Search Results

New Search Photo Search Audiovisual Search
312 records – page 1 of 7.
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Refusnik cases sub-series
Reference publications sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
3-6-3
File
2
Material Format
text
Responsibility
Written and edited by Judith Matz and Margery Sanford ; coordinated by Tina Freiman and Myriam Wolf ; translation by Irving Dalin
Date
Aug. 1976
Physical Description
1 v. : unbound
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Refusnik cases sub-series
Reference publications sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
3-6-3
File
3
Material Format
text
Responsibility
Myriam P. Wolf, Tina Freiman, Judith Matz and Margery Sanford ; translation by Irving Dalin
Date
Mar. 1977
Physical Description
1 v. : unbound
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Refusnik cases sub-series
Reference publications sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
3-6-3
File
4
Material Format
text
Responsibility
Margery Sanford Myriam P. Wolf and Judith Matz ; introduction by Alexander Lerner ; translation by Irving Dalin
Date
Oct. 1977
Physical Description
1 v. : unbound
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Refusnik cases sub-series
Reference publications sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
3-6-3
File
5
Material Format
text
Responsibility
Margery Sanford, Myriam P. Wolf and Judith Matz ; introduction by Dante B. Fascell ; translation by Irving Dalin
Date
Aug. 1978
Physical Description
1 v. : unbound
Subjects
Antisemitism--Soviet Union
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Refusnik cases sub-series
Reference publications sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
3-6-3
File
6
Material Format
text
Responsibility
Margery Sanford, Adele Sandberg and Myriam P. Wolf ; translation by Irving Dalin
Date
Aug. 1979
Physical Description
1 v. : unbound
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Refusnik cases sub-series
Reference publications sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
3-6-3
File
7
Material Format
text
Responsibility
Margery Sanford and Adele Sandberg ; translation by Irving Dalin
Date
Oct. 1980
Physical Description
1 v. : unbound
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Refusnik cases sub-series
Reference publications sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
3-6-3
File
8
Material Format
text
Responsibility
Adele E. Sandberg, Margery Sanford and Myriam P. Wolf ; translation by Irving Dalin
Date
Sept. 1981
Physical Description
1 v. : unbound
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Refusnik cases sub-series
Reference publications sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
3-6-3
File
9
Material Format
text
Responsibility
Adele E. Sandberg, Margery Sanford and Myriam P. Wolf ; translation by Irving Dalin
Date
Sept. 1982
Physical Description
1 v. : unbound
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Refusnik cases sub-series
Reference publications sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
3-6-3
File
10
Material Format
text
Responsibility
Adele E. Sandberg and Margery Sanford ; introduction by Martin Gilbert ; translation by Irving Dalin
Date
Sept. 1984
Physical Description
1 v. : unbound
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Refusnik cases sub-series
Reference publications sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
3-6-3
File
11
Material Format
text
Responsibility
Adele E. Sandberg and Margery Sanford ; introduction by Alan Dershowitz ; translation by Irving Dalin
Date
Sept. 1985
Physical Description
1 v. : unbound
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Refusnik cases sub-series
Reference publications sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
3-6-3
File
12
Material Format
text
Responsibility
Adele E. Sandberg and Margery Sanford ; introduction by Elie Wiesel ; translation by Irving Dalin
Date
Sept. 1986
Physical Description
1 v. : unbound
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee meeting agendas, minutes, reports and correspondence series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 1; File 637
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee meeting agendas, minutes, reports and correspondence series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
1
File
637
Material Format
text
Date
1986
Physical Description
1 book : 138 p.
Custodial History
The book came to us from Pat Alpert and was removed from her fonds for integration into this one.
Notes
Canadian Jewish Congress--History
Canadian Jewish Congress--Ontario Region
Creator
Canadian Jewish Congress
Accession Number
2005-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 87
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
87
Material Format
textual record
architectural drawing
Date
1928-1943
Physical Description
67 cm of textual records
1 architectural drawing
Admin History/Bio
Sometime around 1919, the Family Welfare Committee was set up within the newly created Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto (FJPT) to perform social welfare work with Jewish families. Around 1931, the Committee was reorganized as an independent member agency of the FJPT and renamed the Jewish Family Welfare Bureau (JFWB). At the same time, Dora Wilensky (1902-1959), a professionally-trained social worker, was hired as the agency’s executive director. Throughout its existence, most of its funding came from the FJPT (later the United Jewish Welfare Fund).
Located at 179 Beverley Street, the JFWB’s core activities included: relief provision; helping families meet basic needs, such as medical care, heating and clothing; housekeeping assistance; counseling; and case work. The JFWB’s major concerns shifted over time from a rise of immigration and desertion cases in the 1920s to the dramatic increase of wife abuse, suicide, and unemployment cases during the Great Depression of the 1930s. After the outbreak of the Second World War, the JFWB sought ways of assisting soldiers and their families, such as, investigating special government grants to soldiers.
In an attempt to meet community needs, the JFWB initiated various programs, such as a Homemaking Club to teach women house management skills, and a Clothing Centre to provide families with inexpensive household goods. It also partnered with other local Jewish organizations in the early 1940s in the Liaison Project for troubled Jewish youth. In the 1930s, the Jewish Employment Service and Hebrew Free Burial Society became departments of the JFWB and, in 1941, the JFWB began guaranteeing loans for clients through the Hebrew Free Loan Association. In the same year, the Jewish Big Sister Committee became affiliated with the agency and the Jewish Big Brother Movement followed soon after.
In 1936, the JFWB became one of the first unionized social agencies in Canada when it formed the Staff Association with the Jewish Child Welfare Association (JCWA), another member of the FJPT. Although the JFWB’s focus was work with families and the JCWA’s focus was work with children, both agencies found it necessary at times to work with both children and families. In order to prevent service duplication and reduce confusion over casework responsibility, the Joint Application Bureau was set up within the FJPT to review all case work applications and determine the appropriate agency to provide assistance. However, a merger between the agencies was still believed necessary to improve service to the community and ease confusion. Discussions regarding the co-ordination of services between the JCWA and the JFWB began as early as 1935 and in February 1943, the JCWA and JFWB merged to form the Jewish Family and Child Services (JF & CS).
