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34 records – page 1 of 1.
Address
10 St Andrew Street
Source
Landmarks
Address
10 St Andrew Street
Time Period
1930
History
It was founded by poor Jewish immigrants from Russia (mostly Minsk) in 1912. The current Byzantine Revival building was completed in 1930. The congregation has had only three full-time rabbis: Meyer Levy (1916–1921), Meyer Zimmerman (1940–1954), and Shmuel Spero, who has served from 1988 to the present. It is the only Orthodox synagogue in downtown Toronto with a full-time rabbi, and the only one that holds daily services.
Category
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
187 Brunswick Avenue
Source
Landmarks

During the early 1980s, newcomers to the synagogue introduced an alternative egalitarian service in the basement, which eventually became the main service in the sanctuary. The Synagogue underwent renovations in the early 1980s, and again more recently, in an effort to accommodate its new members and to provide for its future as a neighborhood synagogue. In recent years, the First Narayever has become one of the most well-attended and active synagogues in the downtown area.
Address
187 Brunswick Avenue
Time Period
1914-present
Scope Note
During the early 1980s, newcomers to the synagogue introduced an alternative egalitarian service in the basement, which eventually became the main service in the sanctuary. The Synagogue underwent renovations in the early 1980s, and again more recently, in an effort to accommodate its new members and to provide for its future as a neighborhood synagogue. In recent years, the First Narayever has become one of the most well-attended and active synagogues in the downtown area.
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
25 Bellevue Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The congregation of Rodfei Sholom Anshei Kiev, commonly known as the Kiever, dates back to 1912. The first few members had little means for funding a new synagogue in 1912, so services at this time were held in a rented house on Centre Avenue in the Ward.
Address
25 Bellevue Avenue
Time Period
1927-present
Scope Note
The congregation of Rodfei Sholom Anshei Kiev, commonly known as the Kiever, dates back to 1912. The first few members had little means for funding a new synagogue in 1912, so services at this time were held in a rented house on Centre Avenue in the Ward.
History
In 1917, the Kiever acquired a house at 25 Bellevue Avenue in Kensington Market and by 1923 the Kiever congregation raised enough funds to build a synagogue large enough to accommodate its growing numbers. The Kiever Executive contracted Benjamin Swartz, a Jewish architect, to design the current synagogue at 25 Bellevue, which replaced the two houses that had been used for services. The Synagogue was completed in 1927, after three years of construction. Today, the Kiever is a vibrant synagogue and one of a handful of synagogues remaining in the downtown area.
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
91 Denison Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The Anshei Libavitch Synagogue was formed around 1905 and was first located on Centre Ave in the St. John's Ward. It later moved to Denison Ave where it remained until its merger with Shaarei Tefillah on Bathurst Street in 1976.
Address
91 Denison Avenue
Time Period
1905-1976
Scope Note
The Anshei Libavitch Synagogue was formed around 1905 and was first located on Centre Ave in the St. John's Ward. It later moved to Denison Ave where it remained until its merger with Shaarei Tefillah on Bathurst Street in 1976.
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
134 D'Arcy Street
Source
Landmarks

The Shedlover Shul was a small synagogue established by immigrants from Szydlow, Poland in 1914. The Yiddish and Russian pronunciation is Shidlov.
Address
134 D'Arcy Street
Time Period
1914-
Scope Note
The Shedlover Shul was a small synagogue established by immigrants from Szydlow, Poland in 1914. The Yiddish and Russian pronunciation is Shidlov.
Source
Landmarks
Address
327 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The congregation was formed in 1909 and its first building opened on Spadina Ave in 1921. Around 1960, the congregation moved to the Bathurst and Sheppard area after the synagogue wsa damaged by a fire. In 1975, they merged with Beth Emeth Beit Yehuda
Address
327 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1909-1975
Scope Note
The congregation was formed in 1909 and its first building opened on Spadina Ave in 1921. Around 1960, the congregation moved to the Bathurst and Sheppard area after the synagogue wsa damaged by a fire. In 1975, they merged with Beth Emeth Beit Yehuda
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
69 McCaul Street
Source
Landmarks

