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178 records – page 1 of 4.
Part Of
Maurice Solway fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Maurice Solway fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
13
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1919-1989
Physical Description
11 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Maurice Solway (1906-2001) was a violinist, music teacher, composer, author and actor who lived and worked for most of his life in Toronto. Although he was highly respected as a musician in Toronto, and thoroughly immersed in the city’s musical culture from the 1920s until the 1980s, his greatest fame came to him later in life, as an actor in the Academy Award nominated NFB short film “The Violin”.
Maurice Solway's family lived at 164 York Street, Toronto, where he was born, in 1906. His parents, Jakob (b.1877) and Roza Solway (b.1877), had only just emigrated that year from Halofzen, Russia, where Jakob had been a musician and band leader. In Canada, Jakob adopted his father's trade and worked as a Kosher butcher, in Toronto’s St. John’s Ward. As a youth, Maurice played the violin in variety programmes with his sister, Dora, accompanying him on piano. His father was his first teacher, but he quickly showed enough promise to warrant private lessons with Harry Adaskin, and later with Dr. Luigi von Kunits, at the Canadian Academy of Music. He also studied at the Hambourg Conservatory in Toronto with Henri Czaplinsky and Geza de Kresz, starting in 1921.
Solway began his professional career with the New Symphony, which later became the Toronto Symphony Orchestra (TSO). During the 1920s, he also played in the Famous Players Cinema orchestras that accompanied silent films, and performed lunch concerts in Toronto hotel and department store orchestras, professional venues that would disappear by the 1930s.
From 1926 to 1928, Solway left Canada to study in Brussels with the highly regarded violinist, Eugène Ysaÿe. There he befriended other students of Ysaÿe, such as Nathan Milstein, William Primrose, Viola Mitchell, Robert Velton, and Joseph Gingold.
Upon his return to Toronto, Solway gave several recitals that were both critically and publicly well-received. Few such opportunities, however, existed in Canada at the time, and Solway was obliged to find work in-between solo concerts. He also suffered an injury to his left hand while moving a piano in 1929 that required him to adjust his technique for three fingers and interfered with his being able to play comfortably for a number of years.
He was married in 1930 to Anne Cass (1907-1994), and they had a son, Stephen. Facing his financial obligations to his new family, he opted for the more dependable income of orchestral playing versus the riskier and transitory life of a soloist. Besides classical music, he played with jazz groups like the Jolly Bachelor’s Orchestra, Oscar Peterson, Jerome Kern, and Percy Faith, and on numerous recordings for the CBC, CFCA, and CKGW radio stations. He also played chamber music with the Joyce Trio, founded by Simeon Joyce (piano) and featuring Charles Mathe (cello).
In 1952, Solway retired from the TSO, dedicating himself to his chamber playing and radio work. He founded the Solway String Quartet (SSQ) in 1947, with Marcus Adeney (cello), Nathan Green (viola) and Jack Groob (violin). The quartet played a mixed repertoire that included standard classical music with more widely recognized popular songs and new compositions, especially works by Canadian composers such as Howard Cable, John Weinzweig and Jean Coulthard. Sponsored by the Ontario Board of Education and the CBC, the SSQ played rural Ontario towns and broadcast concerts for a wide demographic of music listeners. In 1955, they performed the Canadian debut of the Castelnuovo-Tedesco Quintet for guitar and strings with Andres Segovia. The SSQ, with frequent changes in personnel, continued performing until 1968. Other players in the SSQ included Robert Warburton, Martin Chenhall, Murray Adaskin, Arthur Milligan, Charles Dobias, Eugene Hudson, Berul Sugerman, Joseph Pach and Ivan Romanoff.
In 1973, Solway was invited to act in a short children’s film “The Violin,” co-produced by George Pastic and Andrew Walsh. Solway also contributed the original music to the film, which was nominated for an Academy Award in 1975. Following the success of the film, Solway also appeared on television, making guest appearances with Sharon, Lois and Bram, on the Elephant Show and Mr. Dressup. During this time, his wife Anne traveled with him and managed his appointments.
Solway was also a violin teacher throughout his career. In 1989, he published a preparatory book, Fiddling for Fun: the Visual and Aural Art of Violin Playing, in which he outlined a new theory for violin practice that proposed an easy to use visual system for familiarizing students with intervals and fingerboard positions.
He also wrote an autobiography, Recollections of a Violinist, in 1984, and continued to lecture and speak about music. In 1981 and 1983 he devised a lecture performance series to commemorate Ysaÿe, the proceeds of which went to the establishment of a music scholarship at the Royal Conservatory. As he began to play less frequently in the 1980s, he also began to compose more regularly, completing more than one hundred compositions, primarily works for solo violin and for violin and piano. As a composer, he returned frequently to folk themes and completed a series of songs based on his travels around the world. Among his folk themes are songs inspired by his visits to such diverse countries as Norway, Maui, Japan, Israel and Spain.
Maurice Solway was affiliated with the Beth Tzedec Synagogue and frequently contributed to charity concerts and fundraising efforts for organizations such as the Inner City Angels, a cultural society for disadvantaged children. He died in 2001 in Toronto.
Scope and Content
The Solway fonds is arranged into twelve files. The documents relate to Solway's professional activities as a musician, educator, composer, actor and author. These include printed texts, photographs, original music scores, promotional materials, programmes, audio cassettes, articles, correspondence, radioscripts and a video.
Notes
Includes 31 photographs, 2 v. of text, 1 videocassette (VHS) and 17 audio cassettes.
Name Access
Solway, Maurice, 1906-2001
Subjects
Musicians
Related Material
Fonds 25, Series 11, Item 9: Photo cabinet, photo #179 (oversized)
Photo cabinet, photo #501
Two titles in the archives library collection (1984-12-6) (1 title missing 15 Aug. 2006)
A vertical file has been created for Maurice Solway.
Creator
Solway, Maurice, 1906-2001
Accession Number
1988-10-9
1991-3-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Maurice Solway fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 13; File 6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Maurice Solway fonds
Level
File
Fonds
13
File
6
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1974-1985
Physical Description
1 videocassette (ca. 25 min.) : duplicate, col. VHS and other material
Admin History/Bio
"The Violin" was a short film by Andrew Welsh and George Pastic, released in 1974, and featuring Maurice Solway as the old man. The producers approached Maurice Solway about being in their film while making initial casting inquiries among Solway's students in regard to the children’s roles in the film. Eventually, they persuaded Solway to star in the film, shot on Ward Island, Toronto, in 1972 and 1973. Solway also wrote the original music and became the film's principle promoter, speaking in schools and at screenings of the film. The film promotes peace and understanding through the power of music and the exchange of knowledge and friendship between the old and the young. In 1975 it was nominated for an Academy Award. The spin-off book was published in 1976. Solway, with the managerial assistance of his wife, Anne, took on the role of promoting the film and saw it as his crowning achievement, the expression of what he wanted to be remembered for, after a career in music and education. The film was made for $25,000 and eventually grossed over $700,000. It was broadcast frequently on CBC in Canada, and CBS in the United States. It was even given a special screening for the 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal.
Scope and Content
This file includes a VHS copy of the original short video of "The Violin" , the accompanying book, correspondence, and promotional materials related to Maurice Solway's speaking tours in promotion of the film. These materials include a picture postcard and numerous posters and programmes for specific speaking and performance engagements associated with the release and screenings of the film. Also included are two hand-coloured children's illustrations of violins with accompanying letters to Solway, from children who had seen the film and wrote to express their appreciation. "The violin: a children's story" (McGraw-Hill: 1976) also uses stills from the film. The text was written by Robert Thomas Allen, from the story by Pastic and Welsh. Solway's score for the film is reproduced in the back of the children's book.
Notes
Includes 1 videocassette (VHS), 1 v. of text, 1 folder of textual records, and 3 graphic images (2 illustrations, 1 picture postcard).
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Morris Norman collection
Level
Collection
ID
Fonds 22
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Morris Norman collection
Level
Collection
Fonds
22
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1856-1995
Physical Description
1.1 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Morris Norman (b. 1946) is a chartered accountant living and working in Toronto. He is an avid collector of Canadiana, specifically Judaica. He purchases lots at auction and donates them to the Ontario Jewish Archives, as well as other institutions.
Scope and Content
This collection consists of the individual items collected at auction by Morris Norman. The records relate to the Toronto Jewish community and Ontario Jewry and include textual documents, photographs, near-prints, publications, artifacts, posters and broadsheets, sound recordings, and ephemera. Most of the items relate to various Jewish organizations, businesses, synagogues and individuals, and to Christian missionary work in Toronto. The material has been described at the file level, or where appropriate, the item level.
There are also four distinct series of records which document Berul Sugarman, who was a concert violinist and orchestral leader; the Franklin family, who owned a large amount of property in Toronto in the late 1800s and early 1900s; radio and television scripts written by Wayne and Shuster, Henry Karpus and Russell Bradley; and a collection of Turofsky photographs.
Notes
Physical description note: Includes 49 objects, 25 photographs, 7 audio recordings and 4 prints.
Name Access
Norman, Morris
Norman, Jessie
Creator
Norman, Morris (1946-)
Accession Number
1995-9-3
1995-9-4
1995-9-8
1996-6-3
1996-7-3
1996-9-1
1997-7-1
1998-1-1
1998-3-44
1998-7-2
1999-10-1
2000-7-4
2000-12-3
2001-3-3
2001-4-3
2001-8-5
2001-10-6
2001-11-1
2002-4-1
2002-5-1
2002-7-1
2002-9-1
2002-10-5
2002-10-58
2002-12-3
2003-5-3
2003-10-6
2004-7-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2003-8-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2003-8-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
6.6 m of textual records and graphic materials
Date
[198-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records relating to Markson's design work for the Holocaust Centre, for Jewish Family & Child Services, and for the film, Growing up in America. These records include textual records, slides, negatives, photographs, films, and sound recordings in various formats.
Use Conditions
Donor retains copyright. Material can be made available for viewing and reference at the OJA. Researchers who require copies for personal use or publication must obtain permission from donor first.
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Name Access
Markson, Morley
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-3-16
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-3-16
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
81 photographs and other material
Date
[ca. 1937]-1998
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records relating to the life and weightlifting career of Bill Gryfe. The textual records are photocopies of correspondence, clippings and certificates from a family album. The photographs are scanned copies from this same album and include images of Bill with various individuals and images of weightlifting teams and individuals that he had coached. There are two trophies: one is a Grand Order of Israel bowling award and one is an award presented to Bill in 1979 by the JCC for over 50 years of service. There is also a CD with Bill Gryfe's memoirs and some additional photographs of Bill at a young age, and of him at various weightlifting events and on vacation.
Administrative History
Bill Gryfe was an early member of the Y.M.H.A. He began as a weightlifter and in 1931 became a bar bell coach of the Y.M.H.A. weightlifting team.
He coached at many national and international competitions such as the Canada games, the Commonwealth Games, the Pan-American Games and the Maccabean Games. He also officiated and refereed at national and international competitions including the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal.
Throughout his life, Bill was devoted to the promotion of physical fitness and competitive weightlifting. He was a founder of the Ontario Weightlifting Association and its first president in 1968. He also organized the national-championship weightlifting competitions, held annually at the Canadian National Exhibition, an institution that had a distinct effect on his life from his earliest years when it was first established by Bill Oliphant in 1935. Over the years, Bill Gryfe received numerous awards and citations, including a nomination for the Order of Canada in 1982. Bill died in 2005 at the age of 95.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes 3 cm of textual records, 2 items, and 1 electronic record.
Name Access
Gryfe, Bill
Y.M.-Y.W.H.A.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-4-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-4-4
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w (tif)
5 documents (tif)
1 folder of textual records
1 DVD
1 videocassette
Date
1941-2004
Scope and Content
Accession consists of copies of electronic copies of photographs, postcards and telegrams as well as newsclippings, a video and a DVD documenting the career of Sam Shapiro in the RCAF and his time as a Prisoner of War at Stalag Luft 3 in Poland.
Administrative History
Sam Shapiro enlisted as a pilot in the Royal Canadian Air Force in September 1940. He received his wings in Brantford and was sent overseas in April 1941 as a sergeant pilot. He was in Squadron ten and flew eight successful missions before his plane was shot down over Holland in August 1941, killing two of the crew.
Shapiro was captured by German forces on 17 August 1941 and was taken to Stalag Luft 3 camp in Poland, where the "Great Escape" took place. Shapiro was not part of the breakout, but did help dig the tunnel that allowed seventy-six of his fellow prisoners to escape.
While a Prisoner of War, Shapiro was promoted to Warrant Officer. He was liberated on 16 April 1945 and arrived in England five days later. Shortly after arriving home in 1945, Shapiro received the YMCA sports badge for his conduct in the POW camp and the Canadian Volunteer Service medal. He married his fiance Geraldine Perlman in 1945.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Shapiro, Sam.
Stalag Luft 3
Perlman, Geraldine
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-12-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-12-4
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
0.3 m. of textual records and other material
Date
1973-2005
Scope and Content
The records in this accession consist of early minutes of the Executive Committee, high holiday sermons, sidureem (booklets) that were produced by the synagogue for Shabbat and the holidays, a cassette containing instructions for bar/bat mitzvah children, a CD of music entitled "Solel Sings "Kids" Songs!", and a videotaped recording of the 25th Anniversary celebration of the shul.