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of textual records and one architectural drawing documenting the programs, operation, finances, and special studies of the Jewish Family Welfare Bureau as well as its relationships with other organizations. Included are reports, meeting notices, agendas and minutes, correspondence, memos, budgets, statistics, theatrical scripts, newsclippings, and one architectural blueprint. A number of the records relate to special short-lived committees and projects that the JFWB participated in with other agencies, such as the Jewish Big Sister Committee, Jewish Big Brother Committee, Jewish Child Welfare Association, the Jewish Community Centre Association, the Young Men's and Women's Hebrew Association, and the Jewish Old Folks' Home.
Records have been arranged into the following 19 series: 1. Board of Directors; 2. Executive Director; 3. Jewish Federation Communal Council; 4. United Jewish Welfare Fund Men's and Women's Service Council; 5. Case Committe; 6. Joint Meetings and Committees; 7. Joint Application Bureau; 8. Homemaking Club; 9. Clothing Centre; 10. Liaison Project; 11. Operational statistics; 12. Finance and accounting; 13. Human Resources; 14. Special projects and studies; 15. Publicity; 16. Liaison with other social welfare organizations; 17. Canadian Association of Social Workers; 18. Welfare Council of Toronto; and, 19. Conferences.
Notes
Associated material note: for related records held at the City of Toronto Archives, see also: Welfare Council of Toronto records in the University Settlement House fonds (fonds 1024, series 658); and, Department of Public Welfare records in the Former City of Toronto fonds (fonds 200).
Name Access
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau
Jewish Community Centre Association
Young Men's-Young Women's Hebrew Athletic Association (Toronto, Ont.) (subject)
Jewish Old Folks Home (Toronto, Ont.)
United Jewish Welfare Fund (Toronto, Ont.) (subject)
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto (subject)
Wilensky, Dora, 1902-1959
Subjects
Charities
Children
Families
Nonprofit organizations
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director and the head of Jewish Family and Child prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
See also: Jewish Child Welfare Association fonds (fonds 86); Jewish Family and Child Services fonds (fonds 79); Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds (fonds 66); and, United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds (fonds 67).
Arrangement
Records relating to programs, committees and liaison with other organizations that continued after the formation of JF & CS are arranged with that fonds.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau fonds
Clothing Centre series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 87; Series 9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau fonds
Clothing Centre series
Level
Series
Fonds
87
Series
9
Material Format
textual record
architectural drawing
Date
1934-1943
Physical Description
6 folders of textual records
1 architectural drawing : blueprint, ms. annotations ; 39 x 48 cm
Admin History/Bio
In the 1930s, the United Welfare Clothing Centre was established to provide clients of the Jewish Family Welfare Bureau, Jewish Big Sisters Committee, Jewish Big Brother Movement, and the JIAS Refugee Establishment Committee with clothing. The Centre’s finances and daily operations were managed by the JFWB’s Clothing Committee; however, other organizations also participated in its operation. For instance, the Rest Home Club collected, sorted and cleaned used clothing, and members of the Community Sewing Centre regularly made clothes for the Centre. The Centre was located at 55 Baldwin Street and likely stopped operating in the early 1940s due to a lack of funds and donations.
Scope and Content
Series consists of textual records and one architectual drawing documenting the renovation and operation of the JFWB's Clothing Centre. Included is correspondence, one blueprint, a building alteration proposal, reports, price lists, inventories, publicity articles and meeting notices, agendas and minutes.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau fonds
Clothing Centre series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 87; Series 9; File 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau fonds
Clothing Centre series
Level
File
Fonds
87
Series
9
File
1
Material Format
textual record
architectural drawing
Date
1934-1936
Physical Description
2 folders of textual records
1 architectural drawing : blueprint, ms. annotations ; 39 x 48 cm
Admin History/Bio
The architectural firm Kaplan & Sprachman was established by Harold S. Kaplan and Abraham Sprachman in 1922. Kaplan & Sprachman were best known for their more than 300 movie theatre projects completed from the 1920s to the 1960s, designing and renovating theatres across Canada in progressive "modern" styles and using innovative building materials. In 1937, they were awarded the bronze medal in the Sixth Biennial Toronto Exhibition for their interiors to the Eglinton Theatre (400 Eglinton Ave. W.) in Toronto, considered to be the finest example of their Art deco design work.
Over the course of their careers, they designed many synagogues for the Jewish community, such as the Anshei Minsk and Shaarei Shomayim synagogues in Toronto, Beth Israel Synagogue, Edmonton, and Beth Israel Synagogue in Vancouver. They also designed the new Mount Sinai Hospital, the Oakdale Golf & Country Club, the Jewish Home for the Aged (Baycrest), and the Jewish Community Centres of Toronto and Hamilton. Their design for the Oakdale Golf & Country Club was chosen as a Canadian entrant in the Arts Competition of the 14th Olympic Games in London, 1948.
In addition to the projects already mentioned, Kaplan & Sprachman worked on retail stores, warehouses and factories, apartment buildings, and single family residences. Their partnership continued until 1965, when the firm of Kaplan & Sprachman was dissolved as of 30 October 1965. Kaplan continued to work as an architectural consultant for several years after this date.
Scope and Content
File consists of textual records and one architectual drawing documenting the renovations to the Clothing Centre, which was located at 55 Baldwin Street. Included is one blueprint and a building alteration proposal by Kaplan & Sprachman Registered Architects, correspondence and job quotes.
Name Access
Clothing Centre
Kaplan & Sprachman Registered Architects
Related Material
See also Harold S. Kaplan fonds 27.