Beth Hamidrash Hagadol, more commonly known as the McCaul Street Synagogue, was first established in 1887 and was originally located above a grocery store (owned by A. Broudy) at the corner of Richmond and York Streets. Due to financial instability, the location changed frequently during its early years, eventually to the top of a blacksmith shop. In 1899, a new home was purchased at the corner of Simcoe and Pearl Streets.
Address
69 McCaul Street
Time Period
1905-1952
Scope Note
Beth Hamidrash Hagadol, more commonly known as the McCaul Street Synagogue, was first established in 1887 and was originally located above a grocery store (owned by A. Broudy) at the corner of Richmond and York Streets. Due to financial instability, the location changed frequently during its early years, eventually to the top of a blacksmith shop. In 1899, a new home was purchased at the corner of Simcoe and Pearl Streets.
Jews from Russia, Galicia, Bucovina, Poland, Roumania, Latvia, Lithuania, White Russia and other countries, particpated in the establishment of the synagogue. The intenion with this synagogue was for it to be inclusive, regardless of country of origin.
History
In 1905, the enlarged congregation moved into a larger home, the former McCaul Street Methodist Church, which it quickly renovated and remodeled into a synagogue. The synagogue was renamed Beth Hamidrash Hagadol Chevra T'hilim. The shul thrived for the next 50 years on McCaul Street. In September of 1952, the synagogue and its sister synagogue Goel Tzedec amalgamated to form Beth Tzedec.
The first cantor was Yudel Breslin and in 1904, Mr. M. Shulman became the cantor. Rabbi Jacob Gordon was appointed in 1905.
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
397 Markham Street
Source
Landmarks

The Shaarei Tzedek Congregation was founded by new Russian immigrants around 1901. The congregation’s first shul was situated originally on 29 Centre Avenue, south of Dundas on the east side of the street, in the vicinity of present-day Nathan Philips Square. Louis Gurofsky (1871-1934), a prominent member of the Jewish community and a business man, lived in a house at 397 Markham Street with his family. In 1937, following Gurofsky’s death in 1934, Shaarei Tzedek occupied the Markham Street house of the Gurofsky family and renovations were soon undertaken to convert the residence into a synagogue, designed by Benjamin Swartz.
Address
397 Markham Street
Time Period
1937-present
Scope Note
The Shaarei Tzedek Congregation was founded by new Russian immigrants around 1901. The congregation’s first shul was situated originally on 29 Centre Avenue, south of Dundas on the east side of the street, in the vicinity of present-day Nathan Philips Square. Louis Gurofsky (1871-1934), a prominent member of the Jewish community and a business man, lived in a house at 397 Markham Street with his family. In 1937, following Gurofsky’s death in 1934, Shaarei Tzedek occupied the Markham Street house of the Gurofsky family and renovations were soon undertaken to convert the residence into a synagogue, designed by Benjamin Swartz.
History
Following the Second World War, a second wave of Russian immigrants, many of whom were Holocaust survivors, found spiritual refuge at the Markham Street shul, and membership again began to rise. In the 1950s the shul employed the services of Rabbi Israel Frankel, a prominent Jewish scholar and one of the founders of the Toronto Jewish Public Library. As the Jewish community increasingly moved to the northern and outlying suburbs of Toronto, this general trend began to take its toll on the membership of the Shaarei Tzedek into the 1960s. The congregation was obliged to declare bankruptcy in 1968. However, a concerted fund-raising effort by Jewish community leaders in the area re-established the congregation in 1970, under the spiritual and administrative leadership of the shul’s president, Dr. Joseph Greenberg.
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
332 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Walerstein's ice cream parlour was owned by Abraham Walerstein, who was originally from Hamilton, Ontario. He opened it in 1917 and it became a hang out for Social Democrats.
Address
332 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1917-unknown
Scope Note
Walerstein's ice cream parlour was owned by Abraham Walerstein, who was originally from Hamilton, Ontario. He opened it in 1917 and it became a hang out for Social Democrats.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
275 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Goldenberg's restaurant, which was kosher, was located at 275 Spadina Ave and was owned by Mr Joseph S. Goldenberg. He made additions to the restaurant in 1929 and 1935 by architect Benjamin Brown.
Address
275 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1925-
Scope Note
Goldenberg's restaurant, which was kosher, was located at 275 Spadina Ave and was owned by Mr Joseph S. Goldenberg. He made additions to the restaurant in 1929 and 1935 by architect Benjamin Brown.
History
The restaurant was originally located in the Ward at 63 Elizabeth Street.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
24 Cecil Street
Source
Landmarks