Custodial History
The records were donated to the OJA from their archives committee. This committee will be responsible for overseeing future transfers and for helping to establish an information management program within the synagogue.
Administrative History
Solel Congregation was established in1973. It is a reform synagogue, situated in Mississauga, that currently has a membership of 300 families.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
Solel Congregation (Mississauga, Ont.)
Places
Mississauga (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-35
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-35
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (jpg)
Date
1965, 1980
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two scanned photographs documenting Ruth Gorbet in two Little Theatre productions. The first photograph is of Ruth playing Sherry in a local production of Bus Stop in 1965. The second image is of Ruth playing Yenta in Fiddler on the Ruth in 1980.
Custodial History
These photographs were donated as part of the Small Jewish Ontario Communities initiative. The donor kept the originals and provided the OJA with the scans.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Communities
Theater
Name Access
Gorbet, Ruth
Places
Owen Sound, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-40
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-40
Material Format
textual record (electronic)
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
16 documents (pdf and jpg)
7 photographs (jpg)
Date
1954-1992
Scope and Content
Accession consists of scanned copies of material reflecting Lee Jourard's involvement in theatre in the Belleville area. There are eight theatre programmes, most of them of plays produced by the Belleville Theatre Guild, in which Jourard was a cast member and/or on the backstage crew. The records also include scanned newspaper clippings about Jourard's talks and plays (including photographs), and seven scanned copy photographs of Jourard.
The photographs are as follows:
01. A Thurber Carnival programme, 1964
02. Albert-St Catharines Review Playbill, Dec 3 1960
03. Belleville Advertiser, June 1971, page 21. Cast of The Drunkard. Lee Jourard in top hat far left.
04. Belleville Advertiser, June 1971, page21. Lee Jourard and Linda Archer dressed for their roles in The Drunkard.
05. Belleville Intel, April 17 1969, page 3.
06. Belleville Intel, Feb 13 1970. Flo Yannover as Queen Mother Yoland in the Lark.
07. Lee Jourard talk advert.
08. Programme Diary of Anne Frank, 1992.
09. Belleville Theatre. Lee Jourard in A Man For All Seasons.
10. Belleville Theatre. Photo of Lee Jourard at Rehersal, 1962.
11. Belleville Theatre Programme, 1962.
12. Birth announcement for Matthew Jourard, 1994.
13. Lee Jourard in costume receiving news of birth of grandson Mathew Joseph Jourard, 1994.
14. Cable Communications, Vol 43, No 10, Oct 1977.
15. Lee Jourard. CableVue 4 went colour, 1977.
16. Lee Jourard as Robert de Baudricourt and Milton A. Crystal as Brother Ladvenu in The Lark, March 1, 1970.
17. My Three Angels, 1960.
18. The Drunkard, June 2 to 12, 1971. Lee Jourard as Lawyer Cribbs and Edward Middleton as Stewart Arnott.
19. The Lark, 1970.
20. The Man Who Came to Dinner, 1956.
21. You Can't Take It With You, cast photo on stage, 1954.
22. You Can't Take It With You programme, 1954.
Administrative History
Entertainer Lee Jourard is well-known in the city of Belleville for his support of the arts and his community involvement. He worked as a broadcaster for CJBQ radio, was the first Community Programs Director at the Cablevue 4 television station, and was a founding member of Belleville's Cultural Awards Committee and the Harbour Improvement Committee. He is a longtime member of the Belleville Theatre Guild, having been in the cast and crew of many of its producations from the 1950s through the 1990s. Jourard is also a member of the Bay of Quinte Power Squadron and the Moira River Conservation Authority Advisory Board. In 2007 he was named Senior of the Year in the City of Belleville.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Theater
Name Access
Jourard, Lee
Places
Belleville, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-33
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-33
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
9 photographs : b&w and col. (jpg)
1 document (jpg)
Date
[191-]-1980
Scope and Content
This accession consists of nine electronic copies of original photographs documenting the Nash family of St. Catharines, Ontario. Included are studio portraits and snapshots, taken in St. Catharines and Port Dalhousie. Also included is one electronic copy of a typwritten remembrances of Buncie Nashman written by Harold Nash and Rhonda Applebaum.
The photographs are as follows:
1. Rose Nash and Tzeine (sister) – two young women in photo, possibly before marriage to Jack.
2. Clara Cohen with baking at cottage at Port Dalhousie (not Rose as suspected) perhaps 1940s.
3. Jack and Rose Nash
4. Nash children, ca. 1930. Top, left to right: Molly, Maurice. Bottom, left to right: Dorothy, Ruth.
5. Nash family, 21 May 1929.
6. Maurice Nash in uniform (air force) with cousin, Henry Wexler, in US Army early 1940s.
7. Maurice Nash in uniform (air force) with cousin, Henry Wexler, in US Army, and unidentified woman, early 1940s.
8. Nash women at Harold’s 50th birthday party, 1980.
9. Harold and Eleanor in Port Dalhousie with cousins, ca. 1935.
Custodial History
The original photographs are in the possession of the donor. The OJA was granted permission to scan the photos in June 2007, as part of the Ontario Small Jewish Communities initiative. These copies were then donated to the Archives on 2007-06-05.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Nash family
Places
St. Catharines (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-36
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-36
Material Format
textual record
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w (jpg)
1 textual record
Date
1923-2004
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one issue of the Jewish Standard, from June 2004, two scanned copy photographs of Sid Slepkov during the Second World War, and one scanned copy photograph of Sid's father Morris in front of his clothing store, the Fashion Cloak and Fur Co. in St. Catharines, Ontario.
The photographs are as follows:
1. Sydney Slepkov in decompression chamber, Second World War.
2. Morris Slepkov outside his store, 1923.
3. Sydney Slepkov, 1944.
Custodial History
The original photographs are in the possession of the donor. The OJA was granted permission to scan the photos in June 2007, as part of the Ontario Small Jewish Communities initiative. These copies were then donated to the Archives on 2007-06-04.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
World War, 1939-1945
Business
Communities
Name Access
Slepkov, Sid
Slepkov, Morris
Places
St. Catharines, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-11
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-11
Material Format
textual record (electronic)
graphic material (electronic)
technical drawing (electronic)
Physical Description
9 documents (pdf and jpg)
9 photographs : b&w and col. (jpg)
1 technical drawing (jpg)
2 drawings (jpg)
Date
1917-[1981?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of electronic copies of documents, photographs, and portraits that pertain to Belleville's Sons of Jacob Congregation, to the activities of the Belleville chapter of Haddassah-Wizo, and the Tobe family of Belleville. The records date from 1917 to circa 1981 and include: the Congregation's constitution (1972) and a certificate from The United Synagogue of America recognizing it as a member synagogue of the Conservative Movement (1961); Hadassah-Wizo documents including certificates relating to donations, photographs, and an advertising bookmark; a plan of the Sons of Jacob Memorial Park (oversized); and various photographs of the Tobe family of Belleville.
There are also two photographs made of oversize drawings (portraits) of persons unidentified but probably related to the Tobes.
Verso of 04.jpg reads: "June 28, 1981. To my friends, Bluma. Zeke Tobe. Happy memories! Bill Palmatier."
Verso of 06.jpg reads: "About 1917. Bellville [sic] Ontario. Dave, Zeke, Bluma, Sam & Abe. Abe was about 5 years when this was taken. His dad 'Moses' (age 42) had died about this time leaving their mom to raise 6 children with very little means of support and she could not speak English."
Custodial History
The records originally belonged to Abe Tobe of Belleville. They were retained by Miri Cohen, president of the shul, when Mr. Tobe passed away in March 2007, to be preserved by the synagogue.
Descriptive Notes
Photographs of oversize portraits by Daniel Ehrenworth.
Subjects
Communities
Name Access
Tobe, Abe
Places
Belleville, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-7-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-7-10
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
19 photographs : b&w
1 folder of textual records
2 books
1 CD
1 vest and 1 hat
Date
1938-1986
Scope and Content
This accession consists of material documenting the donor's family, particularly her father, Nathan Rivelis. The items include a vest and hat worn by her father during the late 1950s as part of the Lion's Club. It also consists of an oral history of her father conducted in 1983; his school primer and English reader; photographs of the business and Hebrew classes; certificates; and finally, newspaper clippings.
Identified photographs are as follows:
01. Nate Rivelis with Rivelis staff, ca. 1982.
02. Lions club executive, ca 1955.
03. Rivelis storefront, [195-].
04. Rivelis interior, [195-].
05. Rivelis storefront, 1986.
Administrative History
The Rivelis family owned a large clothing store in North Bay from 1926 until 1986 called Rivelis. They sold men's and women's mid-range clothing and became famous in town for their annual sale held on November 16th. The business grew from a small family-run store to a large department store with twelve employees.
In addition to running the business, Nate Rivelis was also involved in the local Lion's Club and was the president of this organization from 1957-1958. He was the only Jewish member at that time. In addition, he also served as the president of the Hebrew school during the 1940s.
Subjects
Communities
Business
Name Access
Rosen, Rheta
Rivelis, Nathan
Places
North Bay (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-9-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-9-2
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
architectural drawing (electronic)
Physical Description
37 photographs : b&w and col. (jpg) + 2 identification keys
16 documents (28 jpgs)
2 architectural drawings (jpg)
Date
[189-]-2004
Scope and Content
Accession consists of scanned copies of original records documenting the Jewish community in Cornwall. The records relate to various individuals in the community, including the donor, as well as organizations such as B'nai Brith, Hebrew Ladies' Aid Society, and the Beth-El Congregation. The items include scans of cemetery plans, burial certificates, photographs, meeting minutes, memorial books and various legal documents.
Photographs are as follows:
01. 60th Anniversary of D-Day Programme.
02. Abe and Rose Goldhamer, Long Sault Rapids before the seaway, ca. 1941.
03. Al Burnes in uniform. Al lived in Cornwall and moved to Toronto, [between 1939 and 1945].
04. Archie Dover, first person buried in the new cemetery, pg. 1, 1962.
05. Archie Dover, first person buried in the new cemetery, pg. 2, 1962.
06. Beth El Synagogue, exterior, nd.
07. Beth El Synagogue, interior, nd.
08. Birdie Phillips Miller.
09. B’nai Brith, ca. 1961. [obverse]
10. B’nai Brith, ca. 1961. [reverse]
11. B’nai Brith entertaining seniors from Glen Stor Dun Lodge, 1964.
12. B’nai Brith girls temporary charter, 1967.
13. B’nai Brith Youth Organization temporary charter, 1967.
14. Boys playing hockey behind the shul, 1930s. Back row, left to right: unidentified, Jack Abrugov, Murray Berns, Julius Kolomier. Front row, left to right: unidentified, Jack Goldhamer, unidentified, unidentified, unidentified.
15. Braham Goldhamer on piano.
16. Cemetery plan from office of LP Stidwill, civil engineer and Ontario land surveyor, April 18 1958.
17. Cemetery plan, nd.
18. Construction of the St. Lawrence Seaway, Robert Saunders Dam, 1957.
19. B’nai Brith emergency meeting minutes, 1967.
20. Entertainer, Helen Goldhamer and her father, Julius Miller.
21. General meeting regarding building of the synagogue, pg. 1, Oct. 5, 1924.
22. General meeting regarding building of the synagogue, pg. 2, Oct. 5, 1924.
23. B’nai Brith Cornwall Lodge, 1961. [obverse] Pictured are, Standing left to right: Moe Helperin, Peter Solway, Oscar Niduvitch, Louis Dubinsky, Alex Abugor, Sam Nyman, Moe Schulman, Bernard Miller, I. Martin, Saul Schulman. Seated left to right: Mark Goldhamer, Sam Smolkin, Saul Kaye, Mrs. Eddie Cantor (guest speaker), Rabbi Matts, Julius Miller.
24. B’nai Brith Cornwall Lodge, 1961. [reverse]
25. Hebrew School, ca. 1958.
26. Helen, Mark and Brham Goldhamer, ca. 1958.
27. Helen Goldhamer on the St. Lawrence just west of Cornwall.
28. Helen Goldhamer speaking.
29. Helen Goldhamer thanking guest speaker.
30. Joel Horovitz, Bar Mitzvah programme, 1954.
31. Julius Miller and daughter Helen Goldhamer with father Moses Miller (seated) and grandson Braham Goldhamer at age 2.
32. Julius Miller and wife Birdie in front of their furniture company’s first truck, ca. 1946.
33. Julius Miller Grove invitation to ceremony, 1969.
34. Julius Miller Grove letter, 1969.
35. Julius Miller Grove plaque, ca. 1969.
36. [Phillips family?], ca. 1900.
37. Annette Phillips and Mary Phillips, ca. 1948.
38. Julius Miller presented with a pin by Mrs. Eddie Cantor at an Israel Bonds drive, 1961.
39. Nathan Phillips with unidentified boy.
40. Left to right: Annette Phillips, Mary Phillips, Birdie Phillips Miller and Riva Phillips, 1940s.
41. Left to right: Archie Dover, Julius Miller and Rabbi Lewin at the Memory Board dedication.
42. Left to right: Helen Goldhamer, Sarah Vineberg, Mrs. M. Phillips, Birdie Phillips Miller, Annette Phillips, ca. 1938.
