonds 2 : 6 : 62 : Item 1
See also fonds 28-1 : 4 : 12
See also fonds 28-1 : 7 : 22
Arrangement
The fonds has been arranged and described as 21 files and 1 item by the archivist. The original order was maintained where it was discernible. The scrapbooks were kept intact though some were taken out of their original physical enclosure where possible for conservation purposes. The records have been placed in acid-free folders
Creator
Berg, Maurice, 1913-1993
Accession Number
1988-11-14
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Henry Weingluck fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 44
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Henry Weingluck fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
44
Material Format
multiple media
Date
[ca. 1939]-1985
Physical Description
60 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Henry Weingluck (1902-1987) was an artist and Toronto art gallery owner, who immigrated to Canada in 1948 after being imprisoned in concentration camps in France during the Second World War. Weingluck was born in Zawiercie, Poland on May 7th, 1902, to an Orthodox Jewish family. He was the son of Alter Weingluck, a footwear designer. He studied at art academies in Crakow, Copenhagen, and Berlin and was a pupil of Professor Max Lieberman, president of Berlin's Academy of Arts prior to the Nazi takeover of Germany. Weingluck often depicted Jewish themes in his paintings, in a style he called "academic impressionism." He exhibited in Paris with Kandinsky and Chagall, as well as at the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Jewish Museum, Berlin. He painted portraits of such prominent figures as Albert Einstein, Max Schmelin, Yehudi Menuhin, and Chaim Weizmann.
From 1933 to 1942, Weingluck lived in France and, during the Nazi occupation of France, was imprisoned in eight concentration camps from 1942 to 1945. The Nazis made use of his artistic talent as a barracks designer and portraitist. During this time, the Germans confiscated 375 of his paintings. After the war, Weingluck moved to Tangiers, Morocco, and then emigrated to Canada to join his brother in Toronto. Henry opened H. W. Art Gallery, at 665 College Street, around 1948, and then Weingluck's Art Gallery and Gift Shoppe at 623 College Street, in the 1950s. In 1950, he married his wife Rae (née Simon), whom he met in Canada. Henry died in Toronto in 1987.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of material related to the personal life and artistic career of Henry Weingluck. The records pertain to the following: his experiences during the war and in the work camp at Beaulieu, France; his emigration to Canada; his restitution claims for artworks confiscated by the Nazis; his exhibitions; and his art gallery on College Street in Toronto. These records include personal and professional correspondence, certificates, photographs, newspaper clippings, personal writings, publications, programmes, exhibition catalogues, designs and sketches, and artifacts.
Notes
Physical description note: includes 30 photographs, 1 audio cassette, 22 designs and sketches, and 16 objects.
Associated material note: the Canadian Jewish Congress National Archives (Montreal) has a collection of paintings and other records of Henry Weingluck.
Name Access
Weingluck, Henry, 1902-1987
Subjects
Artists
Physical Condition
Some of the records are in fragile condition.
Related Material
See also the Ontario Jewish Archives' news clippings file under "Weingluck, Henry"
Creator
Weingluck, Henry, 1902-1987
Accession Number
1988-2-11
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Island Yacht Club fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 46
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Island Yacht Club fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
46
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1951-2005
Physical Description
1.5 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
The Island Yacht Club (IYC) was founded in 1951 by a small group of Jewish sailing enthusiasts at a time when Jewish applicants were denied membership to Toronto's yacht clubs. The founding members included Cecil Yolles, Dr. Bernard “Bunny” Willinsky, Ben Dunkelman, John Bussin, Eon Gilmore, Mel and Irving Gould, Mark Speyer, Norm Kerzner, Joe Kitz, Boris Adelberg, and Bill Ackerman. The group obtained a lease from the City of Toronto for a parcel of undeveloped land on Mugg's Island in Blockhouse Bay. They then obtained a provincial charter incorporating the Island Yacht Club as a non-profit corporation. A board of directors was elected, with Bunny Willinsky as its first Commodore.
In 1952, the original group had grown to approximately 35 members. Work parties were formed from among the members to clear the land and a prefabricated building was purchased by the club which served as the early clubhouse. A generator was donated by member Al Jacobs for electricity and two floating docks were built. As the club membership grew, more land was acquired; the original clubhouse was expanded; grounds were landscaped; a swimming pool, lockers, dining room, lounge, docks, and marine railway were installed; and a tender was purchased. By 1956, the membership had grown to 350 with a fleet of eighty sail and power boats and the IYC was accepted into the Lake Yacht Racing Association (LYRA), the oldest association of its kind in North America.
In 1957, the IYC hosted its first open sailing regatta for the seven Toronto area yacht clubs and has since hosted many other regattas including four LYRA events. In order to accommodate its more junior members, a Junior Sailing Club was founded by Commodore John Zeldin in 1958, which has played a large role in the development of the IYC. In 1964, an adult sailing program was instituted to teach members and non-members racing tactics and rules. Racing competitions have been an important part of the IYC’s history. IYC sailors have been members of Canada’s Olympic sailing team and have competed in the Pan-American Games, Maccabiah Games, CORK regattas and other competitions in Canada and the United States.
Over the years, the purpose of the IYC has changed from a racing club that has developed champion sailors, to a more recreational club, oriented to family and leisurely activities. The IYC has also played a large social role in the lives of its membership, hosting galas, auctions, fashion shows, theme nights, bowling events, anniversary parties, the Commodore's Ball, and other activities during both the sailing season and off-season months.
The IYC has suffered from two fires in its fifty-five year history. The first fire occurred in 1986 in the IYC’s boat yard, destroying several boats. The second fire occurred in 2004 and destroyed the IYC’s clubhouse and its contents. A new clubhouse was officially opened on June 18th, 2006 and the IYC continues to serve its members in boating, socializing, dining, and marine services.
Custodial History
The records were donated to the OJA by Brooky Robins, archivist for the Island Yacht Club. Brooky and her husband, Hartley, are both members of the IYC. Hartley Robins has been a member since 1956 and was commodore from 1973 to 1976.
Scope and Content
Fonds documents the various functions and activities of the Island Yacht Club. The records include correspondence, financial records, meeting minutes, invitations, program flyers, year books, photographs, slides, films, flags, tickets and tokens, drawings, clippings, bulletins and newsletters, racing programmes and calendars, as well as the files of founding member, Cecil Yolles, and member and past commodore, Hartley Robins. The fonds also includes the original letters patent for the IYC.
Notes
Physical description note: includes ca. 600 b&w and col. photographs, ca. 400 col. slides, 5 flags, 3 film reels, 2 videocassettes, 1 architectural plan, 1 sketch, and 1 compact disc.
