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345 records – page 1 of 7.
Accession Number
1974-001
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1974-001
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
6 photographs : b&w
Date
1907-1971
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a booklet for a testimonial diner in honour of Joshua J. Barsht (arranged by the Ostrowcer Synagogue and Society), notes from the meetings of the subcommittee on 58 Cecil Street to discuss the future of the building, and a ticket for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur services.
Also included are documents for the Leranbaum-Nisker family including a marriage certificate (1907), correspondence regarding verification of ages of the bride and groom for Old Age Security (1953), a Canadian Certificate of Naturalization, a death certificate, and several obituaries.
This accession also includes phtographs of Mr. and Mrs. Zelig Nisker, Yukel Nesker, Isidore and Sylvia Rayman, and the Ostrovtzer Mutual Benefit Society Ladies Auxiliary.
MG_RG
MG3 A22
MG6 K
Name Access
Nisker (family)
Places
Cecil Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-11-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-11-1
Material Format
text
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 book
8 microfiche sheets
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Date
1889-1917
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records created by Goel Tzedec Congregation. Included are microfiche of minutes and ledgers, a copy of a Seder T'filas Yisroel donated to Goel Tzedec by Chaim Smith in 1917, and a class photograph for the Farband Shule taken in the late 1930s.
Included in the photograph are Hershel Fogle, Rivkah G, Fayge Weingarten, Sarah Gingold, Aaron Hermaub, Shangle Atkin, Lil Newman, Etle Brody, Rochel Blumenshtein, Chava Smith, Sora Zweig, Yaacov Drexler, Malka, Yaacov Rosenzweig, Aaron Shnipper, Klumann, Shore, Aaron Folk and the teachers Fogle, Leah Lander, Shopsai Rappaport, Moishe Rigelhaupt, and Dr. Isaiah Rabinowich
Custodial History
Records were kept by Goel Tzedec and later Beth Tzedec and were donated by the museum on behalf of Dr. Fred Weinberg
Administrative History
Goel Tzedec was established in 1883. It was originally an orthodox congregation founded by a group of recent immigrants from Lithuania. The first synagogue was situated in a room on Richmond and York Streets. Three years later they purchased and remodelled a building on University Avenue at Elm Street that was owned by the Methodist Church. Finally, in 1904 they hired an architect to construct a large building that was perfectly suited to their needs. In February of 1907, the building on University Avenue was dedicated and became the largest synagogue in Toronto, accommodating 1200 congregants.
During the early decades of the twentieth century, Goel Tzedec became more ethnically mixed and established a religious school and women's auxiliary to help raise money and run special events. In 1925, the Congregation joined the Conservative Synagogue Movement and introduced changes to its services.
After the Second World War, Goel Tzedec and its sister synagogue, Beth Hamidrash Hagadol amalgamated in September 1952 to form Beth Tzedec. The two congregations worked together to build a synagogue which was built in the North end of the city on Bathurst and was dedicated 9 December 1955. Rabbi Stuart E. Rosenberg served as Beth Tzedec's first Rabbi and J. Benjamin Friedberg as its Assistant Rabbi. The Chazzan at the time was Cantor Joseph Cooper. The synagogue adhered to the principles of the Conservative Movement and represents the largest synagogue in Toronto
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
Goel Tzedec Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1991-6-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1991-6-5
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 9 x 14 cm and 10 x 12 cm and 18 x 13 cm
Date
[ca.1900]-1918
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one original photograph, one copy photograph, and one negative of Louise Cornblum's grandfather Harry Fein in front of the West Toronto Decorating store at 3132 Dundas Street West in Toronto.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1988-11-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1988-11-10
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
84 photographs : b&w ; 19 x 25 cm or smaller
1 collage (9 photos)
Date
[ca.1890]-[ca.1935]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs which include portraits and group photos taken in Vilna, Poland, Montreal, Quebec, and New York. Many are photo postcards. Identified individuals include Miriam and Isadore Zelker, Benjamin and Dora Zelker and Dr. Serge Koussevitzky. In addition there is a United States Certificate of Citizenship issued to Isadore Zelker by the Supreme Court in Bronx, New York (1930), a Polish passport belonging to Mary Dreazen of Vilno (1921), and her United States States Certificate of Naturalization issued in New York in 1927. Lastly there is an undated Western Union Telegram congratulating Mr. and Mrs. Dreazen of New York on their marriage.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1987-10-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1987-10-2
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
7 cm of textual records and graphic material (approximately 57 photographs : b&w)
Date
[ca. 1842-1946]
Scope and Content
This accession consists of correspondence, photographs, birth certificates, marriage certificates, a German passport, a medal, postcards, Jewish Immigrant Aid Society of Canada receipt vouchers, parchment prayer scrolls, City of Toronto bicycle licenses, and other material relating to Chaim and Hena Silbiger and family of 51 Baldwin Street, Toronto. There are also photographs of Toronto scenes such as Harbord Bakery, Dibble Oil Truck (Manny Rotman), Harbord Fish Market, and a Belle Ewart street scene.
Photo Captions (001 - 012): Toronto Street Scenes, [194-]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, Accession # 1987-10-2.
Photo Caption (002): Street view of Alter and Goldie Kosower's Harbord Bakery, (Toronto, ON), [194-]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, Accession 1987-10-2.
Custodial History
Material was donated by Suzanne Harning and was found in a house on Harbord St., west of Spadina Ave.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1976-6-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1976-6-4
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
6 photographs : b&w
Date
[ca. 1901]-1952
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of B'nai Israel Congregation in Galt, Ont. (now Cambridge, Ont.).
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
B'nai Israel Congregation (Galt, Ont.)
Places
Galt, Ont.
Cambridge, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-1-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-1-2
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
ca. 190 photographs: b&w and col. ; 26 x 21 cm or smaller
1 painting: oil on canvas ; 77 x 63 cm in frame 91 x 78
35 cm of textual records
Date
1901-2005
Scope and Content
The accession includes a painting in the form of an oil on canvas portrait of Harry Dworkin, the grandfather of the donor. The painting was created by Sam Soboloff, who owned a tobacco store on St. Clair Avenue West during the 1920s.
In addition, the accession includes two cubic foot boxes of graphic and textual material. The records are in the form of family photographs of his grandparents and mother, correspondence written by the Dworkins, press clippings, an album as well as other material. Item lists of the materials, compiled previously, are included in the box.
Custodial History
Item lists found in the boxes indicate that these records belonged to Ellen (Honey) Arthurs.
Administrative History
Harry William (Raxlen) Arthurs was born on May 9, 1935 in Toronto to Lewis and Ellen Honey Raxlan. He was adopted in 1942 by Leon Arthurs of Toronto, Honey's second husband. He is the grandson of Dorothy and Harry Dworkin. His sister Cinda was born on Sept. 1, 1942, also in Toronto. In 1958, Arthurs married Sheila Rubin. After their divorce, he remarried Penelope Milnes and together they had two sons, Joshua and Gideon.
Harry Arthurs received his B.A. in 1955 and his LL.B. in 1958, both from the University of Toronto. He received his Masters of Law in 1959 from Harvard and joined Osgoode Hall Law School's faculty in 1961. Between 1968 and 1970, Arthurs served as Associate Dean and then as Dean, from 1972 to 1977. Arthurs served as President and Vice-Chancellor of York University from 1985 to 1992.
Arthurs is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada (1982), an Officer of the Order of Canada (1989), a Member of the Order of Ontario (1995), and a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy (2003). He was awarded the D.W. Mundell Medal in 1988, the first Killam Laureate in the Social Sciences in 2002, and the first Bora Laskin Award for Distinguished Contribution to Labour Law in 2003. His many publications include his book "Without the Law: Administrative Justice and Legal Pluralism in Nineteenth Century England."
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-5-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-5-7
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
19 photographs : b&w (jpg)
Date
[ca. 1908-1961]
Scope and Content
This accession consists of digitized photographs depicting four generations of the Rabovsky family of Owen Sound, from the early 1900s to 1961.
The photographs are as follows:
01. Goldie & Nathan Rabovsky, [ca. 1908].
02. Goldie Rabovsky (9) and Gail (9) in summer of 1961 in front of cottage at Sauble Beach, July 1961.
03. Bar Mitzvah of Stan Rabovsky, at Beth Ezekiel Synagogue, Owen Sound, [ca. 1953].
04. Rose Rabovsky, Stan Rabovsky & Irving Rabovsky at Bar Mitzvah of Stan Rabovsky, Owen Sound, [ca. 1953].
05.Rabovskys at Sauble Beach, 1957.
06. Marsha Rabovsky at Harrison Park, Owen Sound, 1957.
07. Group in suits in front of building, [before 1944]. Back row L to R: Lillian Rabovsky, Goldie [Cadesky] Rabovsky, Rose [Schecter] Rabovsky, Nathan Rabovsky, Max Rabovsky, Celia [Gordon] Rabovsky, Sadie Rabovsky, Irving Rabovsky. Front row L to R: Mike [Meyer] Rabovsky, Stan Rabovsky (on shoulders), Moe [Moses] Rabovsky, Bertha Rabovsky
08. Sauble Beach, Ontario, [1954]. Celia Rabovsky, Marsha Rabovsky, Max Rabovsky.
09. Sadie Rabovsky, Miriam Levison Rabovsky, Celia Rabovsky, Marsha Rabovsky, Molly Cadesky, Max Rabovsky, [1954].
10. Joel Cadesky, Debbie Cadesky, Marsha Rabovsky, Goldie Rabovsky (toddler) Sauble Beach, 1954.
11. Nathan Rabovsky & Goldie Rabovsky in front of their furniture store, Owen Sound, [193-?].
12. L to R: Moses (Moe) Rabovsky, Bertha Rabovsky, Max Rabovsky, Nathan Rabovsky, Owen Sound, [ca. 1940].
13. Max Rabovsky & Celia (Gordon) Rabovsky, Owen Sound, [193-?].
14. Ezekiel Cadesky, Owen Sound, [194-?].
15. Max & Celia Rabovsky, Owen Sound, [193-?].
16. Four young men in suits; second from left is Max Rabovsky, [ca. 1930].
17. Max Rabovsky & Nettye Podnick, Owen Sound, [ca. 1930]
18. Rabovsky family downtown Owen Sound, [before 1944]. Back row L to R: Lillian Rabovsky, Rose Rabovsky, Nathan Rabovsky, Irving Rabovsky, Goldie Rabovsky, Max Rabovsky, Celia Rabovsky, Sadie Rabovsky. Front row L to R: Meyer (Mike) Rabovsky, Stanley Rabovsky (on shoulders), Pvt. Moses (Moe) Rabovsky, Bertha Rabovsky (hugging).
19. Isaac Ezekiel Cadesky, [195-?].
Administrative History
The Rabovsky family is one of the oldest in the Owen Sound Jewish community. Nathan Rabovsky arrived with his brother in 1907; his marriage to Goldie Cadesky in 1909 was the first Jewish wedding in Owen Sound, for which a rabbi was brought in from Toronto. Goldie was the eldest daughter of Ethel Lewisky and Isaac Ezekiel Cadesky, for whom the Beth Ezekiel Synagogue is named. Nathan and Goldie had seven children: Sadie, Meyer (Mike), Irving, Lillian, Moses (Moe), Bertha and Max. Moses, a pilot in the Second World War, was killed in 1944. Max married Celia Gordon, and their granddaughter is donor Julie Gonik.
Use Conditions
None
Descriptive Notes
Related records: 2007-5-5, 2007-6-37
Subjects
Communities
Families
Name Access
Rabovsky family
Places
Owen Sound (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-31
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-31
Material Format
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
1 document (4 jpgs) : col.
Date
[19--]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of scanned copy of the constitution of the B'nai Jacob Congregation of Niagara Falls, 4 pages in four separate files.
Subjects
Synagogues
Communities
Name Access
B'nai Jacob Congregation (Niagara Falls, Ont.)
Places
Niagara Falls, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-9-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-9-2
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
architectural drawing (electronic)
Physical Description
37 photographs : b&w and col. (jpg) + 2 identification keys
16 documents (28 jpgs)
2 architectural drawings (jpg)
Date
[189-]-2004
Scope and Content
Accession consists of scanned copies of original records documenting the Jewish community in Cornwall. The records relate to various individuals in the community, including the donor, as well as organizations such as B'nai Brith, Hebrew Ladies' Aid Society, and the Beth-El Congregation. The items include scans of cemetery plans, burial certificates, photographs, meeting minutes, memorial books and various legal documents.
Photographs are as follows:
01. 60th Anniversary of D-Day Programme.
