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55 records – page 1 of 2.
Accession Number
2012-3-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-3-1
Material Format
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
2 photographs : col. (1 jpg) ; 10 x 15 cm
Date
[2012?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a photograph taken by Jack Hecker of the site of the former Agudath Israel Anshei Sfard Shul (151 Palmerston Ave.). A duplex house currently occupies the site. The text on the duplex building was added in by Jack Hecker.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Architecture
Synagogues
Name Access
Agudath Israel Anshei Sfard Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-7-19
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-7-19
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
51 photographs (tiff)
Date
1980-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting the activities of the Chmeilnicker Charitable Society including the annual "Hazkarah", teas, and an unveiling of the monument at Lambert Cemetery.
Administrative History
The Chmeilnicker Society was started in Toronto after the Holocaust by survivors. In its early years, the Society played an important role in the lives of the newly-arrived groups for socializing with people who had shared similar experiences in Europe. They organized picnics, women's teas, celebrate Yom Yerushalaim, Channukah parties and an annual "Hazkarah", a memorial service for those who died in the war. The Hazkarah continues to be the most important activity of the group today.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-9-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-9-1
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
3 photographs (tiffs) : col.
1 folder of textual records
Date
2005-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of graphic material and a textual record documenting the Transnistria Survivor Association. Included are three photos: 1) Member Arnold Buxbaum standing in front of Memorial for Transnistria at Earl Bales Park; 2) Arnold Buxbaum and Joe Leinburd at UJA Foundation Event, 2011-12; 3) Hazkarah, 2005 at Sharei Shomayim Synagogue. There is also a speech by Arnold Buxbaum presented in 2011 at Sharei Shomayim Synagogue.
Custodial History
Originals were loaned for reproducing.
Administrative History
Founded in 1994, the Transnistria Survivors’ Association works to provide a voice for and raise awareness of a lesser known group of Holocaust survivors. Transnistria was the Romanian authorities’ name for the former Ukrainian region located between the Rivers Dniester and Bug. It was placed under Romanian administration following the German and Romanian conquest of Ukraine in the summer of 1941. Prior to the Second World War, Romania was home to the third largest Jewish population in Europe; but beginning with the Citizenship Revision Laws of 1938, the Jews of Romania were deprived their citizenship rights and became the targets of repressive antisemitic policies and laws. Neighbours turned on neighbours. Thousands of Jews were murdered in pogroms, either by Romanian or German troops, Nazi Einsatzgruppen, or the local population. In 1941, the Jews who remained alive in the Provinces of Bucovina and Bessarabia were deported to camps and ghettos in Transnistria. Thousands were jammed into freight trains while others were marched by foot. Many died along the way. Between 1941 and 1944, it is estimated that German and Romanian authorities, along with Ukrainian collaborators, murdered or caused the deaths of hundreds of thousands of Romanian and Ukrainian Jews in Transnistria. Some of those who survived these tragic circumstances, especially from Bucovina and Bessarabia, and made a new home in Toronto gathered together to lend each other support and to tell their largely unknown story of oppression and survival. The Transnistria Survivor’s Association organized yearly Hazkarah (memorial) services and its dedicated members continue to share their extraordinary stories of survival through speaking engagements at schools, colleges and synagogues. Past presidents include:
1. Felicia (Steigman) Carmelly
2.Osias Nadel
3.Etti Ziegler
4.Lou (Leizer) Hoffer
As of 2017, the current President is Joe Leinburd.
Subjects
Societies
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Name Access
Transnistria Survivors Association
Buxbaum, Arnold
Leinburd, Joe
Hoffer, Lou
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-3-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-3-1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 photograph : b&w
Date
1944, 2006-2007, 2013-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of Holy Blossom Temple Bulletins dated Sept. 2006, Nov. 2006, Jan. 2007, June 2013, Sept. 2013, Dec. 2013, calendar of events for Fall/Winter and Winter/Spring 2013, and family programming for 2013/2014. Also includes an obituary of Irving Milchberg and a scanned copy of a reunion of confirmation class (1944) that pictures Nancy Draper and others.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Name Access
Holy Blossom Temple (Toronto, Ont.)
Draper, Nancy
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-6-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-6-4
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
ca. 40 photographs
3 CDs
Date
1919-2013, predominant 1919-1974
Scope and Content
Accession consists of scanned photographs and textual records that document the Natanson family. Photographs include images of the Lazar and Muriel Natanson's wedding, family portraits, portraits inside and in front of the store, class portraits and Lazar in his military uniform, Textual records consist of the eulogies for Lazar and Muriel Natanson, and copy of a summary of the history of the Weinstein family, and scanned copies of letters from Muriel Natanson to Eileen Bellan (nee Natanson) while Eileen was at Camp B'Nai Brith. Of note is the brief description of Muriel as an eyewitness to the Christie Pitts riot in 1933. CDs consist of digital copies of the photo reproductions in this accession.
Administrative History
Lazar Natanson (1918-1984) was born to Benjamin and Rose (nee Gratz) Natanson. He had five siblings, Albert (b. 1900), Freida (b. 1902), Celia (b. 1905), Nathan (b. 1909) and Ida (b. 1916). Soon after the end of the Second World War Lazar took ill and went to Montreal to recover and returned to Toronto several years later. Muriel Natanson (nee Weinstein) (1923-2013) was born in Bucharest, Romania, to Solomon (Shlomo) and Sylvia Weinstein. She had two brothers, David (1924-2010) and Albert (b.1933). Solomon was a housepainter and wallpaper hanger. Muriel left school at the age of 16 to help support her family, working at Tip Top Tailors and later Reader Mail. She went to night school to obtain her high school diploma. Muriel worked for her father when he opened a confectionary store in 1950. Lazar married Muriel in 1951 and they opened a store, Moffat's North York Bargain House, at 1291 Wilson Avenue that same year. They later changed the store's name to Les and Muriel's. They were likely one of the first Jewish families to move to the Downsview area, and lived above the store. Lazar and Muriel had two children, Eileen and Bob. While caring for their their children Muriel worked alongside Lazar at Les and Muriel's, and when he suffered a stroke in 1968 they sold the store. Eileen Natanson married Stanley Bellan and they had two children, Chad and Renee. Bob Natanson became a stockbroker. Lazar died in 1984 after suffering from a long-term illness. Murial passed away in 2013.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Donor provided photo identification on the back of reproduced photos.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Natanson family
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-5
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
2 folders of textual records
10 photographs
21 photographs (tiff)
Date
1957-2015, predominant 1987-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the activities of Colin and Brenda Baskind. Included are family photographs, such as a wedding portrait of Colin and Brenda, images of family events, graduation portraits of Colin's children, family holiday celebrations, Colin and Brenda running marathons, and the family at a baby naming ceremony for Colin's granddaughter at Darchei Noam Synanagoue. Textual records include thank you letters Colin received from individuals he assisted as President of SAJAC and in other capacities, the CV that Colin used to look for work in Toronto while preparing to immigrate from South Africa, a speech Brenda delivered to a cancer support group regarding her fight with breast cancer and marathon running, newsclippings, certificates, and letters of reference for both Colin and Brenda.
Identified in the photographs are: Colin Baskind, Brenda Baskind, Alan Sandler, Ian Sandler, Lorraine Sandler, Cliff Baskind, Stacey Baskind, Audrey Weinberg, Gerald Weinberg, Solly Simmons, Renee Simmons, Lily Shaie Baskind, Alana Baskind, and Refton Blair.
Administrative History
Colin Baskind was born in Johannesburg, South Africa, on April 20, 1943. As a child, he attended an all boys' school and played a wide variety of sports including, soccer, cricket and rugby. He studied commerce at the University of South Africa and completed a business course through a school in England. While in school he met his future wife, Brenda, on a blind date and they married in 1967. Together they had three children: Stacey, Alana and Cliff.
Colin worked in an import business and Brenda was a nursery school teacher. For a short period of time they cared for the nephew of their maid, whose daughter gave birth at a young age and was still in school. They raised him with their children until his mother was finished school.
Around 1976, Colin and Brenda started to think about leaving South Africa due to the worsening violence and political situation. After first considering Australia, they eventually immigrated to Toronto in 1987. Colin found work in the importing business and Brenda found work at Holy Blossom Temple school. Soon after arriving in Toronto, Colin became involved in the Southern African Jewish Association of Canada. He attended a meeting that had been called to resuscitate SAJAC (the organization, which was formed in 1977, had ceased functioning and there was a need to bring it back to help a new large wave of immigrants). At the meeting Colin was nominated as President and he has held this role ever since. Colin also volunteered with a variety of organizations including, JIAS and JVS. He continued with his athletic pursuits in Canada and jogged, hiked, and cycled in all weather. Around 1998, Brenda started to join Colin and his running group on jogs. Around 2000 they both began running in marathons. By 2015, they had participated in 11 marathons. In 2010, their granddaughter Lily Shaie was born to their daughter Stacey.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Baskind, Colin
Places
Johannesburg
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-8
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
18 photographs : tiff
Date
1969, 1974-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the Cohen family, their immigration to Canada from South Africa and life in Toronto. Textual records include photocopies of correspondence and paperwork relating to the Cohen's immigration, certificates, and a typed document containing humorous stories their South African friends shared at a "10 Years Out Of Africa" party relating to their adjustment to Canadian life. Also included are family portraits and photographs documenting family celebrations such as, weddings and bar mitzvahs. Of note is an image of Vivien and John at the "10 Years Out of Africa" party.