Storage location note: Box 8 (3" Letter Hollinger), 504 col. slides plus 2 b&w photos
Name Access
Island Yacht Club
Subjects
Clubs
Related Material
See also fonds 2, Benjamin Dunkelman fonds, series 1 and sub-series 1-4 for textual records and photographs pertaining to the IYC
See also fonds 37, Gilbert Studios fonds, series 4-1, item 18, for photo of IYC member Mr. William Bernard Herman
See "Island Yacht Club" vertical file in OJA file cabinet for newspaper clippings
Creator
Island Yacht Club (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
2006-2-12
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 15
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
15
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1892-1980
Physical Description
60 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Ida Lewis Siegel (1885-1982) was instrumental in the founding and development of several prominent Jewish organizations, such as the Daughters of Zion, Hadassah-Wizo Organization of Canada, the Hebrew Ladies' Maternity Aid Society and the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. She was also particularly active in the educational sector and in campaigning for the rights of female educators. She was internationally known for her devotion to Jewish learning and for her contributions to the development of the Toronto Jewish community.
Ida was born to Samuel Lewis (b. 1859) and Hannah Ruth (Ticktin) Lewis (b. 1864) on 14 February 1885 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She was the first child to be born in the United States after her parents immigrated from Lithuania. She had two brothers, Abe Lewis (b. 1880) and Charles S. Lewis (b. 1883). She attended elementary school in Pittsburgh, and in 1894, she and her family moved to Toronto.
On 14 February 1905, Ida married Isidore Hirsch Siegel at the Elm Street Synagogue. Isidore was a travelling peddler, and later, owner of a store in Cochrane, Ontario. Together, they had six children: Rohama Lee (1905-?), Leah Gittel (Labovitz) (1907-2004), David Isar (1909-2004), Sarah (Sontag) (1912-1942), Avrom Fichel (1916-2010), and Rivka Hadassah (Gurau) (1923-2001).
Ida is credited with helping to found a large number of Jewish philanthropic and social organizations including the Daughters of Zion, the first ladies' Zionist society in Canada (1899); the Herzl Girls' Club (1904); Hadassah-Wizo Organization of Canada (1916); the Hebrew Ladies' Sewing Circle, which developed into the Hebrew Ladies' Maternity Aid Society (1907); the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. (1919); the Women’s League of the United Synagogues of America in Toronto (192-); the Goel Tzedec Sunday School (1914); and the Goel Tzedec Sisterhood (192-). She was also named honorary president of the Beth Tzedec Sisterhood in 1953. With the help of her brother Abe, Ida formed the first free Jewish Dispensary in Toronto, located on Elizabeth Street in the Ward, which was the forerunner to the Mount Sinai Hospital.
Ida also helped form a unified fundraising body for the Jewish community known as the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies (1917), which would become the current UJA Federation of Greater Toronto. However, Ida was denied a seat on the executive after campaigning for a female representative.
Always involved in the field of education, Ida was one of the original founders of the Home and School Association in 1919. In 1930, she became the first Jewish woman to be elected to the Toronto Board of Education, a post which she held for six years. She was later named honorary secretary of the Toronto Board of Jewish Education. In 1937, she ran unsuccessfully for alderman in Toronto, but remained politically active with the Association of Women's Electors. She was active in the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom from 1915 onward and was an outspoken opponent of both world wars. Throughout her lifetime, Ida held the position of national vice-president of the Zionist Organization of Canada, sat on the executive board of the Canadian Jewish Congress and was a member of the Jewish Historical Society.
Her religious affiliations were with Goel Tzedec, Beth Tzedec, Shaar Shomayim and the Beach Hebrew Institute.
Custodial History
The records were created by Ida Siegel and were in her possession until 1982. After her death, her son Avrom and daughter Rivka took possession of the records until they were donated to the archives in 1998 and 2004.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of the records created and accumulated by Ida Siegel, documenting her personal and professional life, along with her philanthropic work. The types of records include personal reminiscences, diaries and memoirs, family correspondence, professional correspondence, speeches, scrapbooks, newsclippings, oral histories and photographs.
Notes
Includes 30 photographs, 2 scrapbooks, 13 audio cassettes and 7 audio reels.
Name Access
Siegel, Ida Lewis, 1885-1982
Siegel, Isidore Hirsch
Siegel, Leah Gittel (Labovitz) (Sadker)
Siegel, Rohama Lee
Siegel, David Isar
Siegel, Sarah (Sontag)
Siegel, Avrom Fichel
Siegel, Rivka Hadassah (Gurau)
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
1979-1-3
1980-3-4
MG2 O1l
MG2 O1m
National Council of Jewish Women fonds 38
Arrangement
Records had previously been placed in acid free boxes and file folders and labeled according to their contents.
Creator
Siegel, Ida Lewis, 1885-1982
Accession Number
1988-2-13
2004-5-129
2004-5-163
2005-5-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 38
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
38
Material Format
multiple media
Date
[190-]-2002
Physical Description
2.6 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
The National Council of Jewish Women of Canada (NCJWC) was the first national Jewish women's organization in Canada. The council had its beginnings among the urban elite, and played a strong role over the years in influencing public policy in such areas as relations with Israel, national unity, and the plight of world Jewry. The NCJWC is dedicated, in the spirit of Judaism, to furthering human welfare in the Jewish and general communities -- locally, nationally and internationally. It operated around three main pillars: service, education, and social action.
The National Council of Jewish Women was founded in the United States in 1893 by activist Hannah G. Solomon. In 1897, its first Canadian chapter was established in Toronto. In 1925, with seven chapters in Canada, a Canadian liaison position to the National Council of Jewish Women was created. A full-fledged “Canadian Division” of the NCJW was formed in 1934, with rules drafted at the first conference in Winnipeg three years later. Irene Samuel served as the Canadian Division’s first national president. In 1943, the division was renamed the National Council of Jewish Women of Canada, and was officially incorporated in 1944, though it did not receive its letters patent until three years later. Even so, the NCJWC still retained some affiliation with the NCJW, whereby they paid per-capita dues to the Americans in return for program and administrative materials. In 1967 the NCJWC ceased these payments altogether, thereby separating from NCJW completely.
The early NCJWC focused on providing service to young girls and immigrants. They also involved themselves in contemporary politics through support for the war effort; the council donated vehicles to the Red Cross, turned Council House into a servicemen's centre, and even built several libraries at Canadian army camps. A national office opened ca. 1950 in Toronto, but until 1966 it moved to the national president's home city with every election. That year the office was permanently anchored in Toronto. In the 1950s and 1960s the council established Good Age clubs, the Irene Samuel Scholarship Fund, and developed the national Higher Horizons child-care and Newer Horizons elder-care programs. It expanded its overseas programs with support for the Israel Family Counseling Association and Ship-a-Box. The Soviet Jewry projects in the 1970s and 1980s reflected the council’s increasing emphasis on social action. Since the late 1990s, the council has focused on women's issues with efforts such as the Breast Self-Examination (BSE) program.
