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Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 38
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
38
Material Format
multiple media
Date
[190-]-2002
Physical Description
2.6 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
The National Council of Jewish Women of Canada (NCJWC) was the first national Jewish women's organization in Canada. The council had its beginnings among the urban elite, and played a strong role over the years in influencing public policy in such areas as relations with Israel, national unity, and the plight of world Jewry. The NCJWC is dedicated, in the spirit of Judaism, to furthering human welfare in the Jewish and general communities -- locally, nationally and internationally. It operated around three main pillars: service, education, and social action.
The National Council of Jewish Women was founded in the United States in 1893 by activist Hannah G. Solomon. In 1897, its first Canadian chapter was established in Toronto. In 1925, with seven chapters in Canada, a Canadian liaison position to the National Council of Jewish Women was created. A full-fledged “Canadian Division” of the NCJW was formed in 1934, with rules drafted at the first conference in Winnipeg three years later. Irene Samuel served as the Canadian Division’s first national president. In 1943, the division was renamed the National Council of Jewish Women of Canada, and was officially incorporated in 1944, though it did not receive its letters patent until three years later. Even so, the NCJWC still retained some affiliation with the NCJW, whereby they paid per-capita dues to the Americans in return for program and administrative materials. In 1967 the NCJWC ceased these payments altogether, thereby separating from NCJW completely.
The early NCJWC focused on providing service to young girls and immigrants. They also involved themselves in contemporary politics through support for the war effort; the council donated vehicles to the Red Cross, turned Council House into a servicemen's centre, and even built several libraries at Canadian army camps. A national office opened ca. 1950 in Toronto, but until 1966 it moved to the national president's home city with every election. That year the office was permanently anchored in Toronto. In the 1950s and 1960s the council established Good Age clubs, the Irene Samuel Scholarship Fund, and developed the national Higher Horizons child-care and Newer Horizons elder-care programs. It expanded its overseas programs with support for the Israel Family Counseling Association and Ship-a-Box. The Soviet Jewry projects in the 1970s and 1980s reflected the council’s increasing emphasis on social action. Since the late 1990s, the council has focused on women's issues with efforts such as the Breast Self-Examination (BSE) program.
The NCJWC was governed by an executive council, led by a president. Vice-presidents were each responsible for one portfolio, such as membership, public affairs, etc., which were in turn made up of a number of national committees. The national executive was responsible for producing by-laws, guidelines, policies and procedures, as well as developing national service and social action programs. National also provided support and program materials to the sections, and held biennial meetings every other year from 1937 in cities across Canada. Its decentralized structure meant that while the national office remained in Toronto, officers of the executive have resided right across the country.
As of 1997, the National Council of Jewish Women of Canada was an affiliate member of the International Council of Jewish Women, a member of UNESCO Canadian Subcommission of the Status of Women, and a member of the Coalition of Jewish Women Against Domestic Violence and the Coalition for Agunot Rights. Prominent past presidents include Mrs. Harry (Irene) Samuel, Mrs. Lucille Lorie, Dr. Reva Gerstein, Mozah Zemans, Mina Hollenberg, Sophie Drache, Thelma Rolingher, Helen Marr, Bunny Gurvey, Sheila Freeman, Penny Yellen, and Gloria Strom. The council’s national office moved to Winnipeg in November, 1993. As of 2006, the council still had 5 active sections in Canada: Vancouver, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Toronto and Montreal.
Custodial History
NCJWC donated these records to the OJA after they had finished a historical exhibit and catalogue in 1997 called "Faith and Humanity," celebrating 100 years of NCJWC.
Scope and Content
The fonds documents NCJWC’s fundraising, social service and social action work in Toronto, in other cities across the country, and overseas. Records include conference and meeting programs, minutes, hand-written correspondence, speeches and reports, national newsletters, published histories, by-laws and policies, photographs, publicity material, historical subject files and artifacts. The records have been arranged into nine series: National biennial conventions and annual meetings; National Executive Council; National portfolios and committees; National program and event materials; National history research and subject files; International Council of Jewish Women; Toronto Section; Photos and audio-visual material; and National Council of Jewish Juniors, Toronto Section.
Notes
Physical description note: includes ca. 2470 photographs, 13 architectural drawings, 2 artistic drawings, 3 badges, 3 medals, 1 pin, 28 audio cassettes, and 1 videocassette.
Name Access
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada
Subjects
Women
Related Material
See also: photographs 3207, 3192, 4140, 4067, 4066, 4434; Accession 1977-8-7 for National Council of Jewish Women of Welland; National Council of Jewish Juniors, photographs 458, 459, 460, 463, 464, 465, 466, 468; MG2 B-1K
Arrangement
Records have been arranged by function, in accordance with information gleaned from NCJWC's organizational charts and annual reports
Creator
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada
Accession Number
2001-8-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2010-10-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-10-7
Material Format
architectural drawing (electronic)
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
3 compact discs
Date
1976-2008
Scope and Content
This accession consists of three CDs containing 1. The original plans created by Jerome Markson for the Bathurst Jewish Community Centre along with relevant photographs and documents. These records were created between 1976 and 1984 and were digitized in 2007. 2. The mechanical as-builts for the Lipa Green Centre's Family Pavillion, created in 2008. 3. The drawings and specs issued for construction of the Lipa Green Centre's Family Pavillion created in May 2008.
Custodial History
The discs were in the possession of Stephanie Olin Chapman, Facilities Developer for the UJA Federation's Tomorrow Campaign.They were loaned to the Archives for copying and returned on Oct. 28, 2010.
Administrative History
UJA Federation's Tomorrow Campaign is Canada’s largest non-profit community development project. It is Federation's response to the need for new facilities and services brought about by the growth of Toronto’s Jewish community. The Tomorrow Campaign is mandated with the fundraising and creation of three campuses for Jewish life in the GTA. The Downtown District, serving Toronto's growing Jewish population in the city core, is anchored by the new Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre at Bloor & Spadina and the Wolfond Centre for Jewish Campus Life at Harbord & Huron. The new Sherman Campus, on Bathurst north of Sheppard, will include the new Prosserman Family Jewish Community Centre, where the Bathurst Jewish Community Centre is currently located, a new Koffler Centre for the Arts, a new National Centre for Jewish Heritage including the Canadian Jewish Musuem, the Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre and a renovated Lipa Green Building for Jewish Community Services. The Lebovic Jewish Community Campus, at Bathurst & Weldrick north of Rutherford, is designed to provide programs and services for York Region's Jewish community of 60,000 - the fastest growing in Canada. The Lebovic Campus will be highlighted by the Kimel Family Education Centre, housing the northern branch of the Community Hebrew Academy of Toronto (CHAT); the Schwartz-Reisman Centre offering recreational, educational, cultural, social and fitness facilities; community services; a United Synagogue Day School and other schools as well.
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-5
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
10 cm of textual records and other material
Date
[ca. 1957]-1999
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records that document Eugene Winter's activities as a leader in the Hungarian-Jewish community both abroad and in Canada. Included are newsclippings and correspondence featuring Eugene's life story and his nomination and receipt of various medals and awards, an inviation and programme for an Emmanuel Foundation gala dinner honouring Eugene's memory, a letterhead for the Canadian Jewish Federation of Hungarian Descent, photocopied photographs of Eugene speaking at various events, a meeting invitation for the Wallenberg memorial fundraising committee and Eugene's certificate of death. Also included is one Civitas pin, two Jewish War Veterans of Canada pins, Eugene's Ontario Medal for Good Citizenship, Jerusalem medal and Israel medal.
In addition, accession includes a videocassette documenting a Holocaust memorial service at Beth Shalom that had about 2000 Hungarian Jews in attendance (1968), a memorial certificate for Eugene's wife, Maria Winter, and Menorah Jewish News newspapers. Finally, accession contains a photograph of a Rosh Hashanah dinner at the Borochov Centre [ca. 1958] on Lippincott Street. Identified in the photograph from left to right are: Andy Lichtenberg, Henry Schwartz, Henry's wife (?), Bela Heisz (or Bayla Heiss), Peter Heisz (?), Magda Heisz, Shirley Heisz, Edith Lichtenberg and Rena Lichtenberg.
Administrative History
Eugene Winter (1910-1995) was born on December 31, 1910 in Budapest, Hungary. He married his wife, Maria Munczner (1910-1999), in 1932 and together they had two children: Gabriel (1934-2011) and Andy (1946-). During the Second World War he escaped from an enforced labour camp and became invovled in Hungary's Jewish underground resistance against the Nazis. After the war ended, he helped liberate many Hungarian cities from occupation and tracked down several war criminals.
In 1947, Eugene and his family immigrated to Israel where he helped found the town of Bat Shlomo. In 1951, they came to Canada, sponsored by Maria's brother, Frank Dosza. Soon after thier arrival in Canada, Eugene set to work helping other Hungarian Jews settle in Canada. He founded the Canadian Jewish Federation of Hungarian Descent, the Beth Hazichoron Congregation, the Toronto Hakoah Sport, Social and Cultural Club and the Menorah Jewish News. Eugene also served as vice-chairman for a fund-raising committee to build the Wallenberg Memorial Wing at the Regional Negev Hospital in Israel. Eugene passed away in Toronto in 1995.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes 1 photograph, 1 VHS, 4 pins, 3 medals, and 1 medal stand.
Name Access
Winter, Eugene, 1910-1995
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-8
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 30 compact discs and other material
Date
[ca. 2000] - [ca. 2007]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of cassettes, CDs, DVDs and one hard disk that document the activities of the Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario region. Included are recorded meeting minutes for the Community Relations Committee, Public Affairs Committee and the Security Committee, staff portraits, presentation slides, photographs of antisemitic incidents, Congress Contact newsletters, correspondence, and project proposals.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes ca. 10 DVDs, ca. 45 audio cassettes, and 1 computer disk ; 9 x 9 cm.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-12
Material Format
textual record
textual record (electronic)
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
5 photographs (tiff and jpg) : b&w and col.
4 textual records (jpg)
Date
1965-2009
Scope and Content
This accession consists of records relating to the military career of Mikhail Lakrets. Included are five photograhs of Mikhail in uniform, two of which are attached to military documents detailing Mikhail's injury in the line of duty and his military file. Also included is a certificate of disability and a certificate confirming an official statement that he made about 3811 Jews being murdered in the town where his parents grew up. There are also photocopies of several newsclippings and a letter from the Canadian government relating to Russian veterans and social benefits.
Custodial History
The original records are in the possession of the donor. They were loaned to the Archives for copying as part of the Russian Jewish war veteran oral history program. The orignals were returned to the the donor by taxi cab on 22 November 2010.
Administrative History
Mikhail Lakrets was born in Proskurov, Ukraine. He was nineteen years of age when the war began. Lakrets was a private in aviation and reconnaissance and he later graduated from Tank College as a lieutenant. Lakrets was involved in the liberation of Leningrad, Austria, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary. He received many decorations for his involvement in the liberation of these territories, as well as the Order of Patriotic War First Class, the Order of Red Star, two medals for courage and one medal for combat service.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: Records are in Russian.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-11
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-11
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
5 photographs : b&w and sepia (4 tiffs)
1 folder of textual records
Date
1941-2007
Scope and Content
This accession consists of records relating to the military career of Grigory Genin. Included are three photographs of Grigory in uniform as well as two photographs of him with his Soviet troop. Also included are copies of newclippings as well as a poem about his experience written by a friend.
Custodial History
The original records are in the possession of the donor. They were loaned to the Archives for copying as part of the Russian Jewish war veteran oral history program.
The original records were returned to the donor by taxi cab on 22 November 2010.