Administrative History
John Cohen was born in Johannesburg, South Africa in 1944 to Phil and Flora Cohen. Viviane (nee Lehwess) Cohen was born in Johannesburg, South Africa in 1947 to Henry and Isla Lehwess. John's cousin was in physiotherapy school with Viviane and they were introduced to each other. They married on Dec. 3, 1969 and had three children together: Nicole (b. 1972), Steven (b. 1974), and Jeremy David (1979). Viviane was a physiotherapist and John was a textile sales agent. Due to the unstable political situation in South Africa, they immigrated to North York in March 1977. For the first few weeks, they lived in a rental apartment in North York. They soon moved into a townhouse nearby. In 1980, they bought their first house in Thornhill. They were both able to continue in thier professions after immigrating to Canada. Both of their mothers and many of thier friends also moved to Toronto. John and Viviane were members of Shaarei Shalom synagogue for 25 years and are now members of Darchei Noam.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Cohen, John
Places
Johannesburg, South Africa
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
8 cm of textual records
140 photographs : tiff
Date
[194-?]-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the activities of Ivor Simmons. Included is personal correspondence and photographs of Ivor's early life in South Africa and his family life and activities in Toronto. Of note are family portraits, Bialik Hebrew Day School class photos, Holy Blossom Temple Religious school images, images of the Toronto Island Yacht Club, images of Camp New Moon, Camp Ahmek, and Camp Walden, an image at Crystal Beach, and images of Ivor and his family visiting South Africa. Identified in the photographs are: Ivor Simmons, Milly Simmons, Jack Simmons, Renee Simmons, Gail Simmons, Alan Simmons, Eric Simmons, Anthony Giffard, Theo Wardaugh, Ruth Gold, Marlene Goldbach, Vicki Feraris, and Kim Bresge.
Administrative History
Ivor Simmons was born in Bloemfontein, South Africa in 1937 to Milly and Jack Simmons. He has two younger brothers: Michael (B. 1941) and David (b. 1945). Ivor's father owned a printing business. Ivor studied chemical engineering at the University of Capetown and found work at a petroleum refinery near Johannesburg soon after graduating. Around 1961, Ivor moved to London, England where he worked for the Lummus Company. He moved to Canada in 1963 and settled in Toronto. He worked for Union Carbide for a few years conducting industrial market research and then took a job performing the same work for Falconbridge Nickelmines. Around 1970, he opened his own business called A&A Liquid Waste Removal Company.
Ivor married Renee Rothman in 1966. Together they had three children: Alan, Eric, and Gail. Ivor sold his business in 1997. In his retirement, Ivor has volunteered with a variety of organizations including, animal and bird rehabilitations centres, Friends of Cedarvale, the Escarpment Biosphere Conservancy, and Trinity College (assisting with its annual book fair). Ivor is a member of Adath Israel Synagogue and was a member of B'nai Brith for many years.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Simmons, Ivor, 1937-
Places
Bloemfontein, South Africa
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-7
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 70 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1928-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the activities of Ben Zion Shapiro and his family. The bulk of the records document the Shapiro family's involvement in Young Judea. Young Judea material includes: yearbooks, photographs, correspondence, meeting minutes, event programmes, song books, newsletters, and two Camp Biluim flags made by Bunny Shapiro. One flag contains Camp Biluim's crest (1951) and the other one was created for Camp Biluim's colour war and contains the text "We will try and we will succeed Camp Biluim" (1954?). Also included is a VHS tape containing a copy of the Toronto Zionist Council's video about Camp Shalom (1991?). Of note are minute books maintained by Roy Shapiro for the Toronto Young Judea Administrative Board (1928-1934) and for the Leadership Club (1940-1948).
Accession also contains material relating to Roy and Ben Zion's involvement with the following organizations: the Coordinated Services to the Jewish Elderly (Circle of Care), B'nai Israel Beth David Congregation, Beth Tzedec's Mispacha Program, Beth Tzedec's Israel Action Program, Congregation Beth Haminyan, and Holy Blossom Temple's Department for Jewish Living. These records include, minutes, correspondence, newsletters and publications, evaluation reports and other reports. Also included is a demographic report entitied, "Rapid Growth and Transformation: Demographic Challenges Facing the Jewish Community of Greater Toronto" (1995), material from a conference at the University of Toronto on the university's partnership with Israel, CHAT alumni directories, and a CHAT book entitled, "Voices: Jewish Teens of the 90's". Of note are buttons, photographs, reports and correspondence documenting Bunny and Ben Zion's trip to the Soviet Union on behalf of the CJC's Committee for Soviet Jewry.
Finally accession includes material documenting family activities of the Shapiro and Sherman family. Included is a transcript of Bessie Sherman telling her life story (1978), haggadot, PowerPoint presentations created by Ben Zion for his grandchildren and for a family reunion outlining the family history of his family and Bunny's family. There is also a video of Ben Zion presenting his PowerPoint at the Michalski / Cohen family reunion. Also included are family films and videos containing footage of Bunny and Ben Zion's wedding and honeymoon, Camp Biluim, Young Judea events, Bunny on Machon, family wedding anniversaries and birthday parties, trips to Israel, the United States, and Europe as well as footage of the Cousin's Club. Also included is a VHS tape containing a recorded segment from CityPulse News featuring the family's Pesach festivities in 1995.
Photo identification: Back row, left to right: Ray Markus, Michelle Landsberg, Menachem ?, Frank Narrol. Front row, left to right: Gilda Mitchell, Bunny Shapiro, BenZion Shapiro, Malka Rabinowitz.
Administrative History
Ben Zion Shapiro was born in Toronto in 1931 to Roy and Beck (nee Cohen) Shapiro. He has a younger brother, Morden (Mort) Shapiro (b. 1940). His father worked as an office manager at Rotstein Furniture and Maple Leaf Cleaners and his mother worked as a legal secretary until marriage. Roy was active in a number of organizations including: Young Judea, Sons of Jacob Society, Toronto Camera Club, a founding member of Beth David Synagogue, Coordinated Services to the Jewish Elderly (Circle of Care) and President of the Association of Jewish Seniors. Beck was active in Young Judea and Pioneer Women (President of the Golda Meir Club).
Ben Zion received a Master of Social Work from the University of Toronto and attended the Jewish Agency Institute for Youth Leaders from Abroad in Jerusalem, Israel (1951-1952). He has worked for a number of organizations throughout his career, including: Young Judea (he was Director of both Camp Shalom (1962-1969) and Camp Biluim (1954-1956)), B'nai Brith Youth Organization, University Settlement, St. Christopher's House and Director of the Novomeysky Centre in Jerusalem (1957-1961). He was also Professor and Associate Dean of Social Work at the University of Toronto and three times Visiting Professor at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.
Ben married Bunny (Bernice) Shaprio in 1955. Bunny was born in 1934 in Noranda, Quebec to Irving and Bessie (nee Consky) Sherman. Bunny attended public school in Noranda, Noranda High School and Forest Hill Collegiate in Toronto, University of Toronto (BA), the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (M.Ed. in Special Education), and the Jewish Agency Institute for Jewish Leaders from Abroad (1952-1953).
Bunny graduated from the first Camp Biluim Institute for leadership training in 1951 and worked with Ben Zion at Camp Shalom as Camp Mother in 1962 and from 1964-1969. She also worked at Camp Biluim from 1955-1956. In 1983, Bunny and Ben Zion went to the Soviet Union to visit Refuseniks on behalf of the Soviet Jewry Committee of the Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region.
Bunny and Ben have two children: Ayala and Ilan. Since Ben Zion's retirement in 1996, he and Bunny have been living in Jerusalem for half of each year. In 2015, they moved full-time to Jerusalem.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes ca. 300 photographs (256 tiff), 2 PowerPoint presentations, 1 textual record (doc), 4 buttons, 2 flags, 5 VHS tapes, and 18 film reels (8 mm).