The NCJWC was governed by an executive council, led by a president. Vice-presidents were each responsible for one portfolio, such as membership, public affairs, etc., which were in turn made up of a number of national committees. The national executive was responsible for producing by-laws, guidelines, policies and procedures, as well as developing national service and social action programs. National also provided support and program materials to the sections, and held biennial meetings every other year from 1937 in cities across Canada. Its decentralized structure meant that while the national office remained in Toronto, officers of the executive have resided right across the country.
As of 1997, the National Council of Jewish Women of Canada was an affiliate member of the International Council of Jewish Women, a member of UNESCO Canadian Subcommission of the Status of Women, and a member of the Coalition of Jewish Women Against Domestic Violence and the Coalition for Agunot Rights. Prominent past presidents include Mrs. Harry (Irene) Samuel, Mrs. Lucille Lorie, Dr. Reva Gerstein, Mozah Zemans, Mina Hollenberg, Sophie Drache, Thelma Rolingher, Helen Marr, Bunny Gurvey, Sheila Freeman, Penny Yellen, and Gloria Strom. The council’s national office moved to Winnipeg in November, 1993. As of 2006, the council still had 5 active sections in Canada: Vancouver, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Toronto and Montreal.
Custodial History
NCJWC donated these records to the OJA after they had finished a historical exhibit and catalogue in 1997 called "Faith and Humanity," celebrating 100 years of NCJWC.
Scope and Content
The fonds documents NCJWC’s fundraising, social service and social action work in Toronto, in other cities across the country, and overseas. Records include conference and meeting programs, minutes, hand-written correspondence, speeches and reports, national newsletters, published histories, by-laws and policies, photographs, publicity material, historical subject files and artifacts. The records have been arranged into nine series: National biennial conventions and annual meetings; National Executive Council; National portfolios and committees; National program and event materials; National history research and subject files; International Council of Jewish Women; Toronto Section; Photos and audio-visual material; and National Council of Jewish Juniors, Toronto Section.
Notes
Physical description note: includes ca. 2470 photographs, 13 architectural drawings, 2 artistic drawings, 3 badges, 3 medals, 1 pin, 28 audio cassettes, and 1 videocassette.
Name Access
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada
Subjects
Women
Related Material
See also: photographs 3207, 3192, 4140, 4067, 4066, 4434; Accession 1977-8-7 for National Council of Jewish Women of Welland; National Council of Jewish Juniors, photographs 458, 459, 460, 463, 464, 465, 466, 468; MG2 B-1K
Arrangement
Records have been arranged by function, in accordance with information gleaned from NCJWC's organizational charts and annual reports
Creator
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada
Accession Number
2001-8-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2010-10-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-10-7
Material Format
architectural drawing (electronic)
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
3 compact discs
Date
1976-2008
Scope and Content
This accession consists of three CDs containing 1. The original plans created by Jerome Markson for the Bathurst Jewish Community Centre along with relevant photographs and documents. These records were created between 1976 and 1984 and were digitized in 2007. 2. The mechanical as-builts for the Lipa Green Centre's Family Pavillion, created in 2008. 3. The drawings and specs issued for construction of the Lipa Green Centre's Family Pavillion created in May 2008.
Custodial History
The discs were in the possession of Stephanie Olin Chapman, Facilities Developer for the UJA Federation's Tomorrow Campaign.They were loaned to the Archives for copying and returned on Oct. 28, 2010.
Administrative History
UJA Federation's Tomorrow Campaign is Canada’s largest non-profit community development project. It is Federation's response to the need for new facilities and services brought about by the growth of Toronto’s Jewish community. The Tomorrow Campaign is mandated with the fundraising and creation of three campuses for Jewish life in the GTA. The Downtown District, serving Toronto's growing Jewish population in the city core, is anchored by the new Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre at Bloor & Spadina and the Wolfond Centre for Jewish Campus Life at Harbord & Huron. The new Sherman Campus, on Bathurst north of Sheppard, will include the new Prosserman Family Jewish Community Centre, where the Bathurst Jewish Community Centre is currently located, a new Koffler Centre for the Arts, a new National Centre for Jewish Heritage including the Canadian Jewish Musuem, the Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre and a renovated Lipa Green Building for Jewish Community Services. The Lebovic Jewish Community Campus, at Bathurst & Weldrick north of Rutherford, is designed to provide programs and services for York Region's Jewish community of 60,000 - the fastest growing in Canada. The Lebovic Campus will be highlighted by the Kimel Family Education Centre, housing the northern branch of the Community Hebrew Academy of Toronto (CHAT); the Schwartz-Reisman Centre offering recreational, educational, cultural, social and fitness facilities; community services; a United Synagogue Day School and other schools as well.
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-5
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
10 cm of textual records and other material
Date
[ca. 1957]-1999
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records that document Eugene Winter's activities as a leader in the Hungarian-Jewish community both abroad and in Canada. Included are newsclippings and correspondence featuring Eugene's life story and his nomination and receipt of various medals and awards, an inviation and programme for an Emmanuel Foundation gala dinner honouring Eugene's memory, a letterhead for the Canadian Jewish Federation of Hungarian Descent, photocopied photographs of Eugene speaking at various events, a meeting invitation for the Wallenberg memorial fundraising committee and Eugene's certificate of death. Also included is one Civitas pin, two Jewish War Veterans of Canada pins, Eugene's Ontario Medal for Good Citizenship, Jerusalem medal and Israel medal.
In addition, accession includes a videocassette documenting a Holocaust memorial service at Beth Shalom that had about 2000 Hungarian Jews in attendance (1968), a memorial certificate for Eugene's wife, Maria Winter, and Menorah Jewish News newspapers. Finally, accession contains a photograph of a Rosh Hashanah dinner at the Borochov Centre [ca. 1958] on Lippincott Street. Identified in the photograph from left to right are: Andy Lichtenberg, Henry Schwartz, Henry's wife (?), Bela Heisz (or Bayla Heiss), Peter Heisz (?), Magda Heisz, Shirley Heisz, Edith Lichtenberg and Rena Lichtenberg.
Administrative History
Eugene Winter (1910-1995) was born on December 31, 1910 in Budapest, Hungary. He married his wife, Maria Munczner (1910-1999), in 1932 and together they had two children: Gabriel (1934-2011) and Andy (1946-). During the Second World War he escaped from an enforced labour camp and became invovled in Hungary's Jewish underground resistance against the Nazis. After the war ended, he helped liberate many Hungarian cities from occupation and tracked down several war criminals.