The Labour Zionist Order was an outgrowth of the Labour Zionist party in Israel (the Mapai party). They carried out a number of different functions. They were pro-labour and pro-Zionist. They acted as a mutual benefit society—the Labour Zionist Alliance or Farband, formally known as the Jewish National Workers Alliance or Farband Labour Zionist Order. They also operated a school for children called the Farband Folks Shule (later Bialik Hebrew Day School). There was a fundraising organization that they oversaw called the Israel Histadrut of Toronto whose annual campaign raised money for the Israel Histadrut in Israel (the Federation of Labour in Israel), founded in 1920. The campaign money was used to fund economic, trade union, military, social, and cultural activities in Israel, as well as to provide a comprehensive system of health insurance and hospital services to workers. The Israel Histadrut campaign in Toronto had an autonomous executive board, however it's activities were overseen by the Labour Zionist Order.
Address
24 Cecil Street
Time Period
1922-
Scope Note
The Labour Zionist Order was an outgrowth of the Labour Zionist party in Israel (the Mapai party). They carried out a number of different functions. They were pro-labour and pro-Zionist. They acted as a mutual benefit society—the Labour Zionist Alliance or Farband, formally known as the Jewish National Workers Alliance or Farband Labour Zionist Order. They also operated a school for children called the Farband Folks Shule (later Bialik Hebrew Day School). There was a fundraising organization that they oversaw called the Israel Histadrut of Toronto whose annual campaign raised money for the Israel Histadrut in Israel (the Federation of Labour in Israel), founded in 1920. The campaign money was used to fund economic, trade union, military, social, and cultural activities in Israel, as well as to provide a comprehensive system of health insurance and hospital services to workers. The Israel Histadrut campaign in Toronto had an autonomous executive board, however it's activities were overseen by the Labour Zionist Order.
History
The Labour Zionist Order purchased the house at 24 Cecil Street in 1922 and established a library in it. It was called the Farband Institute.
Category
Political
Organization
Source
Landmarks
Address
33 Robert Street
Source
Landmarks

Lansdowne Public School at one time had a high concentration of Jewish students due to its close proximity to Kensginton Market. A 1944 study shows that 778 Jewish students attended Lansdowne Public School (now known as Lord Lansdowne Public School) in that year.
Address
33 Robert Street
Time Period
1888-
Scope Note
Lansdowne Public School at one time had a high concentration of Jewish students due to its close proximity to Kensginton Market. A 1944 study shows that 778 Jewish students attended Lansdowne Public School (now known as Lord Lansdowne Public School) in that year.
Category
Education
Source
Landmarks
Address
150 Beverley Street
Source
Landmarks

By 1919 the plight of post-war Eastern European Jewry and the need for a united community voice for Canadian Jewry led to the creation of the Canadian Jewish Congress. Its founding meeting was held on March 16, 1919 in Montreal. Though it briefly maintained a tiny regional office in Toronto, the CJC remained inactive until 1933, when it fully reconvened by opening offices in Winnipeg, Montreal, and Toronto. Egmont L. Frankel was the first President of the new Central Division in Toronto. While the National Office in Montreal focused on the overarching issues of the social and economic rights of European Jewry, assistance for Jewish immigrants, and combating prejudice in Canada, the Toronto office dealt with local violent anti-Jewish demonstrations as well as continuing discrimination both in employment and in access to public recreational facilities. The structure was based on regular national biennial plenary conferences at which policies were delineated and national and regional executives were elected. Between plenary sessions, National and Regional Councils were in charge.
Address
150 Beverley Street
Time Period
1919-2012
Scope Note
By 1919 the plight of post-war Eastern European Jewry and the need for a united community voice for Canadian Jewry led to the creation of the Canadian Jewish Congress. Its founding meeting was held on March 16, 1919 in Montreal. Though it briefly maintained a tiny regional office in Toronto, the CJC remained inactive until 1933, when it fully reconvened by opening offices in Winnipeg, Montreal, and Toronto. Egmont L. Frankel was the first President of the new Central Division in Toronto. While the National Office in Montreal focused on the overarching issues of the social and economic rights of European Jewry, assistance for Jewish immigrants, and combating prejudice in Canada, the Toronto office dealt with local violent anti-Jewish demonstrations as well as continuing discrimination both in employment and in access to public recreational facilities. The structure was based on regular national biennial plenary conferences at which policies were delineated and national and regional executives were elected. Between plenary sessions, National and Regional Councils were in charge.
History
During the 1930s the Central Division Office moved several times and occupied offices in the following locations; Yonge St., the Bond St. Synagogue, Scheuer House, the Zionist Building, and its long-term home at 150-152 Beverley Street where it remained until its July, 1983 move to the Lipa Green Building in North York. Its activities expanded to include taking responsibility for Jewish educational standards but, by 1941, its main efforts shifted to support for Canada’s war effort. Immediately after the end of the war, the focus again shifted to Jewish immigration projects and the maintenance of Jewish identity in small communities.By 1950, the CJC’s use of the title “division” was changed to “region” to accommodate internal operational “divisions” within each region. Also, by then, the Central Region was busy expanding its programs for all Ontario Jewish communities, creating a province-wide council of youth groups, and working with the newly-created Bureau of Jewish Education (later Board of Jewish Education).
Category
Organization
Source
Landmarks
Address
56 Maria Street
Source
Landmarks