02. Abe and Rose Goldhamer, Long Sault Rapids before the seaway, ca. 1941.
03. Al Burnes in uniform. Al lived in Cornwall and moved to Toronto, [between 1939 and 1945].
04. Archie Dover, first person buried in the new cemetery, pg. 1, 1962.
05. Archie Dover, first person buried in the new cemetery, pg. 2, 1962.
06. Beth El Synagogue, exterior, nd.
07. Beth El Synagogue, interior, nd.
08. Birdie Phillips Miller.
09. B’nai Brith, ca. 1961. [obverse]
10. B’nai Brith, ca. 1961. [reverse]
11. B’nai Brith entertaining seniors from Glen Stor Dun Lodge, 1964.
12. B’nai Brith girls temporary charter, 1967.
13. B’nai Brith Youth Organization temporary charter, 1967.
14. Boys playing hockey behind the shul, 1930s. Back row, left to right: unidentified, Jack Abrugov, Murray Berns, Julius Kolomier. Front row, left to right: unidentified, Jack Goldhamer, unidentified, unidentified, unidentified.
15. Braham Goldhamer on piano.
16. Cemetery plan from office of LP Stidwill, civil engineer and Ontario land surveyor, April 18 1958.
17. Cemetery plan, nd.
18. Construction of the St. Lawrence Seaway, Robert Saunders Dam, 1957.
19. B’nai Brith emergency meeting minutes, 1967.
20. Entertainer, Helen Goldhamer and her father, Julius Miller.
21. General meeting regarding building of the synagogue, pg. 1, Oct. 5, 1924.
22. General meeting regarding building of the synagogue, pg. 2, Oct. 5, 1924.
23. B’nai Brith Cornwall Lodge, 1961. [obverse] Pictured are, Standing left to right: Moe Helperin, Peter Solway, Oscar Niduvitch, Louis Dubinsky, Alex Abugor, Sam Nyman, Moe Schulman, Bernard Miller, I. Martin, Saul Schulman. Seated left to right: Mark Goldhamer, Sam Smolkin, Saul Kaye, Mrs. Eddie Cantor (guest speaker), Rabbi Matts, Julius Miller.
24. B’nai Brith Cornwall Lodge, 1961. [reverse]
25. Hebrew School, ca. 1958.
26. Helen, Mark and Brham Goldhamer, ca. 1958.
27. Helen Goldhamer on the St. Lawrence just west of Cornwall.
28. Helen Goldhamer speaking.
29. Helen Goldhamer thanking guest speaker.
30. Joel Horovitz, Bar Mitzvah programme, 1954.
31. Julius Miller and daughter Helen Goldhamer with father Moses Miller (seated) and grandson Braham Goldhamer at age 2.
32. Julius Miller and wife Birdie in front of their furniture company’s first truck, ca. 1946.
33. Julius Miller Grove invitation to ceremony, 1969.
34. Julius Miller Grove letter, 1969.
35. Julius Miller Grove plaque, ca. 1969.
36. [Phillips family?], ca. 1900.
37. Annette Phillips and Mary Phillips, ca. 1948.
38. Julius Miller presented with a pin by Mrs. Eddie Cantor at an Israel Bonds drive, 1961.
39. Nathan Phillips with unidentified boy.
40. Left to right: Annette Phillips, Mary Phillips, Birdie Phillips Miller and Riva Phillips, 1940s.
41. Left to right: Archie Dover, Julius Miller and Rabbi Lewin at the Memory Board dedication.
42. Left to right: Helen Goldhamer, Sarah Vineberg, Mrs. M. Phillips, Birdie Phillips Miller, Annette Phillips, ca. 1938.
43. Succot. Left to right: Margot Miller, Jack Miller and Braham Goldhamer, ca. 1956.
44. Left to right: Mark Goldhamer, Iruim Thaw, Saul Schulman and guest speaker, ca. 1961.
45. Nathan and Sam Phillips, ca. 1920.
46. Legal letter regarding the deed to the cemetery, pg. 1, 1929.
47. Legal letter regarding the deed to the cemetery, pg. 2, 1929.
48. Markus Goldhamer RCAF discharge papers, pg. 1, 1945.
49. Markus Goldhamer RCAF discharge papers, pg. 2, 1945.
50. Markus Goldhamer RCAF photo, Second World War.
51. Mary Phillips, life member of Hadassah-WIZO card, April 5, 1954.
52. Memorial book, pg. 1, 1926.
53. Memorial book, pg. 2, 1926.
54. Memorial book, pg. 3, 1926.
55. Memorial book, pg. 4, 1926.
56. Memory board.
57. Moses Miller.
58. Original minutes forming the B’nai Brith chapter in Cornwall, pg. 1, 1934.
59. Original minutes forming the B’nai Brith chapter in Cornwall, pg. 2, 1934.
60. Original minutes forming the B’nai Brith chapter in Cornwall, pg. 3, 1934.
61. Original minutes forming the B’nai Brith chapter in Cornwall, pg. 4, 1934.
62. Part of crowd at the annual dinner in Beth El Synagogue hall.
63. Photocopy of Hebrew Ladies’ Aid meeting minutes, pg. 1, Nov. 29, 1922.
64. Photocopy of Hebrew Ladies’ Aid meeting minutes, pg. 2, Nov. 29, 1922.
65. President of B’nai Brith Mark Goldhamer speaking. Helen Goldhamer seated to his left.
66. Riva Phillips beside Julius Miller Furniture shop, 1950s.
67. Thank you card to Mark Goldhamer, pg. 1.
68. Thank you card to Mark Goldhamer, pg. 2.
69. [Phillips family?], ca. 1900.
Custodial History
The original records are in the possession of the donor. The OJA was granted permission to scan the records in September 2007, as part of the Ontario Small Jewish Communities initiative. These copies were then donated to the Archives on 2007-09-04.
Subjects
Communities
Cemeteries
Name Access
Goldhamer, Mark
Places
Cornwall, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-6-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-6-10
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
graphic material
textual record (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w and sepia (2 jpg) ; 14 x 9 cm
1 textual record (7 jpg files)
1 folder of textual records
Date
[ca. 1870]-2008
Scope and Content
This accession consists of records documenting the Posluns family of Toronto. They include two scanned copies of photographs and one original, depicting various members of the Posluns family such as the family patriarch, Yosef ben Abraham and a copy photograph of the Tip Top Tailors building under construction in 1928.
The textual records consist of one electronic copy of a short history of the Posluns family, taken from Samuel Bernstein's biography, as well as a copy of a YMHA bulletin cover page from June 15, 1934, featuring a message from the president, Louis Posluns.
Custodial History
The records were loaned to the OJA on June 17, 2008 to be copied and returned to the donor.
Administrative History
A history of the Poslaniec (Posluns) family can be found online at: http://www.posluns.com/tree/pdfs/poslaniec.pdf
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Name Access
Posluns, Wilfred, 1932-2010
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-7-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-7-2
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
42 photographs : b&w and col. (jpg)
1 folder of textual records
Date
1902-[ca. 1990]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of electronic photographs of the Levison family from Owen Sound, Ontario. Included in the photos are Rabbi Manfred Levison and his wife Rega, their daughters Miriam and Lottie and their son Benny. Also pictured are Miriam's husband Mike Rabovsky and daughter Goldie; Lottie's husband Ralph Glass and their daughters Rochelle and Janice. The photographs depict the family in China, Medicine Hat, Owen Sound, Sauble Beach, Belle Ewart, and Toronto after the family moved to Palmerston Avenue in 1952.
The textual records consist of a German birth certificate for Rabbi Levison, a marriage certificate for Rabbi Levison and Rega Wolf and a marriage certificate for his parents Leib Levisohn and Josefine (née Kaufmann) Levisohn.
Photo Captions:
001: Rochelle Glass and Janice Glass with their grandfather Manfred Levison, (Toronto, ON), ca. 1979.
002: Goldie Ronald, Miriam Rabovsky, Bruce Ronald and Mike Rabovsky (front), (Owen Sound, ON), ca. 1982
003: Goldie Ronald, Bruce Ronald, Miriam Rabovsky, and Mike Rabovsky at the wedding of Craig Levinson, (Toronto, ON), ca. 1990.
004: Mike Rabovsky, Miriam Rabovsky (née Levison), Lottie Glass (née Levison) & Ralph Glass, (Owen Sound, ON), ca. 1989.
005: [Unidentified], Lottie Levison, [unidentified] and Miriam Levison, China, ca. 1940.
006: Benny and Lottie Levison, China, ca. 1940
007: Rega Levison (née Wolf), (Medicine Hat, AB), ca. 1948
008: Miriam Levison, (Medicine Hat, AB), ca. 1948
009: Benny and Lottie Levison, (Owen Sound, ON), 1949.
010: Mike Rabovsky, Miriam Levison, [unknown Cadesky], [unknown Cadesky] and Benny Levision (front), Harrison Park, (Owen Sound, ON), 1951.
011: Mike Rabovsky and Miriam Levison, Harrison Park, (Owen Sound, ON), 1951.
012: Siblings Lottie, Miriam and Benny Levison, Harrison Park, (Owen Sound, ON), 1951.
013: Miriam and Lottie Levison, Harrison Park, (Owen Sound, ON), 1951.
014: Mike Rabovsky and Lottie Levison, (Owen Sound, ON), 1951.
015: Rega Levison (née Wolf), (Owen Sound, ON), 1951.
016: Lottie Levision, (Owen Sound, ON), 1951.
017: Rega and her daughter Lottie Levison, (Sauble Beach, ON), 1952.
018: Lottie Levison, Palmerston Avenue, (Toronto, ON), 1952.
019: Rega Levison, (Sauble Beach, ON), 1952.
020: Benny Levison, (Toronto, ON), 1952.
021: Benny Levison, (Owen Sound, ON), 1952.
022: Benny Levison, Mike Rabovsky and Lottie Levison, (Sauble Beach, ON), 1952.
023: Rega and Manfred Levison, (Sauble Beach, ON), 1952.
024: Manfred, Rega, Lottie and: Studio portrait of Ralph Glass, ca. 1935. Benny Levison (front), (Sauble Beach, ON), 1952.
025: Lottie and Benny Levison, (Sauble Beach, ON), 1952.
026: Levison family at Sauble Beach. Back row: Manfred Levison, Rega Levison and Mike Rabovsky. Front row: Lottie and Benny Levison, (Sauble Beach, ON), 1952.
027: Goldie Rabovsky held by her grandmother Rega Levison, Harrison Park, (Owen Sound, ON), 1953.
028: Mike Rabovsky, Goldie Rabovsky, Rega Levison and Miriam Rabovsky (née Levison),Harrison Park, (Owen Sound, ON), 1953.
029: Lottie Levison, Goldie Rabovsky, Rega Levison , Benny Levison and Miriam Rabovsky (née Levison),Harrison Park, (Owen Sound, ON), 1953.
030: Goldie and Mike Rabovsky, Victoria Day Weekend, Palmerston Avenue, (Toronto, ON), 1954.
031: Miriam and Goldie Rabovsky, Victoria Day Weekend, Palmerston Avenue, (Toronto, ON), 1954.
032: Lottie Levison, Glass family cottage, (Belle Ewart, ON), June 1955.
033: Ralph Glass, Glass family cottage, (Belle Ewart, ON), June 1955.
034: Lottie Levison, Ralph Glass and Arlene Glass (front), Glass family cottage, (Belle Ewart, ON), June 1955.
035: Arlene and Ralph Glass, Glass family cottage, (Belle Ewart, ON), June 1955.
036: Ralph Glass, Glass family cottage, (Belle Ewart, ON), June 1955.
037: Sally White and Lottie Levison, Palmerston Avenue, (Toronto, ON), November 1955.
038: Lottie Levison and Ralph Glass, Palmerston Avenue, (Toronto, ON), November 1955.
039: Miriam, Mike and Goldie Rabovsky, (Owen Sound, ON), August 1959.
040: Goldie Rabovsky, backyard garden, (Owen Sound, ON), August 1959.
041: Goldie Rabovsky, (Owen Sound, ON), August 1959.
042: Studio portrait of Ralph Glass, ca. 1935.
Administrative History
Lottie Glass is the daughter of Rabbi Manfred Levison and Rega (née Wolf) Levison. The Glass family including Lottie's siblings Miriam (m. Rabovsky) and Benny moved to Canada in 1947. They emigrated from China where they had been living since 1939. In Canada, the family first settled in Medicine Hat, Alberta and moved to Yarmouth, Nova Scotia in 1949. In 1950 they settled in Ontario first moving to Welland and then Owen Sound (1950-1952). In the summer of 1952, the family moved to Toronto and lived on Palmerston Avenue. Miriam and her husband Mike Rabovsky remained in Owen Sound. In 1954 after the death of his wife Rega, Rabbi Levison travelled to the United States in search of work and eventually settled in Brooklyn, New York.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Levison, Rabbi Manfred
Levison, Rega (née Wolf)
Levison, Benny
Glass, Lottie
Glass, Ralph
Glass, Rochelle
Glass, Janice
Rabovsky, Miriam
Rabovsky, Mike
Ronald, Goldie (née Rabovsky)
Ronald, Bruce
Places
Owen Sound, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-8-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-8-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w and col. (jpg)
Date
1890-[ca. 1935]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of three electronic scans of original photographs of Nathan Phillips' father Jacob, his mother Mary (nee Rosenbloom) and a group portrait of Nathan with his first son Lewis, his mother Mary and an unidentified older woman.