In 1947, Eugene and his family immigrated to Israel where he helped found the town of Bat Shlomo. In 1951, they came to Canada, sponsored by Maria's brother, Frank Dosza. Soon after thier arrival in Canada, Eugene set to work helping other Hungarian Jews settle in Canada. He founded the Canadian Jewish Federation of Hungarian Descent, the Beth Hazichoron Congregation, the Toronto Hakoah Sport, Social and Cultural Club and the Menorah Jewish News. Eugene also served as vice-chairman for a fund-raising committee to build the Wallenberg Memorial Wing at the Regional Negev Hospital in Israel. Eugene passed away in Toronto in 1995.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes 1 photograph, 1 VHS, 4 pins, 3 medals, and 1 medal stand.
Name Access
Winter, Eugene, 1910-1995
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-8
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 30 compact discs and other material
Date
[ca. 2000] - [ca. 2007]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of cassettes, CDs, DVDs and one hard disk that document the activities of the Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario region. Included are recorded meeting minutes for the Community Relations Committee, Public Affairs Committee and the Security Committee, staff portraits, presentation slides, photographs of antisemitic incidents, Congress Contact newsletters, correspondence, and project proposals.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes ca. 10 DVDs, ca. 45 audio cassettes, and 1 computer disk ; 9 x 9 cm.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-12-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-12-8
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 11 cm of textual records and other material
Date
[ca. 1905] - 1989
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records, photographs and audio-visual material documenting Sharon Abron Drache's family and career. Family records document both sides of her family: the Abramowitz/Abron and Levinters. Family records include correspondence, invitations, photographs, five beta tapes of home movies, certificates, newsclippings, family genealogy trees and one scrapbook. Professional records include Sharon's curriculum vitae, newsclippings and a manuscript of Sharon's unpublished novel entitled, Weekend Commute.
Custodial History
The records were in the custody of Sharon Abron Drache. She has interherited the family photos and documents from both sides of her family.
Administrative History
Murray Abramowitz was born in 1912 in Toronto. His parents were David (1884-1963) and Sarah (nee Winfield) (1885-1955). David arrived in Toronto in 1906. Sarah and her parents, Jacob and Anna, settled in Scranton, Pennsylvania around 1880. Jacob worked as a grocer and relocated his family to Toronto around 1894. Sarah and David were married at the McCaul Street Synagogue in Toronto on 6 March 1906. They resided at 159 York Street after their nuptials. The couple had three children: Rose (1907-2001); Oscar (1910-1986); Murray (1912-2005). David's father, Shevach, served as the lay cantor at the First Roumanian Hebrew Congregation (now Adath Israel). David owned the Men’s shop in the Union Station and his sister, Sophie Abramowitz, ran the Ladies shop. The shops were located on the east end of the Great Hall beneath the composite glass windows. Rose Abron Lahman became a physician, specializing in obstetrics and gynecology. Initially she practised in Toronto and then in Atlanta, Georgia. Rose graduated from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto when there were quotas for both women and Jews.
Murray married Edythe (née Levinter) on 8 June, 1941. The event took place at the bride's family's home above their furniture store, J. Levinter Ltd, at 1169 Bloor Street West. The couple had one child, Sharon Abron Drache. Murray began using the Abron surname during the 1940s, changing it legally in the 1950s.
During his life, Murray worked as an hotelier and ran several businesses. They included the Rex Hotel in Toronto and Tent City at Lake Simcoe (ca. 1935-1945) and the St. Lawrence Hotel in Port Hope (1949-1955). When Murray managed the Rex Hotel he was a 50/50 partner with his mother's brother-in-law, Leo Hertzman. Leo owned and managed the store, United Clothing, which fronted the Rex hotel on Queen Street at the south side of the beverage room. When Leo’s son Harold Hertzman returned from military service in 1945, Leo bought out Murray’s share in the business for Harold. Jack Ross and Morris Meyers purchased the hotel from the Hertzmans in 1951. Murray was also a co-owner of the Tent City business with his father, David Abramowitz, coinciding with his Rex hotel years. During the late 1950s he worked as a real estate broker in Toronto and Florida. From the 1960s to the early 1970s he worked in his mother-in-law’s furniture business, J. Levinter Ltd. After Murray retired from the furniture business he became a stock broker. His hobbies included fishing, photography and storytelling. He died on 10 October 2005.
The Levinter family was headed by Samuel and Rebecca (née Godfried). They were both born in Austria (Galicia) and came to Canada in their teens. After their marriage in 1890, they resided in St. John's Ward. The couple had seven children: Jacob (b. 1892); Etta (b. 1894); Manny (b. 1895); Isadore (b. 1898); Molly (b. 1900); Rose and Dolly. Isadore became a prominent Toronto lawyer and was the first Jew appointed as a bencher at the Law Society of Upper Canada.
Samuel established Levinter Furniture in 1890. The business was initially located at 401-405 Queen Street. By 1925 Samuel had relocated his store to 287 Queen Street West and his son Jacob had opened a second location at 1169 Bloor Street West. Jacob later expanded his location to 1171 Bloor Street West. Samuel died on April 30, 1942; Rebecca died in 1952. Jacob married Sara Kamin (b. 1894, Lodz, Poland) on 25 June 1916. They had six children: Edythe (1918 -2011); Alfred (1919-1919); Evelyn (1922-2006); Murray (1925-); Molly (1926 -); Florence (b. 1930-). Jacob died of a heart attack in 1944. After his death, Sara took his place as owner and manager of the family business grooming her son Murray to succeed her. Sara’s daughter Molly had an early career as a concert pianist in Toronto and New York. Sara died in Toronto in 1990.
Sharon Abron Drache attended Forest Hill Collegiate (g. 1962) and then completed an undergraduate degree and post-graduate diploma in Psychology at the University of Toronto, the latter from the Institute of Child Study. She was enrolled as a special student in the Department of Religion at Carleton University from 1974-78. She has published four books of adult fiction, The Mikveh Man, Ritual Slaughter, The Golden Ghetto, Barbara Klein Muskrat – then and now, and two children's books, The Magic Pot and The Lubavitchers are coming to Second Avenue. She has also worked as a literary journalist and book reviewer for several newspapers and journals including, The Globe and Mail, Ottawa Citizen, Books in Canada, the Glebe Report and the Ottawa and Western Jewish Bulletins.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: Includes 1 scrapbook, ca. 8 photographs, 5 beta-tapes, and 4 DVDs.
Associated Material Note: please see Sharon Drache's fonds at Library and Archives Canada and at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto for material related to her literary career. Please see Sharon Drache's fonds at the Ottawa Jewish Archives for material related to her journalism career. Finally, for additional material related to Sharon's family please see her fonds at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto.
Related Material Note: see accessions #2010-3/1 and #2013-7/15 for addtional records donated to the OJA by Sharon Abron Drache.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-10-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-10-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
2 m of textual records and other material
Date
1982-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the activities and the membership of the Pomegranate Guild of Judaic Textiles, Toronto. Included are meeting minutes, agendas, newsletters, program and event materials, slides, and audio-visual materials documenting Guild events.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Harriet Liebman, the Guild's archivist. They were donated to the archives by the immediate past president, Rikki Blitt.