Congregation Knesseth Israel was built in 1911 at 56 Maria Street in the Junction. Its architect was James Ellis, who between 1890 and 1912 designed over fifty buildings in the area. Early 20th century membership consisted mainly of new Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe, many of whom lived and worked in the Junction as artisans, peddlers, shop owners and scrap and metal collectors. It is the oldest Toronto synagogue still in use as a synagogue today. The synagogue was restored in the early 1990s and remains active today. It is cared for by the descendants of the founding families.
Address
56 Maria Street
Time Period
1911-present
Scope Note
Congregation Knesseth Israel was built in 1911 at 56 Maria Street in the Junction. Its architect was James Ellis, who between 1890 and 1912 designed over fifty buildings in the area. Early 20th century membership consisted mainly of new Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe, many of whom lived and worked in the Junction as artisans, peddlers, shop owners and scrap and metal collectors. It is the oldest Toronto synagogue still in use as a synagogue today. The synagogue was restored in the early 1990s and remains active today. It is cared for by the descendants of the founding families.
Category
Religious
Architecture
Source
Landmarks
Address
119 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The Balfour Building is a Toronto landmark and designated heritage building that is located at 119 Spadina Avenue. It was designed by Benjamin Brown and was one of his most important commissions.
Address
119 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1930-Present
Scope Note
The Balfour Building is a Toronto landmark and designated heritage building that is located at 119 Spadina Avenue. It was designed by Benjamin Brown and was one of his most important commissions.
History
Built in 1930, the building is twelve storeys high and crowned by a two storey tower. It is considered one of the finest examples of Art Deco architecture in Toronto. Initially, many Jewish garment businesses were located in the building. It currently houses offices for several graphic design and advertising firms, shops and a post office. The Balfour Building was declared a heritage building by order of City Council in July of 1989.
Category
Architecture
Manufacturer
Source
Landmarks
Address
225 Richmond Street West
Source
Landmarks

The Gelber Brothers, Louis and Moses, were born in what is now Austria in the late nineteenth century. Together they founded the Imperial Clothing Company, which later became Gelber Brothers Woolens. Their head office was designed by Benjamin Brown and was located in the Gelber Building at 217-225 Richmond Street West. Although selling woolens was their main business, the brothers had other investments, including ownership of a service station at Simcoe and Richmond and a public garage at 287 Spadina Avenue.
Address
225 Richmond Street West
Time Period
1923-present
Scope Note
The Gelber Brothers, Louis and Moses, were born in what is now Austria in the late nineteenth century. Together they founded the Imperial Clothing Company, which later became Gelber Brothers Woolens. Their head office was designed by Benjamin Brown and was located in the Gelber Building at 217-225 Richmond Street West. Although selling woolens was their main business, the brothers had other investments, including ownership of a service station at Simcoe and Richmond and a public garage at 287 Spadina Avenue.
History
The Gelber Brothers were prominent members of the Toronto Jewish community. They were involved in many philanthropic and charitable activities and were active in many Jewish organizations.
Category
Architecture
Manufacturer
Source
Landmarks
Address
197/199 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The Empire Clothing Company building was another fine example of commercial buildings designed by Benjamin Brown. The building was located at 197/199 Spadina Avenue at the corner of Phoebe Street and Spadina Avenue. Brown built the original and a later addition to the building.
Address
197/199 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1923-present
Scope Note
The Empire Clothing Company building was another fine example of commercial buildings designed by Benjamin Brown. The building was located at 197/199 Spadina Avenue at the corner of Phoebe Street and Spadina Avenue. Brown built the original and a later addition to the building.
History
Mr. Abraham M. Schiffer and Mr. William Leibel were the co-owners of Empire Clothing Co. and Cornell Tailored Clothing Ltd. The Empire Clothing Company Building served as the headquarters for both businesses. The Empire Clothing Company manufactured men's clothing and sold it wholesale. Leibel and Schiffer were also close neighbours, living only a few houses apart. William Leibel was a prominent member of the Toronto Jewish community. He was involved in many philanthropic and charitable activities and was active in many Jewish organizations, particularly in the area of Jewish education.
Category
Architecture
Manufacturer
Source
Landmarks
Address
21 Dundas Square
Source
Landmarks

The six-storey Hermant Annex and 14-storey eastern tower were designed by Benjamin Brown in 1920 and 1930 respectively. The building is named after Percy Hermant and served as the headquarters for his company, Imperial Optical. The Hermant Building was built at Wilton Square - which was later renamed Dundas Square. Benjamin Brown's office was located in the Hermant Building in the 1940s. The offices of the Canadian Jewish Review were housed in the building on Dundas Square. The buildings were designated as heritage buildings in 1990.
Address
21 Dundas Square
Time Period
1930-present
Scope Note
The six-storey Hermant Annex and 14-storey eastern tower were designed by Benjamin Brown in 1920 and 1930 respectively. The building is named after Percy Hermant and served as the headquarters for his company, Imperial Optical. The Hermant Building was built at Wilton Square - which was later renamed Dundas Square. Benjamin Brown's office was located in the Hermant Building in the 1940s. The offices of the Canadian Jewish Review were housed in the building on Dundas Square. The buildings were designated as heritage buildings in 1990.
History
Percy Hermant was born in Mogilev, Russia in 1882. In 1897, he immigrated to Canada, arriving in New Brunswick, where he began working as a dry goods peddler. In 1900, he founded the Imperial Optical Company, the first prescription lens business in the Maritimes. This company eventually grew to be the largest company of its kind in the British Commonwealth. In addition to his successful business, he was very involved with philanthropic and community activities within Jewish and non-Jewish circles. He sponsored academic and musical scholarships.
Category
Architecture
Manufacturer
Medical
Source
Landmarks
Address
Dundas and Elizabeth Streets
Source
Landmarks