43. Succot. Left to right: Margot Miller, Jack Miller and Braham Goldhamer, ca. 1956.
44. Left to right: Mark Goldhamer, Iruim Thaw, Saul Schulman and guest speaker, ca. 1961.
45. Nathan and Sam Phillips, ca. 1920.
46. Legal letter regarding the deed to the cemetery, pg. 1, 1929.
47. Legal letter regarding the deed to the cemetery, pg. 2, 1929.
48. Markus Goldhamer RCAF discharge papers, pg. 1, 1945.
49. Markus Goldhamer RCAF discharge papers, pg. 2, 1945.
50. Markus Goldhamer RCAF photo, Second World War.
51. Mary Phillips, life member of Hadassah-WIZO card, April 5, 1954.
52. Memorial book, pg. 1, 1926.
53. Memorial book, pg. 2, 1926.
54. Memorial book, pg. 3, 1926.
55. Memorial book, pg. 4, 1926.
56. Memory board.
57. Moses Miller.
58. Original minutes forming the B’nai Brith chapter in Cornwall, pg. 1, 1934.
59. Original minutes forming the B’nai Brith chapter in Cornwall, pg. 2, 1934.
60. Original minutes forming the B’nai Brith chapter in Cornwall, pg. 3, 1934.
61. Original minutes forming the B’nai Brith chapter in Cornwall, pg. 4, 1934.
62. Part of crowd at the annual dinner in Beth El Synagogue hall.
63. Photocopy of Hebrew Ladies’ Aid meeting minutes, pg. 1, Nov. 29, 1922.
64. Photocopy of Hebrew Ladies’ Aid meeting minutes, pg. 2, Nov. 29, 1922.
65. President of B’nai Brith Mark Goldhamer speaking. Helen Goldhamer seated to his left.
66. Riva Phillips beside Julius Miller Furniture shop, 1950s.
67. Thank you card to Mark Goldhamer, pg. 1.
68. Thank you card to Mark Goldhamer, pg. 2.
69. [Phillips family?], ca. 1900.
Custodial History
The original records are in the possession of the donor. The OJA was granted permission to scan the records in September 2007, as part of the Ontario Small Jewish Communities initiative. These copies were then donated to the Archives on 2007-09-04.
Subjects
Communities
Cemeteries
Name Access
Goldhamer, Mark
Places
Cornwall, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-8-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-8-9
Material Format
textual record (electronic)
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 compact disc
21 photographs (electronic) : b&w and col.
16 textual records (22 jpg files)
Date
[192-]-[198-]
Scope and Content
This accession consists of scanned copies of original documents and photographs depicting the Jewish community of North Bay and the Brown family. The records relate to various individuals in the community, including the donor, as well as the Sons of Jacob Congregation. The items include scans of photographs, correspondence, employment contracts with various spiritual leaders, newspaper clippings, and High Holiday lists.
The compact disc contains a scan of the Synagogue's letters-patent from 1924. The original textual records include a copy of the Synagogues' constitution from the 1950s and a photocopy of a cartoon drawing depicting members of the North Bay B'nai Brith lodge.
Custodial History
The original records are in the possession of the donor. The OJA was granted permission to scan the records in August 2007, as part of the Ontario Small Jewish Communities initiative. These copies were then donated to the Archives on 2007-08-17.
Descriptive Notes
Associated material note: Herb Brown fonds 029 and fonds 032, series 02 at the Nipissing University and Canadore College Archives and Special Collections.
Places
North Bay (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-30
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-30
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
17 photographs : b&w and col. (jpg)
1 document : col. (jpg)
Date
[ca. 1955]-[2003?]
Scope and Content
Accession is comprised of family and community photographs of two generations of the Albert family of Belleville. Images include rabbis Moses Lewin and Walter Seligman, friends, events such as bar mitzvahs, Ethnic Day and a Purim Party, and the Trenton Airbase Jewish Servicemen memorial. People pictured are identified in the finding aid. There is also one electronic copy of a newsclipping about Rabbi Moses Lewin.
The photographs are as follows:
01. Joe Burke far right Norman Albert in middle Ruth Goldberg far right, 1950s.
02. Belleville Community Picnic at the Albert's Summer House.
03. David Albert, 1960.
04. David Albert Bar Mitzvah with Rabbi Seligmann and wife.
05. Ethnic Day at the Shul, mid-1970s.
06. Florence Yannover.
07. Jacob Albert with grandsons, 1958.
08. Left to right: Ruth Lear and Becky Shulmann and Sarah Lightstone in back.
09. Left to right: Selma Bochnek, Shirley Osborne, Ethel Burke, Walter and Mrs Seligmann at synagogue dinner dance.
10. Mark and Michelle and David Albert, March 20 1971, Bar Mitzvah.
11. Norm and Lil and Jacob Albert and Rose.
12. Purim Party, 1957.
13. Purim Party. Joe Burke and Mynra Crystal of Peterborough, April 1957.
14. Rabbi Moses Lewin.
15. Shulman Departure, May 1985.
16. Trenton Airbase Jewish Servicemen Memorial, ca. 2003.
17. Ted and Eleanor Schwab.
Subjects
Communities
Families
Name Access
Albert, Carole
Albert, Norm
Places
Belleville (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-2-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-2-4
Material Format
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
5 photographs : b&w and col. (jpg)
1 photograph : col.
2 documents : col. (jpg)
Date
[1910?]-2008
Scope and Content
Accession consists of six photographs of the Greenspoon family of Sudbury, Ontario. There are also two scanned documents: Moe Greenspoon's 1918 birth certificate and his statement of service in the Canadian Armed Forces, issued in 1990.
Photographs include the following:
01. Benjamin and Fanny Greenspoon ca. 1910. (photograph was a reprint of a scanned original)
02. Paul Allan Greenspoon with grandfather Benjamin and his second wife at bar mitzvah, ca. 1966.
03. Greenspoon family gathering ca. 1942. L to R (back): Nathan, Doris, Moses (Moe), Max, Sydney, Irving, Bill, Ruth, Louis. L to R (front): Dave, wife Ann, Ben, Fanny, Harry, wife Millie.
04. Greenspoons at the Nahala dedication plaque in Israel, Oct. 1972. L to R: Rose (married to Max), daughter Elaine, Max, son Ira, Ira's wife Merle, and Ben in front.
05. Zady's Boyz - basketball team of all the grandsons with Moe, 2008.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
Communities
Families
Name Access
Greenspoon, Moe
Places
Sudbury, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-3-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-3-2
Material Format
textual record
textual record (electronic)
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
4 photographs : b&w and col. (jpg)
6 documents : b&w and col. (jpg)
Date
[1915?]-[200-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of brochures from the Cherney family businesses: their furniture store of fifty years, followed by Cherney Realty, established after 1984. Also included are a pamphlet on the Erica Cherney Inspiration Fund of the Community Counselling and Resource Centre of Peterborough. There is also a memorial card for the death of Harry Cherney in 1984. Electronic records include articles about Cherney's and Erica Cherney, City of Peterborough Awards of Merit for Harry and Erica Cherney, and four photographs.
Photograhps are as follows:
01. Award of Merit, Erica Cherney, 1977.
02. Award of Merit, Harry Cherney, 1981.
03. Harry Cherney on a sailboat, ca. 1978.
04. 40th Anniversary of Cherney Store, 1975. Left to right: Myer and Harry and Lou Cherney.
05. Rebecca Cherney, ca. 1915.
06. Tree of Life donated in honour of Harry Cherney.
07. Cherney business story in Peterborough Industrial Review, 1975.
08. Erica Cherney article in Business Advantage February, 1997, page 13.
09. Cherney ad, 1975.
10. Harry Cherney newspaper article about his death, Peterborough Examiner, December 29 1984, page 1.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Communities
Business
Name Access
Cherney, Erica
Places
Peterborough, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-3-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-3-7
Material Format
textual record
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
7 photographs : b&w and col. (jpg)
Date
[ca. 1910]-1984
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two photocopied letters exchanged between Rose Brewda and Campbellford District High School in 1984 after her visit with students to speak as a survivor of the Holocaust. Two photocopied newspaper clippings relate to this visit. The scanned photographs include aerial photographs of three of the Brewda's four livestock farms; three were in Peterborough and one in Lindsay. There are two older family portraits with Rose's Zaidie taken in Rumania before the Second World War, one of the Brewda family in the 1950s, and one of Rose dancing with her son Irvin at his bar mitzvah, the first one held in Peterborough's new shul in 1965. Photo identification, L to R:
Formal portrait, ca. 1918: Rose's mother Ita, Zaidie Isaac Hert, father Nathan Rosenberg, older sisters Mindle and baby Rivka
In front of house, ca. 1930: Rose (in polka dots), Mindle, mother Ita, toddler Chai, Zaidie Isaac Hert, brother Mayer, sister Rivka. Sister Zisel was missing.
Brewda family on farm, ca. 1957: Kalman and Rose, children Ethyl, Joseph and Irvin.
Descriptive Notes
Textual records are photocopies.
Places
Peterborough (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-6-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-6-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
4 textual records (5 jpg files)
15 photographs : b&w and col. (jpg)
Date
1981
Scope and Content
This accession consists of records related to the dedication of the Pearl and Carl Cole Athletic Wing at the Bathurst Jewish Community Centre in May 1981. The money for the wing was donated in their honour by their sons, Bruce and Ted.
The records consist of 15 digital scans of photographs originally taken at the dedication ceremonies on 10 May 1981, along with a digital scan of the speech given by Ted Cole at the event. Also included is a digital copy of a brunch invitation and of two letters written to Pearl and Carl by Rabbi Irwin Schild and Rabbi Michael Stroh, as well as two hard copy invitations to the dedication ceremonies.
Custodial History
The original records are in the possession of the donor. They were loaned to the Archives in June 2008 for digitization.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-6-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-6-10
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
graphic material
textual record (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w and sepia (2 jpg) ; 14 x 9 cm
1 textual record (7 jpg files)
1 folder of textual records
Date
[ca. 1870]-2008
Scope and Content
This accession consists of records documenting the Posluns family of Toronto. They include two scanned copies of photographs and one original, depicting various members of the Posluns family such as the family patriarch, Yosef ben Abraham and a copy photograph of the Tip Top Tailors building under construction in 1928.
The textual records consist of one electronic copy of a short history of the Posluns family, taken from Samuel Bernstein's biography, as well as a copy of a YMHA bulletin cover page from June 15, 1934, featuring a message from the president, Louis Posluns.
Custodial History
The records were loaned to the OJA on June 17, 2008 to be copied and returned to the donor.
Administrative History
A history of the Poslaniec (Posluns) family can be found online at: http://www.posluns.com/tree/pdfs/poslaniec.pdf
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Name Access
Posluns, Wilfred, 1932-2010
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-8-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-8-4
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
4 photographs : b&w (jpg)
4 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Date
[194-]-2005
Scope and Content
This accession consists of textual records and photographs documenting the Belleville Jewish community and the Sons of Jacob Synagogue. The textual records include a dedication book from the Synagogue as well as documents related to the Synagogue's reunion weekend in 2005. The photographs depict the Judaeans basketball team, a Young Judaea conference, the Synagogue's dedication ceremonies, as well as a children's Purim play.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-8-18
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-8-18
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
47 photographs : b&w and col. (jpg)
2 textual records (pdf)
Date
1919-2000, predominant 1940s
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 47 digital copies of family photographs and photocopied documents belonging to the Wichefsky (later Witchel) family of Sudbury. The photographs are images of family members, the family's cabin near town and their friends. There is also a letter from the yeshiva in Poland attesting to David Wichefsky's graduation, and a family tree.
Administrative History
Doris Witchel Laskin is the daughter of Jacob Witchel and granddaughter of Rabbi David Wichefsky. David Wichefsky was Sudbury's first rabbi and Hebrew teacher. He came in 1894 and with his wife Esther raised their seven children. The family name was later changed to Witchel. David's son Jacob, the second eldest, was born before the family immigrated. Jacob married Bella Cohen in Montreal in 1918. They had six children: Doris, Jess, Shirley, David, Thora, and William (Bill). The Witchels are related to the Moses and Magder families of Sudbury.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-8-19
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-8-19
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
10 photographs : b&w and col. (jpg)
Date
[193-]-1995
Scope and Content
This accession consists of ten electronic copies of photographs documenting the Laskin family and the Jewish community of Thunder Bay. The photographs depict a 1937 royal coronation parade float created by the Jewish community, as well as a portrait of Saul Laskin and members of the Laskin family and some photos of Saul during his political election campaign and during a store giveaway. Also included is the sod turning ceremony of the new synagogue and the street naming of Saul Laskin Drive in Thunder Bay. Also identified in the photographs are: Murray Stitt, Rabbi Sternberg, and Mayor Norman Wilson.
Custodial History
The original records are in the possession of the donor. They were loaned to the OJA for the small Jewish communities project for copying.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Communities
Families
Places
Thunder Bay (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-8-23
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-8-23
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
5 cm textual records
22 photographs : b&w (4 jpg)
Date
ca.1928-1994
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records and photographs pertaining to the interrelated Bogomolny and Greenspan families of Niagara Falls. Included is correspondence and speeches relating to Hadassah, a 1957 Sisterhood cookbook, a Hadassah-WIZO 75th anniversary Commemorative Book, a syngagogue yearbook 1960-1961, B'nai B'rith certificates of Abe Bogomolny's, programmes and invitations to special events, two picture postcards and other family photographs, newspaper clippings relating to the Bogomolnys, and immigration documents from 1928. Also included is a senior undergraduate research paper written by Gerald Enchin (originally of Kitchener), entitled, "A Locational Analysis of the Kitchener-Waterloo Jewish Community," 1971.