Administrative History
The Pomegranate Guild of Judaic Textiles was formed in 1982 for those interested in studying and creating textile art and needlework based on Jewish themes. The Guild charges a yearly membership, which supports its programming, exhibits, and newsletter entitled "The Pomegramme".
Use Conditions
Full citation crediting the Pomegranate Guild of Judaic Textiles, Toronto must appear in all publications alongside the OJA's required caption.
Descriptive Notes
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION NOTE: Includes approx. 500 slides (col.), 5 VHS, 1 DVD, 1 audio cassette.
Subjects
Arts
Name Access
Pomegranate Guild of Judaic Textiles, Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-3-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-3-8
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
58 photographs (tif) and other material
Date
1945, 1965-2003
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the establishment and activities of Toronto's Holocaust Memorial and Education Centre as well as the personal life and professional activities of Gerda Frieberg. Holocaust Education Centre records include audio-visual material, sound recordings, meeting minutes, financial records, booklets and brochures, photographs and flyers. Of note is a video of the opening and dedication of the Holocaust Museum in 1985, and the sheet music and sound recordings of the musical score Gerda commissioned for the Centre by Srul Glick.
Records in the Gerda Frieberg fonds document her involvement with the Holocaust Education Centre, the Jewish Holocaust Survivors of Canada, B'nai Brith Women, the Federation of Jewish Women's organizations, and her other activities. Included are photographs, newspaper clippings, meeting minutes, and correspondence. Also included is a sound recording from a Federation of Jewish Women's Organizations event and a DVD copy of the film "Mend the World", which is a CBC documentary that features Gerda and other Toronto Holocaust survivors. The electronic images were scanned from Gerda's personal scrapbooks.
Custodial History
Records were in the possession of Gerda Frieberg until she donated them to the OJA in 2012.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Includes 4 audio cassette tapes, 4 VHS tapes, 3 DVDs, 3 cm of textual records, and 8 photographs.
Subjects
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Name Access
Frieberg, Gerda
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-4-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-4-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records and other material
Date
[190-]-1994
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the literary and military careers of Leo Heaps, as well as a small selection of family photographs and textual records. Included are various manuscripts and other writings, newsclippings and documents related to Heaps' role as a British paratrooper and his subsequent awarding of the Royal Military Cross. The photographs document the Heaps family, as well as the underground resistance movement in Arnhem, of which he was a part.
The videocassette documents a family trip to Arnhem in 1994 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Arnhem.
Photo Caption (035): Seargent Alan Kettley of the Glider Pilot Regiment, [194-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2012-4-2. Courtesy of the Heaps Family.
Photo Caption (038): Gilbert Sadi-Kirschen known, head of the Special Air Service mission to Arnhem, [194-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2012-4-2. Courtesy of the Heaps Family.
Photo Caption (046): Major Tony Hibbot (left) about to take off for Arnhem, [194-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2012-4-2. Courtesy of the Heaps Family.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Adrian Heaps, son of Leo Heaps.
Administrative History
Leo Heaps (1923-1995) was born in Winnipeg in 1923, the son of A. A. Heaps and Bessie Morris. His father A. A. was a founder of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, the forerunner of the New Democratic Party. Leo Heaps was raised in Winnipeg and received an education at Queen's University, the University of California, and McGill University. During the Second World War, at the age of 21, Heaps was seconded to the British Army and found himself commanding the 1st Battalion's Transport. He participated in the Battle of Arnhem as a paratrooper.
Leo Heaps was awarded the Royal Military Cross for his work with the Dutch Resistance. His brother, David, had also achieved the same distinction, thereby making them the only Jewish brothers during the Second World War to win the decoration. After the war, Heaps went to Israel and aided their army in the establishment of mobile striking units. Whilst there, he met his wife-to-be, Tamar (1927-). Together they had one son, Adrian, and three daughters, Karen, Gillian, and Wendy.
During the Hungarian Revolution he led a special rescue team to bring refugees out and across the border. In the mid-1960s he returned to Britain where he dabbled in various entrepreneurial projects as well as writing several books, notably "The Grey Goose of Arnhem", telling his own story of Arnhem, the aftermath of the battle, and also the stories of other Arnhem evaders and their dealings with the Resistance.
Leo Heaps spent most of his life in Toronto, Canada, and was amongst the forty Canadian veterans who returned to Arnhem in 1994 to mark the 50th anniversary. He died in 1995.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Publication credit line must read: Courtesy of the Heaps Family.
Descriptive Notes
Physical Description note: Includes ca. 100 photographs; 1 videocassette (ca. 32 min) : col, sd. ; VHS, and 1 presentation piece : 52 x 49 cm.
Subjects
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Heaps, Leo, 1923-1995
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-8-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-8-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 18 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1884-1985
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the Coppel and Cooper families of Galt (now Cambridge) and Toronto respectively. Coppel family records include family correspondence, photocopies of Moses Kappel's discharge papers from the Austro-Hungarian military (1884), B'nai Israel Synagogue sisterhood meeting minutes, financial records, photographs, Hadassah booklets and programmes, and a photo album documenting the closing of B'nai Israel Synagogue in 1985. Also included are records relating to Elizabeth Cooper (née Coppel)'s involvement in Canadian Young Judaea and her work as a camp counselor at a Jewish day camp near Kitchener-Waterloo (Judaean Day Camp/Camp Ruach). These records include correspondence, publications, activity schedules, lists of camp counselors, and a Young Judaean scarf. Coppel family records also include marriage and burial records of Aaron Coppel, audio cassettes of an oral history interview conducted with Cy Coppel in 1976, and military records documenting Max David Simonoff's service in the Canadian Navy during the Second World War. Finally, included is a Farband Shule (Folks School) program book (1927) and class photo (ca. 1931). Identified in the photograph is Ethel Raicus (first row, third from the right).
Cooper family records include digital photographs of Sam Cooper and the weightlifting club at the YMHA in Toronto (1930s), portraits of Jacob Cooper (Cooperberg), a school photo of Sam and Max Cooper, and a photo of Hilda Cooper.
Finally accession consists of program books for various events, including a Canadian Jewish Congress song book, an Israel Dance Theatre at the Royal Alexandra, and a Queen Esther Purim play.
Administrative History
Aaron Selig (Archie Aaron) Coppel (Kappel / Koppel / Cappell / Kappele) was born to Moses Kappel and Perl (nee Pistenfeld) in Galicia in 1882. He came to Canada in 1903 and lived with a landsmen family, the Siegels. Mr. Siegel was a horse dealer who took Aaron under his wing and taught him the horse trade. Aaron married Mr. Siegel's daughter, Chaya Geitel (Gertrude) Seigel, in 1905. Aaron and Geitel had seven children: Helen, Rose, Newt, Cyrus ("Cy," born in 1911), Les, George, and Harry. After marrying, Aaron and Geitel remained in Galt, and Aaron continued dealing in livestock. Although he was eager to assimilate into Canadian society (he gave his children British names and spoke with no accent), the family kept kosher and Aaron hired itinerant Hebrew teachers for the children.