Custodial History
The original photographs are in the possession of the donor. They were loaned to the OJA for copying and then returned on Aug. 18, 2008.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
Families
Places
Cornwall (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-6-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-6-13
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
38 photographs (jpg) : b&w and col.
Date
[190?-1990]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting the Chana and Mayer Wisotsky family as well as Dora (Sherr) and her husband Morris Isen. Included are wedding and family portraits, photos of family members in military uniform during the Second World War, images of family celebrations, photos of family businesses, and images of Morris Isen performing with his orchestra. Identified in the photographs are: Anne Sillen, Jack Sillen, Ben Sherr, Dora Wisotsky, Marvin Wain (Wisotsky), Abe Benson, Dora (Sherr) Isen, and Morris Isen.
Administrative History
The Wisotsky family were Ukrainian immigrants who came to Canada around 1908. Chana and Mayer Munny Wisotsky had 13 children, seven of whom remained in Ukraine. Three of their five children and a grandchild (Jack Sillen), came with them in 1908, with two other children, Ben and Annie, following in 1912. The Wisotskys lived originally in Toronto. Ben Wisotsky eventually married Dora Wetstein and moved to the United States in the 1930s. Annie Wisotsky married Abe Benson, who ran a successful auto paint/gas station on Dufferin near Dupont during the 1920s and 1930s.
Morris Isen had a successful career as a trumpet player in the 1930s and 1940s; he was involved in radio orchestra, CBC television and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Families
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-9-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-9-2
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
7 photographs : b&w (jpg)
Date
[ca. 1895]-1943
Scope and Content
Accession consists of seven electronic copies of original photographs depicting various members of the Miller family of Cornwall, Ontario. Included is a photograph of Nathan Miller with his eyeglass testing machine, golden and diamond anniversary gatherings for Nathan and Dubby, a studio portrait of Abe Miller, a photo of Ben Miller in an army tent with fellow soldiers and two photos of Nathan Miller holding his grandson, Jack.
Custodial History
The original photographs are in the possession of the donor, Jack Miller. The scans were produced by the donor for the Archives' Small Jewish Communities project.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
Families
Places
Cornwall (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-11-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-11-1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
5 cm of textual records
6 photographs : b&w ; 21 x 16 cm or smaller
Date
1905-1949
Scope and Content
This accession consists of textual records and photographs documenting members of the Agranove and Lyons families, specifically the donor's grandfather, William Agranove, as well as his mother and father, Frances and Irwin Lyons. The textual records consists mainly of correspondence, however, there are also school report cards and certificates, greeting cards and a souvenir programme. The photographs are group and individual portraits of family members including Avrum Rotenberg, Sarah Rotenberg, Saul Lyons, Mary Agranove, Irwin Lyons, Frances Lyons, Bill Agranove, Anna Lyons, Shirley Lyons, Sam Rotenberg, Nate Rotenberg, Sol Rotenberg, Sam Pollock and Harry Rotenberg.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of the donor before they were donated to the Archives on November 3, 2008.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
Families
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-2-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-2-5
Material Format
object
textual record
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
1 artifact
Date
1902-1981
Scope and Content
The records consist of material produced by Rabbi Saul Gringorten and his son I.M. Gringorten. They include certificates and identification for Rabbi Gringorten and his wife, along with his son I.M. Gringorten. In addition, the accession includes a great deal of correspondence in both English and Yiddish from the father and son during the 1940s, particularly during the period when the rabbi resided in the United States. Some material also documents I.M. Gringorten's involvement in the United Zionists organization during the 1940s. Finally, this accession includes a chupa (marriage canopy) that was first used in 1910 by Saul Wolf Gringorten in Brantford, Ont.. The chupa is made out of a tallis with embellishments sewn into the centre. The chupa was subsequently used by various members of the Gringorten family.
Administrative History
Saul Wolf Gringorten and his wife Rachel (nee Melnick) were born in Poland in 1876 and 1881 respectively. They moved to Canada in 1910 with their eldest child Morris. They subsequently had five more after their arrival. Their children included: Israel Morris (I.M.), Jennie, Jacob, Esther, Louis and Isaac.
Rabbi Gringorten served as spiritual leader, teacher, shochet and mohel for the Brantford Jewish community after his arrival for thirteen years. He would also be on call in northern and western Ontario where the communities were too small to support a rabbi. He then moved to Toronto during the early 1920s and became the principal of a Jewish school. The family lived at 26 Cecil Street at that time and then moved to 393 Markham Street during the late 1920s or early 1930s. He became active in the Jewish community, serving as Vice-President of the Sons of Jacob, a board member of the Folks Farein and the first Trustee of the Old Folks Home.
Rabbi Gringorten and his wife moved to California during the mid-1940s in order to live in a climate that was better for their health. Rachel passed away in 1947 and the Rabbi followed in 1959.
Their oldest son, Israel Morris Gringorten, was born in Poland in 1904. He was educated in Brantford and later graduated from the University of Toronto. He served during the Second World War from 1943 until 1945. After his discharge, he spent his career working as an auto parts manufacturer with Canada Motor Products Ltd. He was an ardent Zionist who served as president of the United Zionists - Revisionists of America during the 1940s. He and his wife had four children.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
LANGUAGE NOTE: Records are in Yiddish and English.
ACCESSION RESTRICTION NOTE: One file contains medical information and is closed.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Gringorten, Saul Wolfe
Gringorten, Rachel
Gringorten, Israel Morris
Places
Brantford (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-5-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-5-3
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
4 cm of textual records
15 photographs
1 album (467 photographs, 29 postcards)
Date
[1903-195?]
Scope and Content
The records include personal documents of Herman Berenblum and his family, including birth certificates, graduation certificates, and his certification as a tailor. Textual records also include 5 letters from the 1940s written to Berenblum from his parents in Germany and from a friend in South America. There are 15 loose photographs as well as a photo album that holds 467 photos and 39 postcards. The photographs document Berenblum's travels in Europe and South America, including an apparent visit to the 1936 Olympics in Berlin, Germany. Records also include a folder of tailor patterns for men's suits.
Custodial History
The records were collected by OJA staff at Mr. Berenblum's apartment. They were in the custody of the property managers of his estate until probate was granted, at which time they were sent to the OJA as requested in April 2009.
Administrative History
Herman Berenblum (1914-2008) was born in 1914 in Lodz, Poland to Joseph (1896-1941) and Cypra (nee Geler) (1897-1941) Berenblum. Herman had a brother, Bernard (192?-2012) and sister, Klara (1923-1941). By the age of six, Berenblum's family had moved to Berlin, where he started school, graduating at the age of 16 in 1930. After graduating from public school, he studied as a tailor, earning his certificate after three years, in 1933. Sometime between 1936 and 1941 Herman was able to leave Germany, settling in La Paz, Bolivia, and by 1947, in Buenos Aires, Argentina. In 1941, Berenblum's mother, father and sister were deported from Berlin to the Riga Ghetto in German-occupied Latvia and then shot by German killing squads on Nov. 30, 1941. In the 1950s, Herman moved to Canada, where his brother Bernard was also living. Here he met his wife. They were married for approximately 50 years, with no children. Herman's wife predeceased him in 2002; he passed away in September, 2008, at the age of 94.
Descriptive Notes
Documents and letters are in German, Polish and Spanish.
Name Access
Berenblum, Herman, 1914-2008
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-11-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-11-1
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
13 photographs : b&w ; 20 x 25 cm or smaller
Date
1903-[ca.1960]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 13 photographs documenting the Wagman family as well as wedding photographs of Charlotte Wagman and Martin Levene at the Goel Tzedec Synagogue. There is also a programme for the Goel Tzedec Religious School graduation exercises of 1944, with Charlotte Wagman as a graduate.
The photographs are as follows:
1. Goel Tzedec Religious School Graduation Exercise Program, 1944.
2. Tel Aviv Hadassah Chapter in Garden, ca. 1957.
3. State of Israel Bond Information Service reception in honour of the Toronto Israel Bond Oheh Regel Tour, at the home of the Canadian Ambassador, Margaret Meagher, in Ramat Gan, ca. 1960
4. Goel Tzedec Sunday school class, 1941.
5. El Al flight in Israel, ca.1961. The image features Mayor Nathan Phillips and his wife.
6. Portrait of the Wagman family, 1903. Includes from bottom row, left to right: Charles, Joseph, Zelic, Etta, Ceril (seated). Top row includes: Myer (nephew), Peter, Isadore and William.
7. Paskowitz family, ca. 1940. Includes Mary, Sadie, Hilda and Fanny.
8. Wedding photograph of Charlotte Wagman and Martin Levene taken in Goel Tzedec, 14 June 1947.
9. Martin and Charlotte under the chuppah at their wedding at Goel Tzedec, 14 June 1947.
10. Goel Tzedec graduation class in robes with Rabbi Sachs (centre), 1944. Front row (left to right): [unidentified], [unidentified], Selma Green, Selma Stone, [unidentified], Hoodis Sidonsky, Charlotte Wagman, Estelle Yolles, Rhea Tishler. Back row (left to right): [unidentified], Murray Mendelson, David Buckstein, Richard Greisman, Sheldon Kert, [unidentified], [unidentified], Austin Cooper, [unidentified].
11. Israel Trip with David Ben Gurion (center), ca. 1952.
12. Trip to Israel with Nathan Philips at far right and Ambassador Meagher, taken in desert, ca. 1960.
13. Ladies Auxiliary from the Henry Street Synagogue, ca. 1908.
Custodial History
The photographs were donated by Charlotte (Wagman) Levine. She is the daughter of Charles Wagman.
Administrative History
The family patriarch, Zelick (also known as Zelig) Wagman, emigrated from Lodz, Poland to Canada around 1903. The following year, his wife Ceril, and six children joined him. They included: Charles, Joseph, Etta, Peter, Isadore and WIlliam. He arrived penniless and earned a living as a peddler. The family lived in the east end of Toronto at 34 Gerard Street.
Zelick founded Z. Wagman & Sons as well as Toronto Cadmium Plating. Joseph took over his father's business. Charles became a supplier of electrical products, establishing Revere Electric. William and Isadore, in turn, ran Industrial Wire & Cable as well and also owned the Fashion Building on Spadina Avenue. Finally, Peter owned his own business called P. Wagman & Sons and later Junior Maid Garment Company.
The family became extremely successful over the years. They also were very active in the Jewish community. Zelick was one of the founders of the Henry Street Synagogue, Beth Jacob. William was the co-founder of the YMHA and the Talmud Torah. His brother Joseph was also involved in many Jewish organizations such as Mount Sinai Hospital, Baycrest and the Primrose Club. Joseph and his wife Minnie were also major philanthropists, funding the Joseph E. and Minnie Wagman Centre at Baycrest.
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIALS: Other records relating to the Wagman family can be found in Accessions 2017-7-6 and 2017-8-13.
Subjects
Families
Weddings
Name Access
Wagman family
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-3-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-3-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 300 photographs and other material
Date
1906-1983
Scope and Content
The accession includes records documenting the family of Sharon Abron Drache. This includes both sides of her family: the Abramowitz/Abron and Levinter. The material consists of two beta home movie tapes, three DVDs, several photo albums, four artifacts as well as newspaper clippings, correspondence, certificates and other material. The donation also includes a book entitled Window on Toronto, a certificate for the Jewish Colonial Trust, examples of Murray Abron's photographs and an Abba Eban recording of a speech he gave at the UN.
Custodial History
The records were in the custody of Sharon Abron Drache. She has interherited the family photos and documents from both sides of her family.
Administrative History
Murray Abramowitz was born in 1912 in Toronto. His parents were David (1884-1963) and Sarah (nee Winfield) (1885-1955). David arrived in Toronto in 1906. Sarah and her parents, Jacob and Anna, settled in Scranton, Pennsylvania around 1880. Jacob worked as a grocer and relocated his family to Toronto around 1894. Sarah and David were married at the McCaul Street Synagogue in Toronto on 6 March 1906. They resided at 159 York Street after their nuptials. The couple had three children: Rose (1907-2001); Oscar (1910-1986); Murray (1912-2005). David's father, Shevach, served as the lay cantor at the First Roumanian Hebrew Congregation (now Adath Israel). David owned the Men’s shop in the Union Station and his sister, Sophie Abramowitz, ran the Ladies shop. The shops were located on the east end of the Great Hall beneath the composite glass windows. Rose Abron Lahman became a physician, specializing in obstetrics and gynecology. Initially she practised in Toronto and then in Atlanta, Georgia. Rose graduated from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto when there were quotas for both women and Jews.