Dr. Max Kates was a Jewish dentist in Toronto. He was married to Lillian Kates, who was the founder of Camp Arowhon, a popular Jewish summer camp in Algonquin Park.
Address
Dundas and Elizabeth Streets
Time Period
ca. 1921-present
Scope Note
Dr. Max Kates was a Jewish dentist in Toronto. He was married to Lillian Kates, who was the founder of Camp Arowhon, a popular Jewish summer camp in Algonquin Park.
History
This building was designed by Benjamin Brown and was commissioned by Dr. Kates to house several stores and offices. It still stands today at the corner of Dundas and Elizabeth Streets in the heart of Toronto’s former St. John’s Ward; the area that first received the thousands of Jewish immigrants fleeing the pogroms in Russia and Eastern Europe.
Category
Architecture
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Address
254-256 Victoria Street
Source
Landmarks

The six-storey Hermant Annex and 14-storey eastern tower were designed by Benjamin Brown in 1920 and 1930 respectively. The building is named after Percy Hermant and served as the headquarters for his company, Imperial Optical. The Hermant Building was built at Wilton Square - which was later renamed Dundas Square. Benjamin Brown's office was located in the Hermant Building in the 1940s. The offices of the Canadian Jewish Review were housed in the building on Dundas Square. The buildings were designated as heritage buildings in 1990.
Address
254-256 Victoria Street
Time Period
1920-present
Scope Note
The six-storey Hermant Annex and 14-storey eastern tower were designed by Benjamin Brown in 1920 and 1930 respectively. The building is named after Percy Hermant and served as the headquarters for his company, Imperial Optical. The Hermant Building was built at Wilton Square - which was later renamed Dundas Square. Benjamin Brown's office was located in the Hermant Building in the 1940s. The offices of the Canadian Jewish Review were housed in the building on Dundas Square. The buildings were designated as heritage buildings in 1990.
History
Percy Hermant was born in Mogilev, Russia in 1882. In 1897, he immigrated to Canada, arriving in New Brunswick, where he began working as a dry goods peddler. In 1900, he founded the Imperial Optical Company, the first prescription lens business in the Maritimes. This company eventually grew to be the largest company of its kind in the British Commonwealth. In addition to his successful business, he was very involved with philanthropic and community activities within Jewish and non-Jewish circles. He sponsored academic and musical scholarships.
Category
Architecture
Manufacturer
Medical
Source
Landmarks
Address
6490 Tilton Lake Road
Source
Landmarks

Camp Solelim was founded in 1965 as a Young Judaean camp. Its name comes from Kibbutz HaSolelim in Israel which recognizes the builders who were integral to the establishment of the State of Israel. The program is infused with informal social, Jewish and Zionist educational programs. Like many of the camps founded earlier, campers are encouraged to participate in the functioning of the camp and derive a strong sense of responsibility through daily camp operations and camp projects. The camp still exists today and is jointly operated by the Toronto Zionist Council and Canadian Young Judaea.
Address
6490 Tilton Lake Road
Time Period
1965-present
Scope Note
Camp Solelim was founded in 1965 as a Young Judaean camp. Its name comes from Kibbutz HaSolelim in Israel which recognizes the builders who were integral to the establishment of the State of Israel. The program is infused with informal social, Jewish and Zionist educational programs. Like many of the camps founded earlier, campers are encouraged to participate in the functioning of the camp and derive a strong sense of responsibility through daily camp operations and camp projects. The camp still exists today and is jointly operated by the Toronto Zionist Council and Canadian Young Judaea.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1110 Brydon Bay Road
Source
Landmarks

Camp Shalom was founded in 1948 by the Zionist Organization of Canada as a summer camp for youth between the ages of 9 and 13. Located in Gravenhurst, Ontario, Camp Shalom was one of the most successful of the Zionist camps. Camp Shalom was administered by the National Camps Association in conjunction with a regional committee, although, the daily operation and staffing of the camp was provided by Canadian Young Judaea. The camp still exists today and is jointly operated by the Toronto Zionist Council and Canadian Young Judaea.
Address
1110 Brydon Bay Road
Time Period
1948-present
Scope Note
Camp Shalom was founded in 1948 by the Zionist Organization of Canada as a summer camp for youth between the ages of 9 and 13. Located in Gravenhurst, Ontario, Camp Shalom was one of the most successful of the Zionist camps. Camp Shalom was administered by the National Camps Association in conjunction with a regional committee, although, the daily operation and staffing of the camp was provided by Canadian Young Judaea. The camp still exists today and is jointly operated by the Toronto Zionist Council and Canadian Young Judaea.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1104 Fish Hatchery Road
Source
Landmarks