Places
Baldwin Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2012-1-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-1-7
Material Format
textual record
architectural drawing
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
Date
2003-2009
Scope and Content
Accession consists of recrods related to UJA's Tomorrow Campaign. Documented is the Central and Lebovic campus facilities including the United Synagogue Day School at Lebovic, the Central Campus Cultural facility plans such as the Canadian Jewish Museum, She'arim, and the Lebovic Campus Educational Committee. Records include reports (including the Lord Consulting Cultural report), meeting minutes, correspondence, business plans and other planning documents.
Custodial History
Records were in the possession of Shirley Worth, director of donor development at UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-2-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-2-5
Material Format
text
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1942-1967
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two Hadassah Daughter of Israel Chapter cookbooks from Timmins, Ontario (1960, 1967) and the Book of Jewish Recipes published by the Jewish Standard and edited by Tina Lohman (1942).
Custodial History
The provenance and custodial history for these items is unknown.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-9-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-9-6
Material Format
text
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
[ca. 1952]-[ca. 1962]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a Hadassah Naomi Chapter cookbook, 3rd ed., published around 1952. The cookbook was originally owned by Evelyn (Quitt) Drutz and also contain handwritten recipes and inserted copies of recipes from various newspapers and magazines.
Custodial History
The cookbook was in the possession of Mark Drutz, the son of Evelyn (Quitt) Drutz.
Administrative History
Mark Drutz is the youngest child of Harold (Hymie) and Evelyn Sandra (Quitt) Drutz. Harold (1913-1998) was born to Phillip (Fyvish) and Annie Drutz of Russia. In 1946 he married Evelyn Quitt (1924-1999), the daughter of Samuel (1891-?) and Bertha (1890-1953) Quitt, also of Russia. They had two children: Paul, who ultimately succumbed to AIDS (1947-1994) and Mark (aka Donald, 1951-). Evelyn and Harold also helped to raise Paul's son and their grandchild, Ezra Matthew (1975-).
Harold worked in the garment trade as a pattern cutter and also served in the Canadian Medical Corps during the Second World War. He was one of 7 children, his siblings being: Meyer, Daniel, Harry (Drue), David, Pauline and Mollie (Simmons). Evelyn was one of 5 chidren, her siblings being: Estelle (Drue - married Harold's brother Harry), Rivka (Smolkin), Gordon (Gerhson), and Beverley (Brown).
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-6-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-6-2
Material Format
textual record
text
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
7 books
Date
1966-1974
Scope and Content
Accession consists of several copies of the Canadian Jewish Review, the Chronicle Review and the Canadian Jewish Chronicle Review. Also included is an Ottawa Jewish bulletin and several books.
Custodial History
Records were in the possession of Stanley Shankman.
Administrative History
Stanley Shankman was the former owner of the Canadian Jewish Chronicle Review. He purchased the Canadian Jewish Chronicle (est. 1914, successor to the Jewish Times, est 1897) in Montreal in 1962 when it was experiencing financial difficulties. Max Melamet was his first editor. He later purchased the Canadian Jewish Review (est. 1921) and combined the two publications into one: the Candian Jewish Chronicle Review (ca. 1967), which published editions in both Montreal and Toronto. Carol Frilegh was the paper's first edtor.
When Ray Wolfe, Donald Carr and Charles Bronfman purchased the Candian Jewish News from M. J. Nurenberger, Shankman sold them the Candian Jewish Chronicle Review to incorporate into one community paper serving the two cities.
Subjects
Newspapers
Name Access
Shankman, Stanley
Canadian Jewish Chronicle Review
Canadian Jewish Review
Canadian Jewish Chronicle
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-8-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-8-3
Material Format
text
Physical Description
1 book : 166 p.
Date
[198-?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one cookbook published by the Sisterhood of the Shaar Hashomayim Synagogue and the Dorothy Rothschild Chapter of Hadassah (Sudbury).
Subjects
Food
Women
Name Access
Shaar Hashomayim Synagogue
Hadassah-Wizo
Places
Subury, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-8
Material Format
textual record
architectural drawing
Physical Description
12 cm of textual records
11 architectural drawings : col.
Date
1997-2008
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material from the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto executive committee regarding meetings and retreats, an annual report from 2006/2007, and a budget report from 2007/2008. Accession also consists of other brochures and folders containing information related to the Jewish Toronto Tomorrow campaign, including information about the Downtown Jewish Day School, a "live generously" brochure, a brochure from the 2008 Words & Deeds leadership award dinner, and "York Region campus conceptual master plan" from 2008. Also included is an organization plan for 750 Spadina Avenue from 1997, proposed architectural drawings for Sherman campus from December 2011, as well as a report presented to the Canadian Council for Israel and Jewish advocacy in 2006.
Custodial History
Records were transferred to the archives by Ted Sokolsky, President and CEO of UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-2-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-2-7
Material Format
architectural drawing
sound recording
textual record
Physical Description
4 architectural drawings
2 mini DV cassettes
1 folder of textual records
Date
2007-2009
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 2 mini DV cassettes dated Nov. 26, 2007 from the UJA Annual General Meeting and material from the board of directors meetings and nominations 2008-2009. Also included are architectural plans for Sherman Campus.
Custodial History
Records were transfered to the Archives by Jeff Springer, Senior VP of Corporate Affairs, UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-2-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-2-5
Material Format
architectural drawing
Physical Description
104 architectural drawings : some reproductions
9 architectural drawings : blueprints
Date
1975-1976
Scope and Content
Accession consists of architectural drawings for the Lipa Green building, Koffler Centre, and the Leah Posluns Theatre under the Y.M.H.A. Completion Program (Toronto).
Custodial History
Records were transferred to the Archives by Andrea Gaichuk of the Construction and Development Office, UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-2-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-2-10
Material Format
text
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records and graphic material
Date
[194-]-[199-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the activities of Canadian Young Judaea, as well as a small amount of Ajalon Lodge records that belonged to former member Maurice Berg. Berg was also involved in Young Judaea through the Zionist Organization of Canada. Included are CYJ photo albums documenting various social events as well as several Kinus (1950s-1990s); correspondence, newsletters and reports (1960s-1990s); a CYJ alumni reunion book; Hanoar Hatzioni newsletters (1976-1992); meeting minutes, reports and the constitution (1940s-1960s); two books about A.M. Klein; Ajalon Lodge photo albums and tour of Israel photographs (1960s-1980s, 1979); as well as one pencil drawing of Maurice Berg (1977).
