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31 records – page 1 of 1.
Accession Number
2012-8-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-8-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 18 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1884-1985
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the Coppel and Cooper families of Galt (now Cambridge) and Toronto respectively. Coppel family records include family correspondence, photocopies of Moses Kappel's discharge papers from the Austro-Hungarian military (1884), B'nai Israel Synagogue sisterhood meeting minutes, financial records, photographs, Hadassah booklets and programmes, and a photo album documenting the closing of B'nai Israel Synagogue in 1985. Also included are records relating to Elizabeth Cooper (née Coppel)'s involvement in Canadian Young Judaea and her work as a camp counselor at a Jewish day camp near Kitchener-Waterloo (Judaean Day Camp/Camp Ruach). These records include correspondence, publications, activity schedules, lists of camp counselors, and a Young Judaean scarf. Coppel family records also include marriage and burial records of Aaron Coppel, audio cassettes of an oral history interview conducted with Cy Coppel in 1976, and military records documenting Max David Simonoff's service in the Canadian Navy during the Second World War. Finally, included is a Farband Shule (Folks School) program book (1927) and class photo (ca. 1931). Identified in the photograph is Ethel Raicus (first row, third from the right).
Cooper family records include digital photographs of Sam Cooper and the weightlifting club at the YMHA in Toronto (1930s), portraits of Jacob Cooper (Cooperberg), a school photo of Sam and Max Cooper, and a photo of Hilda Cooper.
Finally accession consists of program books for various events, including a Canadian Jewish Congress song book, an Israel Dance Theatre at the Royal Alexandra, and a Queen Esther Purim play.
Administrative History
Aaron Selig (Archie Aaron) Coppel (Kappel / Koppel / Cappell / Kappele) was born to Moses Kappel and Perl (nee Pistenfeld) in Galicia in 1882. He came to Canada in 1903 and lived with a landsmen family, the Siegels. Mr. Siegel was a horse dealer who took Aaron under his wing and taught him the horse trade. Aaron married Mr. Siegel's daughter, Chaya Geitel (Gertrude) Seigel, in 1905. Aaron and Geitel had seven children: Helen, Rose, Newt, Cyrus ("Cy," born in 1911), Les, George, and Harry. After marrying, Aaron and Geitel remained in Galt, and Aaron continued dealing in livestock. Although he was eager to assimilate into Canadian society (he gave his children British names and spoke with no accent), the family kept kosher and Aaron hired itinerant Hebrew teachers for the children.
Cyrus Coppel married Channa "Anna" Simonoff on 25 August1946. Anna was born in Russia to Avraham Dov and Chashe Bryna Tzaitzeck. Anna had three siblings: Sarah Merle, Faigle (died en route to Canada), and Mordecai Doved. She immigrated to Ottawa in 1914 with her family. An uncle already living in Ottawa had changed his last name to Simonoff and the family decided to change their name to Simonoff as well. Avraham worked as a tailor in Russia and likely continued in this profession in Canada. The family moved to Toronto sometime after 1919 and was actively involved in the Labour Zionist movement. Anna was in the milliner's union and two of her aunts, Slaava Raicus and Esther Cohen, were members of Club One (Pioneer Women). Anna and Cyrus had two children together: Bryna (24 February 1949-12 January 2006) and Elizabeth (b. 16 Dec. 1950). Cyrus initially worked as a mechanic, but later worked in the office of an auto shop and traded in auto parts. He also traded in livestock as a hobby. Cyrus was one of the founders of the B'nai Israel Synagogue in Galt. Initially, synagogue services were held in the homes of local residents, such as the Spring family; however, a building was finally purchased in 1946. After the synagogue closed, the Torahs and plaques went to the synagogue in Kitchener. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Jacob Cooperberg (Kupferberg, Cooper) came to Canada around 1910 from Kielce, Poland. His wife and children (Max, Sam, and Aidel or Ida) remained in Poland, waiting for Jacob to earn enough money for them to come to Canada as well. His family was unable to join him until after the First World War had ended, arriving in 1920. Jacob and Sarah had three more children in Canada: Irving, Joey, and Hilda. Jacob worked as a peddler in Toronto and later opened a scrap yard, Cooper Iron and Medal. The family lived on Oxford Street in the Kensington Market area.
Sam Cooper married Kay Gernstein in 1948. They had two children together: Neil and Donna (married name is Speigel). Sam initially worked as a tailor, but later worked as a scrap dealer. Neil married Donna Coppel and also works in the scrap trade. Donna is a librarian.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Descriptive Notes
Includes 1 photo album, 7 photographs (tiff), 3 photographs, 2 audio cassettes, and 1 scarf.
Subjects
Families
Places
Galt (Cambridge, Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-6-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-6-4
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
13 photographs : b&w (11 tif, 2 jpg)
Date
1909-[ca. 1952]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting the Gryfe, Silverman, Saul and Greenberg families. The majority of the images are family portraits, however, also included is a school photograph of Sandy Greenberg at Charles G. Fraser School in Toronto, a photograph of Feda and Izzy Greenberg in Ottawa, a photograph of the Silverman family at Crystal Beach, and a photograph of a family celebration for Morris Silverman's birthday. Also identified in the photographs are: Sam Silverman, Bill Gryfe, Esther (Gryfe) Silverman, Lizzie Gryfe, Bayla Gryfe, Fae Silverman, Tillie Silverman, Sam Silverman, Bertha Silverman, Sam Saul, Joseph Saul, Ida Saul, Anna Saul, Rachel Saul, Nancy Silverman, Ruth Silverman, Lou Weitzman, and Ruth Weitzman.
Administrative History
Izzy Greenberg and Anna (nee Nathan) Greenberg immigrated to Ottawa from Romania around 1910. They had six children together: Freda, Harry, Joe, Anne, Helen, and Earl (b. 1920). Izzy likely worked as a peddler. When Anna passed away in 1923 all of the children, except for Freda, were sent to a Jewish orphanage in Montreal (the Montefiore orphanage). The orphanage closed in 1936 when Earl was 16 years old. He came to Toronto where he met Sandy (or Sylvia) Silverman. They were married in 1947. Earl initially worked as a shoe salesman, but later opened his own business, Sanmarcoda, where he bought and sold electronic surplus. He and Sandy had three children together: Marsha, Corey, and David. Sandy worked as a secretary with the provincial government and sold baby's clothing at flea markets on Sundays.
Joseph and Anna Saul came to Canada from Romania in the early 1900s. They had six children together: Sam (b. 1908), Rachel (Rae, b. 1910), Ida, Jeanette, Bonnie, and Dorothy. Joseph abandoned the family around 1923 and travelled to California to become an actor. Although his family never heard from him again, they later recognized him in movies under the name Maurice Samuels. Anna was deaf and mute and worked as a seamstress, making ladies clothing out of her own home. Rae obtained work in a hat factory when she was 13 years old and continued in this trade throughout the remainder of her life. Around 1950 she opened her own hat store at Eglinton and Dufferin called Rae's Hats. She briefly lived above the store with her husband, Sam Silverman.
Morris Silverman, Esther (Gryfe) Silverman, and their two daughters Fae and Tillie immigrated to Hamilton from Romania in 1907. Esther's sister, Lizzie Gryfe, was already living in Hamilton at the time. In 1909, Morris and Esther had another son together, Sam. By 1922, the family had moved to Nassau Street in Toronto where Morris worked as a tailor for Tip Top Tailors. They lived next door to the Saul Family. Sam married Rae Saul in 1927. Sam had had various jobs throughout his life including, cab driver, venetian blind salesman, and driver for a cleaner's.
Subjects
Families
Portraits
Name Access
Greenberg, Sandy
Places
Crystal Beach (Fort Erie, Ont.)
Ottawa (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-12-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-12-5
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Date
1920-1965
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one digital image of a Mandel Bros. Produce Pasteurized Special Sour Cream lid.