Administrative History
Grigory Genin was born in Astrakhan, in southwestern Russian and later moved to Moscow. After finishing military high school he enrolled in the Riazan Artillery College on 1 June 1941. Genin was first sent to the front at the age of 18 and participated in the Stalingrad siege. For his military service, Genin received the Order of Patriotic War, the Order of Red Star, as well as several medals for the liberation of various territories and for the storming of Vienna and Budapest.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-14
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-14
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
7 textual records (jpgs)
4 photographs (tiff and jpgs)
Date
1943-1999
Scope and Content
This accession consists of electronic copies of documents and photographs related to Isaak Zarembo's military career. The documents include certificates of disability, illness and participation in the war, a discharge booklet, and two booklets that accompanied his medals. The four photographs are of Isaak in his uniform, two of which are attached to documents.
Custodial History
The originals are in the possession of the donor. They were loaned to the Archives for copying and returned to the donor on 22 November 2010 as part of the Russian Jewish war veteran oral history program.
Administrative History
Isaak Zarembo was born in 1925 in Riga, Latvia. He was 16 years old when the Second World War began and joined the 43 Guards Latvian Division, 1st Attack Army in 1943 at the age of 20. He began as a private but later became a sergeant. He participated in battles of the Central Front in Latvia, on the river Ivekstve. He was wounded twice and was demobilized in 1945 due to his injuries. Zarembo received the Conspicuous Gallantry medal, the Order of Glory 3rd Class medal and the Order of Patriotic War 1st Class medal.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-9
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff)
11 photographs (jpg)
1 cm of textual records (jpg)
Date
1933-1985
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs and textual records that document Liya's experience in the Soviet Union's military during the Second World War. Included are photographs of Liya with her battalion, the military portraits of her husband, Vladimir Liberova, and portraits of other relatives. Also included are scans of her military identification card, her certificate of injury, credentials for medals that she earned, her discharge certificate, and a document certifying that she was a member of the defense of Leningrad.
Administrative History
Liya was born in 1923 in Novozybkov, and later moved to Leningrad. She was drafted in 1942 to serve in the Soviet Union's anti-aircraft battalion. She was in the administration platoon where she was responsible for enforcing (?) blackouts, and searching the ruins for survivors to provide medical assistance. She was demobilized in 1945 and participated in the Victory Parade in Leningrad.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Soviet Union--Armed Forces
World War, 1939-1945
Places
Soviet Union
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-15
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-15
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
2 photographs (tiff)
1 cm of textual records (jpg)
Date
1946-2000
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs and textual records that document Boris' service in the Soviet Union's military during the Second World War. Included are two military portraits of Boris, letters from the Russian government to commemorate various anniversaries of the military's victory, Boris' Soviet Union travel pass (1990), and Boris' membership renewal booklet for the Association of Second World War Veterans Newkomers from USSR in Israel (1992-2000).
Custodial History
The originals are in the possession of the donor. They were loaned to the Archives for copying and returned to the donor on the same day as part of the Russian Jewish war veteran oral history program.
Administrative History
Boris was born in Belarus, but moved to Israel later in his life. He was 14 when the war began. He served in Frontier Troops, NKVD (predecessor of KGB). Boris was a student in a military college until 1952. He began his military service as a private soldier, but later became an officer. In 1944, he participated in the battles of Eastern Prussia, Latvia and Belarus. He earned the Conspicuous Gallantry Medal and the Order of Patriotic War, 2nd class for his war service.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: documents are in Russian.
Subjects
Soviet Union--Armed Forces
World War, 1939-1945
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-20
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-20
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
5 photographs (tiff) : b&w
Date
[ca. 1947] - [ca. 1970]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting Zinoviy's experience in the Soviet army. Included are photographs of Zinoviy with his army friends while they were stationed on the Far Eastern Front, images of Zinoviy with the army's gymnastics team in North Korea, and a portrait of Zinoviy that was taken after the Soviet army's demobilization.
Custodial History
The original records were loaned to the Archives to be copied as part of the Russian Jewish War Veterans oral history program. They were returned to the donor.
Subjects
Soviet Union--Armed Forces
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-21
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-21
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
3 photographs (tiff)
5 cm of texual records (jpg)
Date
1943-2010
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs and textual records that document Yakov's experience in the Soviet army during the Second World War. Included is a photograph of Yakov in uniform with his family, Yakov's graduation portrait from pharmacy school (1951) and a photograph of Yakov's father (Gregory) in his military uniform, which he sent home from his military base in Lithuania (1944). Also included are various credential cards for medals Yakov received and a letter that was sent to Yakov from Toronto's Russian consulate.
Custodial History
The originals are in the possession of the donor. They were loaned to the Archives for copying and returned to the donor the same day as part of the Russian Jewish war veteran oral history program.
Administrative History
When the Seond World War began Yakov lived in Odessa, and assisted the Soviet Union's war effort by digging trenches. He was army unit was mobilized in 1943, just after he graduated from military college. After serving for three months he was wounded in an attack. He recovered from his wounds and went on to fight in Northern Donetsk and Dneper. His unit also passed the Kharkov and Poltavskaya regions. After his unit forced the crossing of Dneper the Khrushchev got involved and transported the army to Kiev where they were supported by 209 Armoured Brigade. Here, Yakov's unit sometimes experienced up to 20 bombing and shooting attacks per day. During these attacks, Yakov was wounded twice in his legs. First, a bullet hit his leg, and then a mine exploded. He still has shrapnel in his legs from this explosion.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: Russian
Subjects
Soviet Union--Armed Forces
World War, 1939-1945
Places
Soviet Union
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-12-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-12-8
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 11 cm of textual records and other material
Date
[ca. 1905] - 1989
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records, photographs and audio-visual material documenting Sharon Abron Drache's family and career. Family records document both sides of her family: the Abramowitz/Abron and Levinters. Family records include correspondence, invitations, photographs, five beta tapes of home movies, certificates, newsclippings, family genealogy trees and one scrapbook. Professional records include Sharon's curriculum vitae, newsclippings and a manuscript of Sharon's unpublished novel entitled, Weekend Commute.
Custodial History
The records were in the custody of Sharon Abron Drache. She has interherited the family photos and documents from both sides of her family.
Administrative History
Murray Abramowitz was born in 1912 in Toronto. His parents were David (1884-1963) and Sarah (nee Winfield) (1885-1955). David arrived in Toronto in 1906. Sarah and her parents, Jacob and Anna, settled in Scranton, Pennsylvania around 1880. Jacob worked as a grocer and relocated his family to Toronto around 1894. Sarah and David were married at the McCaul Street Synagogue in Toronto on 6 March 1906. They resided at 159 York Street after their nuptials. The couple had three children: Rose (1907-2001); Oscar (1910-1986); Murray (1912-2005). David's father, Shevach, served as the lay cantor at the First Roumanian Hebrew Congregation (now Adath Israel). David owned the Men’s shop in the Union Station and his sister, Sophie Abramowitz, ran the Ladies shop. The shops were located on the east end of the Great Hall beneath the composite glass windows. Rose Abron Lahman became a physician, specializing in obstetrics and gynecology. Initially she practised in Toronto and then in Atlanta, Georgia. Rose graduated from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto when there were quotas for both women and Jews.
Murray married Edythe (née Levinter) on 8 June, 1941. The event took place at the bride's family's home above their furniture store, J. Levinter Ltd, at 1169 Bloor Street West. The couple had one child, Sharon Abron Drache. Murray began using the Abron surname during the 1940s, changing it legally in the 1950s.
During his life, Murray worked as an hotelier and ran several businesses. They included the Rex Hotel in Toronto and Tent City at Lake Simcoe (ca. 1935-1945) and the St. Lawrence Hotel in Port Hope (1949-1955). When Murray managed the Rex Hotel he was a 50/50 partner with his mother's brother-in-law, Leo Hertzman. Leo owned and managed the store, United Clothing, which fronted the Rex hotel on Queen Street at the south side of the beverage room. When Leo’s son Harold Hertzman returned from military service in 1945, Leo bought out Murray’s share in the business for Harold. Jack Ross and Morris Meyers purchased the hotel from the Hertzmans in 1951. Murray was also a co-owner of the Tent City business with his father, David Abramowitz, coinciding with his Rex hotel years. During the late 1950s he worked as a real estate broker in Toronto and Florida. From the 1960s to the early 1970s he worked in his mother-in-law’s furniture business, J. Levinter Ltd. After Murray retired from the furniture business he became a stock broker. His hobbies included fishing, photography and storytelling. He died on 10 October 2005.
The Levinter family was headed by Samuel and Rebecca (née Godfried). They were both born in Austria (Galicia) and came to Canada in their teens. After their marriage in 1890, they resided in St. John's Ward. The couple had seven children: Jacob (b. 1892); Etta (b. 1894); Manny (b. 1895); Isadore (b. 1898); Molly (b. 1900); Rose and Dolly. Isadore became a prominent Toronto lawyer and was the first Jew appointed as a bencher at the Law Society of Upper Canada.
Samuel established Levinter Furniture in 1890. The business was initially located at 401-405 Queen Street. By 1925 Samuel had relocated his store to 287 Queen Street West and his son Jacob had opened a second location at 1169 Bloor Street West. Jacob later expanded his location to 1171 Bloor Street West. Samuel died on April 30, 1942; Rebecca died in 1952. Jacob married Sara Kamin (b. 1894, Lodz, Poland) on 25 June 1916. They had six children: Edythe (1918 -2011); Alfred (1919-1919); Evelyn (1922-2006); Murray (1925-); Molly (1926 -); Florence (b. 1930-). Jacob died of a heart attack in 1944. After his death, Sara took his place as owner and manager of the family business grooming her son Murray to succeed her. Sara’s daughter Molly had an early career as a concert pianist in Toronto and New York. Sara died in Toronto in 1990.
Sharon Abron Drache attended Forest Hill Collegiate (g. 1962) and then completed an undergraduate degree and post-graduate diploma in Psychology at the University of Toronto, the latter from the Institute of Child Study. She was enrolled as a special student in the Department of Religion at Carleton University from 1974-78. She has published four books of adult fiction, The Mikveh Man, Ritual Slaughter, The Golden Ghetto, Barbara Klein Muskrat – then and now, and two children's books, The Magic Pot and The Lubavitchers are coming to Second Avenue. She has also worked as a literary journalist and book reviewer for several newspapers and journals including, The Globe and Mail, Ottawa Citizen, Books in Canada, the Glebe Report and the Ottawa and Western Jewish Bulletins.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: Includes 1 scrapbook, ca. 8 photographs, 5 beta-tapes, and 4 DVDs.
Associated Material Note: please see Sharon Drache's fonds at Library and Archives Canada and at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto for material related to her literary career. Please see Sharon Drache's fonds at the Ottawa Jewish Archives for material related to her journalism career. Finally, for additional material related to Sharon's family please see her fonds at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto.
Related Material Note: see accessions #2010-3/1 and #2013-7/15 for addtional records donated to the OJA by Sharon Abron Drache.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-12-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-12-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
8 photographs (jpg and tiff) : b&w
Date
1925-2005
Scope and Content
This accession consists of eight digital scans of original photographs belonging to Russian war vet Arkady Novokolsky.The photographs include a portait of Novokolsky in military dress, several photos taken during the Second World War and a family photograph from the 1920s.
Custodial History
The original records were loaned to the Archives for copying as part of the Russian Jewish War Veterans oral history program. They were returned to the donor.