Camp Ramah has been in operation since 1960 and operates under the educational guidance of the National Ramah Commission and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. It is governed by the Camp Ramah in Canada Committee. The camp is located in the Muskoka Region of Southern Ontario and is known for its experiential Jewish Education where campers learn Hebrew by singing together as a camp, participating in tefillot (prayers) on the beach and learning about Israel from Mishlachat (Israeli staff).
Address
1104 Fish Hatchery Road
Time Period
1960-present
Scope Note
Camp Ramah has been in operation since 1960 and operates under the educational guidance of the National Ramah Commission and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. It is governed by the Camp Ramah in Canada Committee. The camp is located in the Muskoka Region of Southern Ontario and is known for its experiential Jewish Education where campers learn Hebrew by singing together as a camp, participating in tefillot (prayers) on the beach and learning about Israel from Mishlachat (Israeli staff).
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
7861 Chemin River
Source
Landmarks

B’nai Brith’s Ottawa Lodge 885 was officially founded in February 1921 with 25 members. The Ottawa Lodge supported a Jewish Boy Scouts camp which evolved into the first Ottawa B’nai Brith summer camp for Jewish youth in 1935. Since 1935, the camp has delivered traditional camping programs to their community regardless of affiliation, denomination or financial means. Their mission has been to provide children and youth with the opportunity to experience the outdoors, learn new skills and develop life-long friendships while enhancing Jewish values, traditions, affiliation and community.
Address
7861 Chemin River
Time Period
1935-present
Scope Note
B’nai Brith’s Ottawa Lodge 885 was officially founded in February 1921 with 25 members. The Ottawa Lodge supported a Jewish Boy Scouts camp which evolved into the first Ottawa B’nai Brith summer camp for Jewish youth in 1935. Since 1935, the camp has delivered traditional camping programs to their community regardless of affiliation, denomination or financial means. Their mission has been to provide children and youth with the opportunity to experience the outdoors, learn new skills and develop life-long friendships while enhancing Jewish values, traditions, affiliation and community.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1068 Burlmarie Road
Source
Landmarks

Located on the Lake of Bays in Muskoka, Camp New Moon began as a family lodge in the early 1930s. It was transformed into a children’s camp in the 1950s. In 1959, the camp was purchased by Al Goodman and Bert Fine (who ran Bathurst Manor Day Camp, later renamed to Forest Valley) who operated the camp together until around 1960 when Goodman assumed full ownership. Since the 1990s, the camp has been operated by Al’s son Jack and his wife Sue. The camp continues to flourish, providing campers the same experience that has existed for 60 years. There are now third generation campers attending.
Address
1068 Burlmarie Road
Time Period
1959-present
Scope Note
Located on the Lake of Bays in Muskoka, Camp New Moon began as a family lodge in the early 1930s. It was transformed into a children’s camp in the 1950s. In 1959, the camp was purchased by Al Goodman and Bert Fine (who ran Bathurst Manor Day Camp, later renamed to Forest Valley) who operated the camp together until around 1960 when Goodman assumed full ownership. Since the 1990s, the camp has been operated by Al’s son Jack and his wife Sue. The camp continues to flourish, providing campers the same experience that has existed for 60 years. There are now third generation campers attending.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
Eldorado Park
Source
Landmarks

In 1936 the Labour League (later the United Jewish People's Order) bought Eldorado Park near Brampton, Ontario from the Canadian National Railway to establish Camp Naivelt. It functioned as a camp for children and families and ran a teacher training facility. Political and social activism was a significant part of Camp Naivelt. Its mission was to promote progressive socialist philosophy, tightly integrated with secular Jewish and Yiddish cultural traditions. A key element of the Camp Naivelt mission was to foster a deep and meaningful understanding of secular Jewish culture and folklore, the Yiddish language, music, folk art and dance.
Address
Eldorado Park
Time Period
1936-present
Scope Note
In 1936 the Labour League (later the United Jewish People's Order) bought Eldorado Park near Brampton, Ontario from the Canadian National Railway to establish Camp Naivelt. It functioned as a camp for children and families and ran a teacher training facility. Political and social activism was a significant part of Camp Naivelt. Its mission was to promote progressive socialist philosophy, tightly integrated with secular Jewish and Yiddish cultural traditions. A key element of the Camp Naivelt mission was to foster a deep and meaningful understanding of secular Jewish culture and folklore, the Yiddish language, music, folk art and dance.
History
At its peak in the 1950s, Camp Naivelt had approximately 90 small cottages, a communal dining hall, a dance hall, a youth recreation hall, a grocery store and a camp office. The community also included a camp director’s cabin, arts and crafts cabin, infirmary, and a communal washroom and shower area known as, “The Ritz”. Activities ranged from lectures on current issues, films, poetry readings, Yiddish theatre, kultur vinkls (cultural corners), folk dancing and singing to boating and swimming, volleyball and other sports tournaments, hikes and nature walks and campfires. Some 300 children would attend camp during the summer and, at its height during the 1940s and 1950s, as many as 5000 people would fill Camp Naivelt on a summer weekend.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1485 Murphy Rd.
Source
Landmarks