Administrative History
Mandel’s Creamery opened between 1913-1920. It was initially owned by Harry Mandel. After 1944, it was owned by one of his sons William Mandel and, in the 1950s, it was owned by the brothers Saul, Abraham, Ben, and William Mandel. From 1960 to approximately 1965, it was owned by William Mandel (exclusively).
Mandel's Creamery manufactured cream cheese, cottage cheese, sour cream, and butter milk under the labels Mandel Bros. & Silver Brand. They also manufactured for private label brands and other wholesale and retail customers. They sold wholesale butter, eggs, and hard cheese which they did not manufacture. Low salt & low fat cottage cheese was a specialty sold to institutions such as Baycrest Hospital. Their customers included supermarkets, bakeries, restaurants, institutions, resorts, and summer camps. There was also retail sales at the store front at 29 Baldwin St.
The business was sold by the Mandel family around 1965 to Mr. Bricks and Mr. Caplan who then sold it to Western Creamery some years later.
Subjects
Creameries
Business
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-12-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-12-6
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 200 photographs and other material
Date
[193-]-[2007?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the personal life and family of Myra Merkur. The bulk of the accession consists of photographs and home movies documenting family activities and an outing to High Park and the Toronto Zoo, holiday celebrations (such as, Chanukah, Purim, Passover, and New Year's Eve costume parties), milestones (such as, Myra's wedding and graduation), cottage life at Gamebridge Beach and Camp Wishiwami, and family holidays and travel (such as to Israel, Blue Mountains in Collingwood, and Grossingers in New York).
Also included are sound recordings of a speech made by David Merkur to Nomi Tepperman at her Bat Mitzvah (17 May 1998) and of an interview with David Merkur who explains to his tweleve year old granddaughter what life was like when he was twelve (1 Nov. 2000).
Finally, accession includes a photocopy of a tribute Myra wrote for her late mother Lena Charlotte Gula documenting Lena's life and Myra's memories of her.
Administrative History
Myra (Gula) Merkur was born to Lena (nee Neimen) and Jack Gula in Toronto in 1933. She has one sister, Elaine Wolfish. As a child Myra and her family lived with her maternal grandmother, Betty "Brindel", at 234 Markham Street. They later moved into their own home at 1 Enid Crescent in 1949. Myra's father initially worked as a tailor but later went into the sales business selling furniture and insurance. Myra's mother initially stayed at home, but obtained work in the mid-1950s as a saleswoman at Morgan's department store.
Myra married David Israel Merkur in 1954. David was a civil engineer and lawyer. He later started a family real estate business that involved buying, selling and maintaining properties. Myra and David had three children together: Shauna Tepperman (b. 1956), Lorne Merkur (b. 1957) and Jordan Merkur (b. 1962).
Myra completed her undergraduate degree from Atkinson College (York University) around 1975. She obtained her Master of Education from OISE in 1982. Myra worked as an ESL teacher with the Toronto Public School Board and was involved as a volunteer and leader with the National Council of Jewish Women, JF&CS, and the Jewish Women's Federation (Women's Philanthropy).
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes 1 folder of textual records, 2 sound recordings (wav), and 7 DVDs
Subjects
Families
Vacations
Fasts and feasts--Judaism
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
New York (State)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-9
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
6 photographs : b&w (jpg)
4 documents (jpg)
Date
[195-?]-1979
Scope and Content
Accession consists of six electronic copies of photographs of Irving Levine and the Levine family and electronic copies of three invitations to Irving Levine's birthday party, and one newspaper clipping. Included is Irving and Ruth's wedding portrait and wedding photo with their parents (Sept. 6, 1952), two photographs of Irving with his mother Anne at Cyrstal Beach, a photograph of the Irving brothers in Grimsby, and a photo of Irving with business partner Lionel Robins (ca. 1978). Identified individuals in the photographs include: Irving Levine, Lionel Robins, Harry Levine, David Levine, Anne Levine, Ruth Levine, Sam Levine, Abraham Feldman, and Jennie Feldman.
Administrative History
Irving Levine was born in 1929 to Sam and Anne Levine. He was born in Grimsby, Ontario, where his father owned a junior department store. They were members of Beth Jacob Synagogue in Hamilton. Irving moved to Toronto in 1953, he married Ruth Fern in 1952 and they had three children: Alan, born in 1953, Suzy, born in 1956 and Michael, born in 1961. He has six grandchildren. He purchased Braemar clothing store in the early 1960s, with the first location in Cloverdale Mall. He became the top vice-president of Dylex, Ltd.,one of Canada's largest retail clothing companies, and general manager of Fairweather's division. Lionel Robins became his business partner in 1964.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Further identification can be found with the accession record.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Levine, Irving, 1929-
Places
Crystal Beach (Fort Erie, Ont.)
Grimsby (Ont.)
Hamilton (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-18
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-18
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
85 cm of textual records
184 photographs : b&w and col. (tif and jpg)
ca. 200 photographs : b&w and col.
14 moving images : mov and mp4
Date
[192-]-2015, predominant 1983-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the records related to the activities and operations of the First Narayever Congregation. Included are board and general meeting minutes (1984-1996); general correspondence, high holiday tickets and membership lists (1970s-1990s); membership and dues ledger (1929-1983); Ritual Committee meeting minutes (1984-1988); Implementation Committee records (1970s-1980s); constitutions (1980s); newsletters (1983-2004); a blank seat deed (1920s); a cemetery map (1950s?); records regarding burial rights for the Owen Sound Hebrew Congregation (1966-1980); records regarding a court case filed by members of the congregation surrounding the egalitarian changes being planned; an album documenting SHTICK! A Celebration of Jewish Playwrights (2005-2006); an album documenting the congregation's participation in a UJA Mission to Israel (2003-2004); a binder of material containing photocopied and original records in support of the research for the congregation's 100th anniversary celebrations (1970s-2014); photographs and a video recording of the 100th Anniversary exhbition opening at the Miles Nadal JCC; photographs of events hosted by the congregation; and 9 video interviews with individuals connected to the shul conducted by Sharoni Sibony, Peter Gold, and Harry Schachter for the anniversary celebrations. Interviewees are: Peter Gold, Sharon Weintraub, Murray Teitel, Rosalyn Katz, Julia Gluck, Shaya Petroff, Stuart Schoenfeld, Sylvia Solomon and Ben Rothman. Also included are family photographs and written transcripts of oral interviews conducted with members of the Hersh Petersiel family, who lived in Hastings, Ontario and had early connections to the Narayever Congregation.
Custodial History
The records related to Hersh Petersiel were given to the First Narayever by Marsha Beck for their upcoming 100th anniversary. Marsha agreed to donate them to the OJA along with the Narayever records.
Administrative History
In 1914, Jews from eastern Galicia (now in modern Ukraine) established the First Narayever Congregation in Toronto as a landsmanshaf, i.e. a society of Jewish immigrants from the same town or region. The synagogue takes its name from the small market town of Narayev, which is located in eastern Galicia. The synagogue's founders belonged to the working class and many worked in Toronto's garment industry.
Initially, congregation members met in different locations, but by 1923 their numbers and financial means had grown such that they were able to rent a small house at 70 Huron Street at the corner of Huron and Dundas. This house served as the congregation's home for twenty years.
The congregation's first president was Israel Chaim Katz and its first meeting was held at the Katz home at 156 William Street. The congregation's first rabbi was Solomon Langner, who was hired by the congregation in 1923. He retained this affiliation despite serving the Kiever Synagogue as a full-time rabbi from 1929 until he died in 1973.
In 1943, the congregation purchased property at 187-189 Brunswick Avenue from Bethel Church. This is where the the synagogue is located today. In 1950, Henry Young became president of the congregation. He occupied that position until his death in 1976. Shalom Langner, the son of Rabbi Solomon Langner, succeeded Young as president.
