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46 records – page 1 of 1.
Accession Number
1997-11-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1997-11-3
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
1 folder of textual records
Date
[ca. 1925]-1986
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one black and white photograph taken of a group of campers at Camp Kindervelt in Rouge Hill. Identified in the photograph is Rae Watson (standing at the far left).
Also included were several newspaper clippings from 1976-1986, which have been integrated into the clipping files.
Administrative History
Camp Kindervelt was a Labour Zionist League camp in Rough Hill, in the east end of Toronto in the Rouge Valley.
Subjects
Camps
Labor Zionism
Name Access
Camp Kindervelt
Shiner, Sol
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1993-6-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1993-6-6
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 14 x 9 cm and 13 x 10 cm
Date
[ca. 1943]
Scope and Content
This accession consists of one photographic postcard and one negative of a group of girls at Camp Yungvelt in Pickering. Some of the girls have been identified as follows: Terry Krever is in front row on far left; Miss Simon (M. Shainhouse) is next to her in center; Miss Naomi Strauss is in the far left-hand corner; Mrs. Danilak is in back row, second from right; and "Creed" is in back row, far right.
Subjects
Children
Camps
Name Access
Krever, Terry
Strauss, Naomi
Danilak, Mrs.
Camp Yungvelt
Places
Pickering, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2003-10-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2003-10-4
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
1 videocassette : b&w, si., VHS
Date
1943
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one VHS videocassette copy of an 8mm silent film that was taken by Hy Rossman of campers at Camp Tamarack in 1943. The film includes scenes of the boys engaged in activities at camp as well as "mess hall" gatherings, training sessions and drills
Administrative History
Hy Rossman was the father of one of the campers. The donor, Dr. Martin Wolfish, was a friend of his son and was a camper in 1943 as well.
Descriptive Notes
A clip of the film can be viewed at: //www.youtube.com/embed/eFGNoca4vkw
Subjects
Camps
Children
Name Access
Camp Tamarack
Rossman, Hy
Places
Bracebridge, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1980-2-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1980-2-2
Material Format
text
graphic material
Physical Description
15 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1940-1962
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Workmen's Circle (Arbeiter Ring). Included are: three architectural drawings of the summer cottage for Camp Yunvelt (Pickering, Ont.); two group portraits (one with identification and one without); a bound periodical/journal from 1935; a hardcopy of Fertsik yor arbeter-ring: a geshikhte in bilder (English: Forty Years Workmen's Circle: A History in Pictures) put out by the National Executive Committee of the Workmen's Circle in 1940; a bound periodical/journal of Kultur un dertsiung (English: Culture and Education) for the year 1942; a bound periodical/journal of Der freynd (English: The Friend) for the year 1942; a booklet by Rev. Nathan Stolnitz's titled Some of the Numerous Comments and Reviews on Music in Jewish Life (1957?); a newspaper clipping titled "A bukh vom oyngt" (English: A Book That Opens) that was published in 1957; a hardcopy of Workmen's Circle, Pioneers and Builders put out by the Workmen's Circle Pioneers and Builders Committee in 1962; and two other Yiddish-language publications that have not been identified.
Administrative History
The Workmen's Circle (Yiddish: Arbeiter Ring) was founded in the United States by Jewish immigrants in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Circle branches were established in Canada in Montreal and Toronto in 1907 and 1908. In 1917, the Toronto branches incorporated as nonprofit organization called the Arbeiter Ring. The organization celebrated its centenery in 2017.
Descriptive Notes
Language: Most of the material in the accession is in Yiddish. The drawings are in English and a few of the publications are in English and Yiddish.
Subjects
Camps
Cottages
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Workmen's Circle (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Pickering (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2005-6-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2005-6-1
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1946-1948
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the Wabi-kronicle, the newsletter for Camp Wabi-Kon, a Jewish camp in Northern Ontario near Temagami.
Subjects
Camps
Children
Name Access
Camp Wabi-Kon
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-9
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
6 photographs : b&w ; 9 x 14 cm or smaller
Date
August 1947
Scope and Content
Accession contains a photo album with six photos of Camp Tamarack, some of which have been identified. Included are photos of Duck Lake, Morty Weisberg, Sonny Moshenberg and a boy counting beans (believed to be Lionel Solrush). A numbered guide of all the photos is included.
Subjects
Camps
Name Access
Camp Tamarack
Kirshin, Barry
Weisberg, Morty
Moshenberg, Sonny
Solrush, Lionel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-12-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-12-2
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
90 cm of textual records
1000 photographs [approx.]
Date
1919-2007
Scope and Content
This accession consists of textual and graphic records documenting the programs and activities of Canadian Young Judaea. The records include newsletters and publications, photographs, anniversary books, and program books. There are also two compact discs containing scanned copies of the photographs from this accession.
Custodial History
These records were gathered together for an anniversary celebration held in November 2007. Most of the records were found in the basement of the office building on Marlee Avenue, before being donated to the Archives.
Administrative History
Canadian Young Judaea was founded in 1909 as a Zionist movement for Canadian youth by members of the Herzl Zion Club. As a Zionist organization, Young Judaea continues to be committed to fostering a sense of Jewish identity and values in today's Jewish youth and to encouraging a lifelong commitment to Israel.
In order to foster a closer connection to Israel, Canadian Young Judaea employs educational Shlichim from Israel who are posted at various Jewish communities throughout Canada and offices at the national level. In Toronto, Young Judaea also operates several Zionist summer camps located in each region of Canada, and a summer leadership institute called Camp Biluim in Quebec. In addition to the social programme of the organization, Young Judaea also offers educational seminars and conferences.
Young Judaea's national structure includes a National Executive Board and an Administrative Council. Conventions are held regularly, as are regional conferences. In the past, Young Judaea operated as an associated, but distinct, organization from the Zionist Organization of Canada. However, Young Judaea operations were overseen by the ZOC executive, and Young Judaea received their budget from the ZOC Treasury. In addition, ZOC and Young Judaea worked in conjunction with one another on many projects and programmes, such as with the operation of the Zionist camps. They were therefore dependent on ZOC.
Subjects
Camps
Youth
Zionism
Name Access
Canadian Young Judaea
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-11-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-11-4
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
2 photographs : b&w ; 9 x 14 cm and 9 X7 cm
1 matchbook
Date
1928-2009
Scope and Content
Accession consists of mementos, family documents and clippings from Nancy Draper (née Frankel). The records include a birth announcement card for Nancy in 1928 and a matchbook party favour from her wedding to Darrell Draper in 1949. There is also a scholarship application letter from the donor's granddaughter, Haley Draper, to UJA. Other records include a staff list from Camp Wabi-Kon in 1946; a Globe and Mail obituary of Dr. Martin Wolfish, a past volunteer of OJA; a photograph of David Steinhauer; a clipping about an Inuit sculpture inspired by the experience of Holocaust survivor Leon Kahn; and three eulogies for Patricia Drevnig Goldstein (1940-2005) (née Jacobs). Patricia was the granddaughter of Rabbi Solomon Jacobs of Holy Blossom, and her mother, Edna, was a Frankel. Finally, the accession includes a photocopy of a photograph of members of the Siglen family of Meaford with Maurice Frankel, the great-uncle of the donor, and Irwin Rosen, ca. 1928.
Administrative History
Nancy Frankel (b. 1928) is the daughter of Carl and Dorothy Jacobs Frankel, past prominent members of the Toronto Jewish community and members of Holy Blossom Temple. Nancy attended Camp Wabi-Kon, a Jewish camp in northern Ontario near Temagami, and then worked there as a teenager. She married Darrell Draper on December 10th, 1949. Nancy is a longtime volunteer at the OJA.
Subjects
Clippings (Books, newspapers, etc.)
Camps
Families
Letters
Obituaries
Name Access
Draper, Nancy
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-7-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-7-8
Material Format
textual record
moving images
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 optical disc (48:20 min.) : col. ; DVD
35 photographs : col. ; 16 x 11 cm
Date
2006-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the military career of Corporal Tamar Freeman, particularly her 6-month deployment to Kandahar, Afghanistan. Included is postcard and email correspondence sent to her parents detailing issues of camp life, her religious observance, as well as her role as a medic; a DVD of the film "Sisters in Arms" written and directed by Tamar's sister, Beth Freeman; newspaper clippings and articles on Tamar and the film "Sisters in Arms"; photographs of Tamar receiving an award from the Canadian Jewish Congress, of her family greeting her at the airport upon return to Canada, a portrait of Tamar with another soldier and General Hillier, as well as images taken of fellow soldiers and the surroundings while in Afghanistan.
Administrative History
Corporal Tamar Freeman (1967-) is the daughter of Harvey and Gilda Freeman. She began her military career as an army reservist in 1990. As a reservist, she committed one day per week and one weekend per month to working in hospitals on board ships and in defence research facilities. In 2006, she joined the regular infantry as a medic in the Second Field Ambulance unit. She served in Kandahar for 6 months between 2006 and 2007 as a medic treating wounded soldiers, Afghan allies and civilians. She also served as part of the Provincial Reconstruction Team at a village medical clinic. She received the Alan Rose Award for International Human Dignity from the Canadian Jewish Congress in 2007. Corporal Freeman is currently stationed at Base Borden in Ontario.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Use restrictions note: Personal emails are confidential and require the permission of Tamar Freeman before accessing.