Subjects
Camps
Youth
Zionism
Name Access
Shapiro, Ben Zion, 1931-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-7
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
6 photographs : b&w and col. ; 13 x 18 cm or smaller
Date
[ca.1930]-[ca.1945], [197-]-[2015]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records pertaining to the military service of twin brothers Julius (Jack) Spiegel and Louis (Lou/Syd) S. J. Spiegel. Included are photographs of the young Spiegel brothers with their cousins in front of Central High School of Commerce, Dewson St., ca. 1930, original snapshots and portraits of Lou Spiegel in uniform during the 1940s, a hand drawn Easter greeting card signed by Lou Spiegel, and newspaper clippings concerning Lou's role as an aerial photographer for the U.S. Marine Corps unit and his return home to Toronto. There are wartime photocopies of photos including a portrait of Jack Spiegel in uniform, an image of Jack with his crew in front of military aircraft, and a modern day photo of Lou visiting Jack's grave in Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery in Holland. Textual copies include, an annotated photocopy of Veteran Affairs Canada website listing of Jack Spiegel, including information on his burial location and his listing in the Second World War Book of Remembrance. There is a photocopy of Jack's obituary from the Canadian Jewish Congress Book Canadian Jews in World War II, Part II: Casualties, p. 75, and a copy of a letter from the Royal Canadian Air Force addressed to Jack's mother Mrs. Israel Spiegel, notifying her of her son's death. In addition, there is one colour photograph (197?) of promotional municipal campaign street signs for North York City Councillor and Controller, Irving Paisley.
Administrative History
Julius (Jack) Spiegel (1921-1944, Toronto), and Louis (Lou) Spiegel (1921-1999), are twin brothers born in Toronto on March 26, 1921. Their parents Israel Spiegel (b. 1878) and Eva (née Gelbwachs) Spiegel (b. 1880) of 430 Euclid St. Toronto, immigrated from Austria to Canada in 1894 and 1906 respectively.
According to the 1921 Canada census, Israel and Eva had 8 children; Nat Spiegel (b. 1903, U.S.A.), Morse Spiegel (b. 1906), Gertrude Spiegel (b. 1909), Beatrice Spiegel (b. 1911), Sydney Spiegel (b. 1915), Mildred Spiegel (b. 1917), and twin brothers Julius and Louis S. Spiegel (b. 1921).
Both Jack and his twin brother Lou, attended Central High School of Commerce. Jack enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1941 and trained as a wireless air gunner. He went overseas in May 1944 and successfully completed 10 military missions with his unit. Eyewitnesses reported to Lou that Jack parachuted out of his Lancaster Bomber that was shot down over the Rhineland battlefields in Germany . Originally buried by the Dutch Resistance, Jack was later moved to Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery, Holland. His date of death was confirmed as October 28, 1944. According to his death certificate, the location of his death was Belgium, that he was married at the time of death and resided at 238 Beatrice St. Jack's brothers Sydney and Murray Spiegel, also served in the military during the Second World War. Sydney with the Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps (administrative corps) and Murray with the U.S. Army Medical Department in Kansas.
Louis (Lou) Spiegel (1921-1999, Toronto) served during the Second World War for the Royal Canadian Air Force and the U.S. Marine Corps as an aerial photographer. He later studied at U of T earning a bachelor's degree and transferred to USC (California) earning a master's degree in English and communications. He served as campaign director for the United Welfare Fund in 1954 and worked various jobs throughout his career as an educator in American Community Colleges. He was director of Unarius after Ruth Norman died and was awarded by the same institution with a doctor of psychic therapeutic science degree.
Irving Paisley (1919-2006) married to Adele Paisley, had a 30 year long career in municipal politics in the city of North York holding positions as Councillor, Controller, and Deputy Mayor. He spearheaded the building of York Finch Hospital and served as its founding Chairman. He was also a founding member of Temple Sinai, and founded Paisley Manor Insurance. Paisley’s accomplishments were recognized by the Federal Government and he earned the Centennial Medal for Service to the Nation in 1967.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Spiegel, Jack, 1921-1944
Spiegel, Lou, 1921-1999
Paisley, Adele
Paisley, Irving 1919-2006
Places
Toronto
Holland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-4
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
19 photographs : b&w and col. ; 20 x 26 cm and smaller
1 folder of textual records
1 poster ; 35 x 51 cm
Date
[194-]-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs and textual records related to the personal and professional life of Morley S. Wolfe. Photographs include a snapshot of Morely dressed in a Harbord Collegiate sweater; his first year law class at Osgoode Hall (1951); attendance at B'nai Brith Wilson Height Heights Lodge events and publicity stills from Branson Hospital. Textual records include a Branson Hospital promotional flyer; correspondence with Sir Martin Gilbert, the official biographer of Winston Churchill; email print outs of a series of letter to the editor correspondnece from Morely to the Toronto Star con cerning human rights,immigration and Israel's right to exist.
In addition, there is a photocopy of a Toronto Star photo of Mayor Art Eggleton, awarding Morley S. Wolfe with the William P. Hubbard race relations award; a print out from Harbordite (page 21) of Morely's entry into the Harbord club; a print out of his review of the book Walking with Giants by Saoul Feldberg; and a poster presented to Morely by the Children's Breakfast Club's presdient Rick Gosling, on the occasion of his 75th birthday (2003), in hounour of Morely's volunteer work with the club.
Administrative History
Morley S. Wolfe was born in Winnipeg in 1928 to Cecil (b. 1895) and Betty (nee Davidow) Wolfe. He spent his early childhood in various cities in Saskatchewan and Manitoba until moving to Toronto in 1940. Soon after graduating from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1955 he started his own practice as a senior member of the law firm Burt, Burt, Wolfe and Bowman. In 1971, he was appointed Queen’s Council, and from 1973 to 1977 he served as counsel for B’nai Brith Canada. After his retirement from practice in 1993, the Province of Ontario appointed him presiding Justice of the Peace for Ontario and Deputy Judge in Small Claims Court. His first marriage was to Sandra Newman in 1958 and they had three children together: Leslie, Lee, and Melanie. He later married Joan and became the step-father to her daughter, Erin. Throughout his life Morley was passionate about fighting prejudice and discrimination and became involved with organizations, such as the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews and the Urban Alliance on Race Relations. He was also a member of the Toronto Police Services Board Committee on Race Relations, served as Chair of the North York Committee on Community, Race and Ethnic Relations, and was appointed to the Canadian Multiculturalism Council. In addition, he was the founding president of Toronto Residents in Partnership (TRIP) from 2003 to 2006. His involvement extended to Jewish organizations. He served as National President of B’nai Brith Canada (BBC) from 1982 to 1983 and was a founding member of its League for Human Rights. He was also President of BBC’s Toronto Regional Council and Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998, and of the Jewish Camp Council of Toronto as well as many other organizations. Morley’s hard work and involvement in the community earned him many awards, including, City of Toronto’s William P. Hubbard Race Relations Award, the YMCA Canada Peace Medal, B’Nai Brith Canada Service Award, and the Province of Ontario’s Senior Achievement Award. Around 2002, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 began filing a series of appeals with B’nai Brith International (BBI) over concerns that BBC’s national executive was governing undemocratically. Morley played a key role in filing these appeals and was the centre of one appeal filed after BBC censured him without advance notice or the opportunity for a hearing. These appeals were not all successful. Around 2006, Morley became involved in another appeal against BBC that was filed by a group of members who called themselves the Concerned Members of B’nai Brith Canada (CMOBBC). They alleged that BBC’s national executive had too much centralized power, was not governing transparently, failed to provide members with audited financial statements at multiple annual general meetings (AGMs), passed a constitution that members had defeated at the 2005 AGM, and was threatening and harassing some members. BBI’s appeal court rendered its verdict in 2007 in favour of BBC. Soon after this judgment was made BBC took steps to expel all the members of CMOBBC. In response, Morley resigned from the organization. Morley currently resides in Brampton.
Subjects
Law
Human rights
Name Access
Wolfe, Morley, 1928-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-1-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-1-5
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 10 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1957-2015, predominant 1974-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting Claude Heimann's immigration to Canada, career, involvement with Temple Har Zion and family life. Included are photographs, correspondence, newsletters and journals, writings and presentations by Heimann, certificates, newspaper clippings, event and conference programs, and business cards. Also included are documents with the text used for Totum Research's website.
Administrative History
Claude Heimann was born on 21 March 1944 in Johannesburg, South Africa to Wilhelm (Bill) Otto Heimann and Lotte Heimann (nee Rosenberg). He received a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Witwatersrand in 1966. In 1969, he married Adele Masail at the Pine Street Synagogue in Johannesburg. They lived in Windsor Park, Johannesburg and had two children together: Nicole Heidi (now married to Marshall Starkman) and Marc Steven.
Claude initially worked for Market Research Africa interviewing farm workers across the country. In 1971 he joined Reader's Digest in South Africa as a Research Director. Believing there would not be a peaceful solution to apartheid, Claude had decided at a young age that he would evenutally leave South Africa. He hoped that Reader's Digest was a company that might be able to transfer him to work in another country. Ten years later, in 1981, an opportunity came up with the Canadian edition of Reader's Digest in a similar role. Claude accepted the position and immigrated with his family to Toronto in May 1981. For their first few months they lived at Glengrove Manor on Yonge Street between Lawrence and Eglinton. In July, they moved into their home in Thornhill. Adele initially stayed home with the family, but eventually worked as a bookkeeper for a variety of different businesses.