Camp Moshava was founded in 1962 in the Kawartha Lakes Region on Lake Buckhorn. Affiliated with the Zionist youth movement B’nei Akiva, Moshava is one of several camps they operate in North America.
Address
1485 Murphy Rd.
Time Period
1962-present
Scope Note
Camp Moshava was founded in 1962 in the Kawartha Lakes Region on Lake Buckhorn. Affiliated with the Zionist youth movement B’nei Akiva, Moshava is one of several camps they operate in North America.
History
Historically, the primary aim of the movement was to promote avodah, specifically agricultural work in the field and aliyah, migration to Israel. Today, Camp Moshava provides an informal environment for campers to encounter Judaism through programming and observances that promote Torah education, prayer and Zionist ideals.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1 Arowhon Road
Source
Landmarks

Camp Arowhon has been owned and operated by the Kates family since 1934. It is located on a private lake in Algonquin Provincial Park. Matriarch Lillian Kates established this family business, three generations long, in 1934. A formidable entrepreneur, Kates was undeterred by obstacles of the day such as adventurous travel through Ontario’s wilderness, anti-Semitism, sexism and a lack of financial resources. She passionately pursued her dream of creating a unique Canadian summer camp and single handedly recruited all of its first campers.
Address
1 Arowhon Road
Time Period
1934-present
Scope Note
Camp Arowhon has been owned and operated by the Kates family since 1934. It is located on a private lake in Algonquin Provincial Park. Matriarch Lillian Kates established this family business, three generations long, in 1934. A formidable entrepreneur, Kates was undeterred by obstacles of the day such as adventurous travel through Ontario’s wilderness, anti-Semitism, sexism and a lack of financial resources. She passionately pursued her dream of creating a unique Canadian summer camp and single handedly recruited all of its first campers.
History
When Kates’ son Eugene took over as director, he set up Arowhon’s unique system where campers independently chose their daily activities. True to the inspiration of its name-Samuel Butler’s Utopian novel “Nowhere” spelt backwards “Erehwon”-Arowhon did indeed become “a perfect world for children”. Today the camp is operated by Eugene’s daughter Joanne Kates, the celebrated food critic.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1612 Dudley Rd
Source
Landmarks

In 1958, Camp Timberlane was founded by Barry and Philomena Lowes on the shores of the Lake of Two Islands in the Haliburton Highlands. Their vision was to create a camping experience that would build confidence, spirit and leadership. They strived to provide a nurturing environment that recognized a person’s uniqueness and where values would be learned that would benefit them over a lifetime. The tradition continues today and is being carried out by the present Director and Owner Corey Mandell who attended Timberlane as a camper and counselor.
Address
1612 Dudley Rd
Time Period
1958-present
Scope Note
In 1958, Camp Timberlane was founded by Barry and Philomena Lowes on the shores of the Lake of Two Islands in the Haliburton Highlands. Their vision was to create a camping experience that would build confidence, spirit and leadership. They strived to provide a nurturing environment that recognized a person’s uniqueness and where values would be learned that would benefit them over a lifetime. The tradition continues today and is being carried out by the present Director and Owner Corey Mandell who attended Timberlane as a camper and counselor.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1335 Camp White Pine Ct.
Source
Landmarks

Camp White Pine, a children’s summer camp located in the Haliburton Highlands outside of Toronto was founded by Joe Kronick in 1956. Joe's son, Adam, took over as director of Camp White Pine in 1987. He has run the camp with his wife, Dana, as co-Director since 1990.
Address
1335 Camp White Pine Ct.
Time Period
1956-present
Scope Note
Camp White Pine, a children’s summer camp located in the Haliburton Highlands outside of Toronto was founded by Joe Kronick in 1956. Joe's son, Adam, took over as director of Camp White Pine in 1987. He has run the camp with his wife, Dana, as co-Director since 1990.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1030 Lower Lions Club Road
Source
Landmarks