Custodial History
Many of these records were collected and created by Jennie Greenspan Bogomolny, mother of the donor. They were passed to Brenda upon Jennie's death and kept until they came to the OJA.
Administrative History
Brenda Bogomolny Enchin is the daughter of Jennie Greenspan and Abe Bogomolny. Jennie was 8 years old in 1928 when she came to Canada with her mother and three brothers. Jennie's mother, Faige Bracha Pomerantz, posed as a widow coming to marry Morris Greenspan, even though they were already married. Morris had come ahead to Ontario where his brother Samuel was already settled. The accession includes documents from the rabbi in Poland attesting to Faige's widowed status so that she could get into Canada. Jennie's older brother was Joseph (father of Eddie and Brian Greenspan). Her younger brother, Abram, is living in Dundas as of 2008. The youngest child was Samuel, who was born in Sept. 1927 just a month after Morris had left Poland, so he met his youngest son a year later. Samuel died at age 48 in 1975.
Brenda’s mother Jennie married Abraham Bogomolny in 1946. He came to Niagara Falls in the 1930s, and with his brother Hymie opened the Niagara Rug Company, with braided and woven rugs. They were the biggest suppliers to department stores like Woolworths and Eaton’s. There was a fire in May 1968. Jennie was an elementary school teacher, she taught at Memorial School where the Greenspan children went, and Battleford Elementary School, which now gives out the Jennie Bogomolny Citizenship Award every year.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-6-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-6-13
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
38 photographs (jpg) : b&w and col.
Date
[190?-1990]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting the Chana and Mayer Wisotsky family as well as Dora (Sherr) and her husband Morris Isen. Included are wedding and family portraits, photos of family members in military uniform during the Second World War, images of family celebrations, photos of family businesses, and images of Morris Isen performing with his orchestra. Identified in the photographs are: Anne Sillen, Jack Sillen, Ben Sherr, Dora Wisotsky, Marvin Wain (Wisotsky), Abe Benson, Dora (Sherr) Isen, and Morris Isen.
Administrative History
The Wisotsky family were Ukrainian immigrants who came to Canada around 1908. Chana and Mayer Munny Wisotsky had 13 children, seven of whom remained in Ukraine. Three of their five children and a grandchild (Jack Sillen), came with them in 1908, with two other children, Ben and Annie, following in 1912. The Wisotskys lived originally in Toronto. Ben Wisotsky eventually married Dora Wetstein and moved to the United States in the 1930s. Annie Wisotsky married Abe Benson, who ran a successful auto paint/gas station on Dufferin near Dupont during the 1920s and 1930s.
Morris Isen had a successful career as a trumpet player in the 1930s and 1940s; he was involved in radio orchestra, CBC television and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Families
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-9-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-9-7
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records and other material
Date
1952-1997
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the Jewish community of Sudbury, Ontario, and specifically to Rabbi Rosenthal. The records include a delegates list for the 61st semi-annual conference of the Eastern Canadian Council of B'nai Brith, as well as a delegate's badge belonging to Rabbi Rosenthal; one piece of correspondence; two dinner invitations with the Mayor of Sudbury; a Survivors of the Shoah tribute booklet, as well as a photograph of Rabbi Rosenthal with Dr. Chomsky, and two photographs of children at a Chanukah party at the Shaarei Shomayim Synagogue in Sudbury. There is also a sound recoring of Cantor David Bagley with the Beth Sholom Synagogue choir in Toronto.
Identified individuals in the photographs include: Dorothy Greenspoon, Claudia Greenspoon, Annabelle Grimson, Lynne Waisberg, Sally Ann Braverman, Miriam Rosenthal, Rochelle Jaffe, Goldie Greenspoon, Alexis Singer, Judy Kahn, Hana Suk, Lilian Rosenthal, Jonathan Spiegel, Pauline Rottenberg, Arthur Moses, Stanley Jaffe, Mitchell Spiegel, Leslie Rosenthal, Victor Greenspoon and Jack Greenspoon.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of the donor, who is the daughter of Rabbi Rosenthal, until they were donated to the Archives on Sept. 16, 2008.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: records include 3 photographs, 1 badge and 1 sound recording.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-9-11
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-9-11
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
39 photographs (jpgs) ; b&w and col.
Date
1945-[200-]
Scope and Content
This accession consists of 39 electronic copies of original photographs depicting various members of the Abramsky family of Kingston, their former family homes, dedication ceremonies, family events, buildings that once housed Jewish owned businesses and organizations, photos taken on a Jewish walking tour of Kingston, as well as one image of a victory parade with Abramsky's store featured in the background.
Custodial History
The original photographs are in the possession of the donor. They were loaned for scanning as part of the Small Jewish Communities project.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-6-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-6-7
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
6.82 m of textual records and other material
Date
1935-2008
Scope and Content
Accession contains records documenting the administration, programs and events of Beth Jacob Synagogue in Kitchener, from 1935 to 2008. Non-textual records include photographs, architectural drawings, artifacts, and a couple of books. The textual records include newsletters, correspondence, financial ledgers, community directories, event programmes, membership lists and dues ledgers. There is considerable material on the Talmud Torah, including teaching materials, curricula, student guides, notes on parent meetings, and correspondence. There are approximately 40 photographs in the accession, of which 25 are from one 1985 shul event. Other records relate to the cemetery, memorial plaques, adult education, nursery school, Sisterhood, youth programs, bar and bat mitzvots, clubs and chevra kadisha. There are several artifacts: Rabbi Rosensweig's quill pen, athletic trophies and medallions, I.D. bracelets, Tree of Life plaques, a Hadassah Convention name tag with ribbon from 1951, and an (empty) copper mezuzzah. Records of the Kitchener-Waterloo Hebrew Day School will form a second fonds when the accession is described (see accession file folder for proposed arrangement scheme). The Hebrew Day School records include parents and staff handbooks, procedure manual, teaching materials, certificates, correspondence, governance documents, student records and attendance books with class lists.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Cemeteries
Synagogues
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-10-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-10-4
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
6 m of textual records and other material
Date
1939-2000
Scope and Content
The accession consists of records and artifacts created or collected by Rabbi Monson during his career. This includes his annual journals, marriage registers (1939-2000), newspaper clippings, photographs, awards, certificates, letters, a vinyl record, and several artifacts. The artifacts include objects of recognition from Shaare Zedek Medical Centre in Jerusalem and from a Negev Tribute in 1977, and items of regalia clothing from the Order of the Masons. There are also two scrapbooks of clippings: one documents Beth Sholom Synagogue in the 1940s, and the other is about the University of Waterloo in the 1960s.
Among the photos in this collection is the confirmation of Iona Feldt (m. Silverberg) daughter of Samuel (Shmeal) Feldt.
Administrative History
Rabbi Monson was born in Ottawa in 1917. He was educated at Yeshiva University and later was ordained by the Rabbinical College of Canada of Montreal in 1939.
He served as a rabbi for Shaarei Shomayim Synagogue in Toronto from 1939 until 1943. During the war, he served as a Chaplain with the Canadian military until 1945. After his return to Toronto, he founded Beth Sholom Synaogogue and served as rabbi there until his retirement in 1985. During his tenure, he officiated his first bat mitzvah in 1953, introduced a mixed choir to the service, and allowed men and women to sit together in the sanctuary.
Rabbi Monson was a founding member of the Canadian Council for Christians and Jews. Over the years, he served on the Ontario Police Services Commission and many other government committees. He also helped establish Or Yehuda, a community centre for underprivileged Iraqi and Romanian children in Israel. As well, he was also instrumental in the establishment of the University of Waterloo. He organized the Hebrew Association of the Blind, and was named by the Prime Minister John Diefenbaker to the Board of the Canada Council. He was also active in the Order of the Masons. Finally, Rabbi Monson was a great supporter of Jerusalem’s Shaare Zedek Medical Centre. Through his persistent efforts, the small hospital he first visited during the Six Day War was transformed into a modern, state-of-the-art facility.
During his career he became widely known as the "people's rabbi", due to his ability to connect with community members from all branches of Judaism as well as non-Jews. He died on July 28, 2008, at 91 years of age. His wife Susan predeceased him and he left behind one child, Judith Waldman.
Descriptive Notes
Associated material note: Library and Archives Canada possesses 30 cm of records created by Rabbi Monson as well.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-8-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-8-9
Material Format
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
48 photographs : b&w and col. (1 jpg) ; 21x 25 cm or smaller
Date
[ca. 1910]-[ca. 1980]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of family snapshots and portraits of members of the Zet family of St. Catharines. They include images of the donor's grandmother, Sadie (Hyatt) Zet, and grandfather Morris Zet, their friends, children and grandchildren. Among the events documented are the wedding of Bernice Zet to Albert Shecter in 1946 at the Congregation B'nai Israel, officiated by Rabbi Herschel Shapiro (who officiated weddings from 1931-1956), and summer scenes at Crystal Beach including Bernice Zet, Freda Caplan, Claire Zet and Deborah Caplan. There are several photographs of a group of high school girls, including Anne Granek, Minnie Lefstein, Ann Caplan, Ethel Friedman, Sylvia and Frieda Greenberg, Rae Rosenberg, and Eve Luntz. There is also an image of twenty little girls dressed in white holding British flags on the occasion of the opening of the shul in 1925, and one of Celia Taube with her children. As well, there are pictures of "the gang" of couples at social occasions in the 1950s. Persons pictured include Bayla Katzman, Joel Zeldon, Anne Granek, Abe Herzog, Margaret Zeldon, Jenny Katzman, Joe Katzmean, Gert Granek, Bea Magder, Dave Kates, Sybil Cowitz, Elsie Kates, Chippie (Helen) Feldman, [unknown man], Syd Magder, Dolly Cooperman, Eleanor Lambert, Sarah (Sookie) Slepkov, and Sheila Newman.
Finally, there is a ca. 1908 portrait of Berel and Nachama Kaplan, great-aunt and uncle of the donor.
Administrative History
Morris Zet (Zatulove) immigrated to Toronto in 1913 at age 18. In Romania his family enjoyed prosperity as dairy farmers, but after being conscripted into the Russian army, he left, walking from Russia to Austria. After a year in Toronto, Morris moved to St. Catharines, where he boarded with the Adelsteins. There, he made a living peddling to the many workers building the Welland Canal. In 1917, Morris married Sadie Hyatt (her brother changed the family name to Goldberg in Canada), who had come to Toronto in 1914. Morris opened a men’s wear store on St. Paul’s Street in St Catharines called Zet’s Clothing. Ten years later in 1929, he closed this store and opened Zet’s Men’s Wear in nearby Thorald, though the family continued to live in St Catharines. In 1935, Sadie opened Zet’s Ladies Wear across the street in Thorald. Morris and Sadie Zet had 3 daughters whom they raised in St Catharines: Anne, Clare and Bernice. Anne is the donor's mother. She married Kelley Granek in St. Catharines in 1939. Clare married Sam Kranitz in 1940; Bernice married Albert Schecter of Toronto, also at the St. Catharines shul, in 1946.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Descriptive Notes
Physical Desription note: two of the photographs are colour copies.
Subjects
Communities
Families
Name Access
Zet, Morris
Zet, Sadie
Places
St. Catharines (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-2-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-2-2
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
moving images
Physical Description
87 photographs : col. (jpg)
1 DVD (approx. 10 mins.)
Date
1946-1949, 1980-2009
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of synagogue exteriors, cornerstones, and doorways around Ontario, as well as in the cities of Moncton, Rouyn-Noranda, Saint John, St. John's, Victoria, and Winnipeg. There is one interior shot of the sanctuary of Beth El Synagogue in St. John's, Newfoundland. The accession also contains a DVD with three home movies dated 1946 to 1949. The movies are of a wedding in Goel Tzedec Synagogue in Toronto, a bar mitzvah, and cottage scenes in Beaverton.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Some jpg files contain two or three images scanned together.
Subjects
Amateur films
Judaism--Customs and practices
Synagogue architecture
Name Access
Beth El Synagogue (St. John's, N.L.)
Goel Tzedec Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Beaverton (Ont.)
Moncton (N.B.)
Rouyn-Noranda (Québec)
Saint John (N.B.)
St. John's (N.L.)
Victoria (B.C.)
Winnipeg (Man.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-2-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-2-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 wedding invitation
21 photographs (jpg)
Date
1941-1947, 1999
Scope and Content
Accession consists of scanned photographs documenting the professional and personal lives of Libby Rosenberg and her husband, Ronald Rosenberg. Included are photographs of the Canadian Jewish Congress Servicemen's Centre, Libby and Ronald's wedding, and the Royal Canadian Air Force at Fort William. The accession also includes a scan of an invitation to Ronald and Libby's wedding in 1944.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
Married people
Weddings
Name Access
Canada. Royal Canadian Air Force
Rosenberg, Libby
Rosenberg, Ronald
Places
Fort William (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-3-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-3-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 300 photographs and other material
Date
1906-1983
Scope and Content
The accession includes records documenting the family of Sharon Abron Drache. This includes both sides of her family: the Abramowitz/Abrons and the Levinters. The material consists of two beta home movie tapes, three DVDs, several photo albums, four artifacts (as well as newspaper clippings), correspondence, certificates, and other material. The donation also includes a book entitled Window on Toronto, a certificate for the Jewish Colonial Trust, examples of Murray Abron's photographs, and a recording of a speech Abba Eban gave at the UN.