Murray married Edythe (née Levinter) on 8 June, 1941. The event took place at the bride's family's home above their furniture store, J. Levinter Ltd, at 1169 Bloor Street West. The couple had one child, Sharon Abron Drache. Murray began using the Abron surname during the 1940s, changing it legally in the 1950s.
During his life, Murray worked as an hotelier and ran several businesses. They included the Rex Hotel in Toronto and Tent City at Lake Simcoe (ca. 1935-1945) and the St. Lawrence Hotel in Port Hope (1949-1955). When Murray managed the Rex Hotel he was a 50/50 partner with his mother's brother-in-law, Leo Hertzman. Leo owned and managed the store, United Clothing, which fronted the Rex hotel on Queen Street at the south side of the beverage room. When Leo’s son Harold Hertzman returned from military service in 1945, Leo bought out Murray’s share in the business for Harold. Jack Ross and Morris Meyers purchased the hotel from the Hertzmans in 1951. Murray was also a co-owner of the Tent City business with his father, David Abramowitz, coinciding with his Rex hotel years. During the late 1950s he worked as a real estate broker in Toronto and Florida. From the 1960s to the early 1970s he worked in his mother-in-law’s furniture business, J. Levinter Ltd. After Murray retired from the furniture business he became a stock broker. His hobbies included fishing, photography and storytelling. He died on 10 October 2005.
The Levinter family was headed by Samuel and Rebecca (née Godfried). They were both born in Austria (Galicia) and came to Canada in their teens. After their marriage in 1890, they resided in St. John's Ward. The couple had seven children: Jacob (b. 1892); Etta (b. 1894); Manny (b. 1895); Isadore (b. 1898); Molly (b. 1900); Rose and Dolly. Isadore became a prominent Toronto lawyer and was the first Jew appointed as a bencher at the Law Society of Upper Canada.
Samuel established Levinter Furniture in 1890. The business was initially located at 401-405 Queen Street. By 1925 Samuel had relocated his store to 287 Queen Street West and his son Jacob had opened a second location at 1169 Bloor Street West. Jacob later expanded his location to 1171 Bloor Street West. Samuel died on April 30, 1942; Rebecca died in 1952. Jacob married Sara Kamin (b. 1894, Lodz, Poland) on 25 June 1916. They had six children: Edythe (1918 -2011); Alfred (1919-1919); Evelyn (1922-2006); Murray (1925-); Molly (1926 -); Florence (b. 1930-). Jacob died of a heart attack in 1944. After his death, Sara took his place as owner and manager of the family business grooming her son Murray to succeed her. Sara’s daughter Molly had an early career as a concert pianist in Toronto and New York. Sara died in Toronto in 1990.
Sharon Abron Drache attended Forest Hill Collegiate (g. 1962) and then completed an undergraduate degree and post-graduate diploma in Psychology at the University of Toronto, the latter from the Institute of Child Study. She was enrolled as a special student in the Department of Religion at Carleton University from 1974-78. She has published four books of adult fiction, The Mikveh Man, Ritual Slaughter, The Golden Ghetto, Barbara Klein Muskrat – then and now, and two children's books, The Magic Pot and The Lubavitchers are coming to Second Avenue. She has also worked as a literary journalist and book reviewer for several newspapers and journals including, The Globe and Mail, Ottawa Citizen, Books in Canada, the Glebe Report and the Ottawa and Western Jewish Bulletins.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION NOTE: Includes 4 objects, 2 videocassettes (beta-tapes), 3 DVDs, 1 book, and 1 folder of textual records.
ASSOCIATED MATERIAL NOTE: Please see Sharon Drache's fonds at Library and Archives Canada and at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto for material related to her literary career. Please see Sharon Drache's fonds at the Ottawa Jewish Archives for material related to her journalism career. Finally, for additional material related to Sharon's family please see her fonds at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto.
RELATED MATERIAL NOTE: See accessions #2010-12/8 and # 2013-7/15 for addtional records donated by Sharon Abron Drache.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-10-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-10-4
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
ca. 90 cm of textual records
1 scrapbook
ca. 24 photographs : b&w and col. (17 jpg)
Date
[ca. 1907] - 2008
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs and textual material that document Morley Wolfe’s community involvement and personal and professional life. Personal records include photographs of Morley and his family, correspondence with family and friends, his marriage certificate and school diplomas.
Professional records include his curriculum vitae, photographs, reports, correspondence, nomination letters for various awards, such as the Order of Canada, news clippings, certificates and awards, newsletters, event invitations and records documenting his involvement in a court case between the Ontario Deputy Judges Association and the Attorney General of Ontario. Also included are scanned photographs of Morley presenting an award to Rosa Parks (1999), receiving his Ontario Senior Achievement award (2000), and meeting with Jean Chrétien (2001).
Accession also includes one scrapbook documenting Morley's term as national president of BBC. Finally, accession contains records documenting the various appeals filed against BBC by Wolfe, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 and CMOBBC, such as, the appeal notices filed with BBI’s Court of Appeal, correspondence, various BBC constitutions and by-laws, Wilson Heights Lodge executive meeting minutes, CMOBBC newsletters, and news clippings.
Administrative History
Morley S. Wolfe was born in Winnipeg in 1928 to Cecil (b. 1895) and Betty (nee Davidow) Wolfe. He spent his early childhood in various cities in Saskatchewan and Manitoba until moving to Toronto in 1940. Soon after graduating from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1955 he started his own practice as a senior member of the law firm Burt, Burt, Wolfe and Bowman. In 1971 he was appointed Queen’s Council, and from 1973 to 1977 he served as counsel for B’nai Brith Canada. After his retirement from practice in 1993, the Province of Ontario appointed him presiding Justice of the Peace for Ontario and Deputy Judge in Small Claims Court.
His first marriage was to Sandra Newman in 1958 and they had three children together: Leslie, Lee, and Melanie. He later married Joan and became the step-father to her daughter, Erin.
Throughout his life Morley was passionate about fighting prejudice and discrimination and became involved with organizations, such as the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews and the Urban Alliance on Race Relations. He was also a member of the Toronto Police Services Board Committee on Race Relations, served as Chair of the North York Committee on Community, Race and Ethnic Relations, and was appointed to the Canadian Multiculturalism Council. In addition, he was the founding president of Toronto Residents in Partnership (TRIP) from 2003 to 2006.
His involvement extended to Jewish organizations. He served as National President of B’nai Brith Canada (BBC) from 1982 to 1983 and was a founding member of its League for Human Rights. He was also President of BBC’s Toronto Regional Council and Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998, and of the Jewish Camp Council of Toronto as well as many other organizations.
Morley’s hard work and involvement in the community earned him many awards, including, City of Toronto’s William P. Hubbard Race Relations Award, the YMCA Canada Peace Medal, B’Nai Brith Canada Service Award, and the Province of Ontario’s Senior Achievement Award.
Around 2002, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 began filing a series of appeals with B’nai Brith International (BBI) over concerns that BBC’s national executive was governing undemocratically. Morley played a key role in filing these appeals and was the centre of one appeal filed after BBC censured him without advance notice or the opportunity for a hearing. These appeals were not all successful.
Around 2006, Morley became involved in another appeal against BBC that was filed by a group of members who called themselves the Concerned Members of B’nai Brith Canada (CMOBBC). They alleged that BBC’s national executive had too much centralized power, was not governing transparently, failed to provide members with audited financial statements at multiple annual general meetings (AGMs), passed a constitution that members had defeated at the 2005 AGM, and was threatening and harassing some members. BBI’s appeal court rendered its verdict in 2007 in favour of BBC. Soon after this judgment was made BBC took steps to expel all the members of CMOBBC. In response, Morley resigned from the organization.
Morley currently resides in Brampton.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-3-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-3-1
Material Format
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
2 photographs : col. (1 jpg) ; 10 x 15 cm
Date
[2012?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a photograph taken by Jack Hecker of the site of the former Agudath Israel Anshei Sfard Shul (151 Palmerston Ave.). A duplex house currently occupies the site. The text on the duplex building was added in by Jack Hecker.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Architecture
Synagogues
Name Access
Agudath Israel Anshei Sfard Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-4-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-4-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records and other material
Date
[190-]-1994
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the literary and military careers of Leo Heaps, as well as a small selection of family photographs and textual records. Included are various manuscripts and other writings, newsclippings and documents related to Heaps' role as a British paratrooper and his subsequent awarding of the Royal Military Cross. The photographs document the Heaps family, as well as the underground resistance movement in Arnhem, of which he was a part.
The videocassette documents a family trip to Arnhem in 1994 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Arnhem.
Photo Caption (035): Seargent Alan Kettley of the Glider Pilot Regiment, [194-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2012-4-2. Courtesy of the Heaps Family.
Photo Caption (038): Gilbert Sadi-Kirschen known, head of the Special Air Service mission to Arnhem, [194-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2012-4-2. Courtesy of the Heaps Family.
Photo Caption (046): Major Tony Hibbot (left) about to take off for Arnhem, [194-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2012-4-2. Courtesy of the Heaps Family.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Adrian Heaps, son of Leo Heaps.
Administrative History
Leo Heaps (1923-1995) was born in Winnipeg in 1923, the son of A. A. Heaps and Bessie Morris. His father A. A. was a founder of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, the forerunner of the New Democratic Party. Leo Heaps was raised in Winnipeg and received an education at Queen's University, the University of California, and McGill University. During the Second World War, at the age of 21, Heaps was seconded to the British Army and found himself commanding the 1st Battalion's Transport. He participated in the Battle of Arnhem as a paratrooper.
Leo Heaps was awarded the Royal Military Cross for his work with the Dutch Resistance. His brother, David, had also achieved the same distinction, thereby making them the only Jewish brothers during the Second World War to win the decoration. After the war, Heaps went to Israel and aided their army in the establishment of mobile striking units. Whilst there, he met his wife-to-be, Tamar (1927-). Together they had one son, Adrian, and three daughters, Karen, Gillian, and Wendy.
During the Hungarian Revolution he led a special rescue team to bring refugees out and across the border. In the mid-1960s he returned to Britain where he dabbled in various entrepreneurial projects as well as writing several books, notably "The Grey Goose of Arnhem", telling his own story of Arnhem, the aftermath of the battle, and also the stories of other Arnhem evaders and their dealings with the Resistance.
Leo Heaps spent most of his life in Toronto, Canada, and was amongst the forty Canadian veterans who returned to Arnhem in 1994 to mark the 50th anniversary. He died in 1995.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Publication credit line must read: Courtesy of the Heaps Family.
Descriptive Notes
Physical Description note: Includes ca. 100 photographs; 1 videocassette (ca. 32 min) : col, sd. ; VHS, and 1 presentation piece : 52 x 49 cm.
Subjects
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Heaps, Leo, 1923-1995
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-8-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-8-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 18 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1884-1985
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the Coppel and Cooper families of Galt (now Cambridge) and Toronto respectively. Coppel family records include family correspondence, photocopies of Moses Kappel's discharge papers from the Austo-Hungarian military (1884), B'nai Israel Synagogue sisterhood meeting minutes, financial records, photographs, Hadassah booklets and programmes, and a photo album documenting the closing of B'nai Israel Synagogue in 1985. Also included are records relating to Elizabeth Cooper's (nee Coppel) involvement in Canadian Young Judaea and work as a camp counselor at a Jewish day camp near Kitchener-Waterloo (Judaean Day Camp / Camp Ruach). These records include correspondence, publications, activity schedules, lists of camp counselors, and a Young Judaean scarf. Coppel family records also include marriage and burial records of Aaron Coppel, audio cassettes of an oral history interview conducted with Cy Coppel in 1976, and military records documenting Max David Simonoff's service in the Canadian Navy during the Second World War. Finally, included is a Farband Shule (Folks school) programme book (1927) and class photo (ca. 1931). Identified in the photograph is Ethel Raicus (first row, third from the right).
Cooper family records include digital photographs of Sam Cooper and the weightlifting club at the YMHA in Toronto (1930s), portraits of Jacob Cooper (Cooperberg), a school photo of Sam and Max Cooper, and a photo of Hilda Cooper.
Finally accession consists of programme books for various events, including a Canadian Jewish Congress song book, an Israel Dance Theatre at the Royal Alexandra, and a Queen Esther Purim play.