Camp Kadimah is a day camp for children between the ages of 2-14 operated by the Hamilton Jewish Community Centre.
Address
1030 Lower Lions Club Road
Time Period
1949-present
Scope Note
Camp Kadimah is a day camp for children between the ages of 2-14 operated by the Hamilton Jewish Community Centre.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1 Camp Gesher’s Rd
Source
Landmarks

Camp Gesher originated in 1963 from a merger between Camp Revivim (serving campers from Ottawa and Toronto) and Camp Kissufim (serving campers from Montreal). It is part of Habonim Dror, the Labour-Zionist youth movement and is located near Cloyne, Ontario.
Address
1 Camp Gesher’s Rd
Time Period
1963-present
Scope Note
Camp Gesher originated in 1963 from a merger between Camp Revivim (serving campers from Ottawa and Toronto) and Camp Kissufim (serving campers from Montreal). It is part of Habonim Dror, the Labour-Zionist youth movement and is located near Cloyne, Ontario.
History
Camp Gesher’s small size is central to the spirit of the camp where a culture of acceptance, individuality and mutual respect is fostered. The camp philosophy revolves around socialist ideals and its structure is similar to that of a kibbutz. Hebrew is used in day-to-day conversation and there are many opportunities to learn about Jewish and Israeli history and culture. There is a kosher kitchen and Shabbat and Havdalah are celebrated.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1950 Bathurst St.
Source
Landmarks

Holy Blossom was the first Jewish congregation in Ontario, established in September 1856 as the Toronto Hebrew Congregation. Many of Toronto’s earliest Jewish families were members of this congregation and were also responsible for establishing the city’s first Jewish cemetery on Pape Avenue. For 20 years, the congregation rented space over a drug store on Yonge Street until 1876 when a Synagogue was built on Richmond Street West. As the congregation grew, it moved to a new building on Bond Street in 1897, designed in the Byzantine Revival style (this building is now St. George’s Greek Orthodox Church).
Address
1950 Bathurst St.
Time Period
1937-present
Scope Note
Holy Blossom was the first Jewish congregation in Ontario, established in September 1856 as the Toronto Hebrew Congregation. Many of Toronto’s earliest Jewish families were members of this congregation and were also responsible for establishing the city’s first Jewish cemetery on Pape Avenue. For 20 years, the congregation rented space over a drug store on Yonge Street until 1876 when a Synagogue was built on Richmond Street West. As the congregation grew, it moved to a new building on Bond Street in 1897, designed in the Byzantine Revival style (this building is now St. George’s Greek Orthodox Church).
History
While Holy Blossom was first established as an Orthodox congregation, in the late 1800s a move toward Reform practices began, including changes to services and the introduction of music and family seating. In 1920, Holy Blossom became a Reform Congregation affiliated with the Union of American Hebrew Congregations (now the Union for Reform Judaism), and has remained a leading Reform Synagogue in Canada ever since. By the 1930s, Holy Blossom had outgrown its Bond Street location and a fundraising campaign began to raise money to purchase property and build a new larger synagogue. In 1937, Holy Blossom moved to its present location on Bathurst south of Eglinton, designed in the the Romanesque Revival style by architects Chapman and Oxley with Maurice Dalvin Klein.
Category
Religious
Architecture
Source
Landmarks
Address
52 East Fox Lake Rd.
Source
Landmarks

Established in 1933, Camp Winnebagoe was the first Jewish co-educational camp in Canada, owned and operated by Joe and Sadie Danson. First located on the Rouge River, just east of Toronto, the camp moved to a number of different lakeside locations in the Huntsville area, during its long history. In 1971, Camp Winnebagoe purchased Camp Ogama on Fox Lake and it has been there since, operated by the Lustig family. The camp’s programming includes secular and Jewish traditions including themed days, events honouring individual campers’ outstanding contributions and Friday Night Services.
Address
52 East Fox Lake Rd.
Time Period
1933-present
Scope Note
Established in 1933, Camp Winnebagoe was the first Jewish co-educational camp in Canada, owned and operated by Joe and Sadie Danson. First located on the Rouge River, just east of Toronto, the camp moved to a number of different lakeside locations in the Huntsville area, during its long history. In 1971, Camp Winnebagoe purchased Camp Ogama on Fox Lake and it has been there since, operated by the Lustig family. The camp’s programming includes secular and Jewish traditions including themed days, events honouring individual campers’ outstanding contributions and Friday Night Services.
History
In 1946, David Lieberman founded Camp Ogama, a private a co-educational overnight camp for children aged 6-16, on Fox Lake near Huntsville. It was touted to be “Canada’s most progressive camp for young Jewish boys and girls.” The socially conscience programming offered at Camp Ogama had a profound impact on counselors and campers alike producing highly influential alumni. Former camper journalist Earl Pomerantz reflects, “Camp inoculated us with a passion for justice. And it wasn’t write a check and see you later; this was money where your mouth is.”
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
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