Subjects
Recreation
Zionism
Name Access
Berg, Maurice, 1913-1993
Canadian Young Judaea
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
architectural drawing (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
ca. 30 photographs (tiff)
ca. 15 architectural drawings (tiff)
3 textual records (pdf)
Date
[1945?]-[ca. 1990]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs and architectural drawings documenting Jaime Levy-Bencheton's architectural career in Ontario and Morocco. The bulk of the material relates to projects Levy-Bencheton designed while working for the Government of Ontario including: a greenhouse for the Ontario Science Centre, OPP Headquarters building in London, ON, Rideau Correctional Centre, and Chestnut Hill (Southwestern Ontario regional archaeological office). Also included are architectutal drawings and photographs related to Levy-Bencheton's private practices in Morocco and Toronto and work for architect Martin Mendelow.
Administrative History
Jaime Levy-Bencheton was born on July 6, 1918 in Casablanca, Morocco. Jaime started a private architectural practice in Morocco in 1945. He immigrated to Canada in 1963 and initially found work with the architect Martin Mendelow. In 1965, he started working for the Government of Ontario's Department of Public Works as a draftsman. Starting in 1969, he worked for the Ministry of Government Services as an architectural job captain until his retirement in 1985. During his career Levy-Bencheton specialized in designing facilities for the handicapped and worked on a variety of buildings across Ontario including, industrial, institutional, and office use buildings. In his retirement, Levy-Bencheton became devoted to the study of the Bible and creating Jewish religious art.
Subjects
Architects
Occupations
Name Access
Levy-Bencheton, Jaime, 1918-
Places
Casablanca, Morocco
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-5-14
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-5-14
Material Format
architectural drawing
Physical Description
1 drawing : pencil ; 46 x 43 cm
Date
[ca. 1911]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a demonstration drawing by architect Benjamin Brown of a synagogue, that bears some resemblance to a later design proposal for Beth Jacob Synagogue. The drawing is of the synagogue's facade. This drawing was likely done when Brown was a student at the University of Toronto, School of Practical Science.
Custodial History
This drawing was part of the larger Benjamin Brown collection, but was not part of the original donation in 1987. It was framed and hanging in Jay Levine's office for many years.
Subjects
Architecture
Synagogues
Name Access
Brown, Benjamin
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-8-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-8-9
Material Format
textual record
architectural drawing
Physical Description
1.3 m of textual records
ca. 50 architectural drawings
Date
1974-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the activities, programs and governance of Shaar Shalom Synagogue. Included are financial statements, meeting minutes, by-laws, brochures, architectural drawings, reports, membership lists, forms filled in by participants in life cycle events (such as weddings and conversions), holiday bulletins, invitations, speeches, Yizkor booklets, office manuals and correspondence. Of note is a land title document from 1981.
Administrative History
Shaar Shalom Synagogue was a conservative synagogue in Markham founded in 1972. The synagogue closed in 2016.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
Shaar Shalom Synagogue (Markham, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-11
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-11
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
architectural drawing
Physical Description
ca. 6 m textual records and graphic material
ca. 20 architectural drawings
Date
1972-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the activities, programs and governance of Shaar Shalom Synagogue. Included are financial records, meeting minutes and agendas, architectural drawings, general administrative files, and photographs.
Administrative History
Shaar Shalom Synagogue was a conservative synagogue in Markham founded in 1972. The synagogue closed in 2016.`
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
Shaar Shalom Synagogue (Markham, Ont.)
Places
Markham, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-4-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-4-4
Material Format
text
Physical Description
1 text
Date
2010
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one self-published memoir written by Allan Weiss.
Administrative History
Allan Weiss (1929-2017) was born in the small town of Botiz, a small farming village in the foothills of the Carpathian Mountains. He was one of four children to Izidor and Gizella Weisz. His father owned a general store. At the age of 14, he, his younger sister Magda, and their parents were taken to Auschwitz-Birkenau. His parents and sister were killed but Allan, old enough to be useful, was forced into slave labour as the assistant to a mason building Nazi industrial projects. He was able to survive the Holocaust and at the war's end made his way to a displaced persons camp. Allan was brought to Canada as a war orphan in 1947 under the auspices of the Canadian Jewish Congress. He travelled on the ocean liner the Aquitania. His plan was to eventually join his surviving brother and sister in the United States but instead he met and married his wife Grace Levine and had four children: Jason, Cari, Gerald and Russell.
Upon arrival in Canada he first boarded with the Montagnes family and worked at various jewellry stores. He later worked seven days a week selling aluminum windows door- to-door in the suburbs of Toronto. Eventually, he and a partner opened up a small window shop on Bathurst St. Ten years later, by the age of 29, he and his partners had factories across the country producing aluminum windows and related products. Following Grace's death in 1990, Allan remarried Lila (Shiner) Roher in 1991. Allan passed away on 2 Jan. 2017.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. See administrative notes for details.
Name Access
Weiss, Allan, 1929-2017
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-2-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-2-4
Material Format
graphic material
architectural drawing
sound recording
Physical Description
ca.15 cm of textual records 5 DVD
Date
2002-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material created or accumulated by Vice President, Strategic Community Planning and Engagement Robin Gofine during her time at UJA Federation of Greater Toronto. Through her position with the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto, Robin Gofine was involved in numerous project proposals. The following are documented in this accession: Sorel Etrog Central Square, Dubi Wall Mural, UJA Arts and Culture Mission, Jewish Museum of Toronto, Vaughan Campus, Central Campus Redevelopment, Centre for Canadian Jewish Heritage and Culture, and Sherman Campus.