Administrative History
Arkady Novokolsky was born in 1921 in Voznesensk, Ukraine. He was eighteeen years of age when the Second World War began and when he enlisted in the Military Aviation Navigation school in Krasnodar. He was later diagnosed with colour blindness, a condition which marked him as unfit for military service. However, he was later sent to a military technical school in Moscow and graduated with the rank of Lieutenant. He served in West Belarus as part of the Baranovichi Reconnaissance Party, assigned to process and decipher air photography. In 1944 he was sent to study at the Zhukovsky Military Academy and was then sent to Vilnius, Lithuania where he lived for 37 years until immigrating to Canada in 1981.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-12-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-12-4
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
6 photographs (jpg and tiff) : b&w and col.
4 textual records (jpg)
Date
1937-2009
Scope and Content
This accession consists of digital copies of several photograhps and documents related to the military career and the famiy of Eugene Katz. Included are two photos of Katz in military dress, one family photo, two photos and an accompanying letter about a memorial to his brother Ephraim, a portrait of Katz and his wife Mara and a few scanned copies of commemorative and Russian war medal booklets, which originally accompanied the medals bestowed on Katz.
Custodial History
The original records are in the possession of the donor. They were loaned to the Archives for copying as part of the Russian Jewish War Vet oral history program and were returned to the donor.
Administrative History
Eugene (Zalman) Katz was born in Vilnius, Latvia in 1925. He was fifteen years old at the onset of the Second World War and witnessed the destruction of his village, Disna, and the murder of his entire family by the Nazis. Katz was one of only twelve people to escape. He later became a partisan and then enlisted in the Soviet army, participating in battles near Konigsberg and Belarus. He was a machine-gunner in the infantry and artillery and helped halt a number of German attacks, including shooting down two tanks. For his heroism, he was decorated with eighteen medals, including the prestigious medal for Courage.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Related material note: See vertical file under "Katz, Eugene"
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-12-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-12-5
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
2 photographs (jpg and tiff) : col. and sepia
2 textual records (jpg)
Date
1942, 2005-2010
Scope and Content
This accession consists of digital copies of two photographs and two documents related to the military career of Russian war vet, Shlomo Mushkat. The phtoographs are two portaits of Mushkat in military dress and the documents are a letter detailing his participation in the war as well as a letter from the Ukrainian Embassy on the 65th anniversary of the end of the war.
Custodial History
The original records are in the possession of the donor. They were loaned to the Archives for copying as part of the Russian Jewish War Vet oral history program.
Administrative History
Shlomo Zalmanovich Mushkat was born in Vilnius, Lithuania. In 1940, he was drafted into the Soviet Army and a year later he was sent to the front. He was wounded in battle in 1941, but after recuperating in hospital was again sent back to the front. He participated in the battles of Smolensk and Leningrad. He received many medals for liberating Russian territories and cities, inlcuidng the Order of Glory.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-12-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-12-10
Material Format
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
68 photographs : b&w and col. (34 jpgs and tifs) ; 41 x 51 cm and 300 dpi
Scope and Content
The accession consists of 34 portrait prints produced by photographer Al Gilbert. It also includes the corresponding digital images. The individuals documented are prominant Toronto Jews and include: Ronald Appleby, Michael Benjamin, Avi Bennett, Edward Bronfman, Judy Feld Carr, Lou Copeland, Dan Leslie, John Daniels, A. E. Diamond, Dr. Martin Dobkin, Anne Golden, Ed Goodman, Al Green, Alex Grossman, Carl Keifitz, Marvelle Koffler, Joseph and Wolf Lebovic, Murray Menkes, Miles Nadal, Sam Pencer, Nathan Phillips, Lou Posluns, Wilfred Posluns, Alex Schanider, Seymour Schulich, Izzy Sharpe, Sam Shopsowitz, Edward Sokolowski, Ed Sonshine, Fran Sonshine, Joseph Tanenbaum, Larry Tanenbaum, Max Tanenbaum, and Ray Wolfe.
Administrative History
Nachman (Nathan) Gittelmacher was born in Kiev, Ukraine in 1898, the son of Shloima and Mattie Gittelmacher. Suffering terribly during the pogroms of 1918 and 1920, he fled from place to place and then emigrated to Canada in 1921. Trained as a photographer in Europe, he opened his own photography studio in Toronto in 1922, called Elite Studios. First located at 513 Queen Street West, he soon moved to 615 Queen Street West. Nathan serviced a largely Jewish clientele, photographing weddings, bar mitzvahs, as well as Jewish community events.
Nathan was married to Nina Sokoloff and they had three sons and a daughter: Louis (Lou), Albert (Al), Jack, and Ruth.
During the early 1940s, the family legally changed their name from Gittelmacher to Gilbert and subsequently altered the name of the business to Gilbert Studios. When Nathan moved to the United States, Al, who had been working there since a young age, took over the business and under his management it thrived. In order to accommodate his growing clientele, he moved the studio to Eglinton Avenue and later to 170 Davenport Road, where it is situated today.
Al made a name for himself as a portrait photographer, using natural light in innovative ways to create more natural looking portraits. Al’s primary work involved producing portraits of families, weddings, bar mitzvahs, special events and dinners. Most of his early clients were from the Jewish community. In turn, he also was paid to produce portraits of local entrepreneurs, and his multi-year contract with the city, gave him sole responsibility for the production of portraits of the mayors and councilmen and women. He later branched out beyond the Jewish community, and began to produce images of businessmen and leaders from the Italian community in Toronto.
In addition to the paid contracts involving local personalities and groups, Al Gilbert has also produced many artistic portraits of local, national and international celebrities, artists and leaders such as: Wayne and Shuster, Howie Mandel, Oscar Peterson, Frank Sinatra, Duke Ellington, Robertson Davies, several Canadian prime ministers as well as Prince Charles, all of the Israeli prime ministers, which were made into stamps by the Israeli government, and finally, the last Pope. Gilbert’s work therefore captures a huge range of individuals from the ordinary bride to extraordinary world leaders.
Al has won many awards as well as accolades from his peers throughout his career. He is the three-time recipient of the prestigious Professional Photographers of Canada (PPOC) Photographer of the year honour. He has been named Fellow of the photographic societies in Canada, Britain and the United States. In 1990, he was awarded the Order of Canada. In January 2007, the Professional Photographers of America presented him with their Lifetime Achievement Award. This award is the highest honor PPA can bestow on a person for their body of work and influence on professional photography.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-3-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-3-4
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : b&w ; 187 MB
Date
May 1945
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one scanned photograph that was taken by Noah of Soviet and likely American soldiers just after the war ended. The soviet soldiers are from a special reconnaisance detachment of the Soviet Cavalry Corp. Some of the Soviet and American soldiers traded hats in a sign of friendship.
Custodial History
Record was loaned to the Archives to be copied as part of the Russian Jewish War Veterans oral history program. The original was returned to the donor.
Administrative History
Noah Sneidman was born in Vilnius and was placed in a ghetto in occupied Vilnius during the Second World War. While in the ghetto he was forced to participate in boxing matches. He managed to escape from the ghetto in 1943 and joined the partisans.
Noah served in the Soviet Army for three years and was stationed in Germany, Ukraine and Poland. He was initially a private in a reconnaissance unit, but was later transferred to the Counterintelligence Corps due to his knowledge of five languages. While stationed in Lensen, a small town in East Prussia on the river Elbe, the officers of his unit used his limited knowledge of English to establish contact with the Allies (British and American). For his service in counterintelligence he was later decorated with the Order of the Red Star (a prestigious Soviet decoration, mostly awarded to officers). Other medals awarded to Noah include: Order of Patriotic War second class, Partisan Medal first Class, Medal for Liberation of Kenigsberg and Medal for Victory over Germany, as well as many Commemorative Medals.
After the war, Noah returned to Vilnius and remained there until 1957 when he left for Poland. In 1958 he immigrated to Canada.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Descriptive Notes
A copy jpg was created from the tiff image.
Subjects
World War, 1939-1945
Soviet Union--Armed Forces
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-3-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-3-7
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : b&w ; 355 MB
1 folder of textual records
Date
1941-1945
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one photograph of Eduard Seyder in military uniform that was taken between 1944 and 1945, and one Russian-German dictionary that was printed in Moscow to help soldiers interrogate German prisoners of war.
Administrative History
Eduard Seyder was born in Odessa in 1926. He enlisted as a volunteer in the Russian military as a (sub) machine-gunner in December 1943 and participated in the 3rd Belarusian Front. His detachment pursued, disarmed and captured Germans who were retreating. His company consisted of 120 men, but only 32 survived over 2 months. He later fought near Kenigsberg, East Prussia, in Signals Regiment.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Descriptive Notes
A copy jpg was created from the tiff image.
Subjects
World War, 1939-1945
Soviet Union--Armed Forces
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-3-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-3-10
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
5 photographs (jpgs) : b&w ; 1.06 MB
Date
1939-1961
Scope and Content
Accession consists of electronic copy photographs of Iosif Zibenberg. Three photographs are of Iosif with fellow Russian servicemen, one is with his brother Yaacov, and one is of Iosif and his wife and son visiting his brother's grave and monument in the Ukraine.
Photo captions:
001. Left to right: unidentified, Iosif Zibenberg, Vasia Ulianov. Taken in Germany, 1945.
002. Left to right: Iosif Zibenberg, Vasia Ulianov, unidentified man. Taken in Germany, 1945.
003. Iosif with wife Clara and son Yaacov visiting the monument and grave of his brother, Yaacov, Kielce, Ukraine, 1961.
004. Iosif with brother Yaacov (age 17 and 19 years), 1939.
005. Iosif and Vasia Ulianov in Hungary, 1945.
Custodial History
The photographs were loaned to the OJA by the donor for copying as part of the Russian Jewish War Veterans initiative. They were returned to the donor the same day.
Administrative History
Iosif Zibenberg was born in Falest, Moldova in 1922. He was 19 years old when the Second World War began and was mobilized in 1941, fighting in the battle of Stalingrad. He was in Kursk, Prohorovka and then Poland when the war ended. He participated in the release of Prague and was then demobilized in Germany in 1946. Iosif received many military awards for his participation. He has a wife Clara and a son Yaacov, named after his deceased brother.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
USE CONDITION NOTE: Copyright for photos 001, 002, 004, 005 are in the public domain. Permission for use is not required. Please credit the OJA as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
World War, 1939-1945
Soviet Union--Armed Forces
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-10-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-10-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
2 m of textual records and other material
Date
1982-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the activities and the membership of the Pomegranate Guild of Judaic Textiles, Toronto. Included are meeting minutes, agendas, newsletters, program and event materials, slides, and audio-visual materials documenting Guild events.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Harriet Liebman, the Guild's archivist. They were donated to the archives by the immediate past president, Rikki Blitt.
Administrative History
The Pomegranate Guild of Judaic Textiles was formed in 1982 for those interested in studying and creating textile art and needlework based on Jewish themes. The Guild charges a yearly membership, which supports its programming, exhibits, and newsletter entitled "The Pomegramme".
Use Conditions
Full citation crediting the Pomegranate Guild of Judaic Textiles, Toronto must appear in all publications alongside the OJA's required caption.
Descriptive Notes
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION NOTE: Includes approx. 500 slides (col.), 5 VHS, 1 DVD, 1 audio cassette.
Subjects
Arts
Name Access
Pomegranate Guild of Judaic Textiles, Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-2-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-2-2
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
37 photographs (jpg) : b&w and col. ; 33 MB
Date
1958-2005
Scope and Content
Accession consists of born-digital images and digital scans of original photographs depicting the 2005 closing ceremonies of the Beth El Synagogue in Cornwall as well as exterior and interior images of the synagogue, the congregants, community events and B'nai Brith members.