Administrative History
Aaron Selig (Archie Aaron) Coppel (Kappel / Koppel / Cappell / Kappele) was born to Moses Kappel and Perl (nee Pistenfeld) in Galicia in 1882. He came to Canada in 1903 and lived with a landsmen family - the Siegel's. Mr. Siegel was a horse dealer who took Aaron under his wing and taught him the horse trade. Aaron married Mr. Siegel's daughter Chaya Geitel (Gertrude) Seigel in 1905. Aaron and Geitel had seven children: Helen, Rose, Newt, Cyrus (Cy; born in 1911), Les, George, and Harry. After marriage, Aaron and Geitel remained in Galt and Aaron continued dealing in livestock. Although he was eager to assimilate into Canadian society (gave his children British names and spoke with no accent), the family kept kosher and Aaron hired itinerant Hebrew teachers for the children.
Cyrus Coppel married Channa (Anna) Simonoff on August 25th, 1946. Anna was born in Russia to Avraham Dov and Chashe Bryna Tzaitzeck. Anna had three siblings: Sarah Merle, Faigle (died en route to Canada), and Mordecai Doved. She immigrated to Ottawa in 1914 with her family. An uncle already living in Ottawa had changed his last name to Simonoff and the family decided to change their name to Simonoff as well. Avraham worked as a tailor in Russia and likely continued in this profession in Canada. The family moved to Toronto sometime after 1919 and was actively involved in the labour zionist movement. Anna was in the milliner's union and two of her aunt's were members of Club One (Pioneer Women): Slaava Raicus and Esther Cohen. Anna and Cyrus had two children together: Bryna (24 Feb. 1949-12 Jan. 2006) and Elizabeth (b. 16 Dec. 1950). Cyrus initially worked as a mechanic, but later worked in the office of an auto shop and traded in auto parts. He also traded in livestock as a hobby. Cyrus was one of the founders of the B'nai Israel Synagogue in Galt. Initially, synagogue services were held in the homes of local residents, such as the Spring family, however, a building was finally purchased in 1946. After the synagogue closed, the torahs and plaques went to the Synagogue in Kitchener. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Jacob Cooperberg (Kupferberg, Cooper) came to Canada around 1910 from Kielce, Poland. His wife and children (Max, Sam, and Aidel or Ida) remained in Poland, waiting for Jacob to earn enough money for them to come to Canada as well. His family was unable to join him until after the First World War had ended, arriving in 1920. Jacob and Sarah had three more children in Canada: Irving, Joey, and Hilda. Jacob worked as a peddler in Toronto and later opened a scrap yard, Cooper Iron and Medal. The family lived on Oxford Street in the Kensington Market area.
Sam Cooper married Kay Gernstein in 1948. They had two children together: Neil and Donna (married name is Speigel). Sam initially worked as a tailor, but later worked as a scrap dealer. Neil married Donna Coppel and also works in the scrap trade. Donna is a librarian.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Descriptive Notes
Includes 1 photo album, 7 photographs (tiff), 3 photographs, 2 audio cassettes, and 1 scarf.
Subjects
Families
Places
Galt (Cambridge, Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-7-19
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-7-19
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
51 photographs (tiff)
Date
1980-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting the activities of the Chmeilnicker Charitable Society including the annual "Hazkarah", teas, and an unveiling of the monument at Lambert Cemetery.
Administrative History
The Chmeilnicker Society was started in Toronto after the Holocaust by survivors. In its early years, the Society played an important role in the lives of the newly-arrived groups for socializing with people who had shared similar experiences in Europe. They organized picnics, women's teas, celebrate Yom Yerushalaim, Channukah parties and an annual "Hazkarah", a memorial service for those who died in the war. The Hazkarah continues to be the most important activity of the group today.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-10-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-10-7
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
4 photographs : b&w (2 negatives) ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Date
[190-]-1919
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to Rabbi Yosef (Joseph) Weinreb and the Congregation Machziki Hadas Menhag Sford (Teraulay Street Synagogue). Among the records are marriage certificates, financial documents pertaining to the synagogue along with correponsdence on its opening and the original by-laws. Also included is a photograph and copy negative of a Victoria School manual training class from the 1930s picturing Rabbi Weinreb's son, Sol, a photograph of two men and a child standing on the street (possibly Rabbi Weinreb on Teraulay Street), as well as a copy negative of Rabbi Weinreb with his wife in front of an unidentified building.
Custodial History
There is no acquisition information for these records. It is highly likely that they came in with the Sol Edell records. The accession number has been assigned by the archivist.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-11-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-11-5
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 20 photographs
1 folder of textual records
Date
[190-?]-1963
Scope and Content
Accession consists of graphic and textual material documenting Mark Hazza and his family. Included are family and individual portraits, unidentified school and sports team photographs, and a Rocky Mountain Polo Ranch greeting card. Of note are promotional sight-seeing photographs for Toronto and a photograph of Bob Hope at a Paramount Theatre event in Toronto. Also included are obituaries and other genealogical information that was collected by Nessa Herman.
Identified in the photographs are: Mark Hazza, Mary Hazza, Phillip Hazza, John Hazza, Reuben Hazza, Racheal (nee Hazza) Harris, David Cainer, Sadie (nee Hazza) Cainer, Isadore Harris, Annie (nee Hazza) Cohen, Sam Cohen, Evelyn Cohen, Shirley Harris, Hershel Harris, Sidney Cohen, Ruth Cohen, and Theresa Harris.
Custodial History
Nessa Herman collected the material from various family members and donated it to the OJA.
Administrative History
Mark Hazza was one of the earliest Jewish immigrants to settle in Toronto. He was born in Russian Poland in 1845. To escape the draft he was smuggled into Holland and later went to England in 1866. He finally settled in Toronto around 1871. Soon after arriving in Toronto, Miriam (Marion or Mary) Barnett from Bristol, England joined him here and they were married in the small hall where Holy Blossom Synagogue's services were being conducted at the time. They settled in Yorkville and Mark ran a tailoring business in what was the north end of the city.
Mark and Miriam had six children together: Racheal (Rae), Annie, Phillip, John (Hyman or Imy), Reuben (Rubin or Bun), and Sadie. Reuben went to to become a sports trainer, Phillip worked in the film business as a general manager for Famous Players, and John opened the Rocky Mountain Polo Pony Ranch in Alberta and was the first manager of Capitol Theatre in Calgary.
Mark passed away in 1918.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
Families
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-9-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-9-1
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
3 photographs (tiffs) : col.
1 folder of textual records
Date
2005-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of graphic material and a textual record documenting the Transnistria Survivor Association. Included are three photos: 1) Member Arnold Buxbaum standing in front of Memorial for Transnistria at Earl Bales Park; 2) Arnold Buxbaum and Joe Leinburd at UJA Foundation Event, 2011-12; 3) Hazkarah, 2005 at Sharei Shomayim Synagogue. There is also a speech by Arnold Buxbaum presented in 2011 at Sharei Shomayim Synagogue.
Custodial History
Originals were loaned for reproducing.
Administrative History
Founded in 1994, the Transnistria Survivors’ Association works to provide a voice for and raise awareness of a lesser known group of Holocaust survivors. Transnistria was the Romanian authorities’ name for the former Ukrainian region located between the Rivers Dniester and Bug. It was placed under Romanian administration following the German and Romanian conquest of Ukraine in the summer of 1941. Prior to the Second World War, Romania was home to the third largest Jewish population in Europe; but beginning with the Citizenship Revision Laws of 1938, the Jews of Romania were deprived their citizenship rights and became the targets of repressive antisemitic policies and laws. Neighbours turned on neighbours. Thousands of Jews were murdered in pogroms, either by Romanian or German troops, Nazi Einsatzgruppen, or the local population. In 1941, the Jews who remained alive in the Provinces of Bucovina and Bessarabia were deported to camps and ghettos in Transnistria. Thousands were jammed into freight trains while others were marched by foot. Many died along the way. Between 1941 and 1944, it is estimated that German and Romanian authorities, along with Ukrainian collaborators, murdered or caused the deaths of hundreds of thousands of Romanian and Ukrainian Jews in Transnistria. Some of those who survived these tragic circumstances, especially from Bucovina and Bessarabia, and made a new home in Toronto gathered together to lend each other support and to tell their largely unknown story of oppression and survival. The Transnistria Survivor’s Association organized yearly Hazkarah (memorial) services and its dedicated members continue to share their extraordinary stories of survival through speaking engagements at schools, colleges and synagogues. Past presidents include:
1. Felicia (Steigman) Carmelly
2.Osias Nadel
3.Etti Ziegler
4.Lou (Leizer) Hoffer
As of 2017, the current President is Joe Leinburd.
Subjects
Societies
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Name Access
Transnistria Survivors Association
Buxbaum, Arnold
Leinburd, Joe
Hoffer, Lou
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-12-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-12-3
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w with watercolour retouching ; 26 x 41 cm
Date
[ca. 1906]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a portrait of Samuel Helpert of Sudbury, shortly after arriving from Minsk, Russia. The photograph was originally a glass plate negative that was blown-up and printed. Watercolours were then used to colourize the image and as a way of emphasising the contrast and other features that were lost during the printing process.
Administrative History
Samuel Helpert was the paternal great uncle of the donor. He was born in Minsk, Russia and immigrated to Canada where he lived in Sudbury and Toronto.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
Portraits
Name Access
Helpert, Samuel
Places
Russia
Sudbury (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-3-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-3-1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 photograph : b&w
Date
1944, 2006-2007, 2013-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of Holy Blossom Temple Bulletins dated Sept. 2006, Nov. 2006, Jan. 2007, June 2013, Sept. 2013, Dec. 2013, calendar of events for Fall/Winter and Winter/Spring 2013, and family programming for 2013/2014. Also includes an obituary of Irving Milchberg and a scanned copy of a reunion of confirmation class (1944) that pictures Nancy Draper and others.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Name Access
Holy Blossom Temple (Toronto, Ont.)
Draper, Nancy
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-6-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-6-4
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
ca. 40 photographs
3 CDs
Date
1919-2013, predominant 1919-1974
Scope and Content
Accession consists of scanned photographs and textual records that document the Natanson family. Photographs include images of the Lazar and Muriel Natanson's wedding, family portraits, portraits inside and in front of the store, class portraits and Lazar in his military uniform, Textual records consist of the eulogies for Lazar and Muriel Natanson, and copy of a summary of the history of the Weinstein family, and scanned copies of letters from Muriel Natanson to Eileen Bellan (nee Natanson) while Eileen was at Camp B'Nai Brith. Of note is the brief description of Muriel as an eyewitness to the Christie Pitts riot in 1933. CDs consist of digital copies of the photo reproductions in this accession.
Administrative History
Lazar Natanson (1918-1984) was born to Benjamin and Rose (nee Gratz) Natanson. He had five siblings, Albert (b. 1900), Freida (b. 1902), Celia (b. 1905), Nathan (b. 1909) and Ida (b. 1916). Soon after the end of the Second World War Lazar took ill and went to Montreal to recover and returned to Toronto several years later. Muriel Natanson (nee Weinstein) (1923-2013) was born in Bucharest, Romania, to Solomon (Shlomo) and Sylvia Weinstein. She had two brothers, David (1924-2010) and Albert (b.1933). Solomon was a housepainter and wallpaper hanger. Muriel left school at the age of 16 to help support her family, working at Tip Top Tailors and later Reader Mail. She went to night school to obtain her high school diploma. Muriel worked for her father when he opened a confectionary store in 1950. Lazar married Muriel in 1951 and they opened a store, Moffat's North York Bargain House, at 1291 Wilson Avenue that same year. They later changed the store's name to Les and Muriel's. They were likely one of the first Jewish families to move to the Downsview area, and lived above the store. Lazar and Muriel had two children, Eileen and Bob. While caring for their their children Muriel worked alongside Lazar at Les and Muriel's, and when he suffered a stroke in 1968 they sold the store. Eileen Natanson married Stanley Bellan and they had two children, Chad and Renee. Bob Natanson became a stockbroker. Lazar died in 1984 after suffering from a long-term illness. Murial passed away in 2013.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Donor provided photo identification on the back of reproduced photos.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Natanson family
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-5
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
2 folders of textual records
10 photographs
21 photographs (tiff)
Date
1957-2015, predominant 1987-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the activities of Colin and Brenda Baskind. Included are family photographs, such as a wedding portrait of Colin and Brenda, images of family events, graduation portraits of Colin's children, family holiday celebrations, Colin and Brenda running marathons, and the family at a baby naming ceremony for Colin's granddaughter at Darchei Noam Synanagoue. Textual records include thank you letters Colin received from individuals he assisted as President of SAJAC and in other capacities, the CV that Colin used to look for work in Toronto while preparing to immigrate from South Africa, a speech Brenda delivered to a cancer support group regarding her fight with breast cancer and marathon running, newsclippings, certificates, and letters of reference for both Colin and Brenda.