Subjects
Charities
Name Access
Gofine, Robin
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee meeting agendas, minutes, reports and correspondence series
Level
Series
Fonds
17
Series
1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
text
Date
1948-1998
Physical Description
ca. 3.3 metres of textual records
14 photographs
1 book
Scope and Content
Series consists of the correspondence, minutes, agendas, and reports of a wide variety of committees of the Canadian Jewish Congress. The bulk of the material relates to the CJC National and Ontario region executive committees, officers' committees, and plenary arrangements committees. Additional records relate to committees concerned with such topics as, small Jewish communities, culture, Holocaust remembrance, student campus services, education, finance and fundraising, kashruth, and Israel.
Notes
Files created by the United Jewish Relief Agencies have been removed and may now be found within Fonds 17, Series 4.
Files created by the Committee for Soviet Jewry have been removed and may now be found within Fonds 17, Series 3
Files created by the Joint Community Relations Committee have been removed and may now be found within fonds 17, Series 5.
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Some records are closed for conservation reasons.
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
Toronto Section series
House Committee sub-series
Level
Sub-series
ID
Fonds 38; Series 7-10
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
Toronto Section series
House Committee sub-series
Level
Sub-series
Fonds
38
Series
7-10
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
architectural drawing
Date
1961-[198-?]
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
37 photographs
2 artistic drawings : 52 x 53 cm or smaller
13 architectural drawings : 92 x 60 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Toronto Section's executive historically incorporated five or six vice-presidents, each in charge of a portfolio made up of a group of related committees. In 1963, Toronto Section moved to a new Council House at 4700 Bathurst Street.
Scope and Content
Sub-series includes drawings, photographs, minutes, contracts and correspondence relating to the builiding's construction and later renovations.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Folks Farein fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 105
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Folks Farein fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
105
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
architectural drawing
Date
1914-1977
Physical Description
3.07 m of textual records
110 photographs : b&w and col. (hand-tinted) ; 51 x 41 cm or smaller
6 architectural drawings : 70 x 36 or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Folks Farein, also known as the Hebrew National Association, was established in 1914 by a group of Toronto Jewish immigrants as a society dedicated to anti-missionary and educational outreach. They were first located at 23 Cecil St. and moved to 37 Cecil St. around 1940.
In the early years of the Folks Farein's existence, Christian missions and a number of Jewish converts to Christianity sought to exploit the situation of poor Jews in the community through the distribution of direct relief, services of doctors and midwives and by street-corner preaching and proselytization. To counteract the work of the Toronto missionaries the Folks Farein offered a number of services including welfare for working mothers, a reading room, English language clases and translation services for Yiddish immigrants.
When the threat from missionary activity was no longer an issue, the Folks Farein transformed itself into a philantrophic society. Under its revised mandate the society looked after the sick and needy in hospitals, sanitoriums, mental health institutions and in their homes, and arranged for free doctor services, translation services, medicine, dentures, eyeglasses, orthopedic shoes and medical applicances. The Folks Farein guaranteed the full or partial payment of medical bills by maintaining a fund in several hospitals for the benefit of Jewish patients in need of assistance. They provided assistance to seniors applying for old age pensions, to widows and mothers applying for benefits, assisted needy famililes and patients with kosher meals, provided cash relief during Passover, and fed and billeted the unemployed and homeless at their premises at 37 Cecil St.
In the course of their work, the Folks Farein collaborated with many Jewish organizations and societies such as the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society, Jewish Family Welfare Bureau, Relief Unemployment Fund, Jewish Joint Appliction Bureau, Jewish Children's Bureau, the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto, Canadian Jewish Congress and the Toronto Hebrew Free Loan Association.
Its basis of revenue came from its large membership, house-to-house contributions from the public and from special events such as it annual ball, Moas Chittin campaign, Purim ball, and beauty contest.
In addition to its regular activities the Folks Farein assumed responsibility for providing aid to refugees of the Second World War: the first group arriving from Europe in 1945 and in 1948 to a group of Jewish tailors liberated from the DP camps of Germany. In 1947, the Folks Farein established Hachnoses Orchim, a temporary shelter to accomodate refugees and displaced persons. The shelter was located at 37 Cecil St.
The Folks Farein's first officers were Mr. J. Graner (president), Mr. J. Meisniker (vice-president), Mr. Meyer Littner (superintendent), Chuna Mosoff and Mr. W. Welman (trustees), Miss Weiner and Mr. Cohen (board of education), Mr. A. Kaminsky (recording secretary) and Mr. Cohen (treasurer). Mr. Epstein refered to as "Grandfather" was one of the founders of the Folks Farein.
Other pioneers included Moshe Olebaum, and M. Spiegel (1st vice-president), J. Hurwitz (1st vice-president and president), Abraham Sher, S.M. Shapiro Shlesinger, Joseph Grenner, Mrs. Minna Winter (president of the Women's Auxillary) and Kalman Wagner. In 1930, David Green assumed the position of president of the Folks Farein and served as its exclusive president from 1934 until his passing on 13 May 1977. Sam Cohen was then elected the new president of the Folks Farein.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the Folks Farein's philantrophic activities in the Toronto Jewish community from 1914 to 1977. Records include meeting minutes and agendas of the executive board and committees, resolutions of board of directors, newspaper clippings in both Yiddish and English, publicity material, photographs, general correspondence, architectural drawings, cemetery deeds, legal documents, records relating to David Green's personal interests, financial and fundraising records, wills and bequests, and client case files. The records have been arranged into nine series: Meeting minutes; Scrapbooks; Executive services; Celebrations and events; Building and operations; David Green; Finance and fundraising; and Case files.
Notes
Formerly cited as MG2 O1N.
Name Access
Folk Farein
Hebrew National Association (Toronto, Ont.)