Subjects
Afghan War, 2001---Participation, Canadian
Soldiers--Canada
Name Access
Freeman, Tamar
Places
Afghanistan
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-5-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-5-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
15 cm of textual records
8 architectural drawings
2 CDs
Date
1960-2011, predominant 2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of architectural drawings for the construction of the Northern YM-YWHA at 4600 Bathurst Street (1960) as well as floor plans for the proposed re-development of the site in 1999. Also included are submissions for the competition to design and build the Jewish War Veterans of Canada memorial at the Sherman Campus (2011).
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Subjects
Architecture
Charities
Veterans--Canada
Name Access
Young Men's Hebrew Association (Toronto, Ont.)
Bathurst Jewish Community Centre
Jewish War Veterans of Canada
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-15
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-15
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
ca. 20 cm textual records
3 photographs
Date
1948-2007
Scope and Content
Accession consists of documents and photographs related to Young Judaea programs. Photographs are group pictures from Camp Shalom and Camp Biluim. Among the documents are meeting minutes, newsletters, correspondence, songbooks, scripts, flyers, and guides for counsellors and group leaders. Also included are issues of Hebrew newsletters Daf Hat'Nua and Bat'Nua.
Subjects
Camps
Youth
Zionism
Name Access
Canadian Young Judaea
Camp Shalom
Camp Biluim
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
40 cm of textual records and other material
Date
[192-]-[200-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the life and career of David Green and the Jaffey family. Records include sound and video recordings of events, Goodwill Sales accounting ledgers, meeting minutes from the Jewish Canadian Military Archives and Museum, David Green's military ephemera, manuals and reports of the Jewish Federation Board of Trustees and Bequest and Endowment Fund, and Jaffey family correspondence and photographs. Records also include certificates of appreciation awarded to David Green, mainly from UJA Federation.
Administrative History
David Green (1919-2014) was born in the Junction in west Toronto. He served as a private in the Canadian army as part of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. He was captured and designated MIA when he was held as a POW in Belgium. He became a member of General Wingate Branch 256 Jewish Canadian Legion. In the mid-1940s he married his wife, Sylvia (nee Jaffey) (d. 2010) and they had a daughter, Miriam. He was a longtime volunteer for the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto. In 1990, he was one of the first individuals to establish an Endowment Fund at the Jewish Foundation of Greater Toronto.
The Jaffey family consisted of Kaby Jaffey, his wife, Nellie, and their children Sylvia, Jess and Albert.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: Accession also consists of photographs and textiles.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
Charities
Families
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Green, David, 1919-2014
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-3
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
40 cm textual records
ca. 50 photographs
Date
1940-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records of Canadian Young Judaea. Records include correspondence, camp committee meeting minutes, camp committee and staff lists, the CYJ constitution, organizational newsletters, donation lists, flyers and camp reunion ephemera. Records also include clippings and reproductions from the Zionist Archives, and Camp Solelim photographs, as well as publications from other Jewish organizations.
Administrative History
Canadian Young Judaea was founded in 1909 as a Zionist movement for Canadian youth by members of the Herzl Zion Club. As a Zionist organization, Young Judaea continues to be committed to fostering a sense of Jewish identity and values in today's Jewish youth and to encouraging a lifelong commitment to Israel. In order to foster a closer connection to Israel, Canadian Young Judaea employs educational Shlichim from Israel who are posted to various Jewish communities throughout Canada and to offices at the national level in Toronto Young Judaea also operates several Zionist summer camps located in each region of Canada, and a summer leadership institute called Camp Biluim in Quebec. In addition to the social programme of the organization, Young Judaea also offers educational seminars and conferences.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Access restriction note: Files contain personal information of donors, campers, committee members and applicants for subsidies.
Subjects
Camps
Youth
Zionism
Name Access
Canadian Young Judaea
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1949-1955
Scope and Content
Accession consists of documents such as letters and minutes of meetings of the Jewish Social Service Agencies of the United Jewish Welfare Fund, of which JVS was a member agency.
Custodial History
There is no information on the acquisition of this material. We believe that it likely originated from Milton Friedman, Executive Director of JVS.
Subjects
Charities
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Jewish Vocational Service (Toronto, Ont.)
Friedman, Milton
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-7
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 70 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1928-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the activities of Ben Zion Shapiro and his family. The bulk of the records document the Shapiro family's involvement in Young Judea. Young Judea material includes: yearbooks, photographs, correspondence, meeting minutes, event programmes, song books, newsletters, and two Camp Biluim flags made by Bunny Shapiro. One flag contains Camp Biluim's crest (1951) and the other one was created for Camp Biluim's colour war and contains the text "We will try and we will succeed Camp Biluim" (1954?). Also included is a VHS tape containing a copy of the Toronto Zionist Council's video about Camp Shalom (1991?). Of note are minute books maintained by Roy Shapiro for the Toronto Young Judea Administrative Board (1928-1934) and for the Leadership Club (1940-1948).
Accession also contains material relating to Roy and Ben Zion's involvement with the following organizations: the Coordinated Services to the Jewish Elderly (Circle of Care), B'nai Israel Beth David Congregation, Beth Tzedec's Mispacha Program, Beth Tzedec's Israel Action Program, Congregation Beth Haminyan, and Holy Blossom Temple's Department for Jewish Living. These records include, minutes, correspondence, newsletters and publications, evaluation reports and other reports. Also included is a demographic report entitied, "Rapid Growth and Transformation: Demographic Challenges Facing the Jewish Community of Greater Toronto" (1995), material from a conference at the University of Toronto on the university's partnership with Israel, CHAT alumni directories, and a CHAT book entitled, "Voices: Jewish Teens of the 90's". Of note are buttons, photographs, reports and correspondence documenting Bunny and Ben Zion's trip to the Soviet Union on behalf of the CJC's Committee for Soviet Jewry.
Finally accession includes material documenting family activities of the Shapiro and Sherman family. Included is a transcript of Bessie Sherman telling her life story (1978), haggadot, PowerPoint presentations created by Ben Zion for his grandchildren and for a family reunion outlining the family history of his family and Bunny's family. There is also a video of Ben Zion presenting his PowerPoint at the Michalski / Cohen family reunion. Also included are family films and videos containing footage of Bunny and Ben Zion's wedding and honeymoon, Camp Biluim, Young Judea events, Bunny on Machon, family wedding anniversaries and birthday parties, trips to Israel, the United States, and Europe as well as footage of the Cousin's Club. Also included is a VHS tape containing a recorded segment from CityPulse News featuring the family's Pesach festivities in 1995.
Photo identification: Back row, left to right: Ray Markus, Michelle Landsberg, Menachem ?, Frank Narrol. Front row, left to right: Gilda Mitchell, Bunny Shapiro, BenZion Shapiro, Malka Rabinowitz.
Administrative History
Ben Zion Shapiro was born in Toronto in 1931 to Roy and Beck (nee Cohen) Shapiro. He has a younger brother, Morden (Mort) Shapiro (b. 1940). His father worked as an office manager at Rotstein Furniture and Maple Leaf Cleaners and his mother worked as a legal secretary until marriage. Roy was active in a number of organizations including: Young Judea, Sons of Jacob Society, Toronto Camera Club, a founding member of Beth David Synagogue, Coordinated Services to the Jewish Elderly (Circle of Care) and President of the Association of Jewish Seniors. Beck was active in Young Judea and Pioneer Women (President of the Golda Meir Club).
Ben Zion received a Master of Social Work from the University of Toronto and attended the Jewish Agency Institute for Youth Leaders from Abroad in Jerusalem, Israel (1951-1952). He has worked for a number of organizations throughout his career, including: Young Judea (he was Director of both Camp Shalom (1962-1969) and Camp Biluim (1954-1956)), B'nai Brith Youth Organization, University Settlement, St. Christopher's House and Director of the Novomeysky Centre in Jerusalem (1957-1961). He was also Professor and Associate Dean of Social Work at the University of Toronto and three times Visiting Professor at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.
Ben married Bunny (Bernice) Shaprio in 1955. Bunny was born in 1934 in Noranda, Quebec to Irving and Bessie (nee Consky) Sherman. Bunny attended public school in Noranda, Noranda High School and Forest Hill Collegiate in Toronto, University of Toronto (BA), the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (M.Ed. in Special Education), and the Jewish Agency Institute for Jewish Leaders from Abroad (1952-1953).
Bunny graduated from the first Camp Biluim Institute for leadership training in 1951 and worked with Ben Zion at Camp Shalom as Camp Mother in 1962 and from 1964-1969. She also worked at Camp Biluim from 1955-1956. In 1983, Bunny and Ben Zion went to the Soviet Union to visit Refuseniks on behalf of the Soviet Jewry Committee of the Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region.