Identified in the photographs are: Colin Baskind, Brenda Baskind, Alan Sandler, Ian Sandler, Lorraine Sandler, Cliff Baskind, Stacey Baskind, Audrey Weinberg, Gerald Weinberg, Solly Simmons, Renee Simmons, Lily Shaie Baskind, Alana Baskind, and Refton Blair.
Administrative History
Colin Baskind was born in Johannesburg, South Africa, on April 20, 1943. As a child, he attended an all boys' school and played a wide variety of sports including, soccer, cricket and rugby. He studied commerce at the University of South Africa and completed a business course through a school in England. While in school he met his future wife, Brenda, on a blind date and they married in 1967. Together they had three children: Stacey, Alana and Cliff.
Colin worked in an import business and Brenda was a nursery school teacher. For a short period of time they cared for the nephew of their maid, whose daughter gave birth at a young age and was still in school. They raised him with their children until his mother was finished school.
Around 1976, Colin and Brenda started to think about leaving South Africa due to the worsening violence and political situation. After first considering Australia, they eventually immigrated to Toronto in 1987. Colin found work in the importing business and Brenda found work at Holy Blossom Temple school. Soon after arriving in Toronto, Colin became involved in the Southern African Jewish Association of Canada. He attended a meeting that had been called to resuscitate SAJAC (the organization, which was formed in 1977, had ceased functioning and there was a need to bring it back to help a new large wave of immigrants). At the meeting Colin was nominated as President and he has held this role ever since. Colin also volunteered with a variety of organizations including, JIAS and JVS. He continued with his athletic pursuits in Canada and jogged, hiked, and cycled in all weather. Around 1998, Brenda started to join Colin and his running group on jogs. Around 2000 they both began running in marathons. By 2015, they had participated in 11 marathons. In 2010, their granddaughter Lily Shaie was born to their daughter Stacey.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Baskind, Colin
Places
Johannesburg
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-8
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
18 photographs : tiff
Date
1969, 1974-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the Cohen family, their immigration to Canada from South Africa and life in Toronto. Textual records include photocopies of correspondence and paperwork relating to the Cohen's immigration, certificates, and a typed document containing humorous stories their South African friends shared at a "10 Years Out Of Africa" party relating to their adjustment to Canadian life. Also included are family portraits and photographs documenting family celebrations such as, weddings and bar mitzvahs. Of note is an image of Vivien and John at the "10 Years Out of Africa" party.
Administrative History
John Cohen was born in Johannesburg, South Africa in 1944 to Phil and Flora Cohen. Vivien (nee Lehwess) Cohen was born in Johannesburg, South Africa in 1947 to Henry and Isle (nee Wronsky) Lehwess. John's cousin was in physiotherapy school with Vivien and they were introduced to each other. They married on Dec. 3, 1969 and had three children together: Nicole (b. 1972), Steven (b. 1974), and Jeremy David (1979). Vivien was a physiotherapist and John was a textile sales agent. Due to the unstable political situation in South Africa, they immigrated to North York in March 1977. For the first few weeks, they lived in a rental apartment in North York. They soon moved into a townhouse nearby. In 1980, they bought their first house in Thornhill. They were both able to continue in their professions after immigrating to Canada. Both of their mothers and many of their friends also moved to Toronto. John and Vivien were members of Shaarei Shalom synagogue for twenty-five years and are now members of Darchei Noam.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Cohen, John
Places
Johannesburg, South Africa
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
8 cm of textual records
140 photographs : tiff
Date
[194-?]-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the activities of Ivor Simmons. Included is personal correspondence and photographs of Ivor's early life in South Africa and his family life and activities in Toronto. Of note are family portraits, Bialik Hebrew Day School class photos, Holy Blossom Temple Religious school images, images of the Toronto Island Yacht Club, images of Camp New Moon, Camp Ahmek, and Camp Walden, an image at Crystal Beach, and images of Ivor and his family visiting South Africa. Identified in the photographs are: Ivor Simmons, Milly Simmons, Jack Simmons, Renee Simmons, Gail Simmons, Alan Simmons, Eric Simmons, Anthony Giffard, Theo Wardaugh, Ruth Gold, Marlene Goldbach, Vicki Feraris, and Kim Bresge.
Administrative History
Ivor Simmons was born in Bloemfontein, South Africa in 1937 to Milly and Jack Simmons. He has two younger brothers: Michael (B. 1941) and David (b. 1945). Ivor's father owned a printing business. Ivor studied chemical engineering at the University of Capetown and found work at a petroleum refinery near Johannesburg soon after graduating. Around 1961, Ivor moved to London, England where he worked for the Lummus Company. He moved to Canada in 1963 and settled in Toronto. He worked for Union Carbide for a few years conducting industrial market research and then took a job performing the same work for Falconbridge Nickelmines. Around 1970, he opened his own business called A&A Liquid Waste Removal Company.
Ivor married Renee Rothman in 1966. Together they had three children: Alan, Eric, and Gail. Ivor sold his business in 1997. In his retirement, Ivor has volunteered with a variety of organizations including, animal and bird rehabilitations centres, Friends of Cedarvale, the Escarpment Biosphere Conservancy, and Trinity College (assisting with its annual book fair). Ivor is a member of Adath Israel Synagogue and was a member of B'nai Brith for many years.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Simmons, Ivor, 1937-
Places
Bloemfontein, South Africa
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-7
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 70 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1928-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the activities of Ben Zion Shapiro and his family. The bulk of the records document the Shapiro family's involvement in Young Judea. Young Judea material includes: yearbooks, photographs, correspondence, meeting minutes, event programmes, song books, newsletters, and two Camp Biluim flags made by Bunny Shapiro. One flag contains Camp Biluim's crest (1951) and the other one was created for Camp Biluim's colour war and contains the text "We will try and we will succeed Camp Biluim" (1954?). Also included is a VHS tape containing a copy of the Toronto Zionist Council's video about Camp Shalom (1991?). Of note are minute books maintained by Roy Shapiro for the Toronto Young Judea Administrative Board (1928-1934) and for the Leadership Club (1940-1948).
Accession also contains material relating to Roy and Ben Zion's involvement with the following organizations: the Coordinated Services to the Jewish Elderly (Circle of Care), B'nai Israel Beth David Congregation, Beth Tzedec's Mispacha Program, Beth Tzedec's Israel Action Program, Congregation Beth Haminyan, and Holy Blossom Temple's Department for Jewish Living. These records include, minutes, correspondence, newsletters and publications, evaluation reports and other reports. Also included is a demographic report entitied, "Rapid Growth and Transformation: Demographic Challenges Facing the Jewish Community of Greater Toronto" (1995), material from a conference at the University of Toronto on the university's partnership with Israel, CHAT alumni directories, and a CHAT book entitled, "Voices: Jewish Teens of the 90's". Of note are buttons, photographs, reports and correspondence documenting Bunny and Ben Zion's trip to the Soviet Union on behalf of the CJC's Committee for Soviet Jewry.
Finally accession includes material documenting family activities of the Shapiro and Sherman family. Included is a transcript of Bessie Sherman telling her life story (1978), haggadot, PowerPoint presentations created by Ben Zion for his grandchildren and for a family reunion outlining the family history of his family and Bunny's family. There is also a video of Ben Zion presenting his PowerPoint at the Michalski / Cohen family reunion. Also included are family films and videos containing footage of Bunny and Ben Zion's wedding and honeymoon, Camp Biluim, Young Judea events, Bunny on Machon, family wedding anniversaries and birthday parties, trips to Israel, the United States, and Europe as well as footage of the Cousin's Club. Also included is a VHS tape containing a recorded segment from CityPulse News featuring the family's Pesach festivities in 1995.
Photo identification: Back row, left to right: Ray Markus, Michelle Landsberg, Menachem ?, Frank Narrol. Front row, left to right: Gilda Mitchell, Bunny Shapiro, BenZion Shapiro, Malka Rabinowitz.
Administrative History
Ben Zion Shapiro was born in Toronto in 1931 to Roy and Beck (nee Cohen) Shapiro. He has a younger brother, Morden (Mort) Shapiro (b. 1940). His father worked as an office manager at Rotstein Furniture and Maple Leaf Cleaners and his mother worked as a legal secretary until marriage. Roy was active in a number of organizations including: Young Judea, Sons of Jacob Society, Toronto Camera Club, a founding member of Beth David Synagogue, Coordinated Services to the Jewish Elderly (Circle of Care) and President of the Association of Jewish Seniors. Beck was active in Young Judea and Pioneer Women (President of the Golda Meir Club).
Ben Zion received a Master of Social Work from the University of Toronto and attended the Jewish Agency Institute for Youth Leaders from Abroad in Jerusalem, Israel (1951-1952). He has worked for a number of organizations throughout his career, including: Young Judea (he was Director of both Camp Shalom (1962-1969) and Camp Biluim (1954-1956)), B'nai Brith Youth Organization, University Settlement, St. Christopher's House and Director of the Novomeysky Centre in Jerusalem (1957-1961). He was also Professor and Associate Dean of Social Work at the University of Toronto and three times Visiting Professor at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.
Ben married Bunny (Bernice) Shaprio in 1955. Bunny was born in 1934 in Noranda, Quebec to Irving and Bessie (nee Consky) Sherman. Bunny attended public school in Noranda, Noranda High School and Forest Hill Collegiate in Toronto, University of Toronto (BA), the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (M.Ed. in Special Education), and the Jewish Agency Institute for Jewish Leaders from Abroad (1952-1953).
Bunny graduated from the first Camp Biluim Institute for leadership training in 1951 and worked with Ben Zion at Camp Shalom as Camp Mother in 1962 and from 1964-1969. She also worked at Camp Biluim from 1955-1956. In 1983, Bunny and Ben Zion went to the Soviet Union to visit Refuseniks on behalf of the Soviet Jewry Committee of the Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region.
Bunny and Ben have two children: Ayala and Ilan. Since Ben Zion's retirement in 1996, he and Bunny have been living in Jerusalem for half of each year. In 2015, they moved full-time to Jerusalem.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes ca. 300 photographs (256 tiff), 2 PowerPoint presentations, 1 textual record (doc), 4 buttons, 2 flags, 5 VHS tapes, and 18 film reels (8 mm).
Subjects
Camps
Youth
Zionism
Name Access
Shapiro, Ben Zion, 1931-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-7
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
6 photographs : b&w and col. ; 13 x 18 cm or smaller
Date
[ca.1930]-[ca.1945], [197-]-[2015]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records pertaining to the military service of twin brothers Julius (Jack) Spiegel and Louis (Lou/Syd) S. J. Spiegel. Included are photographs of the young Spiegel brothers with their cousins in front of Central High School of Commerce, Dewson St., ca. 1930, original snapshots and portraits of Lou Spiegel in uniform during the 1940s, a hand drawn Easter greeting card signed by Lou Spiegel, and newspaper clippings concerning Lou's role as an aerial photographer for the U.S. Marine Corps unit and his return home to Toronto. There are wartime photocopies of photos including a portrait of Jack Spiegel in uniform, an image of Jack with his crew in front of military aircraft, and a modern day photo of Lou visiting Jack's grave in Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery in Holland. Textual copies include, an annotated photocopy of Veteran Affairs Canada website listing of Jack Spiegel, including information on his burial location and his listing in the Second World War Book of Remembrance. There is a photocopy of Jack's obituary from the Canadian Jewish Congress Book Canadian Jews in World War II, Part II: Casualties, p. 75, and a copy of a letter from the Royal Canadian Air Force addressed to Jack's mother Mrs. Israel Spiegel, notifying her of her son's death. In addition, there is one colour photograph (197?) of promotional municipal campaign street signs for North York City Councillor and Controller, Irving Paisley.
Administrative History
Julius (Jack) Spiegel (1921-1944, Toronto), and Louis (Lou) Spiegel (1921-1999), are twin brothers born in Toronto on March 26, 1921. Their parents Israel Spiegel (b. 1878) and Eva (née Gelbwachs) Spiegel (b. 1880) of 430 Euclid St. Toronto, immigrated from Austria to Canada in 1894 and 1906 respectively.
According to the 1921 Canada census, Israel and Eva had 8 children; Nat Spiegel (b. 1903, U.S.A.), Morse Spiegel (b. 1906), Gertrude Spiegel (b. 1909), Beatrice Spiegel (b. 1911), Sydney Spiegel (b. 1915), Mildred Spiegel (b. 1917), and twin brothers Julius and Louis S. Spiegel (b. 1921).
Both Jack and his twin brother Lou, attended Central Technical High School of Commerce. Jack enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1941 and trained as a wireless air gunner. He went overseas in May 1944 and successfully completed 10 military missions with his unit. Eyewitnesses reported to Lou that Jack parachuted out of his Lancaster Bomber that was shot down over the Rhineland battlefields in Germany . Originally buried by the Dutch Resistance, Jack was later moved to Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery, Holland. His date of death was confirmed as October 28, 1944. According to his death certificate, the location of his death was Belgium, that he was married at the time of death and resided at 238 Beatrice St. Jack's brothers Sydney and Murray Spiegel, also served in the military during the Second World War. Sydney with the Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps (administrative corps) and Murray with the U.S. Army Medical Department in Kansas.