Claude left Reader's Digest in 1990 to become a partner in Totum Research. Throughout his career, Claude has served on the Research Committee of PMB and has been a member of the Board of Directors of CARF for whom he served as Technical Director. He has also served on a number of other media research related committees, including the Technical Committee of AMPS and the Magazines Canada Research Committee. Claude was also active on the Board of Temple Har Zion, holding a variety of positions, including: regular Board member, Vice President for Worship, Vice President, Treasurer, President and Past President for two years on the Executive. He also reported Board decisions for the THZ monthly bulletin.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes 2.3 MB of textual records, 6 photographs, 17 slides, and 26.3 MB of photographs.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Occupations
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Synagogues
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-1-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-1-9
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
11 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 12 cm or smaller
Date
1943-2016, predominant 1943-1966
Scope and Content
Accession consists of personal records and photographs relating to Miriam Beckerman née Dashkin. Textual records include correspondence with Miriam's childhood friend Bea Madger, Bialik School reports belonging to her son Dan Beckerman (1962-1966), Dan Beckerman's Y.M. & Y.W.H.A swim badge (1968), seven Jewish National Fund (JNF) certificates (1956-65); Toronto Happening Brochure listing Dan Beckerman's performance at the St. Lawrence Centre (1978); Newspaper clipping of death notice for Miriam's father David Dashkin (1976); Yiddish newspaper clipping of death notice for Miriam's grandmother Malka Yadashkin (Dashkin) Cohen; Yiddish correspondence; typed letter by Miriam Beckerman's mother Ethel Dashkin describing the Toronto Yiddish theatre scene; and photocopies of photographs documenting Miriam's trip to Palestine as part of the Habonim, a Jewish Labour Zionist youth movement (1945-47).
Administrative History
Miriam Beckerman (née Dashkin) is an award-winning Yiddish literature translator. She was raised in a Yiddish-speaking home, surrounded by Yiddish books and newspapers, and attended the Farband Folkshule in Toronto in the 1930s. An ardent Zionist in her teens, she trained at the Smithville Hachsharah farm to prepare for making aliyah. She later worked as a bilingual secretary (Yiddish and English) at the Ontario region, Canadian Jewish Congress.
In 1946, she travelled to Israel where she met her husband, Moshe Beckerman, at a kibbutz. The couple and their children emigrated from Israel to Toronto in 1952. Beckerman continues to work as a Yiddish translator. She has a number of published translations, including her recent collaborative work "A Thousand Threads: A story through Yiddish letters."
Beckerman received a 1998 prize from the Dora Teitelbaum Foundation Inc. in Choral Gables, Fla., for her accomplishments in translation. She said if it were not for translations, "many things would be lost to future generations. Moshe passed away in 1993.
Subjects
Yiddish language
Name Access
Beckerman, Miriam Dashkin
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-2
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
92 photographs (jpgs) : col. and b&w
1.55 MB of textual records
Date
1965, 1990-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the activities and history of Dr. Mark Friedlander and his family. Included is a family history written by Mark's father, Bertie Friedlander and a personal CV written by Mark. Also included are photographs documenting a wide variety of Mark's activities, including his work as an anesthesiologist, Jewish holiday celebrations, his cottage life in Buckhorn, his outdoor activities (such as skiing, canoeing, hiking, cycling, fishing, and ice hockey), Danny's Bar Mitzvah at Kehillat Shareei Torah, Mark's marriage to Lila, the university graduations of family members, Mark's involvement with March of the Living, his participation in Walk With Israel, and his various trips to Zimbabwe, South Africa and other parts of the world. Of note is a photograph of Mark and his son Danny on Mount Kilimanjaro and images of the Sharon School Reunion which took place at Mark's house in Thornhill. Individuals identified in the photographs include: Dr. Mark Friedlander, Lila Speigel, Alec Amato, Lauren Amato, Eli Friedlander, Bert Amato, Danny Amato, Paul Ciapparelli, Sergio Ciapparelli, Lou Silver, Dennis Scolnik, Bertie Friedlander, Jarred Goldberg, Mike Green, Warren Liebowitz, Sue Holmes, Hilda Cohen, Florence Weinberger, Vickie Campbell, Joe Feldman, and Martha Shemtov.
Custodial History
The material was in the possession of Dr. Mark Friedlander. All the images he has are digital. He does not have the original prints in his possession.
Administrative History
Dr. Mark Friedlander was born in Salisbury, Rhodesia (now Harare, Zimbabwe) in May 1958 to Bertie and Selma Friedlander. Bertie was a pharmacist whose career went from retail manufacturing to regulations, and later an academic in learning and teaching.
Mark attended the University of Cape Town Medical School from 1976 to 1981. Between 1982 and 1987, he lived and worked in : Cape Town, South Africa; London, England; Saskatchewan, Canada and New York City, USA. In 1987 he married Lesley Kane (from London) in London, England and moved to Toronto for Specialty Residency in Anesthesia at the University of Toronto, Faculty of Medicine. During his four year residency, he and Lesley had two sons: Danny (1989) and Eli (1991).
Since 1992 Mark has worked as a staff anesthesiologist at North York General Hospital, Toronto. He is also a part time consultant at the Chronic Pain Management Allevio and Pinnacle Pain Clinics.
Mark and Lesley divorced In 2011. In 2015, Mark married Lila Speigel. Lila had immigrated to Toronto in about 1986 after living in Israel and before that from Caracas, Venezuela. Mark’s community involvement includes acting as a chaperone and physician on the March of the Living in 1994, as a UJA supporter since 1991 and as host of a Sharon Jewish Day School Zimbabwe reunion. He has also volunteered on numerous surgical missions to various countries including, Ecuador, Peru, Russia and Vietnam. He has been a member of Kehillat Shaarei Torah synagogue since 1996.
Mark has an older sister, Wendy (born in 1956), and a younger brother, Gary (born in 1960). Gary is married to a South African and Wendy is married to Dennis Scolnik also from Zimbabwe and they all live in the Toronto area. Mark’s parents, who moved to Israel with Gary in 1977, immigrated to Toronto in 1992 to be closer to their children and grandchildren. Mark's father passed away in 2012.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Occupations
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Travel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
1 photograph (jpg) : col.
44.5 KB of textual records
Date
2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one family history and photograph documenting Les Krawitz and his family. Identified in the photograph (taken in Muskoka) are:
Back row: Son-in-law Shaun Levy, daughter Delia Krawitz Levy, Daughter-in-law Randi Katz Krawitz, son Evan Krawitz (Delia's twin), wife Joan Krawitz, Les Krawitz, son Stan Krawitz, Stan's partner Laura Vasic, grandchildren Chloe and Max (Stan's kids)
Front row: grandchildren Jordana (Delia & Shaun's child), Adriana and Jake (Evan & Randi's children)
Administrative History
Les Krawitz was born in 1940 in Brakpan, South Africa to Abraham and Ella Krawitz. In 1964, he married Joan Marks. They had three children together: Stan (b. 1968) and twins Evan and Delia (b. 1971). The Krawitz family immigrated to Toronto in October 1987. Les initially worked with Tandem International (a marketing and sales consulting firm). In 1994, he joined the Sales Development Group (a human resources firm). After four years, he branched out with his own human resources company, Just Solutions Inc. In 2003 he joined his son, Stan's, real estate brokerage, Real Facilities, as a sales manager and realtor. He retired in 2011.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-5-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-5-9
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
4 photographs : col. (jpg)
Date
Dec. 2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of the exterior and interior of the South African food store Sedo Snax located at 385 John Street in Thornhill, ON.
Custodial History
Photographs were taken by John Cohen as part of the OJA's Southern African Legacy Project. He e-mailed the images to the OJA soon after they were taken.
Administrative History
The Odes family opened Sedo Snax in 1991. At first the store was run by Solly and Sheila Odes with help from their son, Neil, on weekends and evenings. Originally Biltong, Boerewors and various baked goods were made in the store and the store sold bulk foods such as nuts and raisins. After sanctions were lifted against the import of South African goods, the store phased out the bulk food section and began selling more South African food products. In 2002, Neil took over the operation of the store. The store has moved 5 times since it first opened. It is currently located at 385 John Street in Thornhill, ON.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
5 photographs (jpg)
Date
1953, 2010-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs taken by Jessica Parker documenting the following individuals: Ivan Zarenda, Lucille and Aubrey Groll, and Lynne and David Ginsburg. Jessica took these images after interviewing these individuals for an oral history project related to Jewish immigrants from South Africa living in Kingston, ON.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Related Material note: AC 431, AC 432, AC 433.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-11-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-11-10
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
9 photographs : col. (jpgs) ; 19 MB
586 KB of textual records
Date
[2015?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 9 digital photographs of Daniel Hoffman, owner of The Cutting Veg, teaching urban farming with the Global Garlic Project, and planting onions and garlic. Also included is one electronic textual document depicting The Cutting Veg's mission statement, issued as promotional material.