Bunny and Ben have two children: Ayala and Ilan. Since Ben Zion's retirement in 1996, he and Bunny have been living in Jerusalem for half of each year. In 2015, they moved full-time to Jerusalem.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes ca. 300 photographs (256 tiff), 2 PowerPoint presentations, 1 textual record (doc), 4 buttons, 2 flags, 5 VHS tapes, and 18 film reels (8 mm).
Subjects
Camps
Youth
Zionism
Name Access
Shapiro, Ben Zion, 1931-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-4
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 250 photographs (3 albums) : b&w and col. ; 53 x 43 cm and smaller
9 cm of textual records
Date
(191-)-(197-), 1992
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the Title, Samuels and Fishman families. Included are family photographs, and photos related to involvement with philanthropy and industry, materials related to Reliable Toy Company, Forest Hill Collegiate "Forester" year books, a land deed for the Ansheir Yoisher Misrachi Synagogue in Welland, news clippings relating to Alex Samuels death, a Holy Blossom "Tempelite" year book, a Crown Bakery Bread promotional item, a wedding menu from the marriage of Molly Fishman and Harry Title, Molly Fishman's high school diplomas and JNF certificates. There are a number of photos of the Fishman and Title families in Welland and the United States, photos of the Crowland Volunteer Fire Department with Sam and Frank Fishman, Turk family albums with Moishe Turk and Yeva Fishman, an album of a sefer torah dedication to Baycrest Hospital in memory of Leah Fishman, photos of the Samuels family, their trip to Israel, promotional photos from the Reliable Toy Company, Beth Tzedec founding board photos, and B'nai Brith Women photos.
Administrative History
Samuel (ca. 1882-1929, Russia) and Gussie (nee Moscovitz) (b. ca.1884, Romania) Fishman, immigrated to Welland Ontario from Romania. Both arrived to the USA as teenagers sometime around the turn of the century. Samuel and Gussie were married in the USA and by 1920 immigrated with their young family to the historic township of Crowland in Welland County. Here they opened and operated a men's clothing store. Together they had six children, Molly (b. 1909, USA), Abe (b. 1911, USA), Morris (b. 1916, USA), Ruth (b. 1915, USA), Ann (b. 1920, Ontario) and Ethel. Morris married Pauline and lived in St. Catherines, Ruth married Nate Oelbaum and lived in Tucson Arizona, Anne married Alec Rothman and lived in Port Colborne, Ethel married Eddie Matchtinger and lived in Toronto and Abe never married. Yeva Fishman, the niece of Samuel Fishman married Morris Turk. Her father was (Frank Fishman?) and her mother was Sara Leah Fishman. Molly Fishman married Harry Title (Teitelebaum) (b. ca. 1903). They had three children, Greta (nee Title) Greisman, Sandra (nee Title) Samuels and Stephen (m. Carole Hillman, niece of Ben Hillman). Harry Teitelbaum is the son of Israel and Frumeth Teitelbaum. He was born in Gdansk Poland (b. ca., 1903). Harry Title had four younger siblings Lloyd, Birdie (m. Witlin), Arthur and Lorelle (Lieba) the youngest who was born in Toronto. Harry arrived to Canada shortly after the first world war and worked in the garment industry. He and his brother Arthur founded the Title Dress Company in the late 1920s and operated the business out of 355 Adelaide St. West. In the late 1980s, the business moved from this location to Adelaide and Bathurst. Sandra Title (b. Oct 27, 1936, Toronto), the middle daughter of Molly Fishman and Harry Title, married Lawrence Samuels. Together they had five children Joanna, John, Noah, Tom and Caroline. Lawrence was the eldest son of Alex Samuels (d. 1966) and Kate (nee Goldberg) Samuels. He had two younger siblings Herbie and Florence (m. Bill Goodman). Lawrence's father Alex Samuels immigrated to Canada from Dubrovna, White Russia (present day Dubrouna, Belarus). He immigrated to Canada with his parents Samuel and Chana Samuels and his younger siblings Sol, Ben, Riva and Polly. Alex and his brothers Sol and Ben established Reliable Toy Company in (ca. 1929) on Carlaw Ave. They sold the company in 1990.
Subjects
Business
Charities
Families
Places
Welland, Ont.
Toronto, Ont.
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-10-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-10-1
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
2 folders of textual records
Date
1948-1951
Scope and Content
Accession consists of counter cheques, cancelled cheques, Statements of Account, deposit slips, promissory notes (1948-1950), a 1948 realty tax bill, an invoice from E. Hoffman Machinery Supply and letter of assignment of lien. Also included is a 1951 Camp Kvutza season price fees, a letter to parents, and a promotional pamphlet.
Administrative History
Camp Kvutza was a summer camp for children and adults and was promoted as the summer home of the Labour Zionist Movement. It was situated in Lowbanks, Ontario on the shores of Lake Erie. The children's program (ages 7-16) included swimming, baseball, basketball, ping-pong, arts and crafts, sabbath programs, Hebrew and Yiddish instruction, and Israeli songs and dances. The donor's father was associated with the camp.
Subjects
Camps
Labor Zionism
Name Access
Camp Kvutza (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-4-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-4-7
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
8 cm of textual records
1 photograph : col. ; 13 x 18 cm
Date
2004-2010
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a photograph of Ted Sokolsky and textual records that include: Centre Square Seniors' Centre Program and Design Brief (2004), Israel Emergency Campaign Fact Finding Trip by Ted Sokolsky and Adam Minsky (2007), Israel Emergency Campaign Proposal Draft 1 (2007) and a photo scrapbook of the Hatzor Ha'Glilit Early Childhood Centre (2010) thanking the UJA for its contribution to the construction of its new building.
Custodial History
Donated by Adam Minsky's office.
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Subjects
Charities
Israel
Older people
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-8-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-8-10
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
3 photographs : b&w ; 13 x 9 cm and smaller
1 DVD
Date
[ca. 1920]-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the history of the Dora Wilensky Salsberg Memorial Fund at Jewish Family and Child. Included are: a Canadian Jewish News feature ("Legacy of Life") on Dora Wilensky; a Dora Wilensky Memorial Fund pamphlet; correspondence from J.B. Salsberg regarding Sharyn’s ongoing role with the Jewish Communal Service Graduate Studies Scholarship Program; correspondence regarding the Fund between Sharyn Salsberg Ezrin and Richard Cummings, Ron Levin, Gordon Wolfe, and Sam Helfenbaum; fund and endowment statements regarding the Dora Wilensky Memorial Fund; and correspondence between Sharyn and the Toronto Jewish Congress Endowment Fund. Also includes: records documenting the J.B. Salsberg Tribute Dinner held at Beth Sholom Synagogue on November 13, 1991; Canadian Jewish News and Toronto Life profiles of J.B. Salsberg; an interview of J.B. Salsberg by Sandy Naiman; J.B. Salsberg's eulogy by Irving Abella; and one DVD of a J.B. Salsberg video tribute. Also includes three photographs of J.B. Salsberg and Dora Wilensky, and four issues of various JF&CS publications.
Administrative History
Dora Wilensky Salsberg was one of Toronto’s earliest professionally trained Jewish social workers and a leader in the Canadian social work field. She was born in Russia on July 28, 1902 to Hyman and Mary Wilensky. She had three younger sisters: Bertha (b. 1903) Jenny (b. 1905), and Fagel (b.1910). In 1907, the family immigrated to Toronto where Hyman worked at a cap factory.
Dora had the highest marks in the province of Ontario upon graduating from high school and graduated as a gold medalist in modern history from McMaster University in Toronto. She initially pursued a career in teaching, but had difficulty securing a job due to discrimination. When her only job offer from Oshawa was given on the condition that she change her last name, Dora decided to become a social worker.
After studying at the New York School for Social Work and working briefly in Chicago, Dora returned to Toronto and took up the position as Executive Director of the Jewish Family Welfare Bureau in 1931. When the JF&CS was formed in 1943 she served as its first Executive Director. Under her leadership, JF&CS gained a reputation as being one of the most advanced and progressive agencies in Toronto. She was among the first to hire a psychiatric social worker and to introduce play therapy as part of treatment; she remained on top of advances being made in the field in other countries and encouraged her staff to regularly engage in professional development activities.
Dora attempted to enter the United States for professional development in the fall of 1948. She was refused entry by the commissioner of immigration and naturalization. Her aim was to attend a postgraduate course in social work at the University of Pennsylvania. In spite of numerous official letters of endorsement, her application for admission was denied.
Dora was also actively involved in various professional organizations. She was a member of the National Board of the Canadian Association of Social Workers, served on the Board of Governors and various committees of the Canadian Welfare Council, and was active on the Social Planning Council (formerly the Welfare Council of Toronto). In addition, she was instrumental in the establishment of the University of Toronto’s post-graduate course in social work. For her service to the field, she earned both the King George V and Coronation medals.
In 1927, Dora married J. B. Salsberg. Although she legally adopted his name, she always used her maiden name professionally. They did not have any children. On March 20, 1959, Dora passed away from cancer at the age of 56.