Subjects
Charities
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Folks Farein fonds
Services series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 105; Series 4; File 8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Folks Farein fonds
Services series
Level
File
Fonds
105
Series
4
File
8
Material Format
architectural drawing
Date
[197-]
Physical Description
6 architectural drawings
Scope and Content
File consists drawings of the Bathurst Lawn Cemetery.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Folks Farein fonds
Services series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 105; Series 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Folks Farein fonds
Services series
Level
Series
Fonds
105
Series
4
Material Format
architectural drawing
graphic material
textual record
Date
1940-1974
Physical Description
12 cm of textual records
76 photographs
6 architectural drawings
Scope and Content
Series consists of records of Folks Farein services offered to the community. Of note are Bathurst Lawn architectural drawings, cemetery deeds and delegates, resolution of the board of directors, the notification of registration as a charitable organization, the United Jewish Refugee and War Relief Agencies report of meeting held on January 5, 1945. There are also several photographs depicting Passover dinners and volunteer service performed by various Folks Farein volunteers at Ontario hospitals.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Executive director series
Subject files sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 61; Series 1-1; File 134
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Executive director series
Subject files sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
61
Series
1-1
File
134
Material Format
architectural drawing
Date
[ca. 1959]
Physical Description
3 drawings : perspective and sketch ; 40 x 53 cm folded to 18 x 22 cm
Scope and Content
This file consists of three architectural drawings of the Samuel Godfrey auditorium. They are bound together on one edge.
Accession Number
2004-5-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Executive director series
Subject files sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 61; Series 1-1; File 154
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Executive director series
Subject files sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
61
Series
1-1
File
154
Material Format
textual record
architectural drawing
Date
1952-1953
Physical Description
1 cm of textual records
2 drawings : proposals ; 44 x 39 cm folded to 23 x 21 cm
Scope and Content
This file contains financial records, correspondence and meeting minutes pertaining to the decorations, kitchen and cultural committees, all which operated under the mandate of the Women's Committee. There are also two architectural proposals for the layout of a basement lounge.
Accession Number
2004-5-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Executive director series
Architectural plans sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 61; Series 1-3; File 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Executive director series
Architectural plans sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
61
Series
1-3
File
3
Material Format
architectural drawing
Date
1958-1960
Physical Description
22 drawings : technical and detail ; 77 x 107 cm folded to 33 x 26 or smaller
Scope and Content
This file contains twenty-two architectural drawings of the northern Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. building, created by W. Sefton & Associates Ltd. Consulting Engineers and Gordon S. Adamson & Associates Architects. The drawings detail the facilities and grounds, including the shower rooms, the fire alarm system, the swimming pool, and aspects of the building's foundation and masonry. The drawings are to scale.
Accession Number
2004-5-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Jewish Community Centre Archives Committee series
Photograph collection sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 61; Series 2-2; File 93
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Jewish Community Centre Archives Committee series
Photograph collection sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
61
Series
2-2
File
93
Material Format
graphic material
architectural drawing
Date
1956-1968
Physical Description
65 photographs : b&w (17 negatives ) ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
1 drawing : proposal ; 21 x 36 cm
Scope and Content
This file consists of photographs taken during the construction of the northern Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. branch. Included are images of the surrounding land and river and some images of the completed building and parking lot. There are also some photographic copies of artistic renderings of the interior of the building, photographs of individuals looking at architectural plans and drawings of the new building -- including the visiting Israeli tennis team -- and a copy drawing of the original architectural proposal. There are also some images of the Building Committee and a fundraising meeting at the home of Sam Granatstein.
Identified individuals include Ben Shore, Dorothy Shore, Stephen Shore, John Shore, Percy Hermant, Gordon A. Adamson (architect), Lou Posluns, Sam Granatstein, Paul Granatstein, Alex Fisher, E. I. Shapiro, Ralph Fisher, H. Max Swartz, Bert Fine, Florence Hutner, Harvey Blackstein, Louis Posluns, John Fienberg and Stephen Berger.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Executive director series
Architectural plans sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 61; Series 1-3; File 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Executive director series
Architectural plans sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
61
Series
1-3
File
4
Material Format
textual record
architectural drawing
Date
1981
Physical Description
1 cm of textual records (1 v.)
8 drawings : proposal ; 28 x 43 cm folded to 28 x 22 cm
Scope and Content
This file consists of a study conducted by A.J. Diamond & Partners, Architects & Planners and A.J. Vermeulen, Quantity Surveyor on the feasibility of modifying the Bloor building to accommodate the new demands made on the athletic, school and community space. The study includes information on demographics of the surrounding area, program analysis and renovation/addition options. There are eight accompanying drawings of the proposed modifications, prepared by the architects.
Accession Number
2004-5-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Amalgamated Dawes Road Trustees fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 63
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Amalgamated Dawes Road Trustees fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
63
Material Format
textual record
architectural drawing
Date
1950-1978
Physical Description
1.2 m of textual records and architectural drawings
Admin History/Bio
The Amalgamated Dawes Road Trustees (ADRT) is a non-profit body that was established in 1950. Its primary mandate has been to oversee and maintain the Jewish cemetery located at Dawes Road, which was established around 1903. This has involved maintaining the grounds, fixing and straightening monuments, and beautifying the surroundings. All funds that they receive are spent on the maintenance of the cemetery. In 1953, the ADRT took over responsibility for the Jones Avenue cemetery as well, at the request of Beth Tzedec Congregation after the merger of its two predecessor congregations who owned the two cemeteries.
Previously, ADRT reported to the Canadian Jewish Congress, however, was an autonomous entity with independent decision-making powers. The Trustees that run it are drawn from the congregations and societies who own plots at these two cemeteries. During the early years, there were also representatives from the CJC and the United Jewish Welfare Fund of Toronto.
In 1950, there were 34 groups that possessed cemetery plots, and today, there are 51. Some of the larger and more prominent ones include Beth Tzedec, Temple Sinai, Beth Emeth, Beth David, the Toronto Hebrew Benevolent Society, the United Jewish People's Order and the Keltzer Sick Benefit Society. The ADRT office was originally located at 150 Beverley Street. It later relocated to 3169 St. Clair Avenue East, closer to the cemetery.
Custodial History
The records appear to have been donated by Kurt Kramer, Administrative Secretary for the Amalgamated Dawes Road Trustees.