Administrative History
The Cutting Veg (TCV) is an eco-social enterprise rooted in organic farming. TCV runs four programs aimed at cultivating personal, social, environmental, and economic health. They cultivate multiple acres of mixed vegetables, making organic food more accessible to vegetable lovers of Southern Ontario. In addition to produce sales, TCV runs the “Global Garlic Project.” Specifically, they grow approximately 20 varieties of garlic from around the world, including Polish, Persian, Italian, Russian, Korean, and Israeli. TCV also provides Food Coaching Services, which offers garden & composting project support, agri-business training, food-based workshops, and part-time farming internships. Finally, TCV offers one-on-one “Wellness Counselling” for individuals who want to take steps forward with their health and happiness. Collectively, these programs are helping TCV towards the achievement of its quadruple bottom line: Personal health, Social health, Environmental health, and Economic health. TCV is owned and managed by Daniel Hoffmann. Daniel is an Organic Farmer, Social Worker (BSW), Counsellor, and has been farming in B.C. and Ontario since 2000.
Descriptive Notes
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION NOTE: The textual record is in a graphic file format but is a document.
Subjects
Agriculture
Education
Name Access
Hoffmann, Daniel
The Cutting Veg (Sutton, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-12-63
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-12-63
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
19 photographs : col. (jpgs) ; 72 MB
1 folder of textual records
Date
[2014?]-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 19 digital photos of Shoresh activities including beekeeping, farming, the Kavanah Garden in Vaughan, Maxie's Garden in Kensington Market, a map of Bela Farm in Hillsburgh, and gardening at Baycrest. Also included is a copy of Shoresh 2016 Year in Review.
Administrative History
Shoresh is a grassroots Jewish environmental organization in Southern Ontario. They exist to nurture a regional Jewish community that sees environmental ethics as a core element of Jewish identity, and is actively committed to responsible stewardship of the earth. They do this through educational programs that link Jewish texts and teachings with experiences of awe and wonder of the natural world; leadership opportunities that invest in the next generation of Jewish environmental leaders; and responsive action including environmental advocacy and the production of sustainable products that enrich Jewish life. They operate out of Shoresh’s Kavanah Garden in Vaughan, Bela Farm in Hillsburgh, and through schools, synagogues, camps, and community organizations throughout the Greater Toronto Area.
Descriptive Notes
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION NOTE: There is a PDF version of image #19 of Bela Farm
Subjects
Agriculture
Food
Name Access
Shoresh (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-11-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-11-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. (jpg) ; 10.3 MB
Date
2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 1 digital photo of Ran Goel with produce. This is a publicity photo for Fresh City Farms.
Administrative History
Fresh City Farms is Canada’s largest commercial city farm located on six acres at Downsview Park in Toronto. Its mission is to create and perfect new ways to connect food makers and eaters. Founder Ran Goel lists “his grandmother’s stories about growing up on a Kibbutz, feeling democracy awaken in his childhood home of South Africa and his mom’s stuffed peppers” as inspiration.
Subjects
Agriculture
Farms
Food
Name Access
Fresh City Farms
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-2-23
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-2-23
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
5 photographs
Date
[ca. 2000]-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting Lou Hoffer's involvement with the Transnistria Survivors' Association and the Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre. Included are photographs of Lou with student groups at OISE and Havergal college, an image of Lou lighting a candle with a Bar Mitzvah student as part of the Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre's Bar/Bat Mitzvah Project of Remembrance. Accession also includes a flyer, newspaperclippings and thank you cards.
Administrative History
Lou (Leizer) Hoffer is a Holocaust survivor who is a past President of the Transnistria Holocaust Survivors' Association and was a speaker with the Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre in Toronto.
Lou was born in 1927 in Vijnitz, Northern Bucovina, Romania to David and Chaya Sure Drassinover Hoffer. During the Second World War, Lou and his family was deported (along with all the Jewish people in his town) to the death camps of Transnistria (a territory in Ukraine). He was liberated in 1944.
After the war, Lou, his parents and his younger brother, Joe, wandered through various displaced persons camps in Europe. They eventually immigrated to Canada in March 1948 on the ship Nea Helas. He married Madga (nee Pressburger) in 1959. Together they had three sons and one daughter.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Societies
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Name Access
Hoffer, Lou
Transnistria Survivors' Association (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-3-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-3-7
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
2 photographs (tiff)
1 folder of textual records
Date
[2008?]-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two photographs taken of members of the Transnistria Survivors' Association by the Holocaust memorial at Earl Bales Park, Toronto. In one of the photographs, members are standing with their children and grandchildren. Also included is one JNF certificate documenting trees planted by Lou and Magda Hoffer in the Transnistria Grove in the Aminadav Forest (Jerusalem, Israel) in honour of their parents.
Administrative History
Lou (Leizer) Hoffer is a Holocaust survivor who is a past President of the Transnistria Holocaust Survivors' Association and was a speaker with the Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre in Toronto.
Lou was born in 1927 in Vijnitz, Northern Bucovina, Romania to David and Chaya Sure Drassinover Hoffer. During the Second World War, Lou and his family was deported (along with all the Jewish people in his town) to the death camps of Transnistria (a territory in Ukraine). He was liberated in 1944.
After the war, Lou, his parents and his younger brother, Joe, wandered through various displaced persons camps in Europe. They eventually immigrated to Canada in March 1948 on the ship Nea Helas. He married Madga (nee Pressburger) in 1959. Together they had three sons and one daughter.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Name Access
Transnistria Survivors' Association (Toronto, Ont.)
Hoffer, Lou
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-5
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
41 photographs : b&w and col. (1625 kb jpgs) ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Date
1932-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the Latchman Triplets. Included are family photographs of Donald, Marvin and Victor Latchman, a family portrait taken at the wedding of Philip and Sally Latchman, class photos, summer camp photos, and images of the triplets' 75th and 80th birthdays (5 November 2013).
Identified in photographs are: Donald and Annette Latchman, Victor and Rosalie Latchman, Marvin and Shirley Latchman, Philip and Sally Latchman, Morris Latchman, Vera Latchman Berrin, Mari Latchman Lipton, Irv Lipton, and Belle Latchman.
Textual records include Beth Sholom Bulletin June-August 1997, Beth Sholom Brotherhood Ball and Installation 1971, photocopies of news paper articles about the triplets, class photos and letter regarding payment of King's Bounty.
Administrative History
Philip and Sally (Sugarman) Latchman were married in 1932. In November 1933, Sally gave birth to identical triplets Donald, Marvin and Victor. In celebration, they were sent the King's Bounty of 3 British pounds. The boys were interviewed every year on their birthday by Toronto newspapers until they decided to stop the publicity. The family lived in the Bloor-Markham area until the boys were 11. The family then moved to Montclair Avenue where the boys attended Forest Hill Public School. They had their bar-mitzvahs at the Hebrew Men of England Synagogue. The triplets' father, Philip Latchman was a founding members of Beth Sholom Synagogue. Donald Latchman was on the board and Rosalie Latchman was active in the congregation.
Philip and his younger brother Morris Latchman started Federal Farms Limited in 1948 on 150 acres of Holland March in Brantford, Ontario. They grew vegetables: potatoes, carrots, celery and rutabegas. They also had a potato chip company Mad Hatter Snack Foods which was Kosher for Passover. Federal Farms Ltd. went public in 1961 and Loblaws bought 51% of the shares.
Donald attended Ryerson business school and founded Latchman Insurance Brokers. He married Annette Bachst, a holocaust survivor who grew up in New York.
Marvin attended Ryerson business school then worked for Federal Farms at the Ontario Food Terminal. Later he became a real estate broker. He married Shirley Wolkofsky.
Victor worked on the family farm and at Federal Fruit Company at the Ontario Food Terminal. Victor took a business course at Shaw's Business School. In 1966 he bought Taylors shoes, a business at 2934 Dundas Street. West started in 1920 by Sid Taylor. Victor helped start the Junction Business Improvement Association and was twice President of Junction Gardens BIA. He retired in 2009. Victor and Rosalie Greenspan (d. 2014) were married at Beth Sholom in 1958 by Rabbi David Monson. Their children are Howard, and Faith and Mitchell Sherman. Their grand-children are Matthew, Jennifer and Russell Sherman. Victor and Rosalie were honoured at Beth Sholom Synagogue on 26 October 2013 for their 55th wedding anniversary.
In 2012 at age 78, the triplets believed themselves to be the oldest male identical triplets alive in Canada.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
RELATED MATERIALS NOTE: Federal Farms Limited fonds at Simoce Country Archives. ASSOCIATED MATERIALS NOTE: See accession 2016-12\45 (Victor Latchman) and 2002-10\66 (Morris Latchman).