Subjects
Charities
Charities
Name Access
Salsberg, J. B. (Joseph B.), ca. 1903-1998
Wilensky, Dora, 1902-1959
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-4-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-4-4
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
ca. 35 photographs : b&w and col. ; 33 x 27 cm or smaller
Date
1891-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting members of Harvey Freeman's family, several of whom served in the armed forces. Included are: family photographs, a Krugel family tree, a copy of Itzik Kriegel (Harvey's grandfather)'s army discharge, an attestation paper for Louis Krugel (Harvey's uncle), a signed program for a "stag whoopee dinner and night of blissful freedom" in honour of Lou Krugel's approaching marriage, and printed images of Harvey's daughter Tamar Freeman in Afghanistan. One of the photographs depicts Louis Krugel with professional wrestler and actor Tor Johnson, aka the Swedish Angel.
Photo Caption (001): Wellesley Public School, [ca. 1915]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (002): Louis Krugel. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (003): Buba Sluva with Sara, Moe, Lou, and Harry, 1909. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (004): Berel Krugel in front of 22 Gerard Street West, Toronto, [ca. 1919]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (005): Wedding, 28 September 1926. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (006): Louis Krugel. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (007): Baba Tzluva with Harry, [189-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (008): Louis Krugel. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (009): Shabbat dinner, [ca. 1940]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (010): Norman, Buba Sluva, and Bert, [ca. 1922]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (011): Family portrait, 1909. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (012): Harry and Sara, 1916. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (013): Louis Krugel, [192-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (014): Louis Krugel and unknown man posing with boxing gloves, [1918?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (015): Louis Krugel, 1918. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (016): Harvey Freeman at Camp Borden, 1945. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (017): Unknown. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (018): Louis Krugel and unknown man, 1918. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (019): Louis Krugel with Tor Johnson, aka the Swedish Angel, [194-]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (020): Signed portrait of Louis Krugel. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (021): Louis Krugel, [192-]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Administrative History
Harvey Freeman was born on May 22, 1928. As a youth, he attended Harbord Collegiate and went on to join the militia, where he was the lone Canadian Jewish bagpiper.
Harvey made his living in business, working in different areas including furniture manufacturing and property management. As part of a change in lifestyle, he took up marathons in his early seventies.
Harvey has four children.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIALS: Records for Harvey's daughter Tamar can be found in Accession 2013-7-8.
Subjects
Afghan War, 2001---Participation, Canadian
Families
Soldiers--Canada
Name Access
Freeman, Harvey
Freeman, Tamar
Johnson, Tor, 1903-1971
Places
Afghanistan
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-6-19
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-6-19
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
79 photographs : b&w ; 10 x 15 cm or smaller
Date
1941-1942
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Balfour Manor Camp. Included are approximately eighty black and white photographs, most of which have identifications on the reverse.
Individuals identified in the photographs include: Hanna[h?] Batnick, Gladys Bernstein, Judy Bernstein, Toshie Blackstone, L. Bolter, Jeanette Chapman, Doreen Cohen, [Suzy?] Davidson, Marcia Dillick, Sidney "Sid" Dillick, Dave Faber, R. Freedman, Ruby Freidman, Barbara Gitter, Gloria Glazier, Ruth Goldberg, Abbie Goldblatt, Marv Goldblatt, S. Goldblatt, Shiela Gould, J. Granovsky, Effie Greben, Mimi Hertz, Toni Hertz, Herk Herwitz, Annette Jacobson, Vera K., Marnie Kamin, Freddie Kohal, Sylvia Kohl, Lillian Lampkovitz, B. Levine, Herzel Levine, Esther Kolchin, Rhoda Magder, Ellie Markson, M. Markson, Marilyn Miller, M. Minden, Molly Mintz, Perky Nusbaum, R. Nusbaum, Gilbert Paskowitz, Herbie Paskowitz, J. Pattenick, Joan Pullan, Art Resnick, Lila Riven, Eleanor Rivlin, Lloyd Robstein, Faye Roefe, Les Roefe, Sandra Rose, Sid Rosen, Lewis Rosenberg, Audrey Rothschild, Yitta Rubin, Estelle Rucker, Seabiscuit, Gloria Shaffran, Selma Shone, Ruth Silver, Norm Simpson, Estelle Tucker, Lynda Weiss, and Irving Winston.
Custodial History
The photographs previously belonged to the donor's mother, Marcia Rose (née Dillick).
Administrative History
Irene Granovsky founded the Balfour Manor Camp in 1935 and subsequently served as its director. The camp took its name from British foreign secretary Arthur James Balfour, the author of the Balfour Declaration. The camp was situated on Morrison Lake and served as a private camp for Jewish youth, providing such activities as canoeing, swimming, and tennis. At its peak, the camp was home to two hundred or so campers. It closed in 1952.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Descriptive Notes
RELATED MATERIAL NOTE: Other records relating to Balfour Manor Camp can be found in accession 1991-12-4.
Subjects
Camps
Name Access
Balfour Manor Camp
Dillick, Sidney
Granovsky (family)
Rose, Marcia
Places
Muskoka (Ont. : District municipality)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-21
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-21
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
multiple media
Physical Description
113 cm of textual and other records
1 scrapbook
Date
1938-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Act to End Violence Against Women organization. Included are: meeting minutes of the executive board; a ledger containing executive board waivers of notice; meeting minutes and resolutions from the yearly conventions; photographs of Act to End Violence Against Women members; correspondence with other organizations; correspondence, research material, public reactions, and ephemera from various campaigns; a commemorative booklet for a B'nai Brith cantorial concert; a scrapbook on the formation of the B'nai Brith Women Claire Morry Chapter; constitutions, constitutional amendments, reports, budgets, resolutions and other records of Act to End Violence Against Women; member lists and honour roll of past chapters; material and correspondence with B'nai Brith Washington; UJA material concerning assimilation and intermarriage and 2001 Jewish census data results.
Administrative History
The first Canadian chapter of B'nai Brith Women International was formed in Windsor, Ontario in 1923. Other chapters were soon formed throughout Eastern Canada and additional chapters were established in Winnipeg and British Columbia after 1949. The organization was initially administered by the American B'nai Brith Women. In 1976, it finally became autonomous (although still affiliated with the American agency) and changed its name to B'nai Brith Women of Eastern Canada. In 1981, its name was changed again to B'nai Brith Women of Canada. In 1995, the organization became known as Jewish Women International of Canada (JWIC). In November 2011, the organization underwent a final name change to Act to End Violence Against Women.
JWIC is committed to social change, with a particular focus on improving the lives of women and their families. In the 1980s, the agency initiated programs to counter domestic violence and began operating safe housing for Jewish women and children known as ASTEH (Alternative Safe Temporary Emergency Housing). JWIC also runs the JWI Residential Treatment Centre for emotionally disturbed youth.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: Material in English, Russian and French.
Subjects
Charities
Family violence
Women
Name Access
Act to End Violence Against Women
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-9-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-9-5
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 photograph : sepia ; 20 x 90 cm
Date
1942
Scope and Content
Item is a panoramic group portrait of Camp Winnebagoe campers taken in 1942. Identified are brother and sister Lyle Steinberg (third row up, the sixth boy from the right) and Shiela Steinberg (seated in the front row, second from the left). Later—possibly in 1947—the family changed its name to Stanway.
Custodial History
Margot Freedman, the daughter of Lyle Stanway (né Steinberg), one of the children identified in the portrait, donated the photograph to the Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
Camps
Portraits, Group
Name Access
Camp Winnebagoe
Places
Muskoka (Ont. : District municipality)
Source
Archival Accessions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1194
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1194
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1947
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 26 x 21 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of a the senior boys' section of Camp Winnebagoe, near Huntsville, Ontario. The boys are assembled in a filed for the photograph.
Notes
Title taken from writing on photograph.
Name Access
Camp Winnebagoe
Subjects
Camps
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Huntsville (Ont.)
Accession Number
1976-10-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 2329
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
2329
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1941
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of several young people brushing their teeth near a lake at Camp Kvutza in Richmond Hill.
Name Access
Camp Kvutza (Richmond Hill, Ont.)
Subjects
Camps
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Richmond Hill (Ont.)
Accession Number
1980-9-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 2333
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
2333
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1942
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of several young people making up their cots outside at Camp Kvutza.
Name Access
Camp Kvutza (Richmond Hill, Ont.)
Subjects
Camps
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Richmond Hill (Ont.)
Accession Number
1980-9-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 2334
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
2334
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1942
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of several young people dancing the hora at Camp Kvutza in Richmond Hill.
Name Access
Camp Kvutza (Richmond Hill, Ont.)
Subjects
Hora (Dance)
Camps
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Richmond Hill (Ont.)
Accession Number
1980-9-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 2342
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
2342
Material Format
graphic material
Date
July 1940
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 13 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of a group of campers at their campsite at Camp Camperdown in Collingwood, Ontario. A mountain can be seen in the background.
Name Access
Camp Camperdown
Subjects
Camps
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Collingwood (Ont.)