Scope and Content
The records in this fonds were produced by the ADRT and support their activities. They include legal documents, correspondence, meeting agendas and minutes, perpetual care trusts, auditor reports, interment information, burial certificates, foundation documents, burial charts and a small number of blueprints.
Notes
Associated material note: the Canadian Jewish Genealogical Society of Toronto has produced a database for the burial records and has placed 13,000 entries from the Dawes Road cemetery on the Jewish Gen JOBR Web site.
Name Access
Amalgamated Dawes Road Trustees
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Physical Condition
Much of the correspondence is brittle and flaking.
Creator
Amalgamatied Dawes Road Trustees (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
2005-2-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Hillel Foundation, University of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 65
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Hillel Foundation, University of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
65
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
architectural drawing
Date
1945-1988
Physical Description
3.72 m of textual records, graphic material and architectural drawings
Admin History/Bio
The B’nai Brith Hillel Foundation was founded at the University of Illinois in 1923 by Rabbi Benjamin Frankel. The University of Toronto chapter was established in 1946, by which point there were over one thousand Jewish undergraduates at the university. Hillel’s mandate was to foster students’ Jewish identity, creating a religious, cultural, and communal environment and coordinating the activities of many affiliated sub-groups. Hillel was supported by the B’nai Brith Foundation and the United Jewish Welfare Fund (later the Toronto Jewish Congress), with increasing operational funding from the latter as the decades passed.
Hillel’s predecessor at the University of Toronto was the Menorah Society, founded in 1917 and disbanded in 1931 due to waning interest. In 1944 the Jewish Student Fellowship was formed, and on January 23, 1946 it was transformed into the University of Toronto B’nai B’rith Hillel Foundation.
Hillel chapters were run with the guidance of a professional appointed by the B’nai Brith Hillel Foundations at American and Canadian Universities. During the period covered by this fonds, U of T Hillel had four directors: Rabbi Aaron Kamerling (director 1946-1970), Rabbi Eliyahu Eliezri (1970-1971), Ben Mayer (1971-1978), and Gerry Fisher (1978-1981). The director answered to a board of advisors, drawn from the university and Jewish communities, that was responsible for maintaining Hillel House, overseeing staffing, and representing the foundation to the public. Early chairmen of this board included Edward E. Gelber, Jack D. Pearlstein, Cyril Houser, Dr. Alexander Lipson, Sidney Midanik, and E. M. Sprackman.
At the day-to-day operations level, Hillel was run by an elected council of thirteen students under the director’s guidance. At U of T, the Hillel student council created and implemented a yearly program, edited the literary magazine and Hillelite bulletin, and over the years maintained the following standing committees: religious; cultural; house; social; publicity; art, music and drama; United Jewish Appeal; debates; membership; and seminar. The council met monthly and was required to call general meetings bi-monthly.
Hillel’s first administrative offices were at 492 Spadina Avenue, with programs held in various locations, including the B’nai Brith Youth Organization space at 750 Spadina Avenue, and local synagogues. From the beginning, Hillel joined forces with the B’nai Brith Youth Organization to raise funds for a permanent home on campus for Hillel. Programs in the early years included Shabbat services and lectures, arts performances, dances, personal counseling, and courses such as Jewish literature and Hebrew. Three times a year Hillel published the Scribe, a literary magazine addressing topics of Jewish heritage, life, and prominent figures. This was replaced in the 1950s by an annual magazine named Reflections. The Hillelite bulletin informed members of activities and events. Hillel continued to build the Judaica collection of its Norman Raitblat Memorial Library. It also sent delegates each year to the Hillel Summer Institute in New York State; the Brandeis Camp Institute, a leadership training program sponsored by the American Zionist Youth Commission; and, beginning in 1948, the Inter-Hillel Conference, which was hosted alternately by Queen’s University, McGill University, and U of T.
In 1950, Hillel acquired a house at 186 St. George Street. Hillel House was formally dedicated at Convocation Hall on January 21, 1951. In December 1977 Hillel House was destroyed by fire, after which its offices were moved to space in the YMHA building at Bloor and Spadina. Programs were hosted for several years at ‘The Lower East Side’ in the Newman Centre at 89 St. George Street. In June 1979 Hillel acquired office space in a house at 604 Spadina Avenue.
In the 1970s Hillel’s numbers across North America were in decline. In 1974 the Jewish student population at U of T was approximately 3000, but only 400 were registered members. This slump was apparently reversed by the end of the decade, however, when student interest grew enough that a general council of forty students was established to supplement the elected student council (steering committee). 1970s programs included conventions and retreats, United Jewish Appeal fundraising campaigns, a Shabbat co-op, a choir, the Coffeehouse lounge, a film series, a music club, a library society, an annual Purim Bash, an art festival, and counseling groups.
Hillel also served as the voice of Jewish students at the university. The U of T chapter participated in the fight against quotas for Jewish students and faculty, advocated for kosher food availability on campus, and was successful in persuading the university to avoid having examinations on Jewish holidays. In addition, Hillel often represented the views of the Jewish community to the general student population. It has been involved in the dissemination of Holocaust awareness material and in counteracting propaganda against Israel.
In 1970, partnering with the Jewish Student Federation of York University, Hillel established the Free Jewish University. Its courses were held on the U of T and York campuses and featured free courses covering a range of intellectual, personal and practical topics. Also in conjunction with York, Hillel published Or monthly newspaper and the Masada quarterly magazine. The latter evolved into a non-partisan newspaper, Migdal, which in turn became Images in the early 1980s. In addition, the Jewish Students’ Enquirer was published monthly, a joint publication of Jewish students at U of T, York University, Ryerson Polytechnical Institute, and Seneca College.
In 1978, with a view to modernize and reinvigorate its image, Hillel changed its name to the Jewish Students’ Union–B’nai Brith Hillel. The decision involved some contention with the Hillel advisory board, and reflected a closer association with the Toronto Jewish Congress. A third unofficial organization name, J.U.S.T. (Jewish University Students of Toronto), was used for the monthly newsletter, J.U.S.T. News. This newsletter was briefly renamed The Rolling Scribe before being discontinued in 1980.