Louis (Lou) Spiegel (1921-1999, Toronto) served during the Second World War for the Royal Canadian Air Force and the U.S. Marine Corps as an aerial photographer. He later studied at U of T earning a bachelor's degree and transferred to USC (California) earning a master's degree in English and communications. He served as campaign director for the United Welfare Fund in 1954 and worked various jobs throughout his career as an educator in American Community Colleges. He was director of Unarius after Ruth Norman died and was awarded by the same institution with a doctor of psychic therapeutic science degree.
Irving Paisley (1919-2006) married to Adele Paisley, had a 30 year long career in municipal politics in the city of North York holding positions as Councillor, Controller, and Deputy Mayor. He spearheaded the building of York Finch Hospital and served as its founding Chairman. He was also a founding member of Temple Sinai, and founded Paisley Manor Insurance. Paisley’s accomplishments were recognized by the Federal Government and he earned the Centennial Medal for Service to the Nation in 1967.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Spiegel, Jack, 1921-1944
Spiegel, Lou, 1921-1999
Paisley, Adele
Paisley, Irving 1919-2006
Places
Toronto
Holland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-4
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
19 photographs : b&w and col. ; 20 x 26 cm and smaller
1 folder of textual records
1 poster ; 35 x 51 cm
Date
[194-]-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs and textual records related to the personal and professional life of Morley S. Wolfe. Photographs include a snapshot of Morely dressed in a Harbord Collegiate sweater; his first year law class at Osgoode Hall (1951); attendance at B'nai Brith Wilson Height Heights Lodge events and publicity stills from Branson Hospital. Textual records include a Branson Hospital promotional flyer; correspondence with Sir Martin Gilbert, the official biographer of Winston Churchill; email print outs of a series of letter to the editor correspondnece from Morely to the Toronto Star con cerning human rights,immigration and Israel's right to exist.
In addition, there is a photocopy of a Toronto Star photo of Mayor Art Eggleton, awarding Morley S. Wolfe with the William P. Hubbard race relations award; a print out from Harbordite (page 21) of Morely's entry into the Harbord club; a print out of his review of the book Walking with Giants by Saoul Feldberg; and a poster presented to Morely by the Children's Breakfast Club's presdient Rick Gosling, on the occasion of his 75th birthday (2003), in hounour of Morely's volunteer work with the club.
Administrative History
Morley S. Wolfe was born in Winnipeg in 1928 to Cecil (b. 1895) and Betty (nee Davidow) Wolfe. He spent his early childhood in various cities in Saskatchewan and Manitoba until moving to Toronto in 1940. Soon after graduating from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1955 he started his own practice as a senior member of the law firm Burt, Burt, Wolfe and Bowman. In 1971, he was appointed Queen’s Council, and from 1973 to 1977 he served as counsel for B’nai Brith Canada. After his retirement from practice in 1993, the Province of Ontario appointed him presiding Justice of the Peace for Ontario and Deputy Judge in Small Claims Court. His first marriage was to Sandra Newman in 1958 and they had three children together: Leslie, Lee, and Melanie. He later married Joan and became the step-father to her daughter, Erin. Throughout his life Morley was passionate about fighting prejudice and discrimination and became involved with organizations, such as the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews and the Urban Alliance on Race Relations. He was also a member of the Toronto Police Services Board Committee on Race Relations, served as Chair of the North York Committee on Community, Race and Ethnic Relations, and was appointed to the Canadian Multiculturalism Council. In addition, he was the founding president of Toronto Residents in Partnership (TRIP) from 2003 to 2006. His involvement extended to Jewish organizations. He served as National President of B’nai Brith Canada (BBC) from 1982 to 1983 and was a founding member of its League for Human Rights. He was also President of BBC’s Toronto Regional Council and Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998, and of the Jewish Camp Council of Toronto as well as many other organizations. Morley’s hard work and involvement in the community earned him many awards, including, City of Toronto’s William P. Hubbard Race Relations Award, the YMCA Canada Peace Medal, B’Nai Brith Canada Service Award, and the Province of Ontario’s Senior Achievement Award. Around 2002, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 began filing a series of appeals with B’nai Brith International (BBI) over concerns that BBC’s national executive was governing undemocratically. Morley played a key role in filing these appeals and was the centre of one appeal filed after BBC censured him without advance notice or the opportunity for a hearing. These appeals were not all successful. Around 2006, Morley became involved in another appeal against BBC that was filed by a group of members who called themselves the Concerned Members of B’nai Brith Canada (CMOBBC). They alleged that BBC’s national executive had too much centralized power, was not governing transparently, failed to provide members with audited financial statements at multiple annual general meetings (AGMs), passed a constitution that members had defeated at the 2005 AGM, and was threatening and harassing some members. BBI’s appeal court rendered its verdict in 2007 in favour of BBC. Soon after this judgment was made BBC took steps to expel all the members of CMOBBC. In response, Morley resigned from the organization. Morley currently resides in Brampton.
Subjects
Law
Human rights
Name Access
Wolfe, Morley, 1928-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-6
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
2 photographs (tiff) : b&w
Date
1897-1960, 1993
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the activities of Eli Bloch. Included are photocopies of correspondence, newsclippings, Eli's Canadian certificate of naturalization, travel documents, South African licenses, and a genealogical family tree for the Bloch family. Also included are two photographs of Eli in his later years.
Custodial History
The original records are in the possession of Gerry Bloch, the grandson of Eli Bloch. Gerry is the son of Eli's son Norman.
Administrative History
Eli (Elias) Bloch was born in 1872 to Nokhum Tevel Rabinovitch in Kishinev Moldava. He had four siblings: Golda, Joseph, Samuel and Bertha. In the 1890s Eli and his siblings (with the exception of Golda) immigrated to South Africa. Bertha married Theodore Dissler (an importer/exporter). During the Boer War, Eli and his brother Joseph fought with the Dutch. After the war, Dissler employed Eli in his business. In 1907, Dissler sent Eli to sell ostrich feathers in various cities around the world, including: London (England), Montreal and Toronto. While in Toronto, Eli attended the First Roumanian Hebrew Congregation Adath Israel where he met his future wife Leah Madnok and chose to remain in Ontario, without completing his task of selling ostrich feathers in the remaining cities on his itinerary. He married Leah in 1909. From about 1911 until 1922, Eli and Leah lived in Gravenhurst and ran a general store on the main street. They had four children together: Harry (1912-1945), Rose (1914-1994), Rachel (Rae) (1916-2000), and Norman (1916-1989). Rachel and Norman were twins.
In 1922, Elias and Leah moved to Mactier and opened a general store. By 1926, Leah and the children were living in London, ON and Elias continued to operate the general store. He saw the family regularly. Around 1935, Elias left Mactier. He remained in London until he moved to Toronto in 1942. Elias passed away in Toronto in 1960.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: English, Yiddish, and Russian
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Families
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-2
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
19 photographs (tiff)
Date
[1909?]-[196-?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of scanned images of the Fromstein family, particularly relating to Harry and his wife Pearl. Included are family portraits, images of Harry while he was interning at Hashmall's Drugstore and working in his own pharmacy called Central Drugs, an image from a Rokeah Chapter dinner, and other images of the family at a cottage (possibly Tent City or Belle Ewart), in the backyard of their home (likely on Palmerston) and at Sunnyside Beach.
Custodial History
Carol is the daughter is Harry and Pearl Fromstein.
Administrative History
Harry was born in London, England in 1907 to Getzl (from Obodovka, Podolia, Russia) and Yetta (nee Kramer; from Kosow, Stanislawow, Galicia) Fromstein. Harry had six siblings: Max (Mendel, b. 1902 in Kosow), Anne (Chava Yita, b. 23 Sept. 1905 in London), Shep (b. 1911 in London), Minnie (b. 1916? in Toronto), Joe (b. 1918 in Toronto) and Sam (Shimmy, b. 1919 in Toronto). The family immigrated to Toronto in 1912. Getzl arrived first and then paid for the passage for his wife and children. Getzl was a cantor who also wrote music. He also worked as a presser.
Harry attended the College of Pharmacy at the University of Toronto. As part of his training, he did an internship at Hashmall's Drug Store. Harry graduated in 1932. He married Pearl Shimmerman soon after graduation in 1932. They had met at Pearl's sweet 16 birthday party and had been engaged for 5 years.
Pearl was born in 1911 to Aaron and Malka Shimmerman in Pomorzany, Austria (now in the Ukraine). Pearl was the youngest of seven children. Her siblings were: Tzivia (married name Toben), Max, Toby (married name Rockfeld), Sam, Joe, and Anne (married name Kerbel). She immigrated to Toronto with her family when she was 3 months old. Her family lived at 102 Huron Street and Aaron worked as a labourer (collecting and selling scraps of fabric).
Pearl and Harry had two children together: Jerry (Gerald ; b. 1934) and Carol (b. 1937). By 1935, Harry had opened his own drugstore called Central Drugs, located at Church and Queen. The family initially lived above the store. The store moved a few times, but always remained in one of the corner units at the intersection of Church and Queen. Harry eventually moved his store north to Davenport and Dupont. After many years, his store was finally moved to Dufferin Street at Castlefield and re-named Castlefield Drugs. During the summer, the family regularly rented cottages at Tent City and Belle Ewart.
Carol married Harold Tanenbaum in 1956. They had three children together: Mark, Cheryl, and Michelle.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Families
Pharmacists
Name Access
Fromstein family
Fromstein, Harry
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-1-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-1-5
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 10 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1957-2015, predominant 1974-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting Claude Heimann's immigration to Canada, career, involvement with Temple Har Zion and family life. Included are photographs, correspondence, newsletters and journals, writings and presentations by Heimann, certificates, newspaper clippings, event and conference programs, and business cards. Also included are documents with the text used for Totum Research's website.
Administrative History
Claude Heimann was born on 21 March 1944 in Johannesburg, South Africa to Wilhelm (Bill) Otto Heimann and Lotte Heimann (nee Rosenberg). He received a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Witwatersrand in 1966. In 1969, he married Adele Masail at the Pine Street Synagogue in Johannesburg. They lived in Windsor Park, Johannesburg and had two children together: Nicole Heidi (now married to Marshall Starkman) and Marc Steven.
Claude initially worked for Market Research Africa interviewing farm workers across the country. In 1971 he joined Reader's Digest in South Africa as a Research Director. Believing there would not be a peaceful solution to apartheid, Claude had decided at a young age that he would evenutally leave South Africa. He hoped that Reader's Digest was a company that might be able to transfer him to work in another country. Ten years later, in 1981, an opportunity came up with the Canadian edition of Reader's Digest in a similar role. Claude accepted the position and immigrated with his family to Toronto in May 1981. For their first few months they lived at Glengrove Manor on Yonge Street between Lawrence and Eglinton. In July, they moved into their home in Thornhill. Adele initially stayed home with the family, but eventually worked as a bookkeeper for a variety of different businesses.
Claude left Reader's Digest in 1990 to become a partner in Totum Research. Throughout his career, Claude has served on the Research Committee of PMB and has been a member of the Board of Directors of CARF for whom he served as Technical Director. He has also served on a number of other media research related committees, including the Technical Committee of AMPS and the Magazines Canada Research Committee. Claude was also active on the Board of Temple Har Zion, holding a variety of positions, including: regular Board member, Vice President for Worship, Vice President, Treasurer, President and Past President for two years on the Executive. He also reported Board decisions for the THZ monthly bulletin.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes 2.3 MB of textual records, 6 photographs, 17 slides, and 26.3 MB of photographs.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Occupations
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Synagogues
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-1-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-1-9
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
11 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 12 cm or smaller
Date
1943-2016, predominant 1943-1966
Scope and Content
Accession consists of personal records and photographs relating to Miriam Beckerman née Dashkin. Textual records include correspondence with Miriam's childhood friend Bea Madger, Bialik School reports belonging to her son Dan Beckerman (1962-1966), Dan Beckerman's Y.M. & Y.W.H.A swim badge (1968), seven Jewish National Fund (JNF) certificates (1956-65); Toronto Happening Brochure listing Dan Beckerman's performance at the St. Lawrence Centre (1978); Newspaper clipping of death notice for Miriam's father David Dashkin (1976); Yiddish newspaper clipping of death notice for Miriam's grandmother Malka Yadashkin (Dashkin) Cohen; Yiddish correspondence; typed letter by Miriam Beckerman's mother Ethel Dashkin describing the Toronto Yiddish theatre scene; and photocopies of photographs documenting Miriam's trip to Palestine as part of the Habonim, a Jewish Labour Zionist youth movement (1945-47).