Accession Number
1980-9-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3422
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3422
Material Format
graphic material
Date
Aug. 1942
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 13 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of a a small group seated on chairs at the lakefront at Camp Hagshama. The photograph depicts the backs of the individuals.
Subjects
Camps
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Perth (Ont.)
Accession Number
1982-5-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3426
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3426
Material Format
graphic material
Date
Aug. 1942
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 13 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of a group of campers sitting on the beach at Camp Hagshama, on Otty Lake near Perth, Ontario.
Subjects
Camps
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Perth (Ont.)
Accession Number
1982-5-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3686
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3686
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1947]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of the members of the Camp Naivelt Committee in front of a monument to the Yiddish writer, Sholom Aleichem.
Name Access
Camp Naivelt
Sholem Aleichem, 1859-1916
Subjects
Authors, Yiddish
Camps
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1983-6-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 4043
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
4043
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1947
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 26 x 21 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
This item is an original print of the staff at Camp Winnebagoe, near Huntsville, Ontario. The staff were assembled in front of one of the buildings for the photograph.
Notes
Original photograph by Turofsky.
Subjects
Camps
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Huntsville (Ont.)
Accession Number
1986-4-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 6021
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
6021
Material Format
graphic material
Date
3 Aug. 1942
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 24 x 29 cm and 11 x 13 cm
Scope and Content
Back row: Syd Pascal, Harold Rosenbaum, Jack Gluskin, [Itch?] Litchman, Bernie Cowitz, Arnie Norman, George Riba, Syl [Sylvia?] Weiner, Danny Daniluk, Syl [Sylvia?] Krug.
Centre row: Harold Pearson, Israel Gang, Lil Levine, Rhoda Goldberg, Ann Rose, Ida Epstein, Gordon Stahlberg, Rose Chilin.
Front row: Pinny Saiger, Ruth Farber, Mannie Farber, Laura Rubenstein, Lou Herman, Syd Solway.
Subjects
Camps
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Pickering (Ont.)
Accession Number
1991-5-8
2005-6-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 6026
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
6026
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1941
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 21 x 26 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Admin History/Bio
Founded in the 1920s, Camp Yungvelt was originally situated on Lake Wilcox. It later moved to Pickering, where it operated until it closed in the 1950s. It was established by the Workmen's Circle (Arbeiter Ring), as a Yiddish summer camp for Jewish children. Camp Yungvelt was known for accepting the children of poor immigrants for a small fraction of the regular fee.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of the staff at Camp Yungvelt, located in Pickering, Ontario. Identified individuals include: Bunny Bergstein, Phil Chasin, Bryna Minachovsky (Mann), Helen Lomage, Bertha Goldenthal, Israel Gang, Mr. Barzilei, Mr. Goldman, Manny Farber, Arthur Lerner, Mr. Altman, Lou Herman, Mr. Riba, Mrs. Barzilei, and Sadie Sherman.
Notes
See accession record for position of identified individuals.
Name Access
Altman, Mr.
Barzilei, Mr.
Barzilei, Mrs.
Bergstein, Bunny
Camp Yungvelt
Chasin, Phil
Farber, Manny
Gang, Israel
Goldenthal, Bertha
Goldman, Mr.
Herman, Lou
Lerner, Arthur
Lomage, Helen
Mann, Bryna
Minachovsky, Bryna
Riba, Mr.
Sherman, Sadie
Subjects
Camps
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Pickering (Ont.)
Accession Number
1991-12-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 6027
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
6027
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1942
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 21 x 26 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Admin History/Bio
Founded in the 1920s, Camp Yungvelt was originally situated on Lake Wilcox. It later moved to Pickering, where it operated until it closed in the 1950s. It was established by the Workmen's Circle (Arbeiter Ring), as a Yiddish summer camp for Jewish children. Camp Yungvelt was known for accepting the children of poor immigrants for a small fraction of the regular fee.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of the staff at Camp Yungvelt, located in Pickering, Ontario. Pictured are:
Back row, left to right: J. Abramovitch, Chuck Lestin, Hal Grossman, Helen Lomage, Dave Ritz, John Lomage, Harry [?], Andrew [?], Steve [?].
Fifth row, left to right: D. Lerner, S. Gordener, Chana Goldberg, Percy Lipshitz, Babe Bronstein, Bea Goldman, Berny Wolinsky, Eleanor Smith, Bunny Bergstein, Goldie Grennis, [unidentified], Chonon Fine, Mrs. Mark, Mr. Mark.
Fourth row, left to right: Red Silvers, Mona Gurland, Muni Frumhartz, Bertha Goldenthal, Mr. Brick, Ms. Abkin, Ms. Glazer, Ms. Langbord, [unidentified], Mrs. Niewtkewitcz, Mrs. Niewtkewitcz.
Third row, left to right: Ms. Silverhart, Sonia Olin, Lou Herman.
Second row, left to right: Mr. Riba, Israel Gang, Philip Chasin, Mr. Nodelman, Mr. Abramovitch, Mr. Frumhartz, Mr. Danielak, Mr. Langbord, Esther Levine, Mr. Orenstein.
Front row, left to right: Chasha (Raina) Fishman, Ruth Price, Devy Abkin, Ethel Press, May Hoffman, Eleanor Tolub, Ruth Schwartz, Mitty Krieg.
Notes
See photo for numbered position of identified individuals.
Name Access
Abkin, Devy
Abkin, Ms.
Abramovitch, J.
Abramovitch, Mr.
Andrew
Bergstein, Bunny
Brick, Mr.
Bronstein, Babe
Camp Yungvelt
Danielak, Mr.
Fine, Chonon
Fishman, Chasha
Fishman, Raina
Frumhartz, Mr.
Frumhartz, Muni
Glazer, Ms.
Goldberg, Chana
Goldenthal, Bertha
Goldman, Bea
Gordener, S.
Grennis, Goldie
Grossman, Hal
Gurland, Mona
Harry
Hoffman, May
Krieg, Mitty
Langboard, Mr.
Langboard, Ms.
Lerner, D.
Lestin, Chuck
Levine, Esther
Lipshitz, Percy
Lomage, Helen
Lomage, John
Mark, Mr.
Mark, Mrs.
Niewtkewitcz, Mr.
Niewtkewitcz, Mrs.
Orenstein, Mr.
Press, Ethel
Price, Ruth
Ritz, Dave
Schwartz, Ruth
Silvers, Red
Smith, Eleanor
Steve
Tolub, Eleanor
Wolinsky, Berny
Subjects
Camps
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Pickering (Ont.)
Accession Number
1991-12-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 6064
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
6064
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1945
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 13 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Admin History/Bio
Rev. Goldbloom was a respected Zionist leader in the United Kingdom, who was sent to Canada for protection during the Second World War.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Rev. J. K. Goldbloom giving a speech at the head of a table at Camp Hagshama. The camp was located on Otty Lake near Perth, Ontario, and was run by Young Judaea. Behind him is a sign which reads: welcome delegates, in both Yiddish and English.
Name Access
Goldbloom, Rev. J. K.
Subjects
Camps
Speeches, addresses, etc
Zionists
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Perth (Ont.)
Accession Number
1992-9-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 6065
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
6065
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1945
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 13 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Admin History/Bio
Rev. J. K. Goldbloom was a respected Zionist from the United Kingdom, who was sent to Canada for protection during the Second World War.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of a group of people at Camp Hagshama on Otty Lake near Perth, Ontario. The camp was a Zionist youth camp run by Young Judaea. Pictured left to right are:
Chaim Kirshenbaum (later Dr. Hyman Kirshenbaum, the son of Rabbi David Kirshenbaum), Anne Brown, Max Bookman (from Ottawa), Mrs. J. K. Goldbloom (from England), Nathan Sheister (national president of Canadian Young Judaea), Rev. J. K. Goldbloom (Zionist from England), Martin Stoler, Harry Geffen (camp director and national executive director of Young Judaea). Hanging on the wall behind the group is a sign which reads: welcome delegates, in both Yiddish and English.
Name Access
Bookman, Max
Brown, Anne
Camp Hagshama
Geffen, Harry
Goldbloom, Jacob Koppel, 1872-1961
Goldbloom, Mrs. J. K.
Kirshenbaum, Chaim
Kirshenbaum, Dr. Hyman
Sheister, Nathan
Stoler, Martin
Subjects
Camps
Portraits, Group
Zionists
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Perth (Ont.)
Accession Number
1992-9-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
General community activities series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 4; Series 11
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
General community activities series
Level
Series
Fonds
4
Series
11
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1950-2010
Physical Description
77 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
In addition to his ongoing involvement with Clanton Park, the Canadian Jewish Congress Archives, the Aliyah Support Group, Jones Avenue Cemetery, Shomrai Shabbos and Adas Israel, Sol Edell undertook special projects on behalf of a wide array of Jewish organizations. These include cultural (Toronto Cantorial Scholarship Fund), educational (Netivot Hatorah and Yeshivat Or Chaim Ulpanat Orot), religious (Union of Jewish Orthodox Congregations), social welfare (Association of Jewish Seniors and Co-Ordinated Services to the Jewish Elderly) and Zionist (Canadian Friends of Yeshivat Hakotel and State of Israel Bonds) organizations.