Custodial History
The photographs were acquired by the OJA for the Ontario's Small Jewish Communities exhibit, but they were never accessioned until February 2012.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-1-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-1-4
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
40 photographs : b&w (jpg)
Date
[192-?]-1959
Scope and Content
Accession consists of scanned photographs documenting George Wharton's early life and family. Included are images of George as an infant, George and his family outside their home in Orillia, and George and his family at various Toronto landmarks, such as High Park and the Toronto Island. Also included is a photograph of George's father and grandfather in London, ON [192-?].
Custodial History
The photographs were in the custody of George Wharton. He loaned them to the OJA for scanning and the originals were returned to him.
Administrative History
George Wharton was born in Toronto at the old Mt. Sinai Hospital on October 18, 1940. He is the oldest of the four children of Thomas and Sarah Wharton. George has two brothers, Michael and Arthur, and one sister, Marion.
George’s mother, Sarah Lipovitch (1913-2006) was born in the Jewish shtetl within Ivansk, Poland. Her family arrived in Canada in the summer of 1914 and settled in London Ontario, where her father eventually established a dry-goods store. Sarah was the youngest of five children, some of which later anglicized their family names to Lipton or Leech. Other than the fact that Sarah’s grandfather owned a bakery in Ivansk, little is known about the prior history of her family.
Thomas Wilbur Wharton (1908-1996) was born in London, Ontario. His Wharton ancestors had a very long and colorful history in England and colonial British America. He was the oldest of the four children of Arthur James Wharton and Lulubelle Wharton (nee Doolittle). His sisters were; Clara, May and Constance (Connie). Born in Canada in 1882, Tom’s father Arthur had joined the army in 1899 and fought in the Boer War within the contingent of Canadians that were part of the British Army in South Africa. After returning to Canada he joined the Royal North-West mounted Police, riding circuit in Northern Alberta. After Arthur’s marriage to Lulu, the couple settled in London where Arthur joined the local police force. Tom and his sisters were born here. At the outbreak of World War One, Arthur rejoined the Canadian Army, fighting in France from 1915 to 1918. Wounded at the 1916 Battle of the Somme, he received several medals and rose to the rank of Sergeant. After the war he returned to police work, eventually becoming Chief Constable in London, Ontario.
Tom’s mother, Lulu, had been born to the Doolittle family. Her father’s family was American, but had anglicized its family name from DeLatalle, which had been used by his Métis ancestors. Lulu’s mother, and maternal grandmother, had come to America as refugees from the Irish potato famine of the mid 19th Century. They were originally from the Flanagan and O’Flaherty families, and probably from Cork.
Thomas and Sarah met in London in the late 1930’s. Contrary to the wishes of both families they married in 1938 (1939?). Shunned by both sets of parents, they moved to Toronto where Tom found war work at A.V.Roe in Malton building wings for WW II Lancaster and Mosquito bombers. Also at this time Tom officially converted to Judaism.
As wartime contracts ended in Toronto, the family moved to the town of Orillia, ON. There Tom built a small bungalow at 70 Olive Crescent on the Southern edge of the town. By 1952 there were four children. By 1954, job opportunities became quite scarce in Orillia and, finding work in Toronto, Tom soon moved the entire family here, where they purchased an older house at 248 Wellesley St. East. In 1961 they moved to a nicer home at 60 Lawrence Ave., West, near Yonge St. in North Toronto.
George’s education took place at Jarvis Collegiate and at the University of Toronto, where he met his future wife Phyllis (1945- ). They were married on October 20, 1965, while both were still at school. For several years George and Phyllis lived in rental apartments, but, in 1981, they purchased their own house at 317 Jedburgh Rd. where they lived for the next 25 years.
George’s first permanent job was at the CBC Program (radio) Archives. Here George worked from 1967 to 1975, beginning what was to be a life-long career dealing with historical documentation and specializing in audio-visual records. From 1976 to 1986 he was employed by the National Archives (now L.A.C.) with responsibility for various A/V collections then held at the Toronto Federal Records Centre in Rexdale. During 1987 and 1988 George was employed at the Archives of Ontario on a series of contracts, but in February, 1989 he was hired by the newly-created Metropolitan Toronto Archives, which opened its new facility at 255 Spadina Road in June of 1991. After the 1989 amalgamation of all Toronto municipalities, the facility was renamed City of Toronto Archives. George continued his career here until October, 2005, when he reached the then-mandatory retirement age of 65. In 2006 he was hired as a part-time contract employee of the Ontario Jewish Archives where he designed and implemented several large back-log-reduction projects where much of the processing was accomplished by the OJA’s volunteers.
George and Phyllis had two sons; Charles Jacob was born in 1973, Avrom David was born in 1979. Oldest son Charles married Rixi Abrahamson in December, 2004. Grandchildren from this marriage are: Noah Alexander Wharton (born Dec.7, 2006) and Madelaine Abigail Faye Wharton (born Jan. 15 2012).
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-3-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-3-1
Material Format
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
2 photographs : col. (1 jpg) ; 10 x 15 cm
Date
[2012?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a photograph taken by Jack Hecker of the site of the former Agudath Israel Anshei Sfard Shul (151 Palmerston Ave.). A duplex house currently occupies the site. The text on the duplex building was added in by Jack Hecker.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Architecture
Synagogues
Name Access
Agudath Israel Anshei Sfard Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-4-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-4-1
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
198 photographs : col. (jpgs) ; 520 MB
Date
2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 198 digital images on one CD documenting the groundbreaking, construction and dedication of the Jewish War Veterans of Canada monument on the Sherman Campus of the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto. The photographs were taken between September 11 and November 11, 2011.
Custodial History
The images were on the personal computer of Amek Adler, Vice-President of the Jewish War Veterans of Canada and chair of the monument committee. They were copied onto CD for the archives.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Related material note: please see accession 2011-8/11.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-3-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-3-8
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
58 photographs (tif) and other material
Date
1945, 1965-2003
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the establishment and activities of Toronto's Holocaust Memorial and Education Centre as well as the personal life and professional activities of Gerda Frieberg. Holocaust Education Centre records include audio-visual material, sound recordings, meeting minutes, financial records, booklets and brochures, photographs and flyers. Of note is a video of the opening and dedication of the Holocaust Museum in 1985, and the sheet music and sound recordings of the musical score Gerda commissioned for the Centre by Srul Glick.
Records in the Gerda Frieberg fonds document her involvement with the Holocaust Education Centre, the Jewish Holocaust Survivors of Canada, B'nai Brith Women, the Federation of Jewish Women's organizations, and her other activities. Included are photographs, newspaper clippings, meeting minutes, and correspondence. Also included is a sound recording from a Federation of Jewish Women's Organizations event and a DVD copy of the film "Mend the World", which is a CBC documentary that features Gerda and other Toronto Holocaust survivors. The electronic images were scanned from Gerda's personal scrapbooks.
Custodial History
Records were in the possession of Gerda Frieberg until she donated them to the OJA in 2012.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Includes 4 audio cassette tapes, 4 VHS tapes, 3 DVDs, 3 cm of textual records, and 8 photographs.
Subjects
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Name Access
Frieberg, Gerda
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-4-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-4-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records and other material
Date
[190-]-1994
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the literary and military careers of Leo Heaps, as well as a small selection of family photographs and textual records. Included are various manuscripts and other writings, newsclippings and documents related to Heaps' role as a British paratrooper and his subsequent awarding of the Royal Military Cross. The photographs document the Heaps family, as well as the underground resistance movement in Arnhem, of which he was a part.
The videocassette documents a family trip to Arnhem in 1994 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Arnhem.
Photo Caption (035): Seargent Alan Kettley of the Glider Pilot Regiment, [194-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2012-4-2. Courtesy of the Heaps Family.
Photo Caption (038): Gilbert Sadi-Kirschen known, head of the Special Air Service mission to Arnhem, [194-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2012-4-2. Courtesy of the Heaps Family.
Photo Caption (046): Major Tony Hibbot (left) about to take off for Arnhem, [194-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2012-4-2. Courtesy of the Heaps Family.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Adrian Heaps, son of Leo Heaps.
Administrative History
Leo Heaps (1923-1995) was born in Winnipeg in 1923, the son of A. A. Heaps and Bessie Morris. His father A. A. was a founder of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, the forerunner of the New Democratic Party. Leo Heaps was raised in Winnipeg and received an education at Queen's University, the University of California, and McGill University. During the Second World War, at the age of 21, Heaps was seconded to the British Army and found himself commanding the 1st Battalion's Transport. He participated in the Battle of Arnhem as a paratrooper.
Leo Heaps was awarded the Royal Military Cross for his work with the Dutch Resistance. His brother, David, had also achieved the same distinction, thereby making them the only Jewish brothers during the Second World War to win the decoration. After the war, Heaps went to Israel and aided their army in the establishment of mobile striking units. Whilst there, he met his wife-to-be, Tamar (1927-). Together they had one son, Adrian, and three daughters, Karen, Gillian, and Wendy.
During the Hungarian Revolution he led a special rescue team to bring refugees out and across the border. In the mid-1960s he returned to Britain where he dabbled in various entrepreneurial projects as well as writing several books, notably "The Grey Goose of Arnhem", telling his own story of Arnhem, the aftermath of the battle, and also the stories of other Arnhem evaders and their dealings with the Resistance.
Leo Heaps spent most of his life in Toronto, Canada, and was amongst the forty Canadian veterans who returned to Arnhem in 1994 to mark the 50th anniversary. He died in 1995.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Publication credit line must read: Courtesy of the Heaps Family.
Descriptive Notes
Physical Description note: Includes ca. 100 photographs; 1 videocassette (ca. 32 min) : col, sd. ; VHS, and 1 presentation piece : 52 x 49 cm.
Subjects
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Heaps, Leo, 1923-1995
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-5-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-5-7
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
12 photograph : b&w and col. (tiff and jpgs)
Date
1973-1983
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 12 photographs documenting the activities of the Kieltzer Mutual Benefit Society including the Society's 75th Anniversary, various meetings at the UJA, and UJA Society luncheons.
Identified in the photographs are: Henry Sokolovski, Kalman Sokolovski, Ruben Sokolovski, Morris Blejwas, Harry Lederman, Aaron Geller, Stanley Garnick, Miriam and Philip Platt, Morris and Faye Lazebnik, Myer Rosenberg, Percy Goodman, Philip Platt, Sam Cohn, Charlie Gordon, Betty and Sam Cohn, Percy and Yollie Goodman, Aaron Geller, Mr. and Mrs. David Wiener, Ruby Okolovsky, Lozer Brutman, Shirley Lehrer, Sara Mendly (representing Baycrest)
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-5-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-5-9
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
9 photographs (tiffs)
Date
2005, 1989-1993
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 9 photographs documenting various events of the Masada Chapter of Lithuanian Jews in Toronto.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-8-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-8-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 18 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1884-1985
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the Coppel and Cooper families of Galt (now Cambridge) and Toronto respectively. Coppel family records include family correspondence, photocopies of Moses Kappel's discharge papers from the Austro-Hungarian military (1884), B'nai Israel Synagogue sisterhood meeting minutes, financial records, photographs, Hadassah booklets and programmes, and a photo album documenting the closing of B'nai Israel Synagogue in 1985. Also included are records relating to Elizabeth Cooper (née Coppel)'s involvement in Canadian Young Judaea and her work as a camp counselor at a Jewish day camp near Kitchener-Waterloo (Judaean Day Camp/Camp Ruach). These records include correspondence, publications, activity schedules, lists of camp counselors, and a Young Judaean scarf. Coppel family records also include marriage and burial records of Aaron Coppel, audio cassettes of an oral history interview conducted with Cy Coppel in 1976, and military records documenting Max David Simonoff's service in the Canadian Navy during the Second World War. Finally, included is a Farband Shule (Folks School) program book (1927) and class photo (ca. 1931). Identified in the photograph is Ethel Raicus (first row, third from the right).