Custodial History
The records were in the custody of Sharon Abron Drache. She has interherited the family photos and documents from both sides of her family.
Administrative History
Murray Abramowitz was born in 1912 in Toronto. His parents were David Abramowitz (1884-1963) and Sarah Abramowitz (née Winfield) (1885-1955). David arrived in Toronto in 1906. Sarah and her parents, Jacob and Anna, settled in Scranton, Pennsylvania around 1880. Jacob worked as a grocer and relocated his family to Toronto around 1894. Sarah and David were married at the McCaul Street Synagogue in Toronto on March 6, 1906. They resided at 159 York Street after their nuptials. The couple had three children: Rose (1907-2001), Oscar (1910-1986), and Murray (1912-2005). David's father, Shevach, served as the lay cantor at the First Roumanian Hebrew Congregation (now Adath Israel). David owned the men’s shop in Union Station. His sister, Sophie Abramowitz, ran the ladies' shop. The shops were located on the east end of the Great Hall, beneath the composite glass windows. Rose Abron Lahman became a physician, specializing in obstetrics and gynecology. Initially, she practised in Toronto; later, she practiced in Atlanta, Georgia. Rose graduated from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto when there were quotas for both women and Jews.
Murray married Edythe Levinter (m. Abramowitz) on June, 8, 1941. The event took place at the bride's family's home above their furniture store, J. Levinter Ltd, at 1169 Bloor Street West. The couple had one child, Sharon Abron Drache. Murray began using the Abron surname during the 1940s, changing it legally in the 1950s.
During his life, Murray worked as an hotelier and ran several businesses. These included the Rex Hotel in Toronto, Tent City at Lake Simcoe (ca. 1935-1945), and the St. Lawrence Hotel in Port Hope (1949-1955). When Murray managed the Rex Hotel he was a fifty-fifty partner with his mother's brother-in-law, Leo Hertzman. Leo owned and managed the store, United Clothing, which fronted the Rex Hotel on Queen Street at the south side of the beverage room. When Leo’s son Harold Hertzman returned from military service in 1945, Leo bought out Murray’s share in the business for Harold. Jack Ross and Morris Meyers purchased the hotel from the Hertzmans in 1951. Murray was also a co-owner of the Tent City business with his father, David Abramowitz, coinciding with his Rex Hotel years. During the late 1950s he worked as a real estate broker in Toronto and Florida. From the 1960s to the early 1970s, he worked in his mother-in-law’s furniture business, J. Levinter Ltd. After Murray retired from the furniture business, he became a stock broker. His hobbies included fishing, photography, and storytelling. He died on October 10, 2005.
The Levinter family was headed by Samuel Levinter and Rebecca Levinter (née Godfried). They were both born in Austria (Galicia) and came to Canada in their teens. After their marriage in 1890, they resided in St. John's Ward. The couple had seven children: Jacob (b. 1892), Etta (b. 1894), Manny (b. 1895), Isadore (b. 1898), Molly (b. 1900), Rose, and Dolly. Isadore became a prominent Toronto lawyer and was the first Jew appointed as a bencher at the Law Society of Upper Canada.
Samuel established Levinter Furniture in 1890. The business was initially located at 401-405 Queen Street. By 1925 Samuel had relocated his store to 287 Queen Street West, and his son Jacob had opened a second location at 1169 Bloor Street West. Jacob later expanded his location to 1171 Bloor Street West. Samuel died on April 30, 1942. Rebecca died in 1952. Jacob married Sara Kamin (b. 1894, Lodz, Poland) on June 25, 1916. They had six children: Edythe (1918 -2011), Alfred (1919-1919), Evelyn (1922-2006), Murray (1925-), Molly (1926 -), and Florence (b. 1930-). Jacob died of a heart attack in 1944. After his death, Sara took his place as owner and manager of the family business, grooming her son Murray to succeed her. Sara’s daughter Molly had an early career as a concert pianist in Toronto and New York. Sara died in Toronto in 1990.
Sharon Abron Drache attended Forest Hill Collegiate, graduating in 1962, and then completed an undergraduate degree and post-graduate diploma in psychology at the University of Toronto, the latter from the Institute of Child Study. She was enrolled as a special student in the Department of Religion at Carleton University from 1974-78. She has published four books of adult fiction: the Mikveh Man, Ritual Slaughter, the Golden Ghetto, and Barbara Klein Muskrat – Then and Now. She has also published two children's books: the Magic Pot and the Lubavitchers are Coming to Second Avenue. She has also worked as a literary journalist and book reviewer for several newspapers and journals including the Globe and Mail, the Ottawa Citizen, Books in Canada, the Glebe Report, and the Ottawa and Western Jewish Bulletins.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION NOTE: Includes 4 objects, 2 videocassettes (beta-tapes), 3 DVDs, 1 book, and 1 folder of textual records.
ASSOCIATED MATERIAL NOTE: Please see Sharon Drache's fonds at Library and Archives Canada and at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto for material related to her literary career. Please see Sharon Drache's fonds at the Ottawa Jewish Archives for material related to her journalism career. Finally, for additional material related to Sharon's family please see her fonds at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto.
RELATED MATERIAL NOTE: See accessions #2010-12/8 and # 2013-7/15 for addtional records donated by Sharon Abron Drache.
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 67; Series 17
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Level
Series
Fonds
67
Series
17
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1938-2008
Physical Description
2.18 m of textual records and other materials
Admin History/Bio
Superseding the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies, the first Annual Campaign of the new United Jewish Welfare Fund took place in 1938. It combined the appeals of 37 organizations into one, eliminating much of the inefficiency and competition of the previous twenty years. Money raised was for agencies and causes new and traditional, local and overseas. Recipients included; the Jewish Immigrant Aid Services, Canadian Jewish Congress, the United Jewish Relief Agencies, the Joint Distribution Committee, and Palestine. In 1938, Campaign could be completed within a mere two weeks and raised $161,000. This figure rose to $348,000 in 1942 and surpassed one million dollars in 1951. When the State of Israel was established in 1948, Campaign was combined with the CJC and the United Palestine appeals into a new, combined campaign and re-named The United Jewish Appeal (UJA).
With different local and world challenges and crises over time, annual campaigns have had a variety of foci: for example, the plight of Displaced Persons in Europe after the Second World War; the 1957 Rescue Campaign for refugees in Russia, Europe and North Africa; the first Emergency Campaign in 1967 in response to the Six Days’ War; and Operation Exodus 1990-1991, which raised funds to aid Soviet Jews.
Early Campaign leadership was provided by lay people. Chairmen of the Campaign Cabinet included Samuel Godfrey, Ben Sadowski, Samuel J. Granatstein, Bernard Vise, Morris S. Till, and Samuel J. Zacks. A small administration committee carried out daily operations, but the bulk of the fundraising work was performed by the Service Council, a group of volunteers who planned, canvassed and evaluated each campaign, as well as organizing educational programs and public meetings. A Women’s Service Council and a Young Peoples’ Service Council also played key fundraising roles.
Canvassing was conducted by volunteers from each professional or trade Division, such as doctors, lawyers, retail sales, etc. The volunteers were responsible for canvassing the members of their own group. A special Women’s Campaign had its own chair, sub-committees and programming. Divisions were further added to reflect the amounts of donations, Top Gifts, and Major Gifts for example. By the 1980s, the Service Councils had given way to professional Campaign Associates employed by UJWF. With further changes to UJWF/UJA Federation’s structure, Campaign first fell under the Financial Resource Development Department, then Integrated Development, and, in 2009, the Centre for Philanthropy. It is now supported by the Donor Relations Management, Donor Research, and Missions/VIP departments which cater to the diverse interests of individual donors.
Through the 1940s and 1950s, face-to-face canvassing was the norm, with donor’s names and gifts published in the UJWF annual report. By the 1960s, an expanding community and a need for efficiency increased the use of the telephone, with regular telethons involving hundreds of volunteers. In 1970, a regular springtime Walk with Israel was included within the rest of Campaign events. In the 21st Century, the internet is used to solicit donations, publicize campaign news and events, and register volunteers for telethons and events like the Walk.
Scope and Content
Series consists of two sub-series, Walk with Israel (sub-series 17-1) and General Campaign Records (sub-series 17-2).
Notes
Physical description note: Includes photographs, videocassettes, posters, DVDs, artfacts and books.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 17
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
17
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1936-1992
Physical Description
47 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
By 1919 the plight of post-war eastern European Jewry and the need for a united community voice for Canadian Jewry led to the creation of the Canadian Jewish Congress. Its founding meeting was held on March 16, 1919 in Montreal. Though it briefly maintained a tiny regional office in Toronto, the CJC remained inactive until 1933, when it fully reconvened by opening offices in Winnipeg, Montreal, and Toronto. Egmont L. Frankel was the first president of the new central division in Toronto. While the national office in Montreal focused on the overarching issues of the social and economic rights of European Jewry, assistance for Jewish immigrants, and combating prejudice in Canada, the Toronto office dealt with local, violent anti-Jewish demonstrations as well as continuing discrimination both in employment and in access to public recreational facilities. The structure was based on regular national biennial plenary conferences, at which policies were delineated and national and regional executives were elected. Between plenary sessions, national and regional councils were in charge. These were augmented by the following standing committees: administrative, officers, fersonnel, financial, publications, and educational and cultural. Special committees were created to deal with issues such as: youth, community loans, kashruth, fundraising, Israel, Russian Jewry, and various emergency issues such as refugees, immigration, and housing.
During the 1930s the central division office moved several times and occupied offices in the following locations: Yonge Street, the Bond Street Synagogue, Scheuer House, the Zionist Building, and its long-term home at 150-152 Beverley Street, where it remained until its July 1983 move to the Lipa Green Building in North York.
The CJC's activities expanded to include taking responsibility for Jewish educational standards, but by 1941 its main efforts shifted to support for Canada’s war effort. Immediately after the end of the war, the focus again shifted to Jewish immigration projects and the maintenance of Jewish identity in small communities. By 1950, the CJC’s use of the title “division” was changed to “region” to accommodate internal operational divisions within each region. Also, by then, the central region was busy expanding its programs for all Ontario Jewish communities, creating a province-wide council of youth groups, and working with the newly-created Bureau of Jewish Education (later Board of Jewish Education, now Mercaz). Standardization of kashruth rules in Ontario was implemented. As well, regular educational conferences and cultural events were held throughout the province, while province-wide fundraising efforts in support of Moess Chittin for relief projects in Israel and for local Congress activities were expanded. Many of its educational and cultural responsibilities necessitated working with other Jewish organizations such as the United Jewish Welfare Fund, Jewish Immigrant Aid Society (JIAS), Hadassah, the Canadian Legion, B’nai Brith, the World Jewish Congress, the American Jewish Congress, and the many landsmenshaften (Jewish mutual benefit societies, each formed by immigrants originating from the same Eastern European community).
During the 1960s, the central region began sending Moess Chittin relief shipments to Cuban Jews unable to acquire kosher foods for Passover. Its lobbying efforts included participation in the Royal Commissions on Hate Propaganda, and its greatest success came with the introduction and implementation of Ontario’s fair employment and fair accommodation practices legislation, an achievement in which Congress played a pivotal role.
From 1971 to 1989 the major focus became international and national lobbying for, and providing support to, Soviet Jewry. Virtually all local and Canadian efforts to assist the Soviet Jewish “refusniks” were organized and coordinated in Toronto by the Ontario region office, which provided staff and funding for the many lobbying activities and public demonstrations that characterized this successful effort.
As of November 1975, the central region’s responsibilities in Toronto were radically altered. To improve cost efficiency in Toronto, CJC educational and social service program activities were merged with similar programs already provided by Toronto’s United Jewish Appeal. The UJA assumed sole responsibility for these amalgamated programs in Toronto and was renamed Toronto Jewish Congress. The central region still retained province-wide responsibilities for Ontario’s smaller Jewish communities, and its office remained in Toronto. Also, following this reorganization, its name was changed to Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region. Although CJC no longer provided direct social and educational programs to Toronto, the TJC’s senior executive was, at the time, still obliged to continue to keep it notified about developments concerning previous Congress responsibilities.
From 1983, the Ontario Region's offices were located in the Lipa Green Building at 4600 Bathurst Street. It continued its work of financially supporting various Israeli institutions and fostering Canada-Israel relations. It also spearheaded the movement to support and protect Jews in Arab lands, especially in Syria. Funding for the CJC came from the Canadian Council for Israel and Jewish Advocacy, which restributed a portion of the funds raised by the local Jewish federations across Canada.
The CJC dissolved in 2011. Today, the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs (CIJA) acts as the Jewish community's primary lobby group.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of the records of the Ontario Region office of the Canadian Jewish Congress. Of primary importance in documenting this organization’s history are its minutes of the Executive and Administrative Committees and the various standing, and short-term committees such as Community Organization, Finance, Fund Raising, Educational and Cultural, Research, Immigration, War Efforts, and Jewish Education. Most of these records are still managed all together within Fonds 17, Series 1. Fonds 17, Series 2 contains the general subject and correspondence files of these committees. Records in both series require further processing.