Subjects
Agriculture
Families
Name Access
Latchman, Donald
Latchman, Marvin
Latchman, Victor
Places
Brantford (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-12-45
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-12-45
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w ; col. ; 8 x 11 cm
1 folder of textual records
Date
1958-2010
Scope and Content
Accession consists of family photos of Victor Latchman and textual records about Victor's business Taylors Shoes. Identified in the photos are: Victor Latchman and Rosalie Greenspan, Donald and Annette Latchman and Victor and Rosalie in Miami (1960s). Textual records include a business card for Taylors Shoes and an article about Latchman's retirement published in the Bloor West Town Crier (February 2010).
Administrative History
Philip and Sally (Sugarman) Latchman were married in 1932. In November 1933, Sally gave birth to identical triplets Donald, Marvin and Victor. In celebration, they were sent the King's Bounty of 3 British pounds. The boys were interviewed every year on their birthday by Toronto newspapers until they decided to stop the publicity. The family lived in the Bloor-Markham area until the boys were 11. The family then moved to Montclair Avenue where the boys attended Forest Hill Public School. They had their bar-mitzvahs at the Hebrew Men of England Synagogue. The triplets' father, Philip Latchman was a founding members of Beth Sholom Synagogue. Donald Latchman was on the board and Rosalie Latchman was active in the congregation.
Philip and his younger brother Morris Latchman started Federal Farms Limited in 1948 on 150 acres of Holland March in Brantford, Ontario. They grew vegetables: potatoes, carrots, celery and rutabegas. They also had a potato chip company Mad Hatter Snack Foods which was Kosher for Passover. Federal Farms Ltd. went public in 1961 and Loblaws bought 51% of the shares.
Donald attended Ryerson business school and founded Latchman Insurance Brokers. He married Annette Bachst, a holocaust survivor who grew up in New York.
Marvin attended Ryerson business school then worked for Federal Farms at the Ontario Food Terminal. Later he became a real estate broker. He married Shirley Wolkofsky.
Victor worked on the family farm and at Federal Fruit Company at the Ontario Food Terminal. Victor took a business course at Shaw's Business School. In 1966 he bought Taylors shoes, a business at 2934 Dundas Street. West started in 1920 by Sid Taylor. Victor helped start the Junction Business Improvement Association and was twice President of Junction Gardens BIA. He retired in 2009. Victor and Rosalie Greenspan (d. 2014) were married at Beth Sholom in 1958 by Rabbi David Monson. Their children are Howard, and Faith and Mitchell Sherman. Their grand-children are Matthew, Jennifer and Russell Sherman. Victor and Rosalie were honoured at Beth Sholom Synagogue on 26 October 2013 for their 55th wedding anniversary.
In 2012 at age 78, the triplets believed themselves to be the oldest male identical triplets alive in Canada.
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIALS NOTE: See accession 2016-7-5 (Victor Latchman) and 2002-10-66 (Morris Latchman). RELATED MATERIALS NOTE: Federal Farms Limited fonds at Simcoe County Archives.
Subjects
Business
Families
Name Access
Latchman, Annette
Latchman, Donald
Latchman, Rosalie
Latchman, Victor
Places
Miami (Fla.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-8-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-8-13
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
object
Physical Description
45 photographs (tif) : b&w and col.
2 objects : 7 x 38 or smaller
Date
[192-?]-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Gary Wagman and his family. Included are: a commemorative key commemorating the grand opening of the Apter Centre on 13 Mar. 1949, a key to the Apter Centre, and 45 photographs in TIF format. The photographs are largely of members of the extended Gold-Wagman family including Gary Wagman, Gary's brother Howard "Hushy" Wagman, Gary's mother Ann Wagman (née Gold), and Gary's father Sollie Wagman along with various cousins, grandparents, aunts and uncles. The photographs also depict several unidentified individuals who may be related to Gary.
Photo Caption (007): Ann Gold, [194-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-8-11.
Photo Caption (008): Jack Gold with friends, [194-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-8-11.
Photo Caption (010): Howard “Hushy” Wagman and Gary Wagman waiting for their grandparents at Union Station, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, [195-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-8-11.
Photo Caption (013): Leonard Walker, Mrs. Leonard Walker, Bryan Davidson, Rosalie, Charles Davidson, Aaron Miller, and Marry Miller (née Davidson), [197-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-8-11.
Photo Caption (014): Ann Gold, [193-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-8-11.
Administrative History
Gary Irving Wagman (1951-) was born 19 March 1951 and is the youngest son of Ann Wagman (née Gold, 1926-2017) and Sollie Wagman (1921-2014). His older brother Howard, known as Hushy (1947-2001), was born 9 October 1947. Gary is the grandson of David and Rose Gold (his maternal grandparents) and Celia and Jacob Wagman (his paternal grandparents).
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIALS: Other records relating to the Wagman family can be found in Accessions 2009-11-1 and 2017-7-6.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Apter Friendly Society (Toronto, Ont.)
Gold family
Wagman, Gary, 1951-
Wagman family
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-9-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-9-1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
moving images
Physical Description
ca. 14 cm of textual records
ca. 275 photographs : b&w and col. ; 26 x 21 cm or smaller
1 DVD
Date
[191-?]-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the life of Abe Zukerman and several family members including Abe's father-in-law Elia Rubin and brother-in-law Jack Rubin. Included are: certificates of various sorts, correspondence, a DVD of the dedication of the restored Jewish cemetery in Wachock, eulogies, a family calender, financial documents, identity documents for Abe and Margot Zukerman, memorial books/records for Abe Zukerman and Elia Rubin, photographs, and a small number of administrative and financial records from the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society.
Custodial History
The material that makes up accession 2017-9-1 belonged to Abe Zukerman. Mr. Zukerman's stepson, Mel Perlmutter, gathered the material and donated it to the Archives
Administrative History
Abram "Abe" Zukerman (1914-2009) was born in Wierzbnik, Poland in 1914. He was the only member of his family to survive the Holocaust. In 1948, he came to Canada, where he became involved in the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society and married. His first wife, Esther, predeceased him. In 1975, he married his second wife, Margot, who had two children from a previous marriage. In addition to serving as a senior executive member of the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society for over 50 years, Abe volunteered with United Jewish Appeal and State of Israel Bonds. He passed away 8 Feb. 2009. Photo Caption (001): Abe Zukerman at his store on Queen St. W., Toronto, Ontario, Canada, [196-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (002): Lansdowne Cut Rate Store on Queen St. W., Toronto, Ontario, Canada, [196-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (011): Abe Zukerman at the Western Wall, [199-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (017): Abe Zukerman with others, possibly in Israel, [196-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (018): Abe Zukerman, [193-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Captions (032) - (087): Unidentified individuals, [192-?]-[195-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
A number of photographs have writing in Polish and Yiddish on their opposite side, which might prove useful in their identification.
Subjects
Cemeteries
Families
Societies
Name Access
Rubin, Elia
Rubin, Jack
Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society
Zukerman, Abe, 1914-2009
Zukerman, Margot
Places
Canada
Israel
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Address
187 Brunswick Avenue
Source
Landmarks

During the early 1980s, newcomers to the synagogue introduced an alternative egalitarian service in the basement, which eventually became the main service in the sanctuary. The Synagogue underwent renovations in the early 1980s, and again more recently, in an effort to accommodate its new members and to provide for its future as a neighborhood synagogue. In recent years, the First Narayever has become one of the most well-attended and active synagogues in the downtown area.
Address
187 Brunswick Avenue
Time Period
1914-present
Scope Note
During the early 1980s, newcomers to the synagogue introduced an alternative egalitarian service in the basement, which eventually became the main service in the sanctuary. The Synagogue underwent renovations in the early 1980s, and again more recently, in an effort to accommodate its new members and to provide for its future as a neighborhood synagogue. In recent years, the First Narayever has become one of the most well-attended and active synagogues in the downtown area.
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
25 Bellevue Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The congregation of Rodfei Sholom Anshei Kiev, commonly known as the Kiever, dates back to 1912. The first few members had little means for funding a new synagogue in 1912, so services at this time were held in a rented house on Centre Avenue in the Ward.
Address
25 Bellevue Avenue
Time Period
1927-present
Scope Note
The congregation of Rodfei Sholom Anshei Kiev, commonly known as the Kiever, dates back to 1912. The first few members had little means for funding a new synagogue in 1912, so services at this time were held in a rented house on Centre Avenue in the Ward.
History
In 1917, the Kiever acquired a house at 25 Bellevue Avenue in Kensington Market and by 1923 the Kiever congregation raised enough funds to build a synagogue large enough to accommodate its growing numbers. The Kiever Executive contracted Benjamin Swartz, a Jewish architect, to design the current synagogue at 25 Bellevue, which replaced the two houses that had been used for services. The Synagogue was completed in 1927, after three years of construction. Today, the Kiever is a vibrant synagogue and one of a handful of synagogues remaining in the downtown area.