Cooper family records include digital photographs of Sam Cooper and the weightlifting club at the YMHA in Toronto (1930s), portraits of Jacob Cooper (Cooperberg), a school photo of Sam and Max Cooper, and a photo of Hilda Cooper.
Finally accession consists of program books for various events, including a Canadian Jewish Congress song book, an Israel Dance Theatre at the Royal Alexandra, and a Queen Esther Purim play.
Administrative History
Aaron Selig (Archie Aaron) Coppel (Kappel / Koppel / Cappell / Kappele) was born to Moses Kappel and Perl (nee Pistenfeld) in Galicia in 1882. He came to Canada in 1903 and lived with a landsmen family, the Siegels. Mr. Siegel was a horse dealer who took Aaron under his wing and taught him the horse trade. Aaron married Mr. Siegel's daughter, Chaya Geitel (Gertrude) Seigel, in 1905. Aaron and Geitel had seven children: Helen, Rose, Newt, Cyrus ("Cy," born in 1911), Les, George, and Harry. After marrying, Aaron and Geitel remained in Galt, and Aaron continued dealing in livestock. Although he was eager to assimilate into Canadian society (he gave his children British names and spoke with no accent), the family kept kosher and Aaron hired itinerant Hebrew teachers for the children.
Cyrus Coppel married Channa "Anna" Simonoff on 25 August1946. Anna was born in Russia to Avraham Dov and Chashe Bryna Tzaitzeck. Anna had three siblings: Sarah Merle, Faigle (died en route to Canada), and Mordecai Doved. She immigrated to Ottawa in 1914 with her family. An uncle already living in Ottawa had changed his last name to Simonoff and the family decided to change their name to Simonoff as well. Avraham worked as a tailor in Russia and likely continued in this profession in Canada. The family moved to Toronto sometime after 1919 and was actively involved in the Labour Zionist movement. Anna was in the milliner's union and two of her aunts, Slaava Raicus and Esther Cohen, were members of Club One (Pioneer Women). Anna and Cyrus had two children together: Bryna (24 February 1949-12 January 2006) and Elizabeth (b. 16 Dec. 1950). Cyrus initially worked as a mechanic, but later worked in the office of an auto shop and traded in auto parts. He also traded in livestock as a hobby. Cyrus was one of the founders of the B'nai Israel Synagogue in Galt. Initially, synagogue services were held in the homes of local residents, such as the Spring family; however, a building was finally purchased in 1946. After the synagogue closed, the Torahs and plaques went to the synagogue in Kitchener. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Jacob Cooperberg (Kupferberg, Cooper) came to Canada around 1910 from Kielce, Poland. His wife and children (Max, Sam, and Aidel or Ida) remained in Poland, waiting for Jacob to earn enough money for them to come to Canada as well. His family was unable to join him until after the First World War had ended, arriving in 1920. Jacob and Sarah had three more children in Canada: Irving, Joey, and Hilda. Jacob worked as a peddler in Toronto and later opened a scrap yard, Cooper Iron and Medal. The family lived on Oxford Street in the Kensington Market area.
Sam Cooper married Kay Gernstein in 1948. They had two children together: Neil and Donna (married name is Speigel). Sam initially worked as a tailor, but later worked as a scrap dealer. Neil married Donna Coppel and also works in the scrap trade. Donna is a librarian.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Descriptive Notes
Includes 1 photo album, 7 photographs (tiff), 3 photographs, 2 audio cassettes, and 1 scarf.
Subjects
Families
Places
Galt (Cambridge, Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-7-19
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-7-19
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
51 photographs (tiff)
Date
1980-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting the activities of the Chmeilnicker Charitable Society including the annual "Hazkarah", teas, and an unveiling of the monument at Lambert Cemetery.
Administrative History
The Chmeilnicker Society was started in Toronto after the Holocaust by survivors. In its early years, the Society played an important role in the lives of the newly-arrived groups for socializing with people who had shared similar experiences in Europe. They organized picnics, women's teas, celebrate Yom Yerushalaim, Channukah parties and an annual "Hazkarah", a memorial service for those who died in the war. The Hazkarah continues to be the most important activity of the group today.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-9-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-9-1
Material Format
textual record (electronic)
graphic material (electronic)
moving images
Physical Description
72 CDs and DVDs
Date
1999-2005
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 72 CDs and DVDs containing the records of the Tomorrow Campaign documenting the Downtown (Miles Nadal JCC and Wolfond Centre), Central (Sherman) and City North (Lebovic) campuses. Included are architectural drawings, renderings, photographic images, videos, reports, powerpoint presentations and promotional material.
Custodial History
The records were left in the creative department by an unknown person. They were given to the Archives by Yael Maayani after she failed to locate the owner.
Administrative History
UJA Federation's Tomorrow Campaign is Canada’s largest non-profit community development project. It is Federation's response to the need for new facilities and services brought about by the growth of Toronto’s Jewish community. The Tomorrow Campaign is mandated with the fundraising and creation of three campuses for Jewish life in the GTA. The Downtown District, serving Toronto's growing Jewish population in the city core, is anchored by the new Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre at Bloor & Spadina and the Wolfond Centre for Jewish Campus Life at Harbord & Huron. The new Sherman Campus, on Bathurst north of Sheppard, will include the new Prosserman Family Jewish Community Centre, where the Bathurst Jewish Community Centre is currently located, a new Koffler Centre for the Arts, a new National Centre for Jewish Heritage including the Canadian Jewish Musuem, the Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre and a renovated Lipa Green Building for Jewish Community Services. The Lebovic Jewish Community Campus, at Bathurst & Weldrick north of Rutherford, is designed to provide programs and services for York Region's Jewish community of 60,000 - the fastest growing in Canada. The Lebovic Campus will be highlighted by the Kimel Family Education Centre, housing the northern branch of the Community Hebrew Academy of Toronto (CHAT); the Schwartz-Reisman Centre offering recreational, educational, cultural, social and fitness facilities; community services; a United Synagogue Day School and other schools as well.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-9-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-9-7
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 160 photographs : b&w and col. (ca. 80 tiff)
1 film reel (ca. 8 min.) : col., sd. ; super 8 mm
1 folder of textual records
Date
[ca. 1944]-[199-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the life of Dr. John Ackerman. The bulk of the material consists of photographs that were taken by Dr. Ackerman. Included are photographs documenting Dr. Ackerman's family, military career during the Second World War, university education, and involvement in the Jewish scouting movement. Also included are photographs and one film of Jewish war veteran parades that took place in Toronto in the 1980s. The parades were likely led by the General Wingate Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion and probably took place along Bathurst Street. Of note are photos of the homecoming of Dr. Ackerman's brother, Albert, from military service overseas. Dr. John E. Ackerman, Albert Ackerman, and Robby Engel are identified in the photographs.
Custodial History
The Jewish war veterans parade photos were donated by Dr. Ackerman's wife, Frances. She had originally left the photos with the Jewish War Veterans of Canada. They brought the photos to the OJA and we contacted Frances directly to formally donate them to us. She then let us know about additional material in her possession and added this new material to the donation.
Administrative History
Dr. John E. Ackerman was born in Toronto on December 16, 1921 to Jacob and Mindel Ackerman. He was one of four children. Jacob initially worked as a presser in a factory. Mindel opened and ran a small grocery store at Dundas and Elizabeth Street. Jacob died around the age of fifty-seven.
Dr. Ackerman went to school at Jarvis Collegiate and later enrolled in dentistry school at the University of Toronto. As part of the school's program, Dr. Ackerman had to enlist in the Canadian Army's General Corp. While in school, he also met his future wife, Frances, at a Hillel lecture on campus. Frances was a graduate student studying psychology. Dr. Ackerman graduated from university in 1946. He initially worked as a dental intern at the Toronto General Hospital, but after a few years he opened his own practice above the Royal Bank at Dundas and Elizabeth Street.
Dr. Ackerman married Frances on September 12, 1954. They had three children together: Martin (b. 1959), Penina (b. 1963), and David (b. 1965).
As a young teenager, Dr. Ackerman took up photography as a hobby and remained passionate about it for the remainder of his life. He took many photographs of family life, Toronto, his military involvement, and other activities. He also shot many family films and even converted part of his house into a darkroom.
Dr. Ackerman became involved in the Jewish Boy Scouts after his son Martin became a cub. He was active in Troop 166 out of Beth Tzedec. Frances initially worked in the outpatient department of the Toronto Psychiatric Hospital, but later worked with the Toronto District School Board until her retirement. Dr. Ackerman retired his practice in 1995 or 1996. He passed away on December 13, 2008.
Use Conditions
Credit photos and films to Dr. John E. Ackerman.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-10-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-10-1
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
3 photographs : col. (tiffs)
Date
2006
Scope and Content
Accession consists of graphic material documenting the Transnistria Survivors' Association. Included are group photos taken in fornt of the Memorial Wall in Earl Bales Park by Yad Vashem. The group photos include the Survivors and one of the Survivors with their children as well.
Custodial History
Originals were loaned for reproducing and returned
Administrative History
The Transnistria Survivors' Association was formed in 1994 so that the survivors from Romania and Transnistria could tell their stories of survival and to offer each other support. They planned events including Hannukah parties, speaking engagements and annual memorial services (Hazkarah). According to this group, their voices were left out of the survivors stories and have tried to rectify that by writing memoirs and speaking to various groups to tell their stories of survival. Past presidents include: Felicia (Steigman) Carmelly, Osias Nadel, Etti Ziegler, and Lou (Leizer) Hoffer. As of 2017, the current President is Joe Lienberg.
Name Access
Hoffer, Lou
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-11-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-11-4
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w (tiff)
Date
[192-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one photograph of the exterior of Sam Lichtman's news store. The photograph was taken soon after the store first opened. Identified in the photograph is Sam Lichtman (right). The other man in the photograph may be Toronto's mayor at the time.
Custodial History
The original photograph is in the custody of Sam's daughter, Maxine Cadsby, who has it stored in an antique frame. The scan was taken through the frame.
Administrative History
Sam Lichtman was born in 1888 in Galicia. He immigrated to Canada on his own in 1901 with 25 cents in his pocket. He started out as a newsboy selling daily papers and comic papers in Toronto. He later opened his own news store, Lichtman's, and became a newspaper distributor. Around 1918, he married Fanny (nee Shapero) and they had four daughters together: Grace Hillman, Marjorie Rosenfield, Eileen Hertzman, and Maxine Cadsby. Sam passed away in 1958.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Name Access
Lichtman, Sam, 1888-1958
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-10-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-10-9
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 12 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1917-[ca. 2000]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Edell family, Rabbi Weinreb, Paul Edell's printing company, the She'arim Hebrew Day School, and the Edell family's involvement with the Mackziki Hadas Congregation. Accession also includes records documenting Rabbi Kelman's involvement with the Beth Emeth Bais Yehuda synagogue. Records include photographs of family gatherings and family members participating in a Balfour Declaration march in 1917, correspondence, flyers, invitations, and genealogical information and family reminiscences collected by Sara Kelman. Also included are two printing blocks from Paul Edell's printing company and one stamp used by Rabbi Weinreb. Of note, is a flyer and correspondence documenting the Husiatyner Klaus Beth Israel synagogue and its closure. The bulk of the material is in English, but a small amount is in Yiddish or Hebrew.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Descriptive Notes
Includes 9 photographs (tiff), 2 photographs, 1 stamp, and 2 printing blocks.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-5-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-5-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
10 cm of textual records and other material
Date
2011-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the 100th anniversary celebration of Congregation Knesseth Israel. The records were compiled in an indexed binder by Edwin Goldstein, president of the synagogue. Included are newsclippings, press releases and advertisements; invitations and programs; a commemorative calendar; a volunteer t-shirt, a kippa and a gift bag; correspondence with the Ontario Trillium Foundation; information on a guided architectural walking tour of the area; an Israel Today DVD featuring the synagogue; the book "One Hundred Years at the Junction Shul" written by Neil Ross and Lorne Miller; and a DVD compilation featuring video and photographic highlights from the various anniversary events.