As Toronto's Jewish population began to move north, the First Narayever continued to serve Orthodox Jews living downtown. In the 1980s, the congregation struggled to balance the needs of this older generation with the young generation's desire to make the synagogue more egalitarian with respect to gender. In 1983, the congregation's new leadership team successfully advanced a proposal to allow the full participation of women in traditional services. This innovation led to several long-standing members taking legal action, but their case was dismissed on the grounds that it was not a matter for civil law.
The First Narayever's identity continued to evolve. In 2009, its membership voted to allow its rabbi, Edward Elkin, who began serving the congregation in 2000, to officiate at same-sex marriages.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
First Narayever Congregation (Toronto, Ont.)
Petersiel, Hersh
Places
Hastings (Ont.)
Owen Sound (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-1
Material Format
textual record
moving images
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records and other material
Date
1987, 1998-2009
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the history and events of the Kehillat Shaarei Torah. Included are event invitations, programs, and booklets. Of note is the synagogue's 18th anniversary booklet. Also included are VHS tapes and DVDs of the following events: a Purim celebration featuring a mock wedding (2007), the farewell tribute dinner to Rabbi and Rebbetzin Reuven and Joyce Tradburks and family (2009), the Flo Urbach tribute dinner, the synagogue's 18th anniversary celebrations (1999) and an event honouring Margaret Klompas (2004). Finally, accession includes a CD with images from the Abe Goldberg Torah Dedication (2006).
Administrative History
Kehillat Shaarei Torah is a modern Orthodox congregation that was founded in Toronto in 1980. Most of the early founders and members were recent immigrants from South Africa who had settled in the Bayview-Leslie-York Mills-Shepard area. Unable to find a congregation in their area that reflected their Orthodox traditions from South Africa, they formed their own minyan. They initially met in living rooms and basements and in 1987 opened the synagogue's building at 2640 Bayview Avenue.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: Includes 3 videocassettes (VHS), 2 DVDs, and 1 CD (103 photographs)
Subjects
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Synagogues
Name Access
Kehillat Shaarei Torah of Toronto
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-5
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
41 photographs : b&w and col. (1625 kb jpgs) ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Date
1932-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the Latchman Triplets. Included are family photographs of Donald, Marvin and Victor Latchman, a family portrait taken at the wedding of Philip and Sally Latchman, class photos, summer camp photos, and images of the triplets' 75th and 80th birthdays (5 November 2013).
Identified in photographs are: Donald and Annette Latchman, Victor and Rosalie Latchman, Marvin and Shirley Latchman, Philip and Sally Latchman, Morris Latchman, Vera Latchman Berrin, Mari Latchman Lipton, Irv Lipton, and Belle Latchman.
Textual records include Beth Sholom Bulletin June-August 1997, Beth Sholom Brotherhood Ball and Installation 1971, photocopies of news paper articles about the triplets, class photos and letter regarding payment of King's Bounty.
Administrative History
Philip and Sally (Sugarman) Latchman were married in 1932. In November 1933, Sally gave birth to identical triplets Donald, Marvin and Victor. In celebration, they were sent the King's Bounty of 3 British pounds. The boys were interviewed every year on their birthday by Toronto newspapers until they decided to stop the publicity. The family lived in the Bloor-Markham area until the boys were 11. The family then moved to Montclair Avenue where the boys attended Forest Hill Public School. They had their bar-mitzvahs at the Hebrew Men of England Synagogue. The triplets' father, Philip Latchman was a founding members of Beth Sholom Synagogue. Donald Latchman was on the board and Rosalie Latchman was active in the congregation.
Philip and his younger brother Morris Latchman started Federal Farms Limited in 1948 on 150 acres of Holland March in Brantford, Ontario. They grew vegetables: potatoes, carrots, celery and rutabegas. They also had a potato chip company Mad Hatter Snack Foods which was Kosher for Passover. Federal Farms Ltd. went public in 1961 and Loblaws bought 51% of the shares.
Donald attended Ryerson business school and founded Latchman Insurance Brokers. He married Annette Bachst, a Holocaust survivor who grew up in New York.
Marvin attended Ryerson business school then worked for Federal Farms at the Ontario Food Terminal. Later he became a real estate broker. He married Shirley Wolkofsky.
Victor worked on the family farm and at Federal Fruit Company at the Ontario Food Terminal. Victor took a business course at Shaw's Business School. In 1966 he bought Taylors shoes, a business at 2934 Dundas Street. West started in 1920 by Sid Taylor. Victor helped start the Junction Business Improvement Association and was twice President of Junction Gardens BIA. He retired in 2009. Victor and Rosalie Greenspan (d. 2014) were married at Beth Sholom in 1958 by Rabbi David Monson. Their children are Howard, and Faith and Mitchell Sherman. Their grand-children are Matthew, Jennifer and Russell Sherman. Victor and Rosalie were honoured at Beth Sholom Synagogue on 26 October 2013 for their 55th wedding anniversary.
In 2012 at age 78, the triplets believed themselves to be the oldest male identical triplets alive in Canada.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
RELATED MATERIALS NOTE: Federal Farms Limited fonds at Simoce Country Archives. ASSOCIATED MATERIALS NOTE: See accession 2016-12\45 (Victor Latchman) and 2002-10\66 (Morris Latchman).
Subjects
Agriculture
Families
Name Access
Latchman, Donald
Latchman, Marvin
Latchman, Victor
Places
Brantford (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-7-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-7-6
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
65 photographs : b&w and col. (tiff)
Date
1948-1964
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Gary Wagman and his family. Included are: 65 photographs of the Gold-Wagman family. 28 of the photographs were taken at Gary's bar mitzvah party, which was held on 8 March 1964 at the North Bathurst Talmud Torah.
Administrative History
Gary Irving Wagman (1951-) was born 19 March 1951 and is the youngest son of Ann Wagman (née Gold, 1926-2017) and Sollie Wagman (1921-2014). His older brother Howard, known as Hushy (1947-2001), was born 9 October 1947. Gary is the grandson of David and Rose Gold (his maternal grandparents) and Celia and Jacob Wagman (his paternal grandparents).
Photo Caption (027): Gary Wagman holding chumash given to him by his grandmother, 8 Mar. 1964. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-7-6.
Photo Caption (017): Gary Wagman swinging baseball bat, 1964. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-7-6.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIALS: Other records relating to the Wagman family can be found in Accessions 2009-11-1 and 2017-8-13.
Subjects
Bar mitzvah
Families
Name Access
North Bathurst Talmud Torah
Wagman family
Wagman, Gary, 1951-
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-8-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-8-13
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
object
Physical Description
45 photographs (tif) : b&w and col.
2 objects : 7 x 38 or smaller
Date
[192-?]-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Gary Wagman and his family. Included are: a commemorative key commemorating the grand opening of the Apter Centre on 13 Mar. 1949, a key to the Apter Centre, and 45 photographs in TIF format. The photographs are largely of members of the extended Gold-Wagman family including Gary Wagman, Gary's brother Howard "Hushy" Wagman, Gary's mother Ann Wagman (née Gold), and Gary's father Sollie Wagman along with various cousins, grandparents, aunts and uncles. The photographs also depict several unidentified individuals who may be related to Gary.
Photo Caption (007): Ann Gold, [194-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-8-11.
Photo Caption (008): Jack Gold with friends, [194-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-8-11.
Photo Caption (010): Howard “Hushy” Wagman and Gary Wagman waiting for their grandparents at Union Station, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, [195-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-8-11.
Photo Caption (013): Leonard Walker, Mrs. Leonard Walker, Bryan Davidson, Rosalie, Charles Davidson, Aaron Miller, and Marry Miller (née Davidson), [197-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-8-11.
Photo Caption (014): Ann Gold, [193-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-8-11.
Administrative History
Gary Irving Wagman (1951-) was born 19 March 1951 and is the youngest son of Ann Wagman (née Gold, 1926-2017) and Sollie Wagman (1921-2014). His older brother Howard, known as Hushy (1947-2001), was born 9 October 1947. Gary is the grandson of David and Rose Gold (his maternal grandparents) and Celia and Jacob Wagman (his paternal grandparents).