The 1980s saw Hillel coordinating the efforts and activities of a large number of interest groups: Student United Jewish Appeal, Toronto Student Zionists, Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry, Jewish Residence Council, Jewish Studies Course Union, Student Mobilization for Jews in Arab Lands, Moadon Aliyah, Canadian Branch: North American Jewish Students Network, and Israeli Students Organization. Hillel is now represented on three Toronto universities and three college campuses.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists mainly of textual records created, received and maintained by Hillel directors from 1945 through 1988. The records document the directors’ administration and programming activities, Hillel events, and relations with outside organizations. The most concentrated set of records are those of Rabbi Kamerling from the 1940s and 1950s. The fonds is comprised of correspondence, memoranda, reports, newspapers and newsletters, publicity material, calendars of events, financial records, event programmes, and catalogues. There are blueprints of the proposed extension to Hillel House in the 1960s, the mid-1970s renovations, and the new Hillel House on Huron Street considered in 1978. The fonds also includes annual reports for 1953-1955 and 1960-1970, and a number of publications (incomplete sets): the Hillelite and the Hillel Scribe from the 1940s, the J.U.S.T. (Jewish University Students of Toronto) News, its successor The Rolling Scroll, and newspapers Masada, Migdal, Reflections, Or, and the Jewish Students’ Enquirer.
The fonds contains 130 photographs, predominantly black and white, in the form of prints, contact sheets and 35mm negatives. Aside from 32 head shots of speakers and performers from 1950s events, the photographs date from the 1970s. There are images of plays, meetings, special events, and executive members.
Fonds is arranged with each director’s files separate and in approximate alphabetical order by file name. The files are loosely based on subject/function, likely as they were originally created. Rabbi Kamerling’s records are in two groups since they were acquired in two accessions (see note below).
Name Access
B'nai Brith Hillel Foundation at the University of Toronto (Toronto, Ont.)
Related Material
See MG 9 for a more complete run of publications with which Hillel was involved (eg. Midgal, Images).
Arrangement
Processing of the collection maintained each director’s files separate and in their original order. Following the Hillel House fire in 1978, Rabbi Kamerling’s records (1945-1955) were acquired by the Archives. In 1986, additional Kamerling files were acquired (1946-1970). These overlapping sets of records were described and processed separately.
Creator
B'nai Brith Hillel Foundation at the University of Toronto (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1978-3-7
1981-5-2
1988-11-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Quebec synagogues series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 64; Series 1; File 45
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Quebec synagogues series
Level
File
Fonds
64
Series
1
File
45
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
architectural drawing
Date
1978
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
30 photographs : col. slides and (2) b&w photographs ; 35 mm and 12 x 9 cm
1 architectural drawing
Subjects
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Montréal (Québec)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Reference series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 64; Series 5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Reference series
Level
Series
Fonds
64
Series
5
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
architectural drawing
Date
1859-1980
Physical Description
35 cm of textual records
10 photographs
41 architectural drawings
Scope and Content
Series contains reference materials created by and written about the synagogues. Primary records include commemorative booklets, a small number of newsletters, brochures, and programs from special events. There are also newspaper clippings and copied articles providing histories of synagogues. There is a small number of photograph prints and negatives, but many of the files also include photographs from books, magazines or photocopies. The series is arranged in alphabetical order by city, then by synagogue. Not every synagogue the project team researched has a reference file, and there may be reference files for shuls for which no photographs survive.
Subjects
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Reference series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 64; Series 5; File 10
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Reference series
Level
File
Fonds
64
Series
5
File
10
Material Format
textual record
architectural drawing
Date
1961-1962
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
2 architectural drawings
Scope and Content
File contains two architectural drawings and a Service of Dedication programme for the synagogue from 1962.
Subjects
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Fredericton (N.B.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Reference series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 64; Series 5; File 26
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Reference series
Level
File
Fonds
64
Series
5
File
26
Material Format
textual record
architectural drawing
Date
1952-1977
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
5 architectural drawings
Scope and Content
File contains an information brochure, 25th anniversary commemoration book and five 1952 blueprints for the building.
Subjects
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Montréal (Québec)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Reference series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 64; Series 5; File 27
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Reference series
Level
File
Fonds
64
Series
5
File
27
Material Format
textual record
architectural drawing
Date
1951, 1969
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
2 architectural drawings
Scope and Content
File contains programme and newspaper advertisement for the sod turning ceremony of the synagogue (1969), as well as 2 1951 blueprints for the building.
Subjects
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Montréal (Québec)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Reference series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 64; Series 5; File 28
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Reference series
Level
File
Fonds
64
Series
5
File
28
Material Format
textual record
architectural drawing
Date
1978
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
3 architectural drawings
Scope and Content
File contains bar mitzvah year programme for synagogue (1978) and photocopied architectural drawings.
Subjects
Bar mitzvah
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Montréal (Québec)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Reference series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 64; Series 5; File 33
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Reference series
Level
File
Fonds
64
Series
5
File
33
Material Format
architectural drawing
Date
1947
Physical Description
7 architectural drawings
Scope and Content
File contains 7 blueprints for the 1947 extension and alterations to the shul.
Name Access
Congregation Ahavath Shalom
Subjects
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Montréal (Québec)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Reference series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 64; Series 5; File 40
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Reference series
Level
File
Fonds
64
Series
5
File
40
Material Format
textual record
architectural drawing
Date
1973, 1975
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
3 architectural drawings
Scope and Content
File contains booklet for bar mitzvah commemoration, 1975, and blueprints for the 1973 extension.
Subjects
Bar mitzvah
Reconstructionist Judaism
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Montréal (Québec)
Source
Archival Descriptions
312 records – page 1 of 7.

Narrow By

Collection Name

Source

Format

Date

Description Level

Subject

Name

Place

Language

Restrictions

Available Digital Content