Scope and Content
Series consists of records documenting Sol Edell's involvement with a wide variety of Jewish educational, social and religious organizations and institutions in Canada, the United States, and Israel. Included are meeting minutes, publications, reports, photographs, correspondence, invitations, programmes, financial records, an architectural drawing, and a sound recording. While many of these organizations such as Eitz Chaim, Or Chaim Ulpanat Orot (educational), Mizrachi Organization of Canada, Emunah Women (Zionist) and Beth Jacob V’Anshe Drildz (synagogue) are orthodox, others such as Associated Hebrew Day Schools (educational), State of Israel Bonds (Zionist) and Co-ordinated Services to the Jewish Elderly (social welfare) have no religious affiliation.
Notes
Physical description note: includes 26 photographs, 1 audio cassette, and 1 architectural drawing.
Name Access
Eitz Chaim
Or Chaim Ulpanat Orot
Mizrachi Men’s Organization
Emunah Women
Beth Jacob V'Anshei Drildz (Toronto, Ont.)
Associated Hebrew Day Schools
State of Israel Bonds
Co-ordinated Services to the Jewish Elderly
Camp Moshava
Harbord Collegiate
Netivot Hatorah
Union of Jewish Orthodox Congregations
B'Nei Akiva
Toronto Committee for Bikur Cholim Hospital
Subjects
Charities
Children
Education
Fund raising
Older people
Religion
Zionism
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Mimi Wise fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 16; Item 5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Mimi Wise fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
16
Item
5
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1946
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of a group of campers at Camp Winnebagoe, taken during the summer of 1946. Mimi Wise was one of the counselors at the camp and is pictured on the far left. The other counselor pictured is Miss. [?] Dicker.
Subjects
Camps
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
2003-6-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Benjamin Brown fonds
Jewish community building plans and drawings series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 49; Series 1; File 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Benjamin Brown fonds
Jewish community building plans and drawings series
Level
File
Fonds
49
Series
1
File
1
Material Format
architectural drawing
Date
1940
Physical Description
12 architectural drawings : pencil on tracing paper ; 48 cm length or smaller and 7 cm diam.
Admin History/Bio
Founded in the 1920s, Camp Yungvelt was originally situated on Lake Wilcox. Two years later it moved to Pickering, where it operated until it closed in the 1950s. It was established by the Workmen's Circle, as a Yiddish summer camp for Jewish children. Camp Yungvelt was known for accepting the children of poor immigrants for a small fraction of the regular fee.
Scope and Content
File consists of architectural drawings of several new buildings that were erected at Camp Yungvelt. Floor plans, a foundation plan, and several elevation drawings are included.
Subjects
Camps
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Pickering (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 67
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
67
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1936-1991, predominant 1938-1976
Physical Description
10 m of textual records
5541 photographs, 25 x 20 cm and smaller, and other media
Admin History/Bio
The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto was incorporated in Ontario in March 1917 to coordinate the fundraising activities of Jewish charitable, philanthropic, and social service agencies in Toronto. In 1918, ten separate agencies were funded by the FJPT. By 1937, fourteen agencies were funded. The Great Depression of the 1930s and the development of several newer Jewish aid, education and medical care organizations created both increased need for resources and growing competition for ever-more scarce dollars. Within a very few years this funding crisis forced a major review of the organization.
During 1936 a series of special meetings of leading individuals were held to examine the income and expenditures of all Toronto Jewish agencies and also to speculate about the need for a new Toronto Jewish "Community Chest" as the sole fund-raising organization for a federation of all Jewish agencies including the FJPT. In 1938, the new United Jewish Welfare Fund was formally constituted. Added to the FJPT's previous list of Toronto client agencies in 1938 were: the Canadian Jewish Congress, the Hebrew National Association, the Jewish Immigrant Aid Association, the Mizrachi Society, the Toronto Free Loan Association, the Geverkshaften, and Old Folks Home, and the United Palestine Appeal, raising the total number of agencies to 22.
When the State of Israel was established in 1948, the UJWF's annual fundraising campaign was combined with the CJC's United Palestine appeal to form a new, combined campaign named the United Jewish Appeal (UJA). In 1967, the UJA name was legally changed to the United Jewish Appeal of Metropolitan Toronto.
In mid-1976, the organization's public name was changed to the Toronto Jewish Congress. Although initially thought of as a merger between the UJWF and the CJC, the actual result was the expansion of the UJWF responsibilities to include local education and welfare services previously shared with the Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region. The UJWF, however, remained the legal senior entity.
In 1991 the public name was again changed to the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto and in 1999, to UJA Federation of Greater Toronto. By this date, over 30 beneficiary and affiliated agencies, 49 affiliated schools and five Federation departments were fully or partly funded by the UJA Federation.
In June, 2010, the organization altered its legal structure, with the senior legal entity becoming the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of 25 series: Annual Meetings, Annual Reports, Board of Directors, Constitution Committee, Executive Committee, Officers Committee, Budget and Finance Committee, Administration Committee, Social Planning Committee, Committee on Capital Needs and Planning, Central Committee on Scholarships in Aid, Joint Committee of the BJE and UJWF Study on Jewish Education, Nominations Committee, Pension Fund Committee, Coordinating Committee, Special Ad Hoc and Temporary Committees, Annual Campaign, Client Agencies, Joint Committee of the CJC and the UJWF, Committee on Community Organization, Sub-Committee on Construction and Administration of Community Schools, Joint Committee on Fundraising, Personnel Committee, Community Leadership Development Council, and Israel at Fifty Community Celebration.
Over 4500 photographs and a variety of other media are managed within Series 17, Campaign records.
Notes
For exact details about the contents of individual series and sub-series, please review their scope and contents notes.
Name Access
United Jewish Welfare Fund
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto
United Jewish Appeal
Toronto Jewish Congress
Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Subjects
Charities
Fund raising
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
For records of the predecessor of the UJWF, see Fonds 66, the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds.
Further detailed documentation of the proposed merger between the UJWF and the CJC (creation of the TJC) may be found in Fonds 67, Sub-sub-series 5-5-1, Files 171 and 221.
Further documentation on the United Jewish Welfare Fund may be found within Fonds 9, Series 7, records of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society.
For further detailed records of a key community leader's involvement with the UJWF see Accession 1982-8-8, the records of Samuel Godfrey, 1943-1972.
Creator
United Jewish Welfare Fund (1938-)
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Vocational Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 75
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Vocational Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
75
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
moving images
Date
1947-2006
Physical Description
5.1 m of textual records and graphic material
1 DVD
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Vocational Services (JVS) was established on 16 June, 1947. After the war, thousands of survivors arrived in Canada in search of homes, education for their children and jobs. The returning servicemen, in turn, were also in need of employment as well. The first two years of its existence, it catered to these two groups. By 1949, it expanded its mandate to become a community-wide agency.
Max Enkin, the founder of the famous post-war "tailor scheme," became its first president and chairman of the board. Under this scheme, he and other members of his delegation were able to bring over 6000 survivors to Canada. Other members of the board included Lipa Green, Sydney Harris, Dr. Albert Rose and Louis Locksin. The executive director was Norman Stack. He served for a few years and was replaced by Milton Freidman in 1949. Freidman was a social worker who relocated to Toronto from Buffalo and spent close to 40 years in this position, retiring in 1985.
Its early mandate was to serve as a placement service for applicants and employers and to provide individual counselling services to its clients. Its office was situated above the original Tip Top Tailor building at 455 Spadina Avenue. It later moved its office to 152 Beverley Street and then in the 1960s to Tycos Drive. By the 1960s, JVS began to expand its services to all segments of society including newcomers, people with disabilities and from all sectors of life. The staff included social workers, psychologists, job counsellors and clerical staff.
During the 1980s, Bernie Berger became the new executive director. He served in that capacity until 1991. He was replaced by Ed Segalowitz. During this period, JVS set up a seniors' program called ATLAZ on the grounds of the Baycrest Home for the Aged. It was funded by the Bick family and was intended to create programs to keep seniors occupied. Today, this program is called the Al Green Resource Centre and provides employment, placement, training and volunteer opportunities to adults of all ages and with developmental disabilities. JVS also launched a youth program called Youthinc and a women's program.
Karen Goldenberg became executive director in 1998 and was replaced by Frank Markel in 2011 after her retirement. JVS has expanded its clientele, helping people from all backgrounds with diverse needs to identify their strengths and goals, develop skills, and achieve success in school, work and life. By 2009 it offered an expansive range of over 40 employment-related support programs and services throughout the Greater Toronto Area to thousands of unemployed and underemployed individuals and served 23,000 people.They operated out of 12 locations and have approximately 200 professionals on staff.
Kim Coulter became President and CEO in 2013.
Custodial History
The case files were located in the vault with no accession number. They were likely transferred to the OJA during the 1970s or 1980s.They were assigned accession number 2002-10/34.