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIALS: Other records relating to the Wagman family can be found in Accessions 2009-11-1 and 2017-7-6.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Apter Friendly Society (Toronto, Ont.)
Gold family
Wagman, Gary, 1951-
Wagman family
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-2-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-2-8
Material Format
moving images (electronic)
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 video recording : (mov)
6 photographs : col. (jpg) ;
Date
23 Oct. 2017
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a video recording of a speech written and presented by Gloria Roden. She presented the early history of National Council of Jewish Women, (1897-1957) at a Government of Canada ceremony in which NCJW’s Council House, formerly located at 44 St. George Street, Toronto, was designated an institution of national historic significance by Parks Canada Historic Sites and Monuments Board. The event took place at Council House, 4700 Bathurst Street on October 23, 2017. In addition, there are several photos of Gloria Roden, along with NCJW representatives and government officials with a commemorative plaque to be installed at 44 St. George Street.
Administrative History
Gloria Roden is a a second generation volunteer council member.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Name Access
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-4-14
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-4-14
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
34 photographs (tif) : col. and b&w
Date
[1952]-1989
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs belonging to Lea Garvin depicting her home in Montreal that she shared with her parents and sister, travel in the Laurentian Mountains, her work as a practical nurse with the Red Cross, her move to Toronto and celebrating her mother Yolanda's 100th birthday at Baycrest.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Families
Places
Montréal (Québec)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-5-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-5-8
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
moving images
Physical Description
42 cm of textual records
ca. 400 photographs (jpg)
2 optical discs
Date
2009-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Kulanu Toronto, the city's main Jewish LGBTQ+ social, educational, and cultural group. Included are: 209 photographs of Kulanu Toronto at the 2013 Pride parade; 194 photographs of the World Congress of GLBT Jews held in Winnipeg in 2013; newspaper clippings documenting various activities and initiatives of Kulanu Toronto including its opposition to the presence of the Queers Against Israeli Apartheid (QuAII) group at Pride; material pertaining to the Eighteen: 22 LGBTQ Jewish gathering in Salzburg, Austria; and copies of two Martin Gladstone documentaries, Reclaiming Our Pride and Why is it Hate?
Administrative History
Kulanu Toronto was founded in 2000. It incorporated as a not-for-profit in 2014. Following its dissolution in 2018, some of its functions were taken over by the Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre LGBTQ Initiative.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the donor prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Gay pride parades
Jewish sexual minorities
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Kulanu Toronto
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-5-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-5-12
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
2 photographs (jpeg)
Date
[201-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two photographs taken of Les Singer and Margaret Singer at a Pride parade in the 2010s. They are holding Kulanu Toronto signs in both photographs.
Photo Caption (001): Les Singer and Margaret Singer, [201-]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-5-12.
Photo Caption (002): Margaret Singer with sign, [201-]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-5-12.
Subjects
Gay pride parades
Name Access
Kulanu Toronto
Singer, Les
Singer, Margaret
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-6-21 [Processed]
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-6-21 [Processed]
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
13 cm of textual records
Date
1982-1989
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Cantor Harold Klein and Rabbi Stuart Rosenberg. Cantor Klein's records include sound recordings and sheet music. Rabbi Rosenberg's records include certificates of conversion, divorce, and marriage; counselling and pastoral cards; decree absolutes; a letter to Mr. A. Copnick from Garry Goldberg regarding a "Burn the Mortgage Campaign" (the letter includes a note to the rabbi); a letter Rabbi Rosenberg from Rabbi Bernard Baskin; and wedding record cards.
Custodial History
6/25/2018: Rabbi Yossi Sapirman of Beth Torah Congregation donated the records to the Ontario Jewish Archives.
Administrative History
Cantor Harold Klein was the chazzan of the Shaarei Shomayim Congregation in Toronto. Cantor Klein was a classmate, and then later a student for many years, of Professor Noach Schall of Yeshiva University.
Rabbi Stuart E. Rosenberg led Beth Torah Congregation for nine years. Prior to that, he was senior rabbi for seventeen years at Beth Tzedic, the largest Conservative congregation in Canada.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Cantors (Judaism)
Rabbis
Name Access
Klein, Harold
Rosenberg, Stuart E
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-12
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
450 cm of textual records and other material
ca. 350 audio cassettes
164 audio discs : vinyl
Date
[19--]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Cantor Harold Klein. Included are audio recordings that belonged to Klein, sheet music, and other textual records.
Administrative History
Cantor Harold Klein was born in Borough Park, Brooklyn in 1929. The child of eastern European immigrants, Klein was the second of three sons. When he was four, the family moved to Williamsburg. It was there that he attended yeshiva.
As a child, Klein was inspired by Rabbi Levi Greenwald, Rabbi Dovid Rabinowitz, and Earl Spero to pursue his vocation as a cantor. He studied with Cantor Noah Schall and [Frederick?] Pugel. In a 1984 interview with author Mark Slobin, Klein credited both with his later success.
In the course of his career, Klein sung for several congregations. The first was Sutton Place Synagogue, aka the U.N. Synagogue, where he introduced congregational singing. In 1968, he moved to Toronto and became cantor at Beth Emeth Bais Yehuda Synagogue. After several years at Beth Emeth, he went to Shaarei Shomayim, where he sung for many years.
In addition to regular singing, Klein occupied a number of important posts within the cantorial community. In the 1970s, he was elected to the executive council of the Cantors Assembly of America. At the time he was elected, Klein was serving as the president of the Toronto Council of Hazzanim.
Klein was also a published author. After a friend encouraged him to write a songbook, he formed Mydas Music Company, which published his Let's Sing and Daven songbook in 1985. The songbook, which was accompanied by a ninety-minute cassette of Klein singing to piano accompaniment, won praise from a number of cantors. A sequel, Let's Sing and Celebrate,was released in 1987.
In 1988, the Cantors Institute of the Jewish Theological Seminary inducted Klein as one of its honourary fellows.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Cantors (Judaism)
Music by Jewish composers
Synagogue music
Name Access
Klein, Harold
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-8-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-8-7
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
graphic material
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
108 GB of graphic records (electronic) and other material
17 photographs : col. ; 54 x 44 cm or smaller
Date
2015-2018
Scope and Content
Accession consists of primarily graphic material documenting Victor Helfand's Women of the Bimah photograph series.
Included are: 395 photographs taken at First Narayever Congregation in Toronto, Ontario; 146 photographs taken at Temple Beth Shalom in Miami Beach, Florida; 142 photographs taken at City Shul in Toronto, Ontario; 135 photographs taken at Sukkat Schalom in Berlin, Germany; 118 photographs taken at Temple Sinai in Toronto, Ontario; 114 photographs taken at Congregation Kehillath Israel in Brookline, Massachusetts; 109 photographs taken at Holy Blossom Temple in Toronto, Ontario; 97 photographs taken at Har Tikvah in Brampton, Ontario; 96 photographs taken at SAJ in New York City; 69 photographs of the Beth Chaverim Synagogue in Toronto, Ontario; 63 photographs taken at the Harlow Jewish Community in Harlow, England; 60 photographs taken at Temple Emanu-El-Beth Sholom in Montreal, Quebec; 56 photographs taken at Temple B'nai Brith in Somerville, Massachusetts; 53 photographs taken at Temple Beth Am in Pinecrest, Florida; 51 photographs taken at Leo Baeck College in London, England; 44 photographs taken of the West End Synagogue in New York, New York; 43 photographs taken at Hebrew College in Newton, Massachusetts; 36 photographs taken at Temple Judea in Coral Gables, Florida; 27 photographs taken at Temple Beth Zion in Brookline, Massachusetts; and 6 photographs taken at Shir Libeynu in Toronto, Ontario.