Cyrus Coppel married Channa "Anna" Simonoff on 25 August1946. Anna was born in Russia to Avraham Dov and Chashe Bryna Tzaitzeck. Anna had three siblings: Sarah Merle, Faigle (died en route to Canada), and Mordecai Doved. She immigrated to Ottawa in 1914 with her family. An uncle already living in Ottawa had changed his last name to Simonoff and the family decided to change their name to Simonoff as well. Avraham worked as a tailor in Russia and likely continued in this profession in Canada. The family moved to Toronto sometime after 1919 and was actively involved in the Labour Zionist movement. Anna was in the milliner's union and two of her aunts, Slaava Raicus and Esther Cohen, were members of Club One (Pioneer Women). Anna and Cyrus had two children together: Bryna (24 February 1949-12 January 2006) and Elizabeth (b. 16 Dec. 1950). Cyrus initially worked as a mechanic, but later worked in the office of an auto shop and traded in auto parts. He also traded in livestock as a hobby. Cyrus was one of the founders of the B'nai Israel Synagogue in Galt. Initially, synagogue services were held in the homes of local residents, such as the Spring family; however, a building was finally purchased in 1946. After the synagogue closed, the Torahs and plaques went to the synagogue in Kitchener. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Jacob Cooperberg (Kupferberg, Cooper) came to Canada around 1910 from Kielce, Poland. His wife and children (Max, Sam, and Aidel or Ida) remained in Poland, waiting for Jacob to earn enough money for them to come to Canada as well. His family was unable to join him until after the First World War had ended, arriving in 1920. Jacob and Sarah had three more children in Canada: Irving, Joey, and Hilda. Jacob worked as a peddler in Toronto and later opened a scrap yard, Cooper Iron and Medal. The family lived on Oxford Street in the Kensington Market area.
Sam Cooper married Kay Gernstein in 1948. They had two children together: Neil and Donna (married name is Speigel). Sam initially worked as a tailor, but later worked as a scrap dealer. Neil married Donna Coppel and also works in the scrap trade. Donna is a librarian.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Descriptive Notes
Includes 1 photo album, 7 photographs (tiff), 3 photographs, 2 audio cassettes, and 1 scarf.
Subjects
Families
Places
Galt (Cambridge, Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-9-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-9-7
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 160 photographs : b&w and col. (ca. 80 tiff)
1 film reel (ca. 8 min.) : col., sd. ; super 8 mm
1 folder of textual records
Date
[ca. 1944]-[199-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the life of Dr. John Ackerman. The bulk of the material consists of photographs that were taken by Dr. Ackerman. Included are photographs documenting Dr. Ackerman's family, military career during the Second World War, university education, and involvement in the Jewish scouting movement. Also included are photographs and one film of Jewish war veteran parades that took place in Toronto in the 1980s. The parades were likely led by the General Wingate Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion and probably took place along Bathurst Street. Of note are photos of the homecoming of Dr. Ackerman's brother, Albert, from military service overseas. Dr. John E. Ackerman, Albert Ackerman, and Robby Engel are identified in the photographs.
Custodial History
The Jewish war veterans parade photos were donated by Dr. Ackerman's wife, Frances. She had originally left the photos with the Jewish War Veterans of Canada. They brought the photos to the OJA and we contacted Frances directly to formally donate them to us. She then let us know about additional material in her possession and added this new material to the donation.
Administrative History
Dr. John E. Ackerman was born in Toronto on December 16, 1921 to Jacob and Mindel Ackerman. He was one of four children. Jacob initially worked as a presser in a factory. Mindel opened and ran a small grocery store at Dundas and Elizabeth Street. Jacob died around the age of fifty-seven.
Dr. Ackerman went to school at Jarvis Collegiate and later enrolled in dentistry school at the University of Toronto. As part of the school's program, Dr. Ackerman had to enlist in the Canadian Army's General Corp. While in school, he also met his future wife, Frances, at a Hillel lecture on campus. Frances was a graduate student studying psychology. Dr. Ackerman graduated from university in 1946. He initially worked as a dental intern at the Toronto General Hospital, but after a few years he opened his own practice above the Royal Bank at Dundas and Elizabeth Street.
Dr. Ackerman married Frances on September 12, 1954. They had three children together: Martin (b. 1959), Penina (b. 1963), and David (b. 1965).
As a young teenager, Dr. Ackerman took up photography as a hobby and remained passionate about it for the remainder of his life. He took many photographs of family life, Toronto, his military involvement, and other activities. He also shot many family films and even converted part of his house into a darkroom.
Dr. Ackerman became involved in the Jewish Boy Scouts after his son Martin became a cub. He was active in Troop 166 out of Beth Tzedec. Frances initially worked in the outpatient department of the Toronto Psychiatric Hospital, but later worked with the Toronto District School Board until her retirement. Dr. Ackerman retired his practice in 1995 or 1996. He passed away on December 13, 2008.
Use Conditions
Credit photos and films to Dr. John E. Ackerman.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-10-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-10-9
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 12 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1917-[ca. 2000]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Edell family, Rabbi Weinreb, Paul Edell's printing company, the She'arim Hebrew Day School, and the Edell family's involvement with the Mackziki Hadas Congregation. Accession also includes records documenting Rabbi Kelman's involvement with the Beth Emeth Bais Yehuda synagogue. Records include photographs of family gatherings and family members participating in a Balfour Declaration march in 1917, correspondence, flyers, invitations, and genealogical information and family reminiscences collected by Sara Kelman. Also included are two printing blocks from Paul Edell's printing company and one stamp used by Rabbi Weinreb. Of note, is a flyer and correspondence documenting the Husiatyner Klaus Beth Israel synagogue and its closure. The bulk of the material is in English, but a small amount is in Yiddish or Hebrew.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Descriptive Notes
Includes 9 photographs (tiff), 2 photographs, 1 stamp, and 2 printing blocks.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-5-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-5-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
10 cm of textual records and other material
Date
2011-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the 100th anniversary celebration of Congregation Knesseth Israel. The records were compiled in an indexed binder by Edwin Goldstein, president of the synagogue. Included are newsclippings, press releases and advertisements; invitations and programs; a commemorative calendar; a volunteer t-shirt, a kippa and a gift bag; correspondence with the Ontario Trillium Foundation; information on a guided architectural walking tour of the area; an Israel Today DVD featuring the synagogue; the book "One Hundred Years at the Junction Shul" written by Neil Ross and Lorne Miller; and a DVD compilation featuring video and photographic highlights from the various anniversary events.