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
134 D'Arcy Street
Source
Landmarks

The Shedlover Shul was a small synagogue established by immigrants from Szydlow, Poland in 1914. The Yiddish and Russian pronunciation is Shidlov.
Address
134 D'Arcy Street
Time Period
1914-
Scope Note
The Shedlover Shul was a small synagogue established by immigrants from Szydlow, Poland in 1914. The Yiddish and Russian pronunciation is Shidlov.
Source
Landmarks
Address
397 Markham Street
Source
Landmarks

The Shaarei Tzedek Congregation was founded by new Russian immigrants around 1901. The congregation’s first shul was situated originally on 29 Centre Avenue, south of Dundas on the east side of the street, in the vicinity of present-day Nathan Philips Square. Louis Gurofsky (1871-1934), a prominent member of the Jewish community and a business man, lived in a house at 397 Markham Street with his family. In 1937, following Gurofsky’s death in 1934, Shaarei Tzedek occupied the Markham Street house of the Gurofsky family and renovations were soon undertaken to convert the residence into a synagogue, designed by Benjamin Swartz.
Address
397 Markham Street
Time Period
1937-present
Scope Note
The Shaarei Tzedek Congregation was founded by new Russian immigrants around 1901. The congregation’s first shul was situated originally on 29 Centre Avenue, south of Dundas on the east side of the street, in the vicinity of present-day Nathan Philips Square. Louis Gurofsky (1871-1934), a prominent member of the Jewish community and a business man, lived in a house at 397 Markham Street with his family. In 1937, following Gurofsky’s death in 1934, Shaarei Tzedek occupied the Markham Street house of the Gurofsky family and renovations were soon undertaken to convert the residence into a synagogue, designed by Benjamin Swartz.
History
Following the Second World War, a second wave of Russian immigrants, many of whom were Holocaust survivors, found spiritual refuge at the Markham Street shul, and membership again began to rise. In the 1950s the shul employed the services of Rabbi Israel Frankel, a prominent Jewish scholar and one of the founders of the Toronto Jewish Public Library. As the Jewish community increasingly moved to the northern and outlying suburbs of Toronto, this general trend began to take its toll on the membership of the Shaarei Tzedek into the 1960s. The congregation was obliged to declare bankruptcy in 1968. However, a concerted fund-raising effort by Jewish community leaders in the area re-established the congregation in 1970, under the spiritual and administrative leadership of the shul’s president, Dr. Joseph Greenberg.
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
332 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Walerstein's ice cream parlour was owned by Abraham Walerstein, who was originally from Hamilton, Ontario. He opened it in 1917 and it became a hang out for Social Democrats.
Address
332 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1917-unknown
Scope Note
Walerstein's ice cream parlour was owned by Abraham Walerstein, who was originally from Hamilton, Ontario. He opened it in 1917 and it became a hang out for Social Democrats.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
275 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Goldenberg's restaurant, which was kosher, was located at 275 Spadina Ave and was owned by Mr Joseph S. Goldenberg. He made additions to the restaurant in 1929 and 1935 by architect Benjamin Brown.
Address
275 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1925-
Scope Note
Goldenberg's restaurant, which was kosher, was located at 275 Spadina Ave and was owned by Mr Joseph S. Goldenberg. He made additions to the restaurant in 1929 and 1935 by architect Benjamin Brown.
History
The restaurant was originally located in the Ward at 63 Elizabeth Street.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
24 Cecil Street
Source
Landmarks

The Labour Zionist Order was an outgrowth of the Labour Zionist party in Israel (the Mapai party). They carried out a number of different functions. They were pro-labour and pro-Zionist. They acted as a mutual benefit society—the Labour Zionist Alliance or Farband, formally known as the Jewish National Workers Alliance or Farband Labour Zionist Order. They also operated a school for children called the Farband Folks Shule (later Bialik Hebrew Day School). There was a fundraising organization that they oversaw called the Israel Histadrut of Toronto whose annual campaign raised money for the Israel Histadrut in Israel (the Federation of Labour in Israel), founded in 1920. The campaign money was used to fund economic, trade union, military, social, and cultural activities in Israel, as well as to provide a comprehensive system of health insurance and hospital services to workers. The Israel Histadrut campaign in Toronto had an autonomous executive board, however it's activities were overseen by the Labour Zionist Order.
Address
24 Cecil Street
Time Period
1922-
Scope Note
The Labour Zionist Order was an outgrowth of the Labour Zionist party in Israel (the Mapai party). They carried out a number of different functions. They were pro-labour and pro-Zionist. They acted as a mutual benefit society—the Labour Zionist Alliance or Farband, formally known as the Jewish National Workers Alliance or Farband Labour Zionist Order. They also operated a school for children called the Farband Folks Shule (later Bialik Hebrew Day School). There was a fundraising organization that they oversaw called the Israel Histadrut of Toronto whose annual campaign raised money for the Israel Histadrut in Israel (the Federation of Labour in Israel), founded in 1920. The campaign money was used to fund economic, trade union, military, social, and cultural activities in Israel, as well as to provide a comprehensive system of health insurance and hospital services to workers. The Israel Histadrut campaign in Toronto had an autonomous executive board, however it's activities were overseen by the Labour Zionist Order.
History
The Labour Zionist Order purchased the house at 24 Cecil Street in 1922 and established a library in it. It was called the Farband Institute.
Category
Political
Organization
Source
Landmarks
Address
33 Robert Street
Source
Landmarks

Lansdowne Public School at one time had a high concentration of Jewish students due to its close proximity to Kensginton Market. A 1944 study shows that 778 Jewish students attended Lansdowne Public School (now known as Lord Lansdowne Public School) in that year.
Address
33 Robert Street
Time Period
1888-
Scope Note
Lansdowne Public School at one time had a high concentration of Jewish students due to its close proximity to Kensginton Market. A 1944 study shows that 778 Jewish students attended Lansdowne Public School (now known as Lord Lansdowne Public School) in that year.
Category
Education
Source
Landmarks
Address
150 Beverley Street
Source
Landmarks

By 1919 the plight of post-war Eastern European Jewry and the need for a united community voice for Canadian Jewry led to the creation of the Canadian Jewish Congress. Its founding meeting was held on March 16, 1919 in Montreal. Though it briefly maintained a tiny regional office in Toronto, the CJC remained inactive until 1933, when it fully reconvened by opening offices in Winnipeg, Montreal, and Toronto. Egmont L. Frankel was the first President of the new Central Division in Toronto. While the National Office in Montreal focused on the overarching issues of the social and economic rights of European Jewry, assistance for Jewish immigrants, and combating prejudice in Canada, the Toronto office dealt with local violent anti-Jewish demonstrations as well as continuing discrimination both in employment and in access to public recreational facilities. The structure was based on regular national biennial plenary conferences at which policies were delineated and national and regional executives were elected. Between plenary sessions, National and Regional Councils were in charge.
Address
150 Beverley Street
Time Period
1919-2012
Scope Note
By 1919 the plight of post-war Eastern European Jewry and the need for a united community voice for Canadian Jewry led to the creation of the Canadian Jewish Congress. Its founding meeting was held on March 16, 1919 in Montreal. Though it briefly maintained a tiny regional office in Toronto, the CJC remained inactive until 1933, when it fully reconvened by opening offices in Winnipeg, Montreal, and Toronto. Egmont L. Frankel was the first President of the new Central Division in Toronto. While the National Office in Montreal focused on the overarching issues of the social and economic rights of European Jewry, assistance for Jewish immigrants, and combating prejudice in Canada, the Toronto office dealt with local violent anti-Jewish demonstrations as well as continuing discrimination both in employment and in access to public recreational facilities. The structure was based on regular national biennial plenary conferences at which policies were delineated and national and regional executives were elected. Between plenary sessions, National and Regional Councils were in charge.
History
During the 1930s the Central Division Office moved several times and occupied offices in the following locations; Yonge St., the Bond St. Synagogue, Scheuer House, the Zionist Building, and its long-term home at 150-152 Beverley Street where it remained until its July, 1983 move to the Lipa Green Building in North York. Its activities expanded to include taking responsibility for Jewish educational standards but, by 1941, its main efforts shifted to support for Canada’s war effort. Immediately after the end of the war, the focus again shifted to Jewish immigration projects and the maintenance of Jewish identity in small communities.By 1950, the CJC’s use of the title “division” was changed to “region” to accommodate internal operational “divisions” within each region. Also, by then, the Central Region was busy expanding its programs for all Ontario Jewish communities, creating a province-wide council of youth groups, and working with the newly-created Bureau of Jewish Education (later Board of Jewish Education).
Category
Organization
Source
Landmarks
Address
56 Maria Street
Source
Landmarks

Congregation Knesseth Israel was built in 1911 at 56 Maria Street in the Junction. Its architect was James Ellis, who between 1890 and 1912 designed over fifty buildings in the area. Early 20th century membership consisted mainly of new Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe, many of whom lived and worked in the Junction as artisans, peddlers, shop owners and scrap and metal collectors. It is the oldest Toronto synagogue still in use as a synagogue today. The synagogue was restored in the early 1990s and remains active today. It is cared for by the descendants of the founding families.