Individuals identified in the photographs include: Rabbi Jaime Aklepi, Rabbi Rena Arshinoff, Cantor Ellen Band, Marcia Beck, Deb Bennett, Liz Bohnen, Sarah Colman, Miriam Diamon, Francine Dick, Tali Elkin, Brenda Enchin, Karen Fainman, Shirley Gabriel, Lori Gershon, Julia Gluck, Elaine Gold, Rabbi Elyse Goldstein, Rabbi Rachel Greengrass, Cantor Esther Hirsch, Elsie Howard, Rabbi Eliana Jacobowitz, Jill Kamin, Rabbi Judith Kempler, Rabbi Claudia Kreiman, Esther Kirshenblatt, Lilli Little, Dahlia Margalit-Faircloth, Michale Al Er, Rabbi Andreas Nachama, Laraine Naft, Cantor Rachelle Nelson, Marlene Orenbach, Aviva Philipp-Muller, Medina Robbins, Diane Saxe, Rona Sherebrin,Valerie Simmons, Sylvia Soicher, Sylvia Solomon, Sarah Tessis, Shirly Train, Jean Wodnicki,
Administrative History
Victor Helfand was born in Toronto at the old Mount Sinai Hospital on Yorkville Avenue. His early life was spent in the same city. Around the time he was twenty, he travelled through Europe and North Africa. He also spent six months at Ma’abarot, a kibbutz in central Israel. After returning to Canada, Helfand spent part of the 1970s in Powassan, near North Bay. Thereafter, he returned to Toronto, where he has lived since.
Helfand earned an honours degree in political science and economics from University of Toronto. In his late thirties/early forties, he returned to the university to earn a master’s degree in urban planning. Professionally, Helfand has made his living as an entrepreneur, initially in urban planning and more recently in e-commerce.
Helfand started photographing in 1968. His exhibitions include: Perspective (1971), Salon (2012 and 2014), Marriage Bureau (2013), 3 Generations (2015), Powassan in the 70's: Back to the Land (2015 and 2017), Group Show (2015), and Women of the Bimah (2017). His work has been exhibited in North Bay at the W.K.P. Gallery and the White Water Gallery (WWG) and in Toronto at the Deer Park Gallery, Gallery 44, Gallery Hui, and the Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre. It has been featured as part of the Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival in 2013, 2015, and 2017.
Helfand married and has three children.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Location of originals: External hard drive containing born-digital records is with the donor.
Subjects
Photographers
Synagogues
Women in Judaism
Name Access
Helfand, Victor
Places
Berlin (Germany)
Boston (Mass.)
Brampton (Ont.)
Brookline (Mass.)
Chicago (Ill.)
Harlow (England)
London (England)
Miami Beach (Fla.)
Montréal (Québec)
New York (N.Y.).
Palm Beach (Fla.)
Pinecrest (Fla.)
Somerville (Mass.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-8-19
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-8-19
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records and other material
4 audio cassettes
2 videocassettes
1 optical disc
Date
1991-2008
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting J. B. Salsberg. Included are: tributes to him on his ninetieth birthday, his death in 1998, and the ten-year anniversary of his death in 2008. These include descriptions of his accomplishments and recorded interviews, including transcripts, with a number of his colleagues and friends. Included also are five microcassettes of interviews held in June 1991 with Norman Penner, Harry Simon (two tapes), Morris Biderman, Bob Nixon, and Ethel Harris.
Administrative History
Joseph Baruch Salsberg (1902-1998) was a labour leader, political activist, politician, insurance salesman, and journalist. He was also active in various Jewish organizations, including: the Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC), the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto, and the New Fraternal Jewish Association. He is well-remembered by contemporaries, such as Sam Lipshitz, as a “champion of the people”, committed to social justice, the plight of the working class, and the preservation of Jewish culture.
J. B. was born in Lagov, Poland on November 5, 1902 to Abraham and Sarah-Gittel Salsberg. Abraham immigrated to Toronto in 1910 and J. B. followed with his mother and two younger sisters in 1913. They settled at 73 Cecil Street. Abraham and Sarah-Gittel had additional children in Canada: Nathan (b. 1915), Reuven (Bob or Robert, b. 1917), Betty, and Thelma. Abraham worked as a peddler in Toronto.
J. B. briefly attended Landsdowne Public School, but dropped out around 1915, against his parents' wishes, and took a job in a leather goods factory to contribute to his family’s income. J. B.’s parents had hoped he would become a rabbi and, despite his full-time employment, J.B. continued to study the Torah with scholars at the synagogue on Centre Avenue.
In 1917, J. B. decided to pursue the ideas of Zionism and socialism and, abandoning his plans to become a rabbi, became involved in establishing the Young Poale Zion organization, a Labour Zionist youth group dedicated to secular aims. Around 1922, J. B. was made secretary general of the Young Poale Zion of America in New York, where he worked for one year. Shortly after returning to Toronto, he became the organizer for the Hat, Cap, and Millinery Workers Union of North America in Chicago. J. B. married Dora Wilensky in 1927.
In 1926, J. B. joined the Communist Party of Canada (CPC). He was an active member of the CPC for 30 years, serving as the head of its Trade Union Department for two decades. In 1929 he was suspended from the party for one year as a dissenter. In 1932, he became the Southern Ontario District union organizer for the Communist Workers' Unity League.
It was as a member of the CPC that J. B. entered electoral politics. After a series of failed bids in municipal and provincial elections between 1935 and 1937, J. B. was elected alderman of Ward 4 in Toronto in 1938. He only held the position for one year. In 1943, J. B. was elected to the Ontario Legislature as the representative for the St. Andrew riding. J. B. sat as Member of Provincial Parliament for the Labor-Progressive Party (the provincial wing of the CPC) for 12 years. For several years, he was the only elected Communist in North America. As MPP, he helped create legislation banning discrimination in public places and introduced a bill that would ensure fair employment practices in the province. He lost his seat to Allan Grossman in 1955 and unsuccessfully ran in the federal election later that year. Remembered by journalist Gordon Sinclair as “one of the best debaters in the house”, J. B. was well-respected by members of all political parties. Out of admiration for J. B., Conservative Premier Leslie Frost named Salsberg Township in Northern Ontario in his honour.
Throughout the 1930s and 1940s, J. B. had grown increasingly concerned about reports of Soviet antisemitism and privately urged party leaders to pursue the issue. In 1956, when Soviet First Secretary Nikita Khrushchev exposed the transgressions of Stalin’s regime, J. B. went to Moscow as part of a CPC delegation. After meeting with Khrushchev himself, it became clear to J. B. that antisemitism was indeed a problem in the USSR and that his efforts to probe the situation were being stonewalled.
J. B. publicly expressed his concerns about Soviet antisemitism in a series of articles published in the Vochenblatt from October 25, 1956 to December 13, 1956. He finally left the Communist Party in 1957. However, he remained a member of the United Jewish People’s Order (UJPO), a Communist Jewish fraternal organization.
Entering the business world, J. B. established the Model Insurance Agency Limited in 1957, where he served as president for several years. In 1959 J. B.’s wife, Dora, passed away. Around this time J. B. also resigned from the UJPO, along with other members who felt the organization needed to be more critical of the Soviet Union. They founded an alternative, non-Communist left-wing Jewish organization, the New Fraternal Jewish Association, where J. B. served as president for several terms and edited its publication “Fraternally Yours”.
In his later life, J. B. was active as an executive member of organizations, such as the CJC and the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care. He was the first chairman for the CJC Ontario Region’s Soviet Jewry Committee and the Committee for Yiddish. He also began writing an award-winning weekly column for the Canadian Jewish News. J. B. was awarded the CJC’s Samuel Bronfman Medal for distinguished service, and the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto’s Ben Sadowski Award of Merit. A strong supporter of Israel, he was involved in the creation of two Israeli medical centres that are named in his honour. He also helped establish the J. B. and Dora Salsberg Fund and the J. B. Salsberg Fund for Yiddish at the Jewish Foundation of Greater Toronto. J. B. passed away in 1998.