Administrative History
Congregation Knesseth Israel was established in 1911 at 56 Maria Street in the West end of Toronto. Early 20th century membership in the synagogue consisted mainly of new jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe, many of whom lived and worked in the Junction as artisans, peddlers, shop owners and scrap and metal collectors. Known as the Junction Shul, Knesseth Israel Synagogue was built with the labour and funds provided by the founding members and their families.
Orthodox services first began in 1913 and since the 1930s the synagogue has functioned without a rabbi, with services being led by a cantor or the congregants themselves. Some family names associated with this early period include: Alexandroff, Goldstein, Nickolaevsky, Kronis, Greenblatt, Usprich, Tanenbaum, and Naftalin.
Knesseth Israel is the oldest Toronto synagogue still in use as a synagogue today and is now cared for by the descendents of these founding families. Although members of the synagogue are now few (as the Jewish population of the Junction has waned greatly since the 1960s), the synagogue still performs High Holiday services for some 75-80 full members and 300 associate members.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes 1 text, 3 objects and 2 DVDs.
Subjects
Anniversaries
Synagogues
Name Access
Knesseth Israel (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-5-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-5-4
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
33 photographs : col. (tif)
Date
Sept. 1976
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of the procession in honour of the amalgamation of the Shaarei Tefillah Synagogue and the Anshei Libavitch Synagogue. The procession started at the home of David Malkin at Bathurst and Wilson and proceeded down Bathurst Street. Identified in the photographs are: David Malkin, Abe Cohen, Alvin Malkin, Lewis Baumander, Marlee Petroff, Melody Brocklesby, Maurice Brenner, Rob Cooper, Farley Cohen, Harold Baumander, Marvin Allen, Lauryl Sandler, Stephen Cohen, and Michael Malkin.
Custodial History
Photographs were in the possession of Naomi Cooper, daughter of Abe Cohen and granddaughter of David Malkin, members of Anshei Libavitch in downtown Toronto.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
Malkin, David
Cohen, Abe
Malkin, Alvin
Baumander, Lewis
Petroff, Marlee
Brocklesby, Melody
Brenner, Maurice
Cooper, Rob
Cohen, Farley
Baumander, Harold
Allen, Marvin
Sandler, Lauryl
Cohen, Stephen
Malkin, Michael
Shaarei Tefillah Congregation (Toronto, Ont.)
Anshei Libavitch Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-6-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-6-4
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
13 photographs : b&w (11 tif, 2 jpg)
Date
1909-[ca. 1952]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting the Gryfe, Silverman, Saul and Greenberg families. The majority of the images are family portraits, however, also included is a school photograph of Sandy Greenberg at Charles G. Fraser School in Toronto, a photograph of Feda and Izzy Greenberg in Ottawa, a photograph of the Silverman family at Crystal Beach, and a photograph of a family celebration for Morris Silverman's birthday. Also identified in the photographs are: Sam Silverman, Bill Gryfe, Esther (Gryfe) Silverman, Lizzie Gryfe, Bayla Gryfe, Fae Silverman, Tillie Silverman, Sam Silverman, Bertha Silverman, Sam Saul, Joseph Saul, Ida Saul, Anna Saul, Rachel Saul, Nancy Silverman, Ruth Silverman, Lou Weitzman, and Ruth Weitzman.
Administrative History
Izzy Greenberg and Anna (nee Nathan) Greenberg immigrated to Ottawa from Romania around 1910. They had six children together: Freda, Harry, Joe, Anne, Helen, and Earl (b. 1920). Izzy likely worked as a peddler. When Anna passed away in 1923 all of the children, except for Freda, were sent to a Jewish orphanage in Montreal (the Montefiore orphanage). The orphanage closed in 1936 when Earl was 16 years old. He came to Toronto where he met Sandy (or Sylvia) Silverman. They were married in 1947. Earl initially worked as a shoe salesman, but later opened his own business, Sanmarcoda, where he bought and sold electronic surplus. He and Sandy had three children together: Marsha, Corey, and David. Sandy worked as a secretary with the provincial government and sold baby's clothing at flea markets on Sundays.
Joseph and Anna Saul came to Canada from Romania in the early 1900s. They had six children together: Sam (b. 1908), Rachel (Rae, b. 1910), Ida, Jeanette, Bonnie, and Dorothy. Joseph abandoned the family around 1923 and travelled to California to become an actor. Although his family never heard from him again, they later recognized him in movies under the name Maurice Samuels. Anna was deaf and mute and worked as a seamstress, making ladies clothing out of her own home. Rae obtained work in a hat factory when she was 13 years old and continued in this trade throughout the remainder of her life. Around 1950 she opened her own hat store at Eglinton and Dufferin called Rae's Hats. She briefly lived above the store with her husband, Sam Silverman.
Morris Silverman, Esther (Gryfe) Silverman, and their two daughters Fae and Tillie immigrated to Hamilton from Romania in 1907. Esther's sister, Lizzie Gryfe, was already living in Hamilton at the time. In 1909, Morris and Esther had another son together, Sam. By 1922, the family had moved to Nassau Street in Toronto where Morris worked as a tailor for Tip Top Tailors. They lived next door to the Saul Family. Sam married Rae Saul in 1927. Sam had had various jobs throughout his life including, cab driver, venetian blind salesman, and driver for a cleaner's.
Subjects
Families
Portraits
Name Access
Greenberg, Sandy
Places
Crystal Beach (Fort Erie, Ont.)
Ottawa (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-6-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-6-5
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (tiff)
Date
1920-1926
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of Rae Saul and her relatives outside the Saul family homes on Elizabeth or Venaly Street and Nassau Street. Identified are Millie Aaron, Anna Saul, and Sam Saul.
Administrative History
Joseph and Anna Saul came to Canada from Romania in the early 1900s. They had six children together: Sam (b. 1908), Rachel (Rae, b. 1910), Ida, Jeanette, Bonnie, and Dorothy. Joseph abandoned the family around 1923 and travelled to California to become an actor. Although his family never heard from him again, they later recognized him in movies under the name Maurice Samuels. Anna was deaf and mute and worked as a seamstress, making ladies clothing out of her own home. Rae obtained work in a hat factory when she was 13 years old and continued in this trade throughout the remainder of her life. Around 1950 she opened her own hat store at Eglinton and Dufferin called Rae's Hats. She briefly lived above the store with her husband, Sam Silverman.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Aaron, Millie
Saul, Anna
Saul, Sam
Silverman, Rae
Places
Elizabeth Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Nassau Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-7-15
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-7-15
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
13 film reels (ca. 3 hrs.) : b&w and col., si. ; 16 mm and other material
Date
[ca. 1938]-1965, 2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting both sides of Sharon Abron Drache's family: the Abramowitz's/Abron's and the Levinter's. Included are film reels with footage of both the Abramowitz and Levinter families as well as an album documenting a Jewish National Fund Negev tribute dinner in honour of David Abramowitz's 70th birthday. The album includes congratulatory letters and telegrams, photographs, newspaper clippings, and one vinyl recording entitled "Great Moments of Beth Tzedec". Identified in the photographs are David Abramowitz and Nathan Phillips.
Accession also includes a copy of an oil painting of Jacob Levinter that was by Kenneth Forbes, a wedding portrait of Sharon Abron Drache (1965) by Al Gilbert, and Sharon's curriculum vitae (2013).
Custodial History
Sharon found these records in her home. She inherited them from her parents. The film reels had been stored in an old suitcase in her building's storage locker.
Administrative History
Murray Abramowitz was born in 1912 in Toronto. His parents were David (1884-1963) and Sarah (nee Winfield) (1885-1955). David arrived in Toronto in 1906. Sarah and her parents, Jacob and Anna, settled in Scranton, Pennsylvania around 1880. Jacob worked as a grocer and relocated his family to Toronto around 1894. Sarah and David were married at the McCaul Street Synagogue in Toronto on 6 March 1906. They resided at 159 York Street after their nuptials. The couple had three children: Rose (1907-2001); Oscar (1910-1986); Murray (1912-2005). David's father, Shevach, served as the lay cantor at the First Roumanian Hebrew Congregation (now Adath Israel). David owned the Men’s shop in the Union Station and his sister, Sophie Abramowitz, ran the Ladies shop. The shops were located on the east end of the Great Hall beneath the composite glass windows. Rose Abron Lahman became a physician, specializing in obstetrics and gynecology. Initially she practised in Toronto and then in Atlanta, Georgia. Rose graduated from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto when there were quotas for both women and Jews.
Murray married Edythe (née Levinter) on 8 June, 1941. The event took place at the bride's family's home above their furniture store, J. Levinter Ltd, at 1169 Bloor Street West. The couple had one child, Sharon Abron Drache. Murray began using the Abron surname during the 1940s, changing it legally in the 1950s.
During his life, Murray worked as an hotelier and ran several businesses. They included the Rex Hotel in Toronto and Tent City at Lake Simcoe (ca. 1935-1945) and the St. Lawrence Hotel in Port Hope (1949-1955). When Murray managed the Rex Hotel he was a 50/50 partner with his mother's brother-in-law, Leo Hertzman. Leo owned and managed the store, United Clothing, which fronted the Rex hotel on Queen Street at the south side of the beverage room. When Leo’s son Harold Hertzman returned from military service in 1945, Leo bought out Murray’s share in the business for Harold. Jack Ross and Morris Meyers purchased the hotel from the Hertzmans in 1951. Murray was also a co-owner of the Tent City business with his father, David Abramowitz, coinciding with his Rex hotel years. During the late 1950s he worked as a real estate broker in Toronto and Florida. From the 1960s to the early 1970s he worked in his mother-in-law’s furniture business, J. Levinter Ltd. After Murray retired from the furniture business he became a stock broker. His hobbies included fishing, photography and storytelling. He died on 10 October 2005.
The Levinter family was headed by Samuel and Rebecca (née Godfried). They were both born in Austria (Galicia) and came to Canada in their teens. After their marriage in 1890, they resided in St. John's Ward. The couple had seven children: Jacob (b. 1892); Etta (b. 1894); Manny (b. 1895); Isadore (b. 1898); Molly (b. 1900); Rose and Dolly. Isadore became a prominent Toronto lawyer and was the first Jew appointed as a bencher at the Law Society of Upper Canada.
Samuel established Levinter Furniture in 1890. The business was initially located at 401-405 Queen Street. By 1925 Samuel had relocated his store to 287 Queen Street West and his son Jacob had opened a second location at 1169 Bloor Street West. Jacob later expanded his location to 1171 Bloor Street West. Samuel died on April 30, 1942; Rebecca died in 1952. Jacob married Sara Kamin (b. 1894, Lodz, Poland) on 25 June 1916. They had six children: Edythe (1918 -2011); Alfred (1919-1919); Evelyn (1922-2006); Murray (1925-); Molly (1926 -); Florence (b. 1930-). Jacob died of a heart attack in 1944. After his death, Sara took his place as owner and manager of the family business grooming her son Murray to succeed her. Sara’s daughter Molly had an early career as a concert pianist in Toronto and New York. Sara died in Toronto in 1990.