Records now found in Series 3 document the efforts of the Committee for Soviet Jewry in coordinating the activities of the many Toronto and Ontario organizations involved in assisting Soviet Jewry during the 1971 to 1989 period.
Series 4 consists of administrative and committee records of the United Jewish Refugee and War Relief Agencies in Toronto from 1938 through 1967. These document its work rescuing the survivors of European Jewish communities, settling as many as possible in Ontario, and providing assistance to those attempting to obtain restitution payments.
Series 5 consists of the records of the Community Relations Committee (1938-1976). Responding to depression-era anti-Semitism in Canada, the Canadian Jewish Congress and B’nai Brith together established in 1938 a new joint committee. Since then this Committee has documented racist threats in Canada; initiated advocacy activities to work for improved civil rights; promoted legislation combating hate; worked to ensure equality of access to employment, education and accommodation; and investigated specific incidents of discrimination. The Committee, for example, played a key role in achieving the Anti-Discrimination Act of 1944, and the Fair Employment Practices Act of 1951, key steps leading to Canada’s current Human Rights Code. Although originally named Joint Public Relations Committee in 1938, a series of name changes later occurred; s follows: Joint Community Relations Committee, Central Region (1962-1978), Joint Community Relations Committee, CJC, Ontario Region (ca. 1978-ca. 1991) Community Relations Committee, CJC, Ontario Region (ca. 1991-present) Records in this series were reorganized into 5 sub-series and a further 9 sub-sub-series during the 2009 to 2011 period. For further details please view the database records for Fonds 17, Series 5. Although this series will eventually hold all CRC records up to 1992, only those prior to 1979 are currently fully processed.
Notes
Physical description note: Includes 1839 photographs, 89 audio cassettes, 11 videocassettes, 4 drawings, and 6 microfilm reels (16 mm).
Processing note: Processing of this fonds is ongoing. Additional descriptive entries will be added in future.
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Congress. Ontario Region
Subjects
Pressure groups
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the Archivist prior to accessing some of the records
Arrangement
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the Archivist prior to accessing some of the records.
Creator
Canadian Jewish Congress. Ontario Region (1919-2011)
Places
Ontario
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 17; Series 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
Series
Fonds
17
Series
2
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1948-1998
Physical Description
ca. 7 metres of textual records and other material
Scope and Content
Series consists of the general office subject and correspondence files of the Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region. Included is correspondence, memos, reports, speeches, bulletins, news releases, conference proceedings, promotional material, news clippings, photographs, videos, and sound recordings. The records relate to a wide variety of topics, such as small communities, Yiddish culture, Holocaust survivors and remembrance, Jewish youth and seniors, fundraising initiatives, neo-nazis, Cuban Jews, education, and human rights issues and legal cases.
Notes
Physical description note: Includes 390 photographs, 89 audio cassettes, 11 videocassettes, and 4 drawings.
Files created by the United Jewish Relief Agencies have been removed and may now be found within Fonds 17, Series 4.
Files created by the Committee for Soviet Jewry have been removed and may now be found within Fonds 17, Series 3
Files created by the Joint Community Relations Committee have been removed and may now be found within fonds 17, Series 5.
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dora Till fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 52
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dora Till fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
52
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1921-1986
Physical Description
1.4 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Dora Till (1896-1987) was a leading member of the Toronto Jewish community. She helped found and served on the executives and boards of many organizations, including the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto, the United Jewish Welfare Fund (UJWF), the Candian Jewish Congress Central Region, and the Baycrest Hospital Women's Auxiliary. She was honoured numerous times in her life with awards and tributes for her contributions to the Jewish community.
Till was born in New York City on 20 March 1896, one of six children of Max and Yeta Tobias. Her parents had emigrated from Poland prior to 1892. When Dora was four, the family moved to Toronto where Max Tobias worked as a tailor. In her teens, Till was an active member of two social clubs for girls, the Boot and Shoe Society (for mothers and children in need) and the Herzl Girls Club.
Dora Tobias married Morris S. Till on 21 May 1916, in Toronto. They had two children, Sigmund and Cecile, both of whom she outlived. Sigmund died tragically at the age of 11 after a sudden illness. Cecile married Frank Goldhar and they had two children, Sheila Anne and Meyer Garson.
In 1918, Till joined the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society and she served as its vice-president for the next fifteen years. This was the beginning of a lifetime career in family welfare, health care and services for the aged. Till helped found and was the first president of the Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home located in Bronte and then Tollandale, which provided mothers and children in need with a two-week holiday in the country.
From the 1920s until the 1940s, Till served on several boards including the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto, and the United Jewish Welfare Fund, as well as the Welfare Fund's Women's Division and Women's Service Council. In 1950, she became the first woman to be named honourary vice-president of the UJWF. In 1955, after many years affiliation with the Jewish Home for the Aged, Dora Till organized the newly built Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care's Women's Auxiliary, becoming its first president. She also served for 40 years on the executive board of the Family and Child Service Bureau, the precursor to Jewish Family & Child Services. Till was an active member of many other Jewish organizations, including the Naomi Chapter of Hadassah and the National Council of Jewish Women, B'nai Brith Women, the Mount Sinai Women's Auxiliary, the Jewish Camp Council, and Toronto United Community Appeal - Community Chest. She was also a member of Goel Tzedec Congregation and its successor, Beth Tzedec Congregation.
Dora Till was honoured with several awards and tributes in her lifetime for her contributions to Jewish life, health and welfare in Toronto. In 1956, the Dora and Morris Till Bungalow at the Mothers and Babes Summer Rest Home was dedicated. In 1969, she was the first woman to recieve UJWF's Ben Sadowski Award for Jewish Community Service. As well, in 1977, she received the Queen's Silver Jubilee medal for outstanding community service. In 1983 a Baycrest Centre tribute dinner was held in her honour and in 1984, the top floor of the Baycrest Centre was dedicated to her. This was the culmination of a lifetime devoted to social welfare and community service, and it came just a few years before Till's death, on 22 November 1987.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Dora Till's granddaughter, Mrs. Sheila Gottlieb, until they were donated to the OJA in 1987.
Scope and Content
This fonds consists of records documenting the personal and philanthropic activities of Dora Till, including her ongoing involvement with the Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home, the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care Women's Auxiliary, the United Jewish Welfare Fund, and to a lesser extent other organizations that she was involved or affiliated with. Till's records of the Mothers' and Babes' Rest Home are some of the few to have survived from this important social service organization.
The organizational records in the fonds include minutes, correspondence, reports, speeches, financial records, newsclippings, pamphlets, brochures, invitations, architectural drawings, and photographs, primarily of the Mothers and Babes Rest Home and the Baycrest Centre. As well, there are two artifacts: a Baycrest Centre pin and a gold shovel from the groundbreaking ceremony. The personal records in the fonds include family photographs and portraits, writings, newsclippings and general correspondence.
The fonds has been arranged into eight series: 1. Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home Association. 2. Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care Women's Auxiliary. 3. Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care Heritage Museum Committee. 4. Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care Furnishings Committee. 5. Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care : other committees. 6. United Jewish Welfare Fund. 7. Other organizations. 8. Personal. The records have been described to the file level, while a selection of photographs have been scanned and described at the item level.
Notes
Physical description note: includes 197 photographs (54 negatives), 9 architectural drawings, and 2 objects
Name Access
Till, Dora, 1896-1987
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
For related material on the Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home, please see: Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds 61, Federation of Jewish Philanthropies fonds 66, United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds 67, Ida Lewis Siegel fonds 15, and the Rebecca Kamarner family fonds 11.
For related material on the Baycrest Centre Women's Auxiliary, please see: Pat Joy Alpert fonds 77 and fonds 14.
For related material on National Council of Jewish Women please see fonds 38.
Arrangement
This fonds had previously been arranged and described as MG6 H. The current arrangement was implemented by the archivist in 2010 and as a result, several files from the former MG were culled or merged. Therefore, the former MG finding aid is no longer accurate.
Creator
Till, Dora, 1896-1987
Accession Number
1987-1-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 61
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
61
Material Format
multiple media
Date
[ca. 1920]-1994
Physical Description
3 m of textual records (19 v.) and other material
Admin History/Bio
The Schwartz-Reisman Jewish Community Centre, the Prosserman Jewish Community Centre (formerly the Bathurst Jewish Community Centre or BJCC) and the Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre (MNJCC) in Toronto are the current incarnations of what began, in 1919, as the Hebrew Association of Young Men's and Young Women's Clubs, later known as the Young Men's and Young Women's Hebrew Association of Toronto (Y.M.-Y.W.H.A.). The Y.M.-Y.W.H.A., in turn, began as a merger between several other small athletic clubs operating in the city. The original mandate was strictly athletic, but soon broadened to include other areas of interest, in order to provide a sense of Jewish identity and camaraderie through physical, educational, cultural and community based programming. During the 1920s, the 'Y' became known simply as the Young Men’s Hebrew Association (Y.M.H.A.) – the name under which it was incorporated in 1930.
For close to two decades, the ‘Y’ had rented rooms in the Brunswick Avenue and College Street area, including the basement facilities of the Brunswick Avenue Talmud Torah. By the mid-1930s, these facilities were overcrowded and unable to support the growing membership, particularly when the young women’s programming was reintroduced in 1936.
As a result, in 1937, the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. constructed its own athletic building at 15 Brunswick Avenue, next door to the Talmud Torah, to ease the overcrowding. However, the ‘Y’ still had to make use of five scattered buildings to meet its needs, including the Central Y.M.C.A. gym for its basketball teams. The early ‘Y’ was staffed by volunteers who were granted free memberships in exchange for their time and expertise.
On 3 February 1953, a new Jewish Community Centre was dedicated at the corner of Bloor Street and Spadina Avenue. By the end of the 1950s, the ‘Y’ was providing services for all ages, ranging from a nursery school to their Good Age Club for seniors.
As the Jewish community moved northward, so too did the ‘Y’, with the dedication of a new northern branch on 1 May 1961. This new branch, located at Bathurst Street and Sheppard Avenue, was created in order to address the athletic, educational, cultural and community needs of the expanding Jewish community in the north end of the city. Fourteen years later, an improved cultural and physical education wing was added as part of the completion campaign. This included the addition of the Leah Posluns Theatre and the Murray Koffler Centre of the Arts. In 1978, the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. changed its name to the Jewish Community Centre of Toronto, in order to better reflect its broader role in the community. A new Northeast Valley branch was also established in Thornhill in the early 1980s and later closed in the late 1990s.
In 1994, the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto took over the operation of the northern branch, due to financial difficulties. At this point, all three branches became independent of one another and were no longer constituted as the Jewish Community Centre of Toronto. They each had independent boards of directors, while still receiving some of their operating funds from the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto.
Scope and Content
This fonds consists of the records created and accumulated by the Jewish Community Centre of Toronto -- which included the Bloor branch and the northern Bathurst Jewish Community Centre -- and its predecessor, the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. The records include textual records maintained by the office of the executive director, financial reports, architectural plans, Y-Times newsletters, program material, photographs and oral histories.
The records have been arranged into the following series: Executive director, Jewish Community Centre Archives Committee, Publication Committee, Communications Department, Sports Celebrity Dinner, and Combined Building Campaign Committee.
Notes
Includes 2539 photographs, 42 drawings, 13 sound recordings, 4 artifacts and 2 posters.
Name Access
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto
Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre
Subjects
Community centers
Related Material
See photo #2369-2646, 3412, 3519, 3804, 4201, 5004, 6125, accession #1986-7-8, MG2 N1a
Creator
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
2004-6-6
2004-5-13
2004-5-2
1988-11-7
1988-4-9
1984-7-2
1983-12-1
1982-12-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Sports Celebrity Dinner series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 61; Series 5; File 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Sports Celebrity Dinner series
Level
File
Fonds
61
Series
5
File
3
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1989
Physical Description
72 photographs : col. ; 13 x 13 cm
1 folder of textual records
1 artifact : 30 x 23 cm
Scope and Content
This file consists of a program book and photographs taken at the 1989 Sports Celebrity Dinner. The dinner featured a tribute to R. Alan Eagleson, executive director of the National Hockey League Players Association, chief organizer of the Canada Cup and the driving force behind the 1972 series between Russia and Canada. The dinner was held at the Constellation Hotel on 13 June 1989. There is also a plaque that was presented to Eagleson by the JCC.
The photographs are of the guest of honour and other celebrity guests, the JCC Executive Committee members and Sports Celebrity Committee members, along with the invited guests. The celebrity guests included Harry Neale, Brian McFarlane, Dennis Hull, Jack Donohue, John A. Ziegler Jr., Ron Kanter, Harry Ornest, Bruce Hood, David Edge, Ron Ellis, Paul Henderson, Carrie-Lynn Cohn, Darryl Sittler, Joseph Kibur, Marcel Dionne, Dubie Bader, Bobby Baun, George Chuvalo, John Karpis, Bethany Dworkin, Mike Palmateer and Keith Acton.
Other identified individuals include Bernard Kaimin, Martin Atkins, Harold Cipin, Alan B. Zender, Ted Winick, Bert Fine, Robert Hall, Cantor Louis Danto, Harry Ungerman and Paul Henderson.