Subjects
Labor leaders
Politicians
Name Access
Salsberg, J. B. (Joseph B.), ca. 1903-1998
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-9-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-9-1
Material Format
textual record (electronic)
graphic material (electronic)
moving images (electronic)
Physical Description
ca. 2.26 GB of textual records and other material
Date
2007-2018
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Kulanu Toronto. Included are: meeting minutes, budgets, photographs, videos, Pride materials, and a copy of the letters patent incorporating Kulanu Toronto.
Custodial History
Former executive director Justine Apple kept the records on a USB flash drive. In September 2018, she transferred copies of the records to a computer belonging to the Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre.
Administrative History
Kulanu Toronto was founded in 2000. It incorporated as a not-for-profit in 2014. Following its dissolution in 2018, some of its functions were taken over by the Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre LGBTQ Initiative.
Use Conditions
Conditional Access. Researchers must receive permission from the donor prior to accessing the records. Please contact the OJA for more information.
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Gay pride parades
Jewish sexual minorities
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Kulanu Toronto
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-9-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-9-6
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
41 photographs : b&w and col.
1 folder of textual records
1 photo album
Date
1953-1990, 2010
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Pearl Mekler, her family, and her involvement in several Jewish organizations including Na'amat Canada and Bialik Hebrew Day School.
Included are: 41 photographs dating from Pearl's time with Na'amat Canada, 1 photo album that was given to Pearl by Marianne Ross, formerly of Vancouver Na'amat Pioneer Women; which features photographs of Na'amat Pioneer Women; a farewell letter to the Masada Club in Vancouver from the same; a DVD copy of a DVD recording titled Recalling the History of Bialik Hebrew Day School with Pearl Mekler (9 min 36 sec), a DVD produced by Na'amat Canada (Toronto) containing a Masada tribute video (25 min 54 sec) and photo archive, and an mp3 copy of a CD recording of the Freeman seder in 1970. The latter features the donor's father, Abraham Freeman, and two uncles, Israel and Harry, singing at the Pesach seder in 1970. It was recorded at the donor's apartment on Spadina Road.
Administrative History
Pearl Mekler was president of Na'amat Canada from 1981-1984. She and her husband, Peter, had three children: Mimi, Alan, and Jay. Pearl died on February 4, 2019.
Marianne Ross was involved with Vancouver Na'amat Pioneer Women before moving to Toronto. She died on 13 February 2018.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Location of originals: USB flash drive, from which an mp4 copy of the Living History interview was made, is held by the donor. DVD of the Bialik Hebrew Day School, from which a DVD copy was made, is held by the donor.
General: A pdf copy of the booklet that came with the Freeman seder CD was made. The latter provides information about who sang at the seder.
Subjects
Charities
Families
Israel
Name Access
Mekler, Pearl
Na’amat Canada
Ross, Marianne
Places
Karmi'el (Israel)
Petah Tikva (Israel)
Toronto (Ont.)
United States
Vancouver (B.C.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-11-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-11-5
Material Format
textual record
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
7 cm of textual records
285 MB of photographs and textual records
Date
[201-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the From Latkes to Laffa exhibition that was held at Beth Tzedec Congregation in 2017. Included are textual records organized into the following files: Planning, Introduction, The Ward, Kensington, Eglinton, Dairy/bagels, Delis, Kosher, and New trends. There are two additional files without names that contain additional material related to the exhibition. Also included are electronic records, primarily graphic, that relate to the exhibition. The latter have been organized into two folders: Photographs and USB.
Administrative History
From Latkes to Laffas was an exhibition at Beth Tzedec Congregation's Reuben & Helene Dennis Museum that explored the history of Toronto's Jewish restaurants. The exhibition opened on Wednesday the 6 September 2017.
Descriptive Notes
Source of supplied title proper: Title based on a label on the side of the binder.
Subjects
Ethnic restaurants
Name Access
Beth Tzedec Congregation (Toronto, Ont.)
Rothstein, Gella
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-7-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-7-5
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
45 cm of textual records (6 vol.)
ca. 1000 photographs : b&w and col. ; 25 x 20 cm or smaller
5 drawings
2 ribbons
Date
1976-2007
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs and textual records that document the activities of the General Wingate Branch 256 from 1976-2007. Also included in the accession are 6 albums dated 1976, 1984, 1985-1986, 1998-2002, 2002-2004, and 2002-2007.
The album for 1976 consists of material related to the First World Assembly of Jewish War Veterans held in Jerusalem. Included are photographs, correspondence, a contact list for branch officers, executive committee and chaplains for 1976/77, newsclippings and general memorabilia related to the First World Assembly in Israel. Of note is a photograph of Moshe Dayan at a lecture of the First World Assembly and of President Ephraim Katzir, Israel's 4th President.
The album for 1984 consists of material related to the unveiling of the Canadian Jewish War Veterans's Cenotaph at Mt. Sinai Cemetery, Toronto. Included are photographs of the Cenotaph, Mt. Sinai cemetery, the annual Remembrance Day parade, newsclippings, drawings and political cartoons. Of note are letters of congratulations from members of Parliament to the General Wingate Branch for their efforts in making the Cenotaph possible.
The album for 1985-1986 consists of material related to the annual memorial service dedicated to the men and women who lost their lives in World War II and in particular the 430 Jewish men and women slain in the Canadian Forces. Included are photographs and newsclippings related to the annual memorial service at Mt. Sinai cemetery, Remembrance Day parade and fundraising events.
The album for 1998-2002 consists of material related to the memorial service dedicated to 50th anniversary of the end of WWII. Included are photographs of the memorial service, articles related the Wingate Branch donations to Baycrest and Sunnybrook Hospitals, the CNE Warrior Day parade, the annual Veterans' seder and poppy campaign and the Jewish military exhibit held at Toronto's Lipa Green Building. Of note is a letter from Jean Chretien paying tribute to war veterans.
The album for 2002-2004 consists of material related to the 70th anniversary of the General Wingate Branch 256. Included is a 70th anniversary commemorative soft cover booklet, photographs, newsclippings, general meeting newsletters, correspondence, letters from members of Parliament and the 2004-2005 report to the community.
The album for 2002-2007 consists of material relating to the Wingate Branch annual memorial services held at Mt. Sinai cemetery. Included are photographs of the annual memorial services, community and fundraising events, newsclippings concerning the diminishing membership of the Canadian Legion, letters from members of Parliament, a Portraits of Bravery: Canadian Jewish War Veterans brochure and photo negatives of 2003-2006 events.
Administrative History
The Jewish Brigade was a member of the Great War Association in the 1920s. After its first president was installed in the early 1930s, the Royal Canadian Legion granted a charter for a Jewish Veteran’s Branch. The brigade was renamed the General Wingate Branch in the mid-1940s after the British army officer Major General Orde Charles Wingate, D.S.O. Although Major Wingate was not Jewish, he was a passionate Zionist. At first, the branch met at a veteran’s hall at Crawford and College Street in Toronto, but later purchased its own house at 1610 Bathurst Street. In 1968, the branch moved to Eglinton Avenue West. It is currently located at the Zionist Centre on Marlee Avenue. The Branch holds an annual memorial march and service at the Mt. Sinai Cemetery where there stands a Cenotaph funded and maintained by the branch. The Cenotaph memorializes Jewish servicemen who died and are buried overseas, as well as those who fought in Israel's War of Independence and partisans who fought the Nazis. Once a year veterans distribute poppies and the funds raised are disbursed to assist veterans and their families, hospitals, medical research and charitable causes in the community. In 2018, after more than eight decades of operation Toronto's General Wingate Branch 256 of the Royal Canadian Legion voted to close its doors and give up its charter.
Subjects
Veterans--Canada
Name Access
Royal Canadian Legion. General Wingate Branch 256
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-5-14
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-5-14
Material Format
textual record
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 bound portfolio
Date
2015
Scope and Content
Item is a bound portfolio containing a photograph and the story of the Lagover Mutual Benefit Society.