The remaining records were in the possession of Amanda Batchelor of JVS, who had acquired the material from various past board and committee members for the creation of the 60th anniversary book.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the activities, programs, finances, operation and history of the Jewish Vocational Services. Included are meeting minutes, photographs, correspondence, surveys, reports, financial statements, certificates, bulletins, newsletters, newsclippings, press releases, anniversary books, and one DVD.
Name Access
Jewish Vocational Services of Toronto
Subjects
Charities
Immigrants--Canada
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Creator
Jewish Vocational Services of Toronto (1947-)
Accession Number
2002-10/34
2008-9/6
2010-11/7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Child Welfare Association fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 86
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Child Welfare Association fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
86
Material Format
textual record
Date
1932-1943
Physical Description
23 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Child Welfare Association (JCWA) was formed in 1936 through the amalgamation of the Jewish Children’s Bureau, the Jewish Big Brother Movement, and the Jewish Big Sister Committee. This merger was intended to improve service to families in the community by making one agency responsible for all cases dealing with children and adolescents. The JCWA’s funding primarily came from the Federation for Jewish Philanthropies (later the United Jewish Welfare Fund) and municipal and provincial grants.
The JCWA’s Chairman was Bertram N. Davis and first Executive Secretary was Anne Gussack. Gussack was succeeded by Freda Manson in 1939 and Aaron B. Feld in 1941. Soon after its formation in 1936, the JCWA became one of the first unionized social agencies in Canada when it formed the Staff Association with the Jewish Family Welfare Bureau (JFWB).
Located at 179 Beverley Street, the JCWA’s core activities included: placing children in foster homes, arranging adoptions, supervising children in their own homes, providing housekeeping services to families, and providing supervision and guidance to unmarried mothers. The JCWA paid for the foster children’s room and board, clothing and medical care, supervised their religious education, and supplied scholarships for vocational training through its Jewish Children’s Vocational Fund. The JCWA also ran the Foster Mothers’ Parent Education Group, initiated a foster day care program to allow foster mothers to work, and arranged for the placement of children in summer camps. A constant problem for JCWA was the lack of appropriate foster homes. In order to secure more homes, the agency regularly engaged in a foster homefinding publicity campaign.
The Child Welfare Committee of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society assisted the JCWA with finding and visiting foster homes, arranging adoptions, and attending to chronic clinical cases. The Hebrew Maternity Aid Society also participated in a Car Corp program with the JCWA by providing its social workers with volunteer drivers to help them travel to different locations.
The JCWA’s Big Brother and Big Sister Departments provided guidance for delinquent, troubled, and developmentally disabled adolescents through individual and group work. Both departments assisted troubled youth with employment, vocational training, school adjustment and recreational activities. In 1941, the Big Sister Committee left the JCWA to become affiliated with the JFWB.
Discussions regarding the co-ordination of services between the JCWA and the JFWB began as early as 1935. Since both agencies worked with children and families, a merger was believed necessary to improve service to the community and ease confusion. In February 1943, the JCWA and the JFWB merged to form the Jewish Family and Child Services (JF & CS).
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of textual records documenting the programs, operation, finances and special projects and studies of the Jewish Child Welfare Association and its predecessor the Jewish Children's Bureau. Included is correspondence, reports, surveys, memos, meeting notices, agendas and minutes, financial records, questionnaires, speeches, client and membership lists, case presentations, news articles, theatrical scripts, event invitations and statistics.
Fonds has been arranged with one sous-fonds, which contains the records of the Jewish Children's Bureau. In total there are 25 series. The Jewish Child Welfare Association (main fonds) series are: 1. Board of Trustees; 2. Executive Director; 3. Committees; 4. Adoption; 5. Foster care; 6. Summer camp program; 7. Nursery school; 8. Jewish Children's Vocational Board; 9. Finance and accounting; 10. Human Resources; 11. Operational statistics; 12. Special studies and surveys; 13. Publicity; 14. Liaison with other social welfare organizations; and 15. Welfare Council of Toronto. The Jewish Children's Bureau (sous-fonds) series are: 1. Board of Trustees; 2. Executive Director; 3. Adoption; 4. Foster care; 5. Finance and accounting; 6. Human resources; 7. Building administration; 8. Special studies and surveys; 9. Publicity; and, 10. Liaison with other social welfare organizations.
Notes
Associated material note: for related records held at the City of Toronto Archives, see also: Children's Aid Society of Toronto fonds (fonds 1001); Welfare Council of Toronto records in the University Settlement House fonds (fonds 1024, series 658); and, Department of Public Welfare records in the Former City of Toronto fonds (fonds 200).
Name Access
Jewish Child Welfare Association
Jewish Children's Home
Jewish Children's Vocational Fund
Davis, Bertram N.
Gussack, Anne
Manson, Freda
Feld, Aaron B.
Jewish Big Sisters Committee
Jewish Big Brothers Movement
Jewish Family and Child Services
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies
United Jewish Welfare Fund
Department of Public Welfare
Welfare Council of Toronto
Children's Aid Society
Subjects
Charities
Children
Families
Nonprofit organizations
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director and the head of Jewish Family and Child prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
See also: Jewish Family Welfare Bureau fonds (fonds 87); Jewish Family and Child fonds (fonds 79); Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds (fonds 66); and, United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds (fonds 67).
Arrangement
Records of the Jewish Big Sisters Committee, the Jewish Big Brothers Movement and records documenting programs of the JCWA that continued after the formation of JF & CS, such as the Foster Homefinding Campaign and the Foster Mothers' Parent Education Group, are arranged with the JF & CS fonds 79.
Accession Number
2004-1-8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 87
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
87
Material Format
textual record
architectural drawing
Date
1928-1943
Physical Description
67 cm of textual records
1 architectural drawing
Admin History/Bio
Sometime around 1919, the Family Welfare Committee was set up within the newly created Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto (FJPT) to perform social welfare work with Jewish families. Around 1931, the Committee was reorganized as an independent member agency of the FJPT and renamed the Jewish Family Welfare Bureau (JFWB). At the same time, Dora Wilensky (1902-1959), a professionally trained social worker, was hired as the agency’s Executive Director. Throughout its existence, most of its funding came from the FJPT (later the United Jewish Welfare Fund).
Located at 179 Beverley Street, the JFWB’s core activities included: relief provision; helping families met basic needs, such as medical care, heating and clothing; housekeeping assistance; counseling; and case work. The JFWB’s major concerns shifted over time from a rise of immigration and desertion cases in the 1920s to the dramatic increase of wife abuse, suicide and unemployment cases during the Great Depression of the 1930s. After the outbreak of the Second World War, the JFWB sought ways of assisting soldiers and their families, such as, investigating special government grants to soldiers.
In an attempt to meet community needs, the JFWB initiated various programs, such as a Homemaking Club to teach women house management skills, and a Clothing Centre to provide families with inexpensive household goods. It also partnered with other local Jewish organizations in the early 1940s in the Liaison Project for troubled Jewish youth. In the 1930s, the Jewish Employment Service and Hebrew Free Burial Society became departments of the JFWB and, in 1941, the JFWB began guaranteeing loans for clients through the Hebrew Free Loan Association. In the same year, the Jewish Big Sister Committee became affiliated with the agency and the Jewish Big Brother Movement followed soon after.
In 1936, the JFWB became one of the first unionized social agencies in Canada when it formed the Staff Association with the Jewish Child Welfare Association (JCWA), another member of the FJPT. Although the JFWB’s focus was work with families and the JCWA’s focus was work with children, both agencies found it necessary at times to work with both children and families. In order to prevent service duplication and reduce confusion over casework responsibility, the Joint Application Bureau was set up within the FJPT to review all case work applications and determine the appropriate agency to provide assistance. However, a merger between the agencies was still believed necessary to improve service to the community and ease confusion. Discussions regarding the co-ordination of services between the JCWA and the JFWB began as early as 1935 and in February 1943, the JCWA and JFWB merged to form the Jewish Family and Child Services (JF & CS).
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of textual records and one architectural drawing documenting the programs, operation, finances, and special studies of the Jewish Family Welfare Bureau as well as its relationships with other organizations. Included are reports, meeting notices, agendas and minutes, correspondence, memos, budgets, statistics, theatrical scripts, newsclippings, and one architectural blueprint. A number of the records relate to special short-lived committees and projects that the JFWB participated in with other agencies, such as the Jewish Big Sister Committee, Jewish Big Brother Committee, Jewish Child Welfare Association, the Jewish Community Centre Association, the Young Men's and Women's Hebrew Association, and the Jewish Old Folks' Home.
Records have been arranged into the following 19 series: 1. Board of Directors; 2. Executive Director; 3. Jewish Federation Communal Council; 4. United Jewish Welfare Fund Men's and Women's Service Council; 5. Case Committe; 6. Joint Meetings and Committees; 7. Joint Application Bureau; 8. Homemaking Club; 9. Clothing Centre; 10. Liaison Project; 11. Operational statistics; 12. Finance and accounting; 13. Human Resources; 14. Special projects and studies; 15. Publicity; 16. Liaison with other social welfare organizations; 17. Canadian Association of Social Workers; 18. Welfare Council of Toronto; and, 19. Conferences.