Sharon Abron Drache attended Forest Hill Collegiate (g. 1962) and then completed an undergraduate degree and post-graduate diploma in Psychology at the University of Toronto, the latter from the Institute of Child Study. She was enrolled as a special student in the Department of Religion at Carleton University from 1974-78. She has published four books of adult fiction, The Mikveh Man, Ritual Slaughter, The Golden Ghetto, Barbara Klein Muskrat – then and now, and two children's books, The Magic Pot and The Lubavitchers are coming to Second Avenue. She has also worked as a literary journalist and book reviewer for several newspapers and journals including, The Globe and Mail, Ottawa Citizen, Books in Canada, the Glebe Report and the Ottawa and Western Jewish Bulletins.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes 1 album, 1 painting, 1 photograph, and 1 folder of textual records
Associated Material Note: please see Sharon Drache's fonds at Library and Archives Canada and at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto for material related to her literary career. Please see Sharon Drache's fonds at the Ottawa Jewish Archives for material related to her journalism career. Finally, for additional material related to Sharon's family please see her fonds at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto.
Related Material Note: see accessions #2010-12/8 and #2010-3/1 for addtional records donated to the OJA by Sharon Abron Drache.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-4-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-4-6
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
ca. 500 photographs (tif) : b&w and col.
Date
[ca. 1937]-[ca. 1983]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of scanned copies of photographs taken by Dr. John E. Ackerman, which document his personal and professional activities. Included are images of family events, his mother's grocery store business, his dental practice and education at the University of Toronto and Jarvis Collegiate, his military involvement during the Second World War, his involvement in the scouting movement, and Jewish communal events. Also included are snapshots of individuals who lived in his Toronto neighbourhood near Dundas and Elizabeth as well as beach and resort images taken at Crystal Beach, Sunnyside Beach, Smith's Bay, Muskoka, Manor House, and the Greenspoon's resort in Glasgow (Bolton). Of note are images taken of the first Israel Day parade in Toronto (May 16, 1948); the opening of Baycrest Hospital (December 1954); the homecoming of Dr. Ackerman's brother, Al, from military service overseas; a Beth Tzedec Synagogue and Beaches Hebrew Institute event; B'nai Brith Institute events; an image taken of the Hillel House opening at the University of Toronto (1951); and an image of Dr. Ackerman's family at the UJA Walkathon (1973). Among the photographs of family and friends are images taken of Jewish families living in North Bay and Sudbury. Identified individuals include: Dr. John E. Ackerman, Al Ackerman, Frances Ackerman, Mindel Ackerman, Phil Halpern, Harold Nirenberg, Gary Nirenberg, Mrs. Tattlebaum, Jeffrey Halpern, Fran Halpern, and Lynn Reiss.
Custodial History
Records were inherited by Dr. Ackerman's son David after his death; he donated them to the OJA.
Administrative History
Dr. John E. Ackerman was born in Toronto on December 16, 1921 to Jacob and Mindel Ackerman. John was one of four children. Jacob initially worked as a presser in a factory. Mindel opened and ran a small grocery store at Dundas and Elizabeth Street. Jacob died around the age 57.
Dr. Ackerman went to school at Jarvis Collegiate and later enrolled in dentistry school at the University of Toronto. As part of the school's program, Dr. Ackerman had to enlist in the Canadian Army's General Corp. While in school, he also met his future wife, Frances, at a Hillel lecture on campus. Frances was a graduate student studying psychology. Dr. Ackerman graduated from university in 1946. He initially worked as a dental intern at the Toronto General Hospital, but after a few years he opened his own practice above the Royal Bank at Dundas and Elizabeth Street.
Dr. Ackerman married Frances on September 12, 1954. They had three children together: Martin (b. 1959), Penina (b. 1963), and David (b. 1965).
As a young teenager, Dr. Ackerman took up photography as a hobby and remained passionate about it for the remainder of his life. He took many photographs of family life, Toronto, his military involvement, and other activities. He also shot many family films and even converted part of his house into a darkroom.
Dr. Ackerman became involved in the Jewish Boy Scouts after his son Martin became a cub. He was active in Troop 166 out of Beth Tzedec. Frances initially worked in the outpatient department of the Toronto Psychiatric Hospital, but later worked with the Toronto District School Board until her retirement. Dr. Ackerman retired his practice in 1995 or 1996. He passed away on December 13, 2008.
Use Conditions
Credit Dr. John E. Ackerman for the photographs.
Name Access
Ackerman, John, 1921-2008
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-7-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-7-13
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
moving images
Physical Description
ca. 100 photographs (jpg)
1 DVD
3 film reels (ca. 25 min.) : col., sd. ; 16 mm and super 8 mm
Date
[ca. 1938]-1982
Scope and Content
Accession consists of scanned photographs and home movies taken by Dr. John E. Ackerman, which document his personal and professional activities. Included are photographs of family gatherings, the grocery store owned by Ackerman's mother, Jarvis Collegiate, Dr. Ackerman's dental practice, the military involvement of Dr. Ackerman and his brother Al, beach activities, families living in North Bay and Sudbury, and individuals living in Dr. Ackerman's Toronto neighbourhood of Dundas and Elizabeth. Of note are photos taken by Al Ackerman of his military service overseas as well as an image of him arriving back in Toronto in uniform in front of Union Station. Also of note is an image of Dr. Ackerman in military uniform standing in front of Anshel Wise's cigar store at 100 Dundas Street West and images likely of the Hudson Street Tennis Club.
The Home movies include footage of a Jewish War Veterans parade and service in front of a monument at Earl Bales Park (ca. 1980), a Beth Tzedec Sukkot service with the children of its Hebrew school (ca. 1978), other unidentified events at Beth Tzedec (one in its banquet hall), a family seder, and a family trip to Israel. Also included is footage of the seventy-fifth anniversary parade of the Boy Scouts, performances at Camp Shalom for visitor's day (1982), and a film with footage of a trade fair attended by Larry Grossman.
Administrative History
Dr. John E. Ackerman was born in Toronto on December 16, 1921 to Jacob and Mindel Ackerman. John was one of four children. Jacob initially worked as a presser in a factory. Mindel opened and ran a small grocery store at Dundas and Elizabeth Street. Jacob died around the age 57.
Dr. Ackerman went to school at Jarvis Collegiate and later enrolled in dentistry school at the University of Toronto. As part of the school's program, Dr. Ackerman had to enlist in the Canadian Army's General Corp. While in school, he also met his future wife, Frances, at a Hillel lecture on campus. Frances was a graduate student studying psychology. Dr. Ackerman graduated from university in 1946. He initially worked as a dental intern at the Toronto General Hospital, but after a few years he opened his own practice above the Royal Bank at Dundas and Elizabeth Street.
Dr. Ackerman married Frances on September 12, 1954. They had three children together: Martin (b. 1959), Penina (b. 1963), and David (b. 1965).
As a young teenager, Dr. Ackerman took up photography as a hobby and remained passionate about it for the remainder of his life. He took many photographs of family life, Toronto, his military involvement, and other activities. He also shot many family films and even converted part of his house into a darkroom.
Dr. Ackerman became involved in the Jewish Boy Scouts after his son Martin became a cub. He was active in Troop 166 out of Beth Tzedec. Frances initially worked in the outpatient department of the Toronto Psychiatric Hospital, but later worked with the Toronto District School Board until her retirement. Dr. Ackerman retired his practice in 1995 or 1996. He passed away on December 13, 2008.
Use Conditions
Credit Dr. John E. Ackerman for all photos and films
Contact donor for permission to publish footage of the family seder and family trips. OJA has copyright of other film footage.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Ackerman, John, 1921-2008
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-9-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-9-1
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
3 photographs (tiffs) : col.
1 folder of textual records
Date
2005-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of graphic material and a textual record documenting the Transnistria Survivor Association. Included are three photos: 1) Member Arnold Buxbaum standing in front of Memorial for Transnistria at Earl Bales Park; 2) Arnold Buxbaum and Joe Leinburd at UJA Foundation Event, 2011-12; 3) Hazkarah, 2005 at Sharei Shomayim Synagogue. There is also a speech by Arnold Buxbaum presented in 2011 at Sharei Shomayim Synagogue.
Custodial History
Originals were loaned for reproducing.
Administrative History
Founded in 1994, the Transnistria Survivors’ Association works to provide a voice for and raise awareness of a lesser known group of Holocaust survivors. Transnistria was the Romanian authorities’ name for the former Ukrainian region located between the Rivers Dniester and Bug. It was placed under Romanian administration following the German and Romanian conquest of Ukraine in the summer of 1941. Prior to the Second World War, Romania was home to the third largest Jewish population in Europe; but beginning with the Citizenship Revision Laws of 1938, the Jews of Romania were deprived their citizenship rights and became the targets of repressive antisemitic policies and laws. Neighbours turned on neighbours. Thousands of Jews were murdered in pogroms, either by Romanian or German troops, Nazi Einsatzgruppen, or the local population. In 1941, the Jews who remained alive in the Provinces of Bucovina and Bessarabia were deported to camps and ghettos in Transnistria. Thousands were jammed into freight trains while others were marched by foot. Many died along the way. Between 1941 and 1944, it is estimated that German and Romanian authorities, along with Ukrainian collaborators, murdered or caused the deaths of hundreds of thousands of Romanian and Ukrainian Jews in Transnistria. Some of those who survived these tragic circumstances, especially from Bucovina and Bessarabia, and made a new home in Toronto gathered together to lend each other support and to tell their largely unknown story of oppression and survival. The Transnistria Survivor’s Association organized yearly Hazkarah (memorial) services and its dedicated members continue to share their extraordinary stories of survival through speaking engagements at schools, colleges and synagogues. Past presidents include:
1. Felicia (Steigman) Carmelly
2.Osias Nadel
3.Etti Ziegler
4.Lou (Leizer) Hoffer
As of 2017, the current President is Joe Leinburd.
Subjects
Societies
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Name Access
Transnistria Survivors Association
Buxbaum, Arnold
Leinburd, Joe
Hoffer, Lou
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-9-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-9-7
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
5 photographs
Date
1920-1977
Scope and Content
5 electronic copies of black and white photographs relted to Wellts Deli: 1) Peter and Fannie Wellts 2) Peter Wellts with cleaver in hand in the deli. 3) Exterior of Wellts Deli (1959) taken by realtor when it closed. 4-5) exterior of Wellt's Deli taken in 1977 before building was being torn down. The word "Kosher" in Yiddish/Hebrew is still visible.