Subjects
Fraternal organizations
Name Access
Lagover Mutual Benefit Society
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-6-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-6-5
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
4 m of textual records and other material
Date
[194-]-2017
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records, photographs, sound recordings, moving images, and several felt badges and crests. The textual records include strategic planning documents, pedagogical and curriculum documents, meeting minutes, capital planning documents, fundraising records, school yearbooks, graduation programs, newsletters to parents and internal newsletters, and other operational documents. Photographs document the building and classrooms; school classes; sports teams; class outings; special guests; Jewish holiday celebrations; and Bialik groundbreakings, galas, and anniversary celebrations. The audio recordings include the school choir and an interview with Pearl Meckler. Moving images include graduations.
Custodial History
Records were stored in the Viewmount location. A committee of past alumni and parents formed to sort the archival material in preparation for donation to the OJA.
Administrative History
Bialik Hebrew Day School was established by the Labour Zionist Alliance, which also operated the Farband Folks Shule and The Borochov School. In the 1950s, the Labour Zionist Alliance sold its property on Cecil Street in order to finance the purchase of the 12 Viewmount Avenue, which housed both the offices of the Labour Zionist Alliance and Bialik Hebrew Day School. The school was intended to fill a gap in Jewish education in Toronto, namely by teaching Yiddish as well as Hebrew and by promoting Zionism. The school was named for Chaim Nachman Bialik, Israel’s national poet.
Bialik Hebrew Day School began with 29 pre-school and first grade students in 1961, and by the mid-2000s had grown to over 800 students in kindergarten through grade 8. Several renovations and expansions took place over the intervening decades, and in 2003 a new school was opened at 2760 Bathurst Street. In 2013, the school opened a northern campus (Bialik North, or the Ben and Edith Himel Education Centre) on the Joseph & Wolf Lebovic Jewish Community Campus in Vaughan to serve students in the York Region.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION NOTE: Includes ca. 1000 photographs, sound recordings, moving images, and several objects.
Subjects
Education
Jewish day schools
Name Access
Bialik Hebrew Day School
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-6-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-6-7
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
48 photographs (jpg) : col.
1 photograph (png) : col.
Date
[Downloaded 2019]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of forty-nine photographs taken at the 2017 Pride Parade in Toronto. Rafi Yablonsky, the donor of the photographs, is visible in many of the pictures.
Administrative History
As of June 2019, Rashi Yablonsky was campaign director at the Jewish National Fund of Canada.
Subjects
Gay Pride Day
Jewish sexual minorities
Parades
Name Access
Yablonsky, Rafi
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-3-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-3-12
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
2 folders of textual records
7 photographs : col
2 photographs : b&w
Date
1949-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Miriam Beckerman's work as a translator. Included are correspondence, English translations with corresponding Yiddish texts, awards, and some promotional materials relating to published translations. Also included are several photographs of Miriam.
Subjects
Yiddish language
Yiddish literature
Name Access
Beckerman, Miriam
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Koffler Centre of the Arts fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 100
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Koffler Centre of the Arts fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
100
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1967-2013
Physical Description
1.9 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
The Koffler Centre of the Arts was established in 1977, as part of the Bathurst Jewish Community Centre at Bathurst Street and Sheppard Avenue, to enrich the cultural life of Toronto through arts education and exhibitions. The Koffler exists to encourage and develop the creative and artistic potential of the diverse community it serves. The Koffler Gallery as a public gallery and member of the Ontario Association of Art Galleries exhibits, interprets, and documents works of excellence in the visual arts with a focus on contemporary Canadian art, including the work of visual artists, emerging artists, and programming of special interest in the Jewish community.
The Koffler has offered an array of programmatic, education, and learning programs, including national and international art exhibitions, educational tours, and workshops, literary arts programs, art classes, lectures, concerts, film screenings, and theatre performances. The Koffler has also served public and private school students and their teachers through Koffler Gallery exhibition tours and workshops.
The Koffler Centre is governed by an executive board and standing and ad-hoc committees and is funded by endowments, donations, and sponsorhips as its primary sources of funding. The Koffler also receives annual operating support from the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto and all levels of government, including the City of Toronto, the Ontario Arts Council, and the Canada Council. The staff consists of an executive director, curators, and administrative support staff.
In 2013, after five years of off-site programs, the Koffler Centre of the Arts opened its administrative offices and the new Koffler Gallery at Artscape Youngplace on Shaw Street in downtown Toronto. The Artscape Youngplace facilities showcase Koffler Gallery exhibitions, public programs, and expanded school and education programs, as well as Koffler cross-disciplinary programs: literary events, theatre readings and performances, concerts, workshops, and more.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the activities and functions of the Koffler Centre of the Arts and its role in bringing Jewish-inspired visual, dance, dramatic and musical arts to the community. Included are records related to its board of directors and committees, its former affiliation with the Bathurst Jewish Community Centre and the YM-YWHA, building campaigns, financial operations, art exhibitions, the Jewish Book Fair and Bookmark Project, educational programming, performances, and special events. Records include meeting minutes, memoranda, correspondence, committee reports, budget and financial statements, press clippings and reviews, program guides, art exhibition catalogues, artist statements and CVs, promotional material, photographs, architectural drawings, a sound recording, and moving images. The fonds is arranged into the following ten series: Board of directors, Committees, Planning and development, Financial and administrative, Public relations, Educational programming, Book fair, Art exhibitions, Performances and events, and the Bookmark Project.
Notes
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION NOTE: Includes 672 photographs, 3 architectural drawings, 1 sound recording, and 7 moving images.
Name Access
Koffler Centre of the Arts
Subjects
Art centers
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Bella Diamant fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 117
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Bella Diamant fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
117
Material Format
textual record
graphic material (electronic)
Date
1926-1947
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
11 photographs : b&w and sepia (tiff)
Admin History/Bio
Bella Diamant (m. Hershenhorn) was the daughter of Moishe and Sarah Diamant. She was born in Ostrowiec (Ostrovietz), Poland and had five siblings: Esther, Chaim Myer, David, Baruch, and Ruth. Bella met her future husband, Samuel Hershenhorn, in Poland. He was the son of Mendel and Miriam Hershenhorn from Drildz. The family arrived in Toronto sometime during the early 1920s; Mendel arriving first followed by Miriam and Samuel. The marriage between Bella and Samuel was arranged by their families and so Bella was sent to Toronto to be with him in 1927. They married on 13 Nov. 1927. Together they had three children: Ruth (Rishie), Esti and Lee. Samuel worked for a slipper and spat manufacturer and then started his own company: The Canadian Spat and Slipper Company. He was a member of the Dirildzer Sick Benefit Society. Bella was a housewife. Many of Bella's relatives perished during the Holocaust, including both her parents, her brother David who died with his wife and daughter on a forced march, and her sister Ruth who was murdered by the Nazis alongside her young daughter. Chaim Myer was sent to live with Bella and Samuel in Toronto prior to the onset of the war and therefore survived. Baruch and Esther both survived the Holocaust and eventually moved to New York City.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of letters written to Bella Diamant Hershenhorn from relatives in Poland and Frankfurt. The pre-war letters are from Bella's father Moishe in Poland as well as Bella's sibings and cousins, usually added as additional notes and postscripts onto Moishe's letters. The post-war letters are from Bella's sister Esther and brother Baruch in Frankfurt, who both survived the Holocaust. The letters are written in Yiddish and Polish and have accompanying English translations. Also included are several scanned copies of photographs depicting Bella on the SS Estonia, en route to Canada (ca. 1927), and with various relatives in Poland prior to immigration.
Notes
REPRODUCTION RESTRICTON NOTE: Donor must be notified prior to publication of letters.
Name Access
Hershenhorn, Bella, ca. 1906-1999
Subjects
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Letters
Arrangement
The letters have been arranged chronologically.
Places
Ostrowiec (Sokolów Podlaski, Poland)
Toronto (Ont.)