Administrative History
Miriam Beckerman (née Dashkin) is an award-winning Yiddish literature translator. She was raised in a Yiddish-speaking home, surrounded by Yiddish books and newspapers, and attended the Farband Folkshule in Toronto in the 1930s. An ardent Zionist in her teens, she trained at the Smithville Hachsharah farm to prepare for making aliyah. She later worked as a bilingual secretary (Yiddish and English) at the Ontario region, Canadian Jewish Congress.
In 1946, she travelled to Israel where she met her husband, Moshe Beckerman, at a kibbutz. The couple and their children emigrated from Israel to Toronto in 1952. Beckerman continues to work as a Yiddish translator. She has a number of published translations, including her recent collaborative work "A Thousand Threads: A story through Yiddish letters."
Beckerman received a 1998 prize from the Dora Teitelbaum Foundation Inc. in Choral Gables, Fla., for her accomplishments in translation. She said if it were not for translations, "many things would be lost to future generations. Moshe passed away in 1993.
Subjects
Yiddish language
Name Access
Beckerman, Miriam Dashkin
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-2
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
92 photographs (jpgs) : col. and b&w
1.55 MB of textual records
Date
1965, 1990-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the activities and history of Dr. Mark Friedlander and his family. Included is a family history written by Mark's father, Bertie Friedlander and a personal CV written by Mark. Also included are photographs documenting a wide variety of Mark's activities, including his work as an anesthesiologist, Jewish holiday celebrations, his cottage life in Buckhorn, his outdoor activities (such as skiing, canoeing, hiking, cycling, fishing, and ice hockey), Danny's Bar Mitzvah at Kehillat Shareei Torah, Mark's marriage to Lila, the university graduations of family members, Mark's involvement with March of the Living, his participation in Walk With Israel, and his various trips to Zimbabwe, South Africa and other parts of the world. Of note is a photograph of Mark and his son Danny on Mount Kilimanjaro and images of the Sharon School Reunion which took place at Mark's house in Thornhill. Individuals identified in the photographs include: Dr. Mark Friedlander, Lila Speigel, Alec Amato, Lauren Amato, Eli Friedlander, Bert Amato, Danny Amato, Paul Ciapparelli, Sergio Ciapparelli, Lou Silver, Dennis Scolnik, Bertie Friedlander, Jarred Goldberg, Mike Green, Warren Liebowitz, Sue Holmes, Hilda Cohen, Florence Weinberger, Vickie Campbell, Joe Feldman, and Martha Shemtov.
Custodial History
The material was in the possession of Dr. Mark Friedlander. All the images he has are digital. He does not have the original prints in his possession.
Administrative History
Dr. Mark Friedlander was born in Salisbury, Rhodesia (now Harare, Zimbabwe) in May 1958 to Bertie and Selma Friedlander. Bertie was a pharmacist whose career went from retail manufacturing to regulations, and later an academic in learning and teaching.
Mark attended the University of Cape Town Medical School from 1976 to 1981. Between 1982 and 1987, he lived and worked in : Cape Town, South Africa; London, England; Saskatchewan, Canada and New York City, USA. In 1987 he married Lesley Kane (from London) in London, England and moved to Toronto for Specialty Residency in Anesthesia at the University of Toronto, Faculty of Medicine. During his four year residency, he and Lesley had two sons: Danny (1989) and Eli (1991).
Since 1992 Mark has worked as a staff anesthesiologist at North York General Hospital, Toronto. He is also a part time consultant at the Chronic Pain Management Allevio and Pinnacle Pain Clinics.
Mark and Lesley divorced In 2011. In 2015, Mark married Lila Speigel. Lila had immigrated to Toronto in about 1986 after living in Israel and before that from Caracas, Venezuela. Mark’s community involvement includes acting as a chaperone and physician on the March of the Living in 1994, as a UJA supporter since 1991 and as host of a Sharon Jewish Day School Zimbabwe reunion. He has also volunteered on numerous surgical missions to various countries including, Ecuador, Peru, Russia and Vietnam. He has been a member of Kehillat Shaarei Torah synagogue since 1996.
Mark has an older sister, Wendy (born in 1956), and a younger brother, Gary (born in 1960). Gary is married to a South African and Wendy is married to Dennis Scolnik also from Zimbabwe and they all live in the Toronto area. Mark’s parents, who moved to Israel with Gary in 1977, immigrated to Toronto in 1992 to be closer to their children and grandchildren. Mark's father passed away in 2012.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Occupations
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Travel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
1 photograph (jpg) : col.
44.5 KB of textual records
Date
2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one family history and photograph documenting Les Krawitz and his family. Identified in the photograph (taken in Muskoka) are:
Back row: Son-in-law Shaun Levy, daughter Delia Krawitz Levy, Daughter-in-law Randi Katz Krawitz, son Evan Krawitz (Delia's twin), wife Joan Krawitz, Les Krawitz, son Stan Krawitz, Stan's partner Laura Vasic, grandchildren Chloe and Max (Stan's kids)
Front row: grandchildren Jordana (Delia & Shaun's child), Adriana and Jake (Evan & Randi's children)
Administrative History
Les Krawitz was born in 1940 in Brakpan, South Africa to Abraham and Ella Krawitz. In 1964, he married Joan Marks. They had three children together: Stan (b. 1968) and twins Evan and Delia (b. 1971). The Krawitz family immigrated to Toronto in October 1987. Les initially worked with Tandem International (a marketing and sales consulting firm). In 1994, he joined the Sales Development Group (a human resources firm). After four years, he branched out with his own human resources company, Just Solutions Inc. In 2003 he joined his son, Stan's, real estate brokerage, Real Facilities, as a sales manager and realtor. He retired in 2011.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Source
Archival Accessions
Address
187 Brunswick Avenue
Source
Landmarks

During the early 1980s, newcomers to the synagogue introduced an alternative egalitarian service in the basement, which eventually became the main service in the sanctuary. The Synagogue underwent renovations in the early 1980s, and again more recently, in an effort to accommodate its new members and to provide for its future as a neighborhood synagogue. In recent years, the First Narayever has become one of the most well-attended and active synagogues in the downtown area.
Address
187 Brunswick Avenue
Time Period
1914-present
Scope Note
During the early 1980s, newcomers to the synagogue introduced an alternative egalitarian service in the basement, which eventually became the main service in the sanctuary. The Synagogue underwent renovations in the early 1980s, and again more recently, in an effort to accommodate its new members and to provide for its future as a neighborhood synagogue. In recent years, the First Narayever has become one of the most well-attended and active synagogues in the downtown area.
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
25 Bellevue Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The congregation of Rodfei Sholom Anshei Kiev, commonly known as the Kiever, dates back to 1912. The first few members had little means for funding a new synagogue in 1912, so services at this time were held in a rented house on Centre Avenue in the Ward.
Address
25 Bellevue Avenue
Time Period
1927-present
Scope Note
The congregation of Rodfei Sholom Anshei Kiev, commonly known as the Kiever, dates back to 1912. The first few members had little means for funding a new synagogue in 1912, so services at this time were held in a rented house on Centre Avenue in the Ward.
History
In 1917, the Kiever acquired a house at 25 Bellevue Avenue in Kensington Market and by 1923 the Kiever congregation raised enough funds to build a synagogue large enough to accommodate its growing numbers. The Kiever Executive contracted Benjamin Swartz, a Jewish architect, to design the current synagogue at 25 Bellevue, which replaced the two houses that had been used for services. The Synagogue was completed in 1927, after three years of construction. Today, the Kiever is a vibrant synagogue and one of a handful of synagogues remaining in the downtown area.
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
91 Denison Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The Anshei Libavitch Synagogue was formed around 1905 and was first located on Centre Ave in the St. John's Ward. It later moved to Denison Ave where it remained until its merger with Shaarei Tefillah on Bathurst Street in 1976.
Address
91 Denison Avenue
Time Period
1905-1976
Scope Note
The Anshei Libavitch Synagogue was formed around 1905 and was first located on Centre Ave in the St. John's Ward. It later moved to Denison Ave where it remained until its merger with Shaarei Tefillah on Bathurst Street in 1976.
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
134 D'Arcy Street
Source
Landmarks

The Shedlover Shul was a small synagogue established by immigrants from Szydlow, Poland in 1914. The Yiddish and Russian pronunciation is Shidlov.
Address
134 D'Arcy Street
Time Period
1914-
Scope Note
The Shedlover Shul was a small synagogue established by immigrants from Szydlow, Poland in 1914. The Yiddish and Russian pronunciation is Shidlov.
Source
Landmarks
Address
327 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The congregation was formed in 1909 and its first building opened on Spadina Ave in 1921. Around 1960, the congregation moved to the Bathurst and Sheppard area after the synagogue wsa damaged by a fire. In 1975, they merged with Beth Emeth Beit Yehuda
Address
327 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1909-1975
Scope Note
The congregation was formed in 1909 and its first building opened on Spadina Ave in 1921. Around 1960, the congregation moved to the Bathurst and Sheppard area after the synagogue wsa damaged by a fire. In 1975, they merged with Beth Emeth Beit Yehuda
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
69 McCaul Street
Source
Landmarks

Beth Hamidrash Hagadol, more commonly known as the McCaul Street Synagogue, was first established in 1887 and was originally located above a grocery store (owned by A. Broudy) at the corner of Richmond and York Streets. Due to financial instability, the location changed frequently during its early years, eventually to the top of a blacksmith shop. In 1899, a new home was purchased at the corner of Simcoe and Pearl Streets.
Address
69 McCaul Street
Time Period
1905-1952
Scope Note
Beth Hamidrash Hagadol, more commonly known as the McCaul Street Synagogue, was first established in 1887 and was originally located above a grocery store (owned by A. Broudy) at the corner of Richmond and York Streets. Due to financial instability, the location changed frequently during its early years, eventually to the top of a blacksmith shop. In 1899, a new home was purchased at the corner of Simcoe and Pearl Streets.
Jews from Russia, Galicia, Bucovina, Poland, Roumania, Latvia, Lithuania, White Russia and other countries, particpated in the establishment of the synagogue. The intenion with this synagogue was for it to be inclusive, regardless of country of origin.
History
In 1905, the enlarged congregation moved into a larger home, the former McCaul Street Methodist Church, which it quickly renovated and remodeled into a synagogue. The synagogue was renamed Beth Hamidrash Hagadol Chevra T'hilim. The shul thrived for the next 50 years on McCaul Street. In September of 1952, the synagogue and its sister synagogue Goel Tzedec amalgamated to form Beth Tzedec.
The first cantor was Yudel Breslin and in 1904, Mr. M. Shulman became the cantor. Rabbi Jacob Gordon was appointed in 1905.
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
397 Markham Street
Source
Landmarks

The Shaarei Tzedek Congregation was founded by new Russian immigrants around 1901. The congregation’s first shul was situated originally on 29 Centre Avenue, south of Dundas on the east side of the street, in the vicinity of present-day Nathan Philips Square. Louis Gurofsky (1871-1934), a prominent member of the Jewish community and a business man, lived in a house at 397 Markham Street with his family. In 1937, following Gurofsky’s death in 1934, Shaarei Tzedek occupied the Markham Street house of the Gurofsky family and renovations were soon undertaken to convert the residence into a synagogue, designed by Benjamin Swartz.
Address
397 Markham Street
Time Period
1937-present
Scope Note
The Shaarei Tzedek Congregation was founded by new Russian immigrants around 1901. The congregation’s first shul was situated originally on 29 Centre Avenue, south of Dundas on the east side of the street, in the vicinity of present-day Nathan Philips Square. Louis Gurofsky (1871-1934), a prominent member of the Jewish community and a business man, lived in a house at 397 Markham Street with his family. In 1937, following Gurofsky’s death in 1934, Shaarei Tzedek occupied the Markham Street house of the Gurofsky family and renovations were soon undertaken to convert the residence into a synagogue, designed by Benjamin Swartz.
History
Following the Second World War, a second wave of Russian immigrants, many of whom were Holocaust survivors, found spiritual refuge at the Markham Street shul, and membership again began to rise. In the 1950s the shul employed the services of Rabbi Israel Frankel, a prominent Jewish scholar and one of the founders of the Toronto Jewish Public Library. As the Jewish community increasingly moved to the northern and outlying suburbs of Toronto, this general trend began to take its toll on the membership of the Shaarei Tzedek into the 1960s. The congregation was obliged to declare bankruptcy in 1968. However, a concerted fund-raising effort by Jewish community leaders in the area re-established the congregation in 1970, under the spiritual and administrative leadership of the shul’s president, Dr. Joseph Greenberg.
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
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