Subjects
Celebrities
Sports
Accession Number
2004-6-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 62
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
62
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1919-2001
Physical Description
93 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Benjamin Gershon Kayfetz was born on December 24, 1916 in Toronto, graduating from the University of Toronto in 1939, with a B.A. in modern languages. Between the years 1941 and 1943, he worked as a high school teacher in Huntsville and Niagara Falls. In 1943, he joined the war effort, working for the Department of National Defense in Postal Censorship and was responsible for reviewing prisoner of war mail. After the war, Kayfetz traveled to British Occupied Germany where he worked as a censor of telecommunications with the Control Commission until 1947.
Upon returning to Toronto, he was hired as the National Director of Community Relations by the Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC), and as the Executive (National) Director of the Joint Community Relations Committee (JCRC), a CJC - B'nai B'rith cooperative organization. He also served as the Central Region Executive Director of the CJC between 1973 and 1978. During his tenure, he worked with various churches, unions and minority groups to develop anti-discrimination laws and for the protection of minority and religious rights. Kayfetz was also actively involved in promoting the welfare of Jewish Communities worldwide, and made visits to Cuba in 1962 and 1965, and Russia in 1985, to study and report on the state of these Jewish Communities. After his retirement in 1985, he was awarded the Samuel Bronfman Medal by the Canadian Jewish Congress. In recognition of his efforts to promote Human Rights, he was also awarded the Order of Canada in 1986.
In addition to his professional activities, Kayfetz wrote articles for various Jewish publications under both his own name and the pseudonym, Gershon B. Newman, and gave a weekly radio address on CHIN radio addressing various contemporary Jewish issues. He was also actively involved in the Toronto Jewish Historical Society (serving as its president), Canadian Jewish Historical Society and Yiddish Luncheon Circle. Ben Kayfetz died in 2002.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of materials produced or acquired by Ben Kayfetz in both his personal and professional capacity. It includes biographical materials, minutes, correspondence, recorded CJC and JCRC meetings, memorabilia, transcripts and recorded versions of CHIN radio broadcasts he delivered, as well as various interviews, speeches, articles, book reviews and works he composed. Fonds also consists of minutes, agendas and other records of various Yiddish and historical associations Mr. Kayfetz was involved in.
Notes
Physical Description note: includes 20 photographs, 107 audio cassettes, 1 Beta video cassette and 1 object.
Fonds includes audio tapes 1-5, 7-32, 35-37, 39-42, 44-45, 47-50, 53-56, 58-64, 66-67, 70-85, A1-A5, A7-A9, A12-A14, A16-A20, A23-A28, A30, A32-A38 and A40-A43.
Name Access
Kayfetz, Ben, 1916-2002
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
Audio tapes AC 246-AC 275 belonged to Ben Kayfetz and are related to this fonds.
Creator
Kayfetz, Ben, 1916-2002
Accession Number
1975-012, 1976-10-4, 1980-12-13, 1982-2-2, 1983-6-2, 1985-4-2, 1987-2-3, 1996-5-4, 1998-3-22, 2000-11-4, 2004-3-1, 2004-5-20, 2006-2-9, 2006-8-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Personal series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 62; Series 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Personal series
Level
Series
Fonds
62
Series
1
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1933-1999
Physical Description
5 cm of textual records and other material
Scope and Content
Series consists of biographical materials and memorabilia relating to Ben Kayfetz and his family. Materials include newspaper articles, a taped interview, certificates, awards, university examinations, personal memorabilia from his service in Germany and materials relating to the Bronfman Medal and Order of Canada he received. This series also contains the video "The Life and the Times of Ben Kayfetz".
Notes
Audio tape A14 is part of this series.
Physical description note: includes 1 photograph, 1 audio tape and 1 Beta video cassette.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 64
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
64
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1859-1980, predominant 1977-1979
Physical Description
ca. 5178 photographs and other material
Admin History/Bio
The “Shuls Project” was the work of three University of Toronto architecture students, who in 1977 wrote a research paper on the eight Toronto synagogues built before World War II. Concerned at the lack of resources on these synagogues, Sidney Tenenbaum, Lynn Milstone and Sheldon Levitt foresaw the loss of communities’ recorded history as membership dwindled and elders passed on. The students conceived a project that would photograph and document every synagogue in Canada, gathering visual evidence, memorabilia, plaques and stories before they disappeared and history was lost. The students’ goal was to document synagogues’ architecture, art, and historical development through research, interviews and site visits.
The students secured a large portion of the required funding for the project from the Samuel and Saidye Bronfman Family Foundation in Montreal, funding which was matched by the Canadian Jewish Congress. This financial support enabled Levitt, Milstone and Tenenbaum to begin their study, named “Shuls… A Study of Canadian Synagogue Architecture.” They began in the summer of 1977, traveling through the Western provinces. The next summer, they visited eight Maritime cities, Montreal and other Quebec communities. Financial support in the project’s second year was again provided by the Bronfman Family Foundation, along with the Canadian government and donations in kind from businesses, including Benjamin Photo Finishers in Toronto, and Polaroid. The summer of 1979 was spent in Ontario, with an added grant from Wintario. In total, the Shuls project team traveled over 24,000 kilometres, taking thousands of photographs and conducting several hundred interviews. Photographs were taken by Tenenbaum, with Levitt and Milstone assuming primary responsibility for researching synagogues’ history and gathering historic records. Interviews were conducted by all three researchers, in both English and Yiddish.
With no handy index of every shul in Canada, the researchers located small shuls by word of mouth. They spread word of their project and solicited assistance using press releases, letters to known communities, and slideshow presentations as they traveled. They would first examine a building to get an idea of a community’s character and heritage, then conduct interviews with designers, architects, rabbis and other prominent community members.
With the research and photographs created, the team compiled three catalogues of the Western, Eastern/Quebec, and Ontario phases of the project. These catalogues have entries on each synagogue that include historical summaries highlighting the founding, growth, mergers and decline of Jewish communities, their changing needs, changing architectural expressions and trends, and the evolving uses of synagogues over the course of the twentieth century. There are also building descriptions, some with critical comments by the authors, and lists of the photographs and slides produced.
The compilation of materials and preparation of these catalogues took place at the Project’s offices at 26 Ava Road in Toronto, and continued through the summer of 1980 when the Ontario catalogue was completed. In 1985, Tenenbaum, Milstone and Levitt published a book highlighting their work, called Treasures of a People: The Synagogues of Canada.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of the records created and collected by the team of students conducting the Shuls study from 1977 to 1980. The majority of the fonds is made up of graphic material, in the form of 35mm colour slides and black-and-white Polaroid prints and (print-size) negatives. There are approximately 5110 photographs in the fonds. Fonds also consists of notes and inventory forms of buildings' architectural features. There are no interview transcripts, but the fonds does include three audio cassettes with recorded interviews and shul tours. Reference materials used in researching the history of the shuls include dedication and anniversary commemorative books and programmes, newsletters, articles and newspaper clippings. In addition the fonds contains 47 blueprints, the majority from Montreal synagogues. The fonds is arranged in the following series: 1. Quebec synagogues; 2. Ontario synagogues; 3. Western Canada synagogues; 4. Eastern Canada synagogues; 5. Reference.
Notes
Physical description note: includes 92 cm of textual records, 42 architectural drawings, 3 audio cassettes, and 1 drawing.
Physical extent note: many of the slides were culled because they were felt to be reproductions. Some of the synagogue images in the research book may therefore not be included in the fonds.
Name Access
Shuls Project
Subjects
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Creator
Levitt, Sheldon
Milstone, Lynn
Tenenbaum, Sidney T.
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Congregation B'nai Israel of St. Catharines, Ontario fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 76
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Congregation B'nai Israel of St. Catharines, Ontario fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
76
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1949-1999
Physical Description
66 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
In 1909, the congregation legally adopted the name Chavra B’nai Israel and R. J. Hoffman became the first president. Services were held at a variety of different homes, including those of Mr. Barnett and Mr. Zalavinsky.
After the synagogue was left a large bequest in 1917 by the Friedman family, the congregation decided to purchase the house that it had been renting earlier for $3,500. The partitions between the rooms were removed to construct the sanctuary. It still continued to house the Hebrew school and provide living accommodations for the teacher and shochtim.
Due to the expansion of the community after the First World War, the house became too small to accommodate the congregation. The community therefore began to plan for a new building. The Building Committee accepted a design submitted by Nicholson & McBeth and the shul was built by the Newman Brothers. The groundbreaking ceremony was held on September 14, 1924. Once the synagogue was completed, a larger ceremony took place in July 1925. Services were conducted according to Orthodox tradition and membership at that time was about 30 families.
The congregation adopted a constitution in 1945. The synagogue remained affiliated with the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America. Mixed seating emerged during the later years of the decade; however, Orthodox rabbis continued to serve the synagogue for years to come.
In 1981, the synagogue was incorporated as a charitable and religious organization. It also joined the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism organization. At this time, membership began to decline and they were barely able to maintain a minyan for daily and Friday night services.
In May 2002, B’nai Israel celebrated the 100th anniversary of the community. The celebration included an extended Shabbat service featuring Cantor Howard Shalowitz from New York, followed by a gala dinner on Saturday night with entertainment by the Toronto band Bais Groove.
Custodial History
The records were donated by individuals who were members of the synagogue as well as Congregation B'nai Israel from 1976 until 2009.
Scope and Content
The records document the activities of Congregation B'nai Israel of St. Catharines, Ontario. The material consists of textual, graphic, architectural and electronic records.
The fonds include bulletins, board of governors meeting minutes and reports, anniversary books, correspondence, sisterhood records, financial statements, constitutional documents, committee reports, building plans, Hebrew school materials and other items.
Photo identification:
001. Hebrew school graduating class, 1962. Top row, from left to right: Michael Mandel, Rabbi Dr. Israel Freedman, David Cooperman, Jerry Uretsky. Bottom row, from left to right: Peter Cooperman, Bruce Nepan, Marilyn Granek, Lorraine Tator, Linda Sherman, Rick Uretsky, Howard Slepkov.
002. 1974 bar mitzvah class. Eden Orvitz, Jocques Kesselman, Kevin Semson, Mr. Leo Possen, Ross Metzer, Larry Ritchie, Auby Fenig, Leslie Goldfarb.
003. B’nai Brith Cub Scouts, Fall 1959. B’nai Israel Scout and Cub Pack. This photo was taken as the Troop prepared for a parade in honour of Baden Powell’s birthday.
004. Synagogue board. Top row, from left to right: Harry Offstein, Harry Rubin, Eddie Offstein, Max Silver, Harry Tomarin, Martin Revzin, Jack Engel. Bottom row, from left to right: Ben Fruitman, Dave Katzman, Jacob Cooperman, Joseph Halperin, Saul Granek.
Notes
Physical Description Note: Includes 25 photographs (jpg), 8 architectural drawings (jpg), and 1 document (jpg).
Name Access
Congregation B'nai Israel (St. Catharines, Ont.)
Subjects
Synagogues
Physical Condition
Records are in good condition.
Arrangement
The records are arranged at the file level by function.
Creator
Congregation B'nai Israel (St. Catharines, Ont.)
Places
St. Catharines (Ont.)
Accession Number
1976-7-9; 2004-2-4; 2004-2-9; 2004-5-91; 2008-9-1; 2009-8-2; 2009-8-7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 51
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
51
Material Format
multiple media
Date
[192-]-1990
Physical Description
1.35 metres of textual records (20 vols.) and other material
Admin History/Bio
Philip Gerard Givens (1922-1995) was a municipal, provincial and federal politician, a judge, a police commissioner and an active Jewish communal leader. He is largely remembered as the 54th Mayor of Toronto.
Phil Givens was born in Toronto on April 24th, 1922, the only son of Hyman and Mary Gevertz (Gewercz). As a youth, he attended Harbord Collegiate and graduated from the University of Toronto in political science and economics in 1945 and from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1949. In 1947, he married Minnie "Min" Rubin (born February 7th, 1924) and together they had two children, Eleanor and Michael.
Givens graduated as a lawyer from Osgoode Hall; however, shortly thereafter he decided to enter politics, running as a municipal school board trustee in 1950. In 1951 he was elected as alderman for Ward 5, serving in this capacity until 1960, when he was subsequently elected as a city Controller.
Givens was appointed Queen’s Counsel in 1962.
Following the sudden death of Mayor David Summerville in 1963, Givens was appointed by City Council as the Mayor of Toronto and was officially elected to the position in 1964, winning a close race against the former mayor, Allan Lamport. As mayor, Givens was automatically a member of the Metropolitan Toronto Executive and Council, the Metropolitan Toronto Police Commission, the Consumer’s Gas Company Executive, the Toronto Hydro Commission and the governing boards of Toronto’s major hospitals.
Givens was publicly seen as an affable and populist mayor but his tenure was not without controversy. His support for the construction of the St. Lawrence Centre for the Arts and his decision to acquire Henry Moore’s bronze sculpture “the Archer” for the new Nathan Phillips Square were both highly controversial during his term in office. In particular, the Moore sculpture sparked intense controversy and public debate amongst council members and citizens alike. Although ultimately purchased with private solicited donations, the controversy surrounding the statue’s purchase was still partly to blame for Givens’ 1966 election defeat to William Dennison.
In 1967 Givens entered national politics for the second time, the first being a failed 1957 bid in Toronto’s Spadina riding, winning a seat as a Liberal in Toronto’s York West riding. In 1971 he stepped down before the end of his term to campaign for a seat in the Provincial Legislature. Again running under the Liberal banner, Givens won his seat in York-Forest Hill and after the elimination of this riding in 1975, was re-elected in the new riding of Armourdale. In 1977 he retired from politics. He also worked briefly as a current affairs commentator for local radio broadcaster CHUM 1050 AM.