Frankfurt am Main (Germany)
Accession Number
2016-12-44
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Mimi Wise fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 16; Item 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Mimi Wise fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
16
Item
4
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Date
[ca. 1940]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w (jpg)
Admin History/Bio
Joseph Marin was a founder of the Beach Hebrew Institute and was involved in the Toronto Hebrew Free Loan and Farband.
Scope and Content
This item is an electronic copy photograph of a portrait of Joseph Marin.
Name Access
Beach Hebrew Institute (Toronto, Ont.)
Farband
Toronto Hebrew Free Loan
Subjects
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
2006-9-7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 67
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
67
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1936-1991, predominant 1938-1976
Physical Description
10 m of textual records
5541 photographs, 25 x 20 cm and smaller, and other media
Admin History/Bio
The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto was incorporated in Ontario in March 1917 to coordinate the fundraising activities of Jewish charitable, philanthropic, and social service agencies in Toronto. In 1918, ten separate agencies were funded by the FJPT. By 1937, fourteen agencies were funded. The Great Depression of the 1930s and the development of several newer Jewish aid, education, and medical care organizations created both increased need for resources and growing competition for ever-more scarce dollars. Within a very few years this funding crisis forced a major review of the organization.
During 1936 a series of special meetings of leading individuals were held to examine the income and expenditures of all Toronto Jewish agencies and also to speculate about the need for a new Toronto Jewish "Community Chest" as the sole fund-raising organization for a federation of all Jewish agencies including the FJPT. In 1938, the new United Jewish Welfare Fund was formally constituted. Added to the FJPT's previous list of Toronto client agencies in 1938 were: the Canadian Jewish Congress, the Hebrew National Association, the Jewish Immigrant Aid Association, the Mizrachi Society, the Toronto Free Loan Association, the Geverkshaften, and Old Folks Home, and the United Palestine Appeal, raising the total number of agencies to 22.
When the State of Israel was established in 1948, the UJWF's annual fundraising campaign was combined with the CJC's United Palestine appeal to form a new, combined campaign named the United Jewish Appeal (UJA). In 1967, the UJA name was legally changed to the United Jewish Appeal of Metropolitan Toronto.
In mid-1976, the organization's public name was changed to the Toronto Jewish Congress. Although initially thought of as a merger between the UJWF and the CJC, the actual result was the expansion of the UJWF responsibilities to include local education and welfare services previously shared with the Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region. The UJWF, however, remained the legal senior entity.
In 1991 the public name was again changed to the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto and in 1999, to UJA Federation of Greater Toronto. By this date, over 30 beneficiary and affiliated agencies, 49 affiliated schools and five Federation departments were fully or partly funded by the UJA Federation.
In June, 2010, the organization altered its legal structure, with the senior legal entity becoming the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of 25 series: Annual Meetings, Annual Reports, Board of Directors, Constitution Committee, Executive Committee, Officers Committee, Budget and Finance Committee, Administration Committee, Social Planning Committee, Committee on Capital Needs and Planning, Central Committee on Scholarships in Aid, Joint Committee of the BJE and UJWF Study on Jewish Education, Nominations Committee, Pension Fund Committee, Coordinating Committee, Special Ad Hoc and Temporary Committees, Annual Campaign, Client Agencies, Joint Committee of the CJC and the UJWF, Committee on Community Organization, Sub-Committee on Construction and Administration of Community Schools, Joint Committee on Fundraising, Personnel Committee, Community Leadership Development Council, and Israel at Fifty Community Celebration.
Over 4500 photographs and a variety of other media are managed within Series 17, Campaign records.
Notes
For exact details about the contents of individual series and sub-series, please review their scope and contents notes.
Name Access
United Jewish Welfare Fund
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto
United Jewish Appeal
Toronto Jewish Congress
Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Subjects
Charities
Fund raising
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
For records of the predecessor of the UJWF, see Fonds 66, the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds.
Further detailed documentation of the proposed merger between the UJWF and the CJC (creation of the TJC) may be found in Fonds 67, Sub-sub-series 5-5-1, Files 171 and 221.
Further documentation on the United Jewish Welfare Fund may be found within Fonds 9, Series 7, records of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society.
For further detailed records of a key community leader's involvement with the UJWF see Accession 1982-8-8, the records of Samuel Godfrey, 1943-1972.
Creator
United Jewish Welfare Fund (1938-)
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 61
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
61
Material Format
multiple media
Date
[ca. 1920]-1994
Physical Description
3 m of textual records (19 v.) and other material
Admin History/Bio
The Schwartz-Reisman Jewish Community Centre, the Prosserman Jewish Community Centre (formerly the Bathurst Jewish Community Centre or BJCC) and the Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre (MNJCC) in Toronto are the current incarnations of what began, in 1919, as the Hebrew Association of Young Men's and Young Women's Clubs, later known as the Young Men's and Young Women's Hebrew Association of Toronto (Y.M.-Y.W.H.A.). The Y.M.-Y.W.H.A., in turn, began as a merger between several other small athletic clubs operating in the city. The original mandate was strictly athletic, but soon broadened to include other areas of interest, in order to provide a sense of Jewish identity and camaraderie through physical, educational, cultural and community based programming. During the 1920s, the 'Y' became known simply as the Young Men’s Hebrew Association (Y.M.H.A.) – the name under which it was incorporated in 1930.
For close to two decades, the ‘Y’ had rented rooms in the Brunswick Avenue and College Street area, including the basement facilities of the Brunswick Avenue Talmud Torah. By the mid-1930s, these facilities were overcrowded and unable to support the growing membership, particularly when the young women’s programming was reintroduced in 1936.
As a result, in 1937, the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. constructed its own athletic building at 15 Brunswick Avenue, next door to the Talmud Torah, to ease the overcrowding. However, the ‘Y’ still had to make use of five scattered buildings to meet its needs, including the Central Y.M.C.A. gym for its basketball teams. The early ‘Y’ was staffed by volunteers who were granted free memberships in exchange for their time and expertise.
On 3 February 1953, a new Jewish Community Centre was dedicated at the corner of Bloor Street and Spadina Avenue. By the end of the 1950s, the ‘Y’ was providing services for all ages, ranging from a nursery school to their Good Age Club for seniors.
As the Jewish community moved northward, so too did the ‘Y’, with the dedication of a new northern branch on 1 May 1961. This new branch, located at Bathurst Street and Sheppard Avenue, was created in order to address the athletic, educational, cultural and community needs of the expanding Jewish community in the north end of the city. Fourteen years later, an improved cultural and physical education wing was added as part of the completion campaign. This included the addition of the Leah Posluns Theatre and the Murray Koffler Centre of the Arts. In 1978, the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. changed its name to the Jewish Community Centre of Toronto, in order to better reflect its broader role in the community. A new Northeast Valley branch was also established in Thornhill in the early 1980s and later closed in the late 1990s.
In 1994, the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto took over the operation of the northern branch, due to financial difficulties. At this point, all three branches became independent of one another and were no longer constituted as the Jewish Community Centre of Toronto. They each had independent boards of directors, while still receiving some of their operating funds from the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto.
Scope and Content
This fonds consists of the records created and accumulated by the Jewish Community Centre of Toronto -- which included the Bloor branch and the northern Bathurst Jewish Community Centre -- and its predecessor, the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. The records include textual records maintained by the office of the executive director, financial reports, architectural plans, Y-Times newsletters, program material, photographs and oral histories.
The records have been arranged into the following series: Executive director, Jewish Community Centre Archives Committee, Publication Committee, Communications Department, Sports Celebrity Dinner, and Combined Building Campaign Committee.
Notes
Includes 2539 photographs, 42 drawings, 13 sound recordings, 4 artifacts and 2 posters.
Name Access
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto
Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre
Subjects
Community centers
Related Material
See photo #2369-2646, 3412, 3519, 3804, 4201, 5004, 6125, accession #1986-7-8, MG2 N1a
Creator
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
2004-6-6
2004-5-13
2004-5-2
1988-11-7
1988-4-9
1984-7-2
1983-12-1
1982-12-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
31 records – page 1 of 1.

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