Administrative History
Congregation Knesseth Israel was established in 1911 at 56 Maria Street in the West end of Toronto. Early 20th century membership in the synagogue consisted mainly of new jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe, many of whom lived and worked in the Junction as artisans, peddlers, shop owners and scrap and metal collectors. Known as the Junction Shul, Knesseth Israel Synagogue was built with the labour and funds provided by the founding members and their families.
Orthodox services first began in 1913 and since the 1930s the synagogue has functioned without a rabbi, with services being led by a cantor or the congregants themselves. Some family names associated with this early period include: Alexandroff, Goldstein, Nickolaevsky, Kronis, Greenblatt, Usprich, Tanenbaum, and Naftalin.
Knesseth Israel is the oldest Toronto synagogue still in use as a synagogue today and is now cared for by the descendents of these founding families. Although members of the synagogue are now few (as the Jewish population of the Junction has waned greatly since the 1960s), the synagogue still performs High Holiday services for some 75-80 full members and 300 associate members.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes 1 text, 3 objects and 2 DVDs.
Subjects
Anniversaries
Synagogues
Name Access
Knesseth Israel (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-7-15
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-7-15
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
13 film reels (ca. 3 hrs.) : b&w and col., si. ; 16 mm and other material
Date
[ca. 1938]-1965, 2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting both sides of Sharon Abron Drache's family: the Abramowitz's/Abron's and the Levinter's. Included are film reels with footage of both the Abramowitz and Levinter families as well as an album documenting a Jewish National Fund Negev tribute dinner in honour of David Abramowitz's 70th birthday. The album includes congratulatory letters and telegrams, photographs, newspaper clippings, and one vinyl recording entitled "Great Moments of Beth Tzedec". Identified in the photographs are David Abramowitz and Nathan Phillips.
Accession also includes a copy of an oil painting of Jacob Levinter that was by Kenneth Forbes, a wedding portrait of Sharon Abron Drache (1965) by Al Gilbert, and Sharon's curriculum vitae (2013).
Custodial History
Sharon found these records in her home. She inherited them from her parents. The film reels had been stored in an old suitcase in her building's storage locker.
Administrative History
Murray Abramowitz was born in 1912 in Toronto. His parents were David (1884-1963) and Sarah (nee Winfield) (1885-1955). David arrived in Toronto in 1906. Sarah and her parents, Jacob and Anna, settled in Scranton, Pennsylvania around 1880. Jacob worked as a grocer and relocated his family to Toronto around 1894. Sarah and David were married at the McCaul Street Synagogue in Toronto on 6 March 1906. They resided at 159 York Street after their nuptials. The couple had three children: Rose (1907-2001); Oscar (1910-1986); Murray (1912-2005). David's father, Shevach, served as the lay cantor at the First Roumanian Hebrew Congregation (now Adath Israel). David owned the Men’s shop in the Union Station and his sister, Sophie Abramowitz, ran the Ladies shop. The shops were located on the east end of the Great Hall beneath the composite glass windows. Rose Abron Lahman became a physician, specializing in obstetrics and gynecology. Initially she practised in Toronto and then in Atlanta, Georgia. Rose graduated from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto when there were quotas for both women and Jews.
Murray married Edythe (née Levinter) on 8 June, 1941. The event took place at the bride's family's home above their furniture store, J. Levinter Ltd, at 1169 Bloor Street West. The couple had one child, Sharon Abron Drache. Murray began using the Abron surname during the 1940s, changing it legally in the 1950s.
During his life, Murray worked as an hotelier and ran several businesses. They included the Rex Hotel in Toronto and Tent City at Lake Simcoe (ca. 1935-1945) and the St. Lawrence Hotel in Port Hope (1949-1955). When Murray managed the Rex Hotel he was a 50/50 partner with his mother's brother-in-law, Leo Hertzman. Leo owned and managed the store, United Clothing, which fronted the Rex hotel on Queen Street at the south side of the beverage room. When Leo’s son Harold Hertzman returned from military service in 1945, Leo bought out Murray’s share in the business for Harold. Jack Ross and Morris Meyers purchased the hotel from the Hertzmans in 1951. Murray was also a co-owner of the Tent City business with his father, David Abramowitz, coinciding with his Rex hotel years. During the late 1950s he worked as a real estate broker in Toronto and Florida. From the 1960s to the early 1970s he worked in his mother-in-law’s furniture business, J. Levinter Ltd. After Murray retired from the furniture business he became a stock broker. His hobbies included fishing, photography and storytelling. He died on 10 October 2005.
The Levinter family was headed by Samuel and Rebecca (née Godfried). They were both born in Austria (Galicia) and came to Canada in their teens. After their marriage in 1890, they resided in St. John's Ward. The couple had seven children: Jacob (b. 1892); Etta (b. 1894); Manny (b. 1895); Isadore (b. 1898); Molly (b. 1900); Rose and Dolly. Isadore became a prominent Toronto lawyer and was the first Jew appointed as a bencher at the Law Society of Upper Canada.
Samuel established Levinter Furniture in 1890. The business was initially located at 401-405 Queen Street. By 1925 Samuel had relocated his store to 287 Queen Street West and his son Jacob had opened a second location at 1169 Bloor Street West. Jacob later expanded his location to 1171 Bloor Street West. Samuel died on April 30, 1942; Rebecca died in 1952. Jacob married Sara Kamin (b. 1894, Lodz, Poland) on 25 June 1916. They had six children: Edythe (1918 -2011); Alfred (1919-1919); Evelyn (1922-2006); Murray (1925-); Molly (1926 -); Florence (b. 1930-). Jacob died of a heart attack in 1944. After his death, Sara took his place as owner and manager of the family business grooming her son Murray to succeed her. Sara’s daughter Molly had an early career as a concert pianist in Toronto and New York. Sara died in Toronto in 1990.
Sharon Abron Drache attended Forest Hill Collegiate (g. 1962) and then completed an undergraduate degree and post-graduate diploma in Psychology at the University of Toronto, the latter from the Institute of Child Study. She was enrolled as a special student in the Department of Religion at Carleton University from 1974-78. She has published four books of adult fiction, The Mikveh Man, Ritual Slaughter, The Golden Ghetto, Barbara Klein Muskrat – then and now, and two children's books, The Magic Pot and The Lubavitchers are coming to Second Avenue. She has also worked as a literary journalist and book reviewer for several newspapers and journals including, The Globe and Mail, Ottawa Citizen, Books in Canada, the Glebe Report and the Ottawa and Western Jewish Bulletins.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes 1 album, 1 painting, 1 photograph, and 1 folder of textual records
Associated Material Note: please see Sharon Drache's fonds at Library and Archives Canada and at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto for material related to her literary career. Please see Sharon Drache's fonds at the Ottawa Jewish Archives for material related to her journalism career. Finally, for additional material related to Sharon's family please see her fonds at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto.