Administrative History
Wellts Delicatessen was founded by Peter and Fannie Wellts in the 1910s at 350 College Street. Peter Wellts was born in Tarnigrad, Poland in 1888 and Fannie Brown was born in New York City in 1889. They met in New York and moved with Fannie’s family to Toronto in 1910. Peter worked in the garment district prior at the start of the restaurant business. Fannie’s father David Brown had come earlier from New York to work for Eaton’s in the men’s clothing business. The rest of the Brown family, Fannie’s parents and siblings eventually returned to New York. Peter and Fannie married in Toronto on November 26, 1910. They had two daughters Sylvia (b. August 26, 1911) (m. Walfish) and Ethel (b. January 7, 1928) (m. Rochwerg). They lived in an apartment above the delicatessen. When Ethel married her husband Nathan Rochwerg in 1948, they moved in with Fannie and Peter above the deli. Ethel and Nathan had three children Martin, Arlene (m. Kochberg), and Sidney. When Peter was in his 70s, it was decided that the family would move north into the Bathurst Manor and close the deli. Peter had a heart attack on December 26, 1959, before the move, and Fannie moved in with Nathan and Ethel and their three children. The deli closed in 1959. The deli was known for 5 cent pastrami/corned beef sandwiches sold during the depression. Peter Wellts never let anyone go hungry during this period. They had Vernor's ginger ale on tap during a time when everything was in bottles. Deliveries would come in through the backyard by the garage. It was kosher. Ethel remembers people coming in to use the phone in the kitchen or the washroom in the basement.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Related material note: an article on the deli from one of the local daily newspapers from 1969 is in a vertical file on Wellt's Deli
Subjects
Delicatessens
Places
College Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-10-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-10-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
60 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1964-2005
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the National Council of Jewish Women, London Section. Included are board and committee meeting minutes and correspondence, general correspondence, program material, publicity records, committee and membership lists, publications, anniversary records, newsletters, newsclippings, cookbooks, photographs and slides, audio cassetees documenting the "Jewish Family Life" series, as well as one promotional video in BETA format.
Administrative History
The London Section of the National Council for Jewish Women of Canada was founded in the late 1940s. The section was presented its charter in 1950. Dev Fox was the section's first president. The section was involved in fundraising for various causes through events such as raffles, bingo nights, fashion shows and dinner-dances. They also organized discussion groups, programs and campaigns around topics of social interest such as mental and physical health, education, poverty, women's equality, women's health, child abuse and others. The London Section is no longer active.
Descriptive Notes
Physical Description note: includes ca. 500 photographs and slides, 8 audiocassettes, and 1 videocassette.
Name Access
National Council of Jewish Women, London Section (subject)
Alter, Ronnee (creator)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-8-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-8-6
Material Format
textual record (electronic)
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records and graphic material : b&w and sepia (tiff and jpg) ; 780 MB
Date
1915-[ca. 1955]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of electronic copies of original records documenting the Zack and Levy families from Hamilton and Toronto. Records included family photographs, a border crossing identification card, a military identity document and a war service badge certificate, Irving Levy's intern registration card for Barnert Memorial Hospital, a graduation diploma and a sworn declaration regarding Irving Levy's name.
Administrative History
Isaac (d. 1955) Zack and Rose (d. ca 1965) Chertkoff were both born in Russia and came separately to Canada in the early 1900s. They married in Toronto in 1907 and then moved to Hamilton. Together, they had five children: Hy (b. ca. 1909); Betty (Joseph) (b. ca. 1911); Sadie (Levy) (1913-2013); Mannie (b. ca. 1915); and Gordie (b. ca. 1922). Isaac and Rose ran "Zack's Furniture" store on York Street in Hamilton. They were ardent Labour Socialists.
Nathan (d. 1965) Levy and Annie (d. 1975) Persofsky both came spearately to Toronto with their families. They married in Toronto sometime before 1908 and had seven children: Frances (Hendricks) (b. ca. 1908); Morris; Mary (Rubin); Irving (1916-ca. 1998); Godie (Nass); Larry (b. ca. 1924); and Jackie. Nathan was a barber.
Nathan's son Irving studied medicine at the University of Toronto. Following graduation in 1941, Irving went to the United States and interned for one year at the Barnert Memorial Hospital in Patterson, New Jersey. Following his internship, Irving returned to Canada and married Sadie Zack sometime after February 1943. The two had met at a National Council of Jewish Women's party in Hamilton. Irving enlisted in the Royal Canadan Army Medical Corps in February of 1943 and served on active duty until 1946. He attained the rank of Captain and served in Italy as a physician. Upon returning to Canada, Irving opened his own medical practice in Hamilton. Together, Irving and Sadie had three children: Marsha (Slavens) (b. 1947); Richard (b. 1949); and Ira (b. 1952). Irving and Sadie were active memebers of the Hamilton Jewish community, Sadie being a long-time member of the National Council of Jewish Women and the Temple Ahshe Shalom Sisterhood and Irving a member of B'nai Brith. Irving died ca. 1998 and Sadie died in 2013 in Hamilton.
Name Access
Slavens, Marsha, 1947- (subject)
Levy, Irving, 1916-1998 (subject)
Levy, Sadie, 1913-2013 (creator)
Zack, Isaac, -1955 (subject)
Zack, Rose, -1965 (subject)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-11-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-11-2
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
6 photographs : b&w and col. ; 15 x 20 cm and 9 x 15 cm and 11 x 8 cm
1 photograph (electronic) : jpg
Date
1930-2001
Scope and Content
Accession consists of three colour photographs from the reunion of the Baldwin Club, a young men's club from the 1940s based in Kensington Market. The reunion took place in 2006 at the Steeles Deli. The photographs feature: Pearl Godfrey with Rose Simon Zand and her husband David Zand (Rose Simon Zand grew up in the market and her family owned a grocery store); Jack Gelman (founder of the Baldwin Club. His parents owned P. Gelman Fruit and Groceries at 174 Baldwin Street). To his right is his wife. Seated are Rose Simon and Pearl Godfrey; Left to right: Solly Raykeff, Jackie Gelman, Mel Lastman.
Also included are three black and white photographs depicting 1) Three women in front of 172 Baldwin, left to right: Sandy Shabinsky, Katie Lottman Grossman, Ruth Berman; 2) Two girls in front of 172 Baldwin: left to right: Bella Tichberg (Judy Lottman Tichberg's daughter) and her cousin Henry; 3) Jake Lottman and his father Sam Lottman at 181 Baldwin shown cracking eggs for a photo taken for Queen Elizabeth's visit to Toronto.
Also included is one electronic photo of three women working at Lottman's bakery (Helen Wiseman who worked at the bakery for 50 years, Katie Lottman Grossman's mother in law Brancha Loffman, and Gertie who also worked at the bakery for many years)
There is also a small amount of textual records including two newspaper articles entitled "From Humble Beginnings in Kensington" (National Post, 2006) and "Demise of Lottman's Bakery mounred by all" (CJN, Thursday, November 29, 1984); a cookbook of recipes by Rose Simon entitled Recipes by Rose (2001); as well as five photocopies of photos of the Baldwin Street Boys (1940s).
Administrative History
Pearl Godfrey's father was Sam Lottman, owner of Lottman's Bakery which opened in the 1920s and was originally located at 172 Baldwin Street. It had a brick oven and on Friday nights women would bring their pots to keep the chollent warm for the Sabath. Sam Lottman was born in Poland and arrived in Toronto when he was 12 years old. He arrived with nothing but soon got a job as a baker. Sam's first wife Bella died in the 1920s. They had two children Judy Tichberg and Joe Lottman. There was also another daughter that died. Sam was a founder of the Hebrew Loan Society (Axia), where members donated 25 cents per week.
Pearl's mother was Emma (Birkin) Lottman. She arrived from Poland with her sister and mother in 1919 and was a wig maker. Emma Lottman mother would go with neighbours to collect household items for new immigrants. She also worked alongside Sam in the bakery. They lived on top of the bakery until Pearl was 12 years old. Emma and Sam had three children: Jake Lottman, Katie Grossman and Pearl Godfrey. Pearl went to Ryerson Public School and then to Harbord Collegiate for a year before transferring to Forest Hill.
The family lived on top of the store until 1947 when they moved to 50 Ava Road in Forest Hill. They built a new store at 191 Baldwin. It had a traveling oven which was very rare at the time, which allowed for the baked goods to move along a conveyer belt through the heat.
Jake who had built the business alongside his father moved to California. Joe Lottman took over the business when Sam retired. Joe died at the age of 60 in 1981 and his daughter Bonnie Lottman and son Terry Lottman ran the business.
The bakery closed in 1984.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Business
Name Access
Lottman, Sam
Lottman, Emma
Places
Kensington Market (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-11-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-11-1
Material Format
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
27 photographs : b&w and col. (26 tiff) ; 21 x 26 cm
1 document (electronic)
Date
1948-[198-], predominant 1948-1968
Scope and Content
Accession consists predominantly of photographs documenting the athletic career and family life of Maurice Strauss. Included are photos of Maurice performing gymnastic stunts and with his family in Belgium prior to coming to Canada, Maurice with his wife and children in Ontario, and shots of Maurice practicing his weightlifting and competing at various locations across Ontario including, the Brunswick Y, the Bloor YMHA (now known as the Miles Nadal Community Centre), and the Northern Y (now the Prosserman Centre on the Sherman campus). Also included are images of Maurice in Israel at the Maccabiah Games and shots of his son, Joel, competing in various weightlifting competitions. Finally, accession also includes a memoir in which Maurice recounts his memories of living in German occupied Belgium during the Second World War.
Identified in the photographs are: Maurice Strauss, Ruth Strauss, Dave Strauss, Daniel Strauss, Joel Strauss, Ida Strauss, Urin Strauss, Helen Strauss, George Chuvalo, Nate Mudrick (?), and Sherwin Desser.
Custodial History
Records were donated by Daniel Strauss, Maurice's son.
Administrative History
Maurice Strauss, a weightlifting champion, was born in Poland in 1929. At age 2, he moved to Brussels with his parents and older sister. A younger brother was born in Brussels. Like his father, Maurice eventually became a tailor. His father made strategic moves to protect the family--sending of Maurice's sister to work as a maid for a gentile family. Maurice wa able to move around freely by using the papers of a friend who was shot. His youngest brother did not make it out alive--he died of Tuberculosis in the concentration camps. Maurice, his sister, and parents came to Toronto in 1929.
Eventually Maurice opened up Sunny Cleaners at Sunnyside. In 1964, he opened a menswear store at Yonge and Eglinton called Maurice Menswear. He had acumen as a businessman despite his grade 7 education. He owned 3 laundry mat locations
He married Ruth Speigel in 1956. She was from a cultured family. Maurice went on to university as he felt that this was important. He studied business and French and received an Honours degree. He attempted to go to Teachers College but didn't get in. He did, however, received a business degree at age 58. At age 60, he taught at a high school in Etobicoke and also taught at CHAT.
His weightlifting career began in Brussels and when he came to Toronto, he was at an advantage because of his European training which was more advanced than Canada's athletic training. When he arrived in Toronto, he worked out at the YMHA on Brunswick and then at the newly opened YMHA at Bloor. He also coached weightlifting there.
The family was raised in the Bathurst Manor on Baycrest Ave, where Maurice bought a home in 1957. Maureice had 3 sons. While the children grew up, they went to the Bathurst JCC regularly. "It was their religion," according to son Daniel. Son, Joel was also a successful weightlifter and participated in the commonwealth games.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-7
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
9 CDs (graphic material)
1 DVD (graphic material)
Date
2008-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs from the "Israel at 60 mission", the 2008 "Prime Minister's mission" in Israel, a film by Haim Hecht called "One flight for us", photographs from the UJA Atari luncheon in 2008, photographs and a draft schedule from the Women's Philanthropy Atarah Mission to Cuba in 2009, photographs from UJA women's philanthropy event on April 15, 2010, and photographs from the LOJE Tea event on June 16, 2011.
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-2-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-2-4
Material Format
textual record
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 CD
Date
2008-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the Societies Division of Jewish Foundation including invitations to Spring Luncheon for Societies and other events, and 1 CD of Masada chapter of Lithuanian Jews photographs and society member lists. Accession also contains 2013 Book of Life signed stories.
Administrative History
The Book of Life is an archival collection of family stories from those who have left a legacy to ensure the future of the Jewish community through tzedakah.
Name Access
Jewish Foundation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
330 records – page 1 of 7.

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