In 1977, Givens was appointed as a provincial court judge and chairman of the Metropolitan Toronto Police Commission, serving in both capacities until 1985, when he left the Commission but continued in the judiciary as a civil trial judge until officially retiring from public life in 1988.
An ardent Zionist, Givens was also a prominent leader of several Jewish communal organizations. He was the founder and first president of the Upper Canada Lodge of B’nai Brith and sat on the executives of the Canadian Jewish Congress, the United Jewish Welfare Fund, the Talmud Torah Eitz Chaim, the Zionist Organization of Canada, the Toronto Zionist Council, Jewish National Fund, State of Israel Bonds and the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care. He was chairman of the United Israel Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund in 1967 and the United Jewish Appeal-Israel Special Fund in 1968. From 1973 to 1985 he was the national president of the Canadian Zionist Federation and in the 1990s was the national chairman of the Canadian Jewish Congress’ Committee for Yiddish.
Givens was honoured by Jewish community organizations, including the Jewish National Fund’s Negev Award in 1968 and the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews’ Human Relations Award in 1969. As well, in 1972, he received the Award of Honour from the Toronto Regional Council of B’nai Brith.
Givens was also known to be a passionate sailor and was a member of both the Royal Canadian and the Island Yacht Clubs in Toronto. He died on November 30th, 1995 at the age of 73.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Phil Givens until they were donated to the Archives in September 1990 by his wife.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the personal, professional and communal activities of Phil Givens. The bulk of the material is graphic and most of the photographs relate to his tenure as Mayor of Toronto and to his Jewish communal work. The records also include general correspondence, speeches, campaign material, scrapbooks, cartoons, certificates and awards, biographical writings, audio and visual materials and artifacts. The records have been arranged into nine series representing Givens’ various roles and activities and have been described to the file level and item level when necessary. These series are: 1. Personal life; 2. City of Toronto Alderman; 3. City of Toronto Controller; 4. City of Toronto Mayor; 5. Metropolitan Toronto Police Commissioner; 6. Provincial politics; 7. National politics; 8. Legal career; 9. Jewish communal service.
Notes
Physical Description Note: Includes ca. 915 photographs, 14 drawings, 1 print, 1 presentation piece, 27 objects, 4 DVD’s, 4 videocassettes and 1 audiocassette.
Physical Extent Note: Fonds was reduced from 5.5 m of records to 2.6 m of records. Please see accession record for further details regarding the records that were culled.
General Note: Previously cited as MG6 B
Associated material note: City of Toronto Archives: “Philip Givens fonds” (fonds 1301) and Series 363, Sub-series 2 “Mayor' Office journals” (fonds 200). Library and Archives Canada: “Correspondence and subjects” series (R4942-1-1-E) in the Stuart E. Rosenberg fonds (R4942-0-X-E); Henry S. Rosenberg fonds (R3946-0-9-E); Jewish National Fund of Canada fonds (R4347-0-1-E), “Subject series: Givens, Judge Philip G. – Toronto” (R4347-7-4-E); “Correspondence, memoranda, minutes, reports” series (MG31-H67), Zdzislaw Przygoda fonds (R6257-0-0-E) [Sir Casimir Gzowski monument committee records –chaired by Phil Givens]; B'nai Brith Canada fonds (R6348-0-9-E); Canadian Zionist Federation fonds (R9377-0-6-E).
Name Access
Givens, Phillip, 1922-1995
Givens (nee Rubin), Min
Subjects
Law
Politicians
Related Material
See Fonds 2: Benjamin Dunkelman fonds
See Fonds 18: Gordon Mendly fonds
See Fonds 28: Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
See Fonds 37: Gilbert Studios fonds (Negev dinners series, Zionist Building series, Portraits series).
Creator
Givens, Philip, 1922-1995
Accession Number
1990-9-7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Personal life series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 51; Series 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Personal life series
Level
Series
Fonds
51
Series
1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Date
[192-]-1988
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
74 photographs : b&w and col. (8 negatives) ; 36 x 26 cm or smaller
Scope and Content
Series consists of textual records and graphic material related to the personal life of Phil Givens. This includes general correspondence, family portraits and personal snapshots, school materials and biographical writings.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
City of Toronto Mayor series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 51; Series 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
City of Toronto Mayor series
Level
Series
Fonds
51
Series
4
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1963-1990
Physical Description
ca. 360 photographs : b&w, sepia toned, and col (99 contact sheet, 2 slides) ; 34 x 26 cm or smaller and other material
Scope and Content
Series consists of records documenting Phil Givens’ work as Mayor of Toronto from 1963 until 1966. The bulk of the records are photographs featuring Mayor Givens at various city and community events; of note are images of Givens meeting with Robert Kennedy, Israeli President Zalmon Shazar, Sam Shopsowitz, and Pope Paul VI. Also included is general correspondence, speeches, election campaign materials, cartoons, certificates, artifacts, textual records related to the acquisition of the Henry Moore sculpture, a VHS cassette of Givens discussing the building of the New City Hall and an audiocassette documenting a council trip to Montreal in 1966. In addition, there is a small number of photographs which document events that occurred outside the dates of his time in office, but which relate to his role as mayor.
The series has been arranged into nine sub-series: 4-1. Campaign; 4-2. City of Toronto Council; 4-3. Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto Council; 4-4. City of Toronto Board of Control; 4-5. Henry Moore Sculpture and artwork; 4-6. Official engagements; 4-7. Certificates and Awards; 4-8. Portraits and publicity; and 4-9. Political cartoons.
Notes
Includes 7.8 cm of textual records, 14 drawings, 1 DVD, 1 videocassette, 1 audiocassette, and 8 objects.
Photographers and photography studios are identified on the photographs.
Subjects
Politicians
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
4
Material Format
multiple media
Date
[ca. 1900]-2010
Physical Description
3.1 metres of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Sol Edell (1919-2000) was a prominant member of the Toronto Jewish community who initially pursued a career as a pharmacist and was later founder and president of the property development company, Elmdale Investments. He held positions as board member or chair in a wide variety of religious, educational and social service organizations and institutions both in Canada and Israel. In Toronto, these included: Clanton Park Synagogue, Adas Israel Synagogue, Jones Avenue Cemetery, Canadian Jewish Congress and the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto (formerly Toronto Jewish Congress, and now the United Jewish Appeal Federation of Greater Toronto).
Edell was born in Toronto on 5 March 1919, the son of Pesach and Molly Edell. He attended Harbord Collegiate and graduated from the Toronto College of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, in 1943 while on leave of absence from the army. He was enlisted in the Canadian Armed Forces during the Second World War and served in the signal corps.
After he completed his army service, he opened Edell’s Drug Store at 1978 Queen Street in Etobicoke in 1948, the first shomer Shabbat drug store in the city. He operated a second store at 494 Spadina Avenue in the late 1940s. In 1955 the Queen Street location was expropriated by the City of Toronto. Subsequently, Edell founded Elmdale Investments, the company which built and managed the Elmhurst Plaza in Etobicoke. He reopened the drug store, which was renamed Elmhurst Drugs in the plaza. He also invested in two retail textile stores, Deltex Drapery and Dodd’s Drapery which had been founded by group of businessmen including his cousin Israel Edell.
In 1952 he married Dolly Weinstock, the daughter of Moishe and Sylvia Weinstock. They lived in the newly developed suburb of North York with their four children: Ethel, Simcha, Malka and Joseph. After 10 years of marriage, Dolly died and in 1966, he married Celia Rogen Hoffman.
Sol Edell was a founding member and first president of the Clanton Park Congregation. He was actively involved in the construction of the synagogue and its development. He continued to be affiliated with Shomrai Shabbos where his grandfather Rabbi Yosef Weinreb had been the rabbi. He was also involved with Adas Israel, the synagogue in Hamilton where his wife Celia had been an active member.
He was chair of the Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region -- Toronto Jewish Congress Archives Committee, which subsequently became the Ontario Jewish Archives. During his tenure, the archives was responsible for the reconstruction of the Kiever Synagogue which had been built in the early 1900s but had fallen into a state of disrepair by the 1960s.
Sol Edell was also involved in a number of Zionist organizations. He was the founding chair of the Aliyah Support Committee of the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto, whose mandate was to assist Torontonians who had moved to Israel and ease their transition into Israeli society. He was also an active member of the Mizrachi organization and its affiliated institutions. Another one of Sol Edell’s interests was ensuring the preservation of local cemeteries. He was president of the Jones Avenue Cemetery and on the board of Pardes Shalom and the Bathurst Lawn Cemetery, Clanton Park section.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting Sol Edell's business activities, community involvement and personal life. Included is correspondence, meeting minutes, photographs, financial records, legal records, publications, audio-visual material, invitations, newspaper clippings, artifacts, lists, reports, speeches, and architectural drawings.
The fonds is organized into the following eleven series: Personal; Edell's Drug Store and Elmhurst Pharmacy; Elmdale Investments; Deltex Drapery and Dodd's Drapery; Adas Israel Synagogue; Clanton Park Synagogue; Shomrai Shabbos; Aliyah; Cemetery and funeral home; Historical materials; and, Activities and organizations.
Notes
Physical description note: includes 739 photographs, 232 architectural drawings, 11 audio cassettes, 9 audio reels, 13 film reels, 7 videocassettes, 4 slides, 1 plaque, 4 badges, and 1 key.
Name Access
Edell Solomon, 1919-2000
Clanton Park Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Edell, Dolly
Edell, Celia
Edell's Drug Store
Elmhurst Pharmacy
Jones Avenue Cemetery
Canadian Jewish Congress/ Toronto Jewish Congress Archives
Aliyah Support Committee
Subjects
Business
Pharmacists
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Physical Condition
The bulk of the architectural drawings are currently being stored rolled up. They should be flattened and encapsulated in melinex.
Film and sound reels should be digitized.
Related Material
See fonds #5 for material related to Paul Edell.
See accession #2012-10/9 for material related to the Edell family.
Creator
Edell, Solomon, 1919-2000
Accession Number
2002-12-2
2008-8-29
2011-5-4
2012-10-9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
Personal series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 4; Series 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
Personal series
Level
Series
Fonds
4
Series
1
Material Format
multiple media
Date
[ca. 1900]-2000
Physical Description
49 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Sol Edell, the son of Paul and Mollie Edell, was one of five siblings. He and Dolly Weinstock, the daughter of Moishe and Sylvia Weinstock, had two daughters and two sons and lived in Toronto. After Dolly died in 1961, he married Celia (nee Rogen) Hoffman, a widow, in 1966. He became the stepfather to the two sons of Max and Celia Hoffman who had been residents of Hamilton. Some members of the family remained in Toronto while others moved to other parts of Canada, the United States and Israel. Sol Edell was actively involved in or provided financial support to many educational, professional and religious organizations.
Scope and Content
Series includes correspondence, invitations, publications, photographs, family films and a sound recording. The series is made up of seven sub-series: Associations, Charities, Community Activities, Education and Extra-Curricular Activities, Life Cycle and Family Events, Religious, and Residence.
Notes
Physical description note: includes 12 photographs, 7 film reels, 1 audio reel, 1 plaque, 4 badges, and 47 architectural drawings.
Name Access
Hoffman, Max
Hoffman, Celia
Rho Pi Phi
Harbord Collegiate
Subjects
Education
Greek letter societies
Physical Condition
Film and sound reels should be digitized.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
Adas Israel Synagogue series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 4; Series 5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
Adas Israel Synagogue series
Level
Series
Fonds
4
Series
5
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1958-2008
Physical Description
21 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Adas Israel is an orthodox congregation that was founded in the 1920s. The original building was on Cannon Street in downtown Hamilton. After the arrival of Rabbi Morton Green in 1958, a decision was made to move the synagogue to the western suburbs of Hamilton. The new building was built in 1961 and also included the Hamilton Hebrew Academy Day School. Since its move, synagogue membership has increased from 75 families to 350 families. Sol Edell became a member in 1966 after he married Celia Hoffman who was a member of the congregation. He did not attend the synagogue and had no regular involvement but did supervise a number synagogue renovation projects.
Custodial History
The material in this series was originally collected by the Hoffman family who were members of the congregation in the 1960s. Sol Edell became a member of the congregation after his marriage to Celia Hoffman in 1966. After her death in 1973, he inherited the material that she had collected and he continued to receive material from the congregation since he maintained his membership until his death in 2000.
Scope and Content
Series consists of correspondence, blueprints, photographs, audiotapes and films relating to the establishment and construction of the new synagogue in 1961. It also includes correspondence and anniversary books documenting a variety of synagogue activities such as the dedication of the synagogue and a tribute dinner honouring Rabbi Mordechai Green. Also included are synagogue bulletins from 1958 to 2000. The series is made up of 6 sub series: Building, Clergy, Religious, Programmes, Administration and Finance, and Publications.
Notes
Physical description note: includes 27 photographs, 3 audio reels, 1 film reel, 15 architectural drawings, and 1 key.
Name Access
Green, Morton, Rabbi
Hoffman, Celia
Hamilton Hebrew Academy Day School
Subjects
Architecture
Education
Synagogues
Source
Archival Descriptions
178 records – page 1 of 4.

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