Related Material Note: see accessions #2010-12/8 and #2010-3/1 for addtional records donated to the OJA by Sharon Abron Drache.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-10-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-10-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
60 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1964-2005
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the National Council of Jewish Women, London Section. Included are board and committee meeting minutes and correspondence, general correspondence, program material, publicity records, committee and membership lists, publications, anniversary records, newsletters, newsclippings, cookbooks, photographs and slides, audio cassetees documenting the "Jewish Family Life" series, as well as one promotional video in BETA format.
Administrative History
The London Section of the National Council for Jewish Women of Canada was founded in the late 1940s. The section was presented its charter in 1950. Dev Fox was the section's first president. The section was involved in fundraising for various causes through events such as raffles, bingo nights, fashion shows and dinner-dances. They also organized discussion groups, programs and campaigns around topics of social interest such as mental and physical health, education, poverty, women's equality, women's health, child abuse and others. The London Section is no longer active.
Descriptive Notes
Physical Description note: includes ca. 500 photographs and slides, 8 audiocassettes, and 1 videocassette.
Name Access
National Council of Jewish Women, London Section (subject)
Alter, Ronnee (creator)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-2-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-2-8
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
55 photographs : col.
10 cm of textual records
1 VHS
1 CD
1 DVD
1 medal
Date
1975-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs from the Israel at 50 event, canvasser training materials from 2011, Joshua Institute records 2011-2012, the "Jewish campus life task force report" of April 24, 2009, a booklet of plans in the project proposal for upgrading Yoseftal Hospital in Eilat (ca. 2013), campaign donor list from 1975, UJA Federation annual meeting "toward tomorrow" booklet from October 29, 2001, 2007-2008 UJA budget records, and an organizational chart for Foundation. Also included is a VHS tape "The Mission: Under the wing of God and the Shadow of Amalek" by Dubi Arie, DVD of "Becoming a witness: The march of the living interfaith experience" (2005), CD with photographs from the UIA of Canada visit to Israel in August 2006, and a medal from the UJA Federation Fun Run of 2000.
Custodial History
Records were transferred to the archives by Ted Sokolsky, President and CEO of UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-5-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-5-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
15 cm of textual records
8 architectural drawings
2 CDs
Date
1960-2011, predominant 2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of architectural drawings for the construction of the Northern YM-YWHA at 4600 Bathurst Street (1960) as well as floor plans for the proposed re-development of the site in 1999. Also included are submissions for the competition to design and build the Jewish War Veterans of Canada memorial at the Sherman Campus (2011).
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Subjects
Architecture
Charities
Veterans--Canada
Name Access
Young Men's Hebrew Association (Toronto, Ont.)
Bathurst Jewish Community Centre
Jewish War Veterans of Canada
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-7-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-7-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 30 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1939-2005, predominant 1955-1978
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the personal and family life of Miriam Beckerman. The bulk of the material is correspondence written to Miriam and her husband from their children Daniel (who was studying abroad in England) and Rina (who was studying and living abroad in Israel). Also included is correspondence from Miriam's brother-in-law and sister-in-law Tziporah and Chanan Piran as well as her sister-in-law Malka (Malkin) Beckerman and Malka's parents .
In addition, accession includes family films documenting family life in Toronto and trips around Canada and other locations such as Israel and Hawaii. Also included is a grade 5 Bialik school class photo of Dan Beckerman (1967), Miriam's diploma and composite graduation photograph from Glendon College at York University (1972-3) as well as flyers and programmes for Dan's various musical performances. Of note are photographs of Miriam's father David Dashkin beside the memorial to his father Yom Tov Yudashkin in Roselawn Cemetery (1939), a photograph taken on the ship (Marine Carp) that Miriam took from New York to Palestine/Israel (Dec. 1946), a scanned copy of Miriam's Palestine Identity card and Israel military registration card (1947) as well as a University of Toronto graduation photo of Miriam's life-long friend Ruth (nee Zaionce?) Young. Finally, accession includes the Rosh Hashanah cards of Rabbi Nachman Shemen and a State of Israel Bonds of Toronto brochure (1968).
Administrative History
Miriam Beckerman (nee Dashkin) is a Yiddish literature translator. She attended the Farband Folkshule in Toronto during the 1930s and later worked as a bilingual secretary (Yiddish and English) at the Ontario Region, Canadian Jewish Congress. In 1946, she travelled to Israel where she met her husband, Moshe Beckerman, at a kibbutz. The couple and their children emigrated from Israel to Toronto in 1952. Beckerman continues to work as a Yiddish translator. She has a number of published translations, including her recent collaborative work "A Thousand Threads: A story through Yiddish letters." Her work has been recognized by the Dora Teitelboim Foundation of Coral Gables, Fla. Moshe passed away in 1993.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes ca. 20 film reels (8 mm), ca. 10 photographs, and 1 audio reel.
Language note: English and Hebrew
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-4
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1 m textual records and other materials
Date
1915-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of personal and professional materials of Gerald Tulchinsky. Documents include agendas and journals written between 1958 and 2013, clippings, research notes, articles, correspondence and vacation souvenirs. Among the resarch materials are notes, oral histories and films on Joe Salsberg for Tulchinsky's book, Joe Salsberg: A Life of Commitment. Photographs pertain mainly to Tulchinsky's Salsberg research material but there are also personal photographs of Tulchinsky family gatherings. The audio cassettes include several oral histories used for Tulchinsky's research. The stamps appear on empty envelopes addressed to different recipients, including Tulchinsky's parents, Harry and Anne Tulchinsky, with return addresses from all over the world.
Administrative History
Dr. Gerald Tulchinsky was Professor Emeritus at Queen's University, Department of History, and author of several books on the history of Canadian Jewry and labour issues in Canada. His books include: Shtetl on the Grand (2015); Joe Salsberg: A Life of Commitment (2013); Canada's Jews: A People's Journey (2008); Branching Out: The Transformation of the Canadian Jewish Community (1998); Taking Root: The Origins of the Canadian Jewish Community (1992); and The River Barons: Montreal Businessmen and the Growth of Industry and Transportation, 1837-53 (1977).
Tulchinsky was born in Brantford, Ontario in 1933 to Harry and Anne Tulchinsky. He resided in Kingston, Ontario until his death on 13 Dec. 2017.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: Includes textual records, ca. 50 stamps, ca. 20 photographs, 2 video cassettes, 6 audio cassettes
Name Access
Salsberg, J. B. (Joseph B.), ca. 1903-1998
Tulchinsky, Gerald, 1933-2017
Source
Archival Accessions
129 records – page 1 of 3.

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