Notes
Associated material note: for related records held at the City of Toronto Archives, see also: Welfare Council of Toronto records in the University Settlement House fonds (fonds 1024, series 658); and, Department of Public Welfare records in the Former City of Toronto fonds (fonds 200).
Name Access
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau
Jewish Community Centre Association
Young Men's-Young Women's Hebrew Athletic Association (Toronto, Ont.) (subject)
Jewish Old Folks Home (Toronto, Ont.)
United Jewish Welfare Fund (Toronto, Ont.) (subject)
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto (subject)
Wilensky, Dora, 1902-1959
Subjects
Charities
Children
Families
Nonprofit organizations
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director and the head of Jewish Family and Child prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
See also: Jewish Child Welfare Association fonds (fonds 86); Jewish Family and Child Services fonds (fonds 79); Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds (fonds 66); and, United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds (fonds 67).
Arrangement
Records relating to programs, committees and liaison with other organizations that continued after the formation of JF & CS are arranged with that fonds.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sharon Chapter of Hadassah fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 90
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sharon Chapter of Hadassah fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
90
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1918-1981, predominant 1952-1973
Physical Description
22 cm of textual records (4 v.)
16 microfiches of textual records
2 photographs
Admin History/Bio
Canada’s third chapter of Hadassah was organized in Brantford on January 2, 1918 by Mrs. Anna Selig (later Mrs. Anna Raginsky) and sponsored by Mrs. Leah Lazarus primarily to assist with Canada’s war effort. In 1919, it joined with other Canadian chapters to form the Hadassah Organization of Canada. By 1921, Hadassah Canada had merged with the Women’s International Zionist Organization (WIZO) and changed its name to Hadassah-WIZO. In 1929, the Brantford chapter adopted the name Rose of Sharon, but abbreviated it to the Sharon Chapter of Hadassah.
As a member of Hadassah-WIZO, the Sharon Chapter shared its mandate of financially and socially supporting the peoples of Israel and promoting Jewish culture and ideals in Canada. Following the national organization’s mandate, its administration consisted of two levels: a general membership and an Executive Committee. The general membership voted on all issues and activities, while the Executive Committee ensured all tasks were completed. Although the chapter initially only elected one president, it began electing three presidents in 1943.
Mrs. Sam Fox served as the chapter’s first president over the charter membership of 30 women. Membership initially remained fairly constant, but grew to 92 members by 1962. All members paid annual dues, of which a small portion was used to pay the chapter’s expenses with the remainder being forwarded to the regional Hadassah council to pay administrative costs and donations.
Some of the fundraising activities Sharon Chapter organized include; an annual birthday party (started in 1925), an annual Bazaar (started in 1952), sewing circles, pot lucks, tea and garden parties, rummage and auction sales, and showers. The funds and other goods accumulated from these events were forwarded to the regional Hadassah council to support various Hadassah-WIZO projects, such as Youth Aliyah and the Acco Baby Creche. The Sharon Chapter also supported local projects, such as, assisting new immigrants, and entertaining servicemen at the local canteen during the Second World War.
The population of Brantford’s Jewish community began declining after the 1960s as younger generations moved to larger cities and were followed by their parents after retirement. By 1999, the Sharon Chapter’s membership had fallen to 24 women and meetings were being held only once a year. The Sharon Chapter likely closed around 2001; the same year that dwindling resources and membership forced the closure of Brantford’s synagogue, Congregation Beth David.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the activities, finances, special programs and fundraising events of Brantford’s Sharon Chapter of Hadassah-WIZO. Included are meeting minutes, correspondence, photographs, ledgers, annual budgets, remittance forms, financial bulletins, financial statements, certificates, invitations, lists, notebooks, programmes, reports, recipes, speeches, news clippings, an auditorium lease, a contract, a theatrical script, and pledge cards.
Fonds has been arranged into five series: 1. Meetings; 2. Special projects and events; 3. Annual Bazaar; 4. Finance and accounting; and, 5. Administration. One item and one file are attached to the fonds-level.
Notes
Physical extent note: fonds was reduced from ca. 50 cm to 22 cm. See accession 2001-10-3 for further information about the culled material.
Name Access
Sharon Chapter
Hadassah-Wizo
Brantford
Subjects
Charities
Children
Related Material
For additional OJA records documenting the Sharon Chapter, see Sadie Stren fonds 78 and the Congregation Beth David fonds 88.
For additional OJA Hadassah-WIZO records, see Toronto Hadassah fonds 71, accessions 1996-11-1, 2008-3-3, and 2009-8-6.
For additional OJA records related to Brantford families and other Jewish organizations, such as the B'nai Brith lodge, please see accession #2001-10-3; #2009-7-1, 1978-11-4, 1977-8-16, 1992-8-3, 1980-1-14, 1978-1-2, 2008-7-1, photo# 109, photo# 755, and photo #758.
See also the Hadassah-WIZO Organization of Canada fonds at Library and Archives Canada, reference #R3454-0-7-E.
Accession Number
2001-10-3
1979-9-21
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Folks Farein fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 105
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Folks Farein fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
105
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
architectural drawing
Date
1914-1977
Physical Description
3.07 m of textual records
110 photographs : b&w and col. (hand-tinted) ; 51 x 41 cm or smaller
6 architectural drawings : 70 x 36 or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Folks Farein, also known as the Hebrew National Association, was established in 1914 by a group of Toronto Jewish immigrants as a society dedicated to anti-missionary and educational outreach. They were first located at 23 Cecil St. and moved to 37 Cecil St. around 1940.
In the early years of the Folks Farein's existence, Christian missions and a number of Jewish converts to Christianity sought to exploit the situation of poor Jews in the community through the distribution of direct relief, services of doctors and midwives and by street-corner preaching and proselytization. To counteract the work of the Toronto missionaries the Folks Farein offered a number of services including welfare for working mothers, a reading room, English language clases and translation services for Yiddish immigrants.
When the threat from missionary activity was no longer an issue, the Folks Farein transformed itself into a philantrophic society. Under its revised mandate the society looked after the sick and needy in hospitals, sanitoriums, mental health institutions and in their homes, and arranged for free doctor services, translation services, medicine, dentures, eyeglasses, orthopedic shoes and medical applicances. The Folks Farein guaranteed the full or partial payment of medical bills by maintaining a fund in several hospitals for the benefit of Jewish patients in need of assistance. They provided assistance to seniors applying for old age pensions, to widows and mothers applying for benefits, assisted needy famililes and patients with kosher meals, provided cash relief during Passover, and fed and billeted the unemployed and homeless at their premises at 37 Cecil St.
In the course of their work, the Folks Farein collaborated with many Jewish organizations and societies such as the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society, Jewish Family Welfare Bureau, Relief Unemployment Fund, Jewish Joint Appliction Bureau, Jewish Children's Bureau, the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto, Canadian Jewish Congress and the Toronto Hebrew Free Loan Association.
Its basis of revenue came from its large membership, house-to-house contributions from the public and from special events such as it annual ball, Moas Chittin campaign, Purim ball, and beauty contest.
In addition to its regular activities the Folks Farein assumed responsibility for providing aid to refugees of the Second World War: the first group arriving from Europe in 1945 and in 1948 to a group of Jewish tailors liberated from the DP camps of Germany. In 1947, the Folks Farein established Hachnoses Orchim, a temporary shelter to accomodate refugees and displaced persons. The shelter was located at 37 Cecil St.
The Folks Farein's first officers were Mr. J. Graner (president), Mr. J. Meisniker (vice-president), Mr. Meyer Littner (superintendent), Chuna Mosoff and Mr. W. Welman (trustees), Miss Weiner and Mr. Cohen (board of education), Mr. A. Kaminsky (recording secretary) and Mr. Cohen (treasurer). Mr. Epstein refered to as "Grandfather" was one of the founders of the Folks Farein.
Other pioneers included Moshe Olebaum, and M. Spiegel (1st vice-president), J. Hurwitz (1st vice-president and president), Abraham Sher, S.M. Shapiro Shlesinger, Joseph Grenner, Mrs. Minna Winter (president of the Women's Auxillary) and Kalman Wagner. In 1930, David Green assumed the position of president of the Folks Farein and served as its exclusive president from 1934 until his passing on 13 May 1977. Sam Cohen was then elected the new president of the Folks Farein.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the Folks Farein's philantrophic activities in the Toronto Jewish community from 1914 to 1977. Records include meeting minutes and agendas of the executive board and committees, resolutions of board of directors, newspaper clippings in both Yiddish and English, publicity material, photographs, general correspondence, architectural drawings, cemetery deeds, legal documents, records relating to David Green's personal interests, financial and fundraising records, wills and bequests, and client case files. The records have been arranged into nine series: Meeting minutes; Scrapbooks; Executive services; Celebrations and events; Building and operations; David Green; Finance and fundraising; and Case files.
Notes
Formerly cited as MG2 O1N.
Name Access
Folk Farein
Hebrew National Association (Toronto, Ont.)
Subjects
Charities
Source
Archival Descriptions
46 records – page 1 of 1.

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