Address
56 Maria Street
Time Period
1911-present
Scope Note
Congregation Knesseth Israel was built in 1911 at 56 Maria Street in the Junction. Its architect was James Ellis, who between 1890 and 1912 designed over fifty buildings in the area. Early 20th century membership consisted mainly of new Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe, many of whom lived and worked in the Junction as artisans, peddlers, shop owners and scrap and metal collectors. It is the oldest Toronto synagogue still in use as a synagogue today. The synagogue was restored in the early 1990s and remains active today. It is cared for by the descendants of the founding families.
Category
Religious
Architecture
Source
Landmarks
Address
119 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The Balfour Building is a Toronto landmark and designated heritage building that is located at 119 Spadina Avenue. It was designed by Benjamin Brown and was one of his most important commissions.
Address
119 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1930-Present
Scope Note
The Balfour Building is a Toronto landmark and designated heritage building that is located at 119 Spadina Avenue. It was designed by Benjamin Brown and was one of his most important commissions.
History
Built in 1930, the building is twelve storeys high and crowned by a two storey tower. It is considered one of the finest examples of Art Deco architecture in Toronto. Initially, many Jewish garment businesses were located in the building. It currently houses offices for several graphic design and advertising firms, shops and a post office. The Balfour Building was declared a heritage building by order of City Council in July of 1989.
Category
Architecture
Manufacturer
Source
Landmarks
Address
225 Richmond Street West
Source
Landmarks

The Gelber Brothers, Louis and Moses, were born in what is now Austria in the late nineteenth century. Together they founded the Imperial Clothing Company, which later became Gelber Brothers Woolens. Their head office was designed by Benjamin Brown and was located in the Gelber Building at 217-225 Richmond Street West. Although selling woolens was their main business, the brothers had other investments, including ownership of a service station at Simcoe and Richmond and a public garage at 287 Spadina Avenue.
Address
225 Richmond Street West
Time Period
1923-present
Scope Note
The Gelber Brothers, Louis and Moses, were born in what is now Austria in the late nineteenth century. Together they founded the Imperial Clothing Company, which later became Gelber Brothers Woolens. Their head office was designed by Benjamin Brown and was located in the Gelber Building at 217-225 Richmond Street West. Although selling woolens was their main business, the brothers had other investments, including ownership of a service station at Simcoe and Richmond and a public garage at 287 Spadina Avenue.
History
The Gelber Brothers were prominent members of the Toronto Jewish community. They were involved in many philanthropic and charitable activities and were active in many Jewish organizations.
Category
Architecture
Manufacturer
Source
Landmarks
Address
197/199 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The Empire Clothing Company building was another fine example of commercial buildings designed by Benjamin Brown. The building was located at 197/199 Spadina Avenue at the corner of Phoebe Street and Spadina Avenue. Brown built the original and a later addition to the building.
Address
197/199 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1923-present
Scope Note
The Empire Clothing Company building was another fine example of commercial buildings designed by Benjamin Brown. The building was located at 197/199 Spadina Avenue at the corner of Phoebe Street and Spadina Avenue. Brown built the original and a later addition to the building.
History
Mr. Abraham M. Schiffer and Mr. William Leibel were the co-owners of Empire Clothing Co. and Cornell Tailored Clothing Ltd. The Empire Clothing Company Building served as the headquarters for both businesses. The Empire Clothing Company manufactured men's clothing and sold it wholesale. Leibel and Schiffer were also close neighbours, living only a few houses apart. William Leibel was a prominent member of the Toronto Jewish community. He was involved in many philanthropic and charitable activities and was active in many Jewish organizations, particularly in the area of Jewish education.
Category
Architecture
Manufacturer
Source
Landmarks
Address
21 Dundas Square
Source
Landmarks

The six-storey Hermant Annex and 14-storey eastern tower were designed by Benjamin Brown in 1920 and 1930 respectively. The building is named after Percy Hermant and served as the headquarters for his company, Imperial Optical. The Hermant Building was built at Wilton Square - which was later renamed Dundas Square. Benjamin Brown's office was located in the Hermant Building in the 1940s. The offices of the Canadian Jewish Review were housed in the building on Dundas Square. The buildings were designated as heritage buildings in 1990.
Address
21 Dundas Square
Time Period
1930-present
Scope Note
The six-storey Hermant Annex and 14-storey eastern tower were designed by Benjamin Brown in 1920 and 1930 respectively. The building is named after Percy Hermant and served as the headquarters for his company, Imperial Optical. The Hermant Building was built at Wilton Square - which was later renamed Dundas Square. Benjamin Brown's office was located in the Hermant Building in the 1940s. The offices of the Canadian Jewish Review were housed in the building on Dundas Square. The buildings were designated as heritage buildings in 1990.
History
Percy Hermant was born in Mogilev, Russia in 1882. In 1897, he immigrated to Canada, arriving in New Brunswick, where he began working as a dry goods peddler. In 1900, he founded the Imperial Optical Company, the first prescription lens business in the Maritimes. This company eventually grew to be the largest company of its kind in the British Commonwealth. In addition to his successful business, he was very involved with philanthropic and community activities within Jewish and non-Jewish circles. He sponsored academic and musical scholarships.
Category
Architecture
Manufacturer
Medical
Source
Landmarks
Address
Dundas and Elizabeth Streets
Source
Landmarks

Dr. Max Kates was a Jewish dentist in Toronto. He was married to Lillian Kates, who was the founder of Camp Arowhon, a popular Jewish summer camp in Algonquin Park.
Address
Dundas and Elizabeth Streets
Time Period
ca. 1921-present
Scope Note
Dr. Max Kates was a Jewish dentist in Toronto. He was married to Lillian Kates, who was the founder of Camp Arowhon, a popular Jewish summer camp in Algonquin Park.
History
This building was designed by Benjamin Brown and was commissioned by Dr. Kates to house several stores and offices. It still stands today at the corner of Dundas and Elizabeth Streets in the heart of Toronto’s former St. John’s Ward; the area that first received the thousands of Jewish immigrants fleeing the pogroms in Russia and Eastern Europe.
Category
Architecture
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Address
254-256 Victoria Street
Source
Landmarks

The six-storey Hermant Annex and 14-storey eastern tower were designed by Benjamin Brown in 1920 and 1930 respectively. The building is named after Percy Hermant and served as the headquarters for his company, Imperial Optical. The Hermant Building was built at Wilton Square - which was later renamed Dundas Square. Benjamin Brown's office was located in the Hermant Building in the 1940s. The offices of the Canadian Jewish Review were housed in the building on Dundas Square. The buildings were designated as heritage buildings in 1990.
Address
254-256 Victoria Street
Time Period
1920-present
Scope Note
The six-storey Hermant Annex and 14-storey eastern tower were designed by Benjamin Brown in 1920 and 1930 respectively. The building is named after Percy Hermant and served as the headquarters for his company, Imperial Optical. The Hermant Building was built at Wilton Square - which was later renamed Dundas Square. Benjamin Brown's office was located in the Hermant Building in the 1940s. The offices of the Canadian Jewish Review were housed in the building on Dundas Square. The buildings were designated as heritage buildings in 1990.
History
Percy Hermant was born in Mogilev, Russia in 1882. In 1897, he immigrated to Canada, arriving in New Brunswick, where he began working as a dry goods peddler. In 1900, he founded the Imperial Optical Company, the first prescription lens business in the Maritimes. This company eventually grew to be the largest company of its kind in the British Commonwealth. In addition to his successful business, he was very involved with philanthropic and community activities within Jewish and non-Jewish circles. He sponsored academic and musical scholarships.
Category
Architecture
Manufacturer
Medical
Source
Landmarks
Address
1110 Brydon Bay Road
Source
Landmarks

Camp Shalom was founded in 1948 by the Zionist Organization of Canada as a summer camp for youth between the ages of 9 and 13. Located in Gravenhurst, Ontario, Camp Shalom was one of the most successful of the Zionist camps. Camp Shalom was administered by the National Camps Association in conjunction with a regional committee, although, the daily operation and staffing of the camp was provided by Canadian Young Judaea. The camp still exists today and is jointly operated by the Toronto Zionist Council and Canadian Young Judaea.
Address
1110 Brydon Bay Road
Time Period
1948-present
Scope Note
Camp Shalom was founded in 1948 by the Zionist Organization of Canada as a summer camp for youth between the ages of 9 and 13. Located in Gravenhurst, Ontario, Camp Shalom was one of the most successful of the Zionist camps. Camp Shalom was administered by the National Camps Association in conjunction with a regional committee, although, the daily operation and staffing of the camp was provided by Canadian Young Judaea. The camp still exists today and is jointly operated by the Toronto Zionist Council and Canadian Young Judaea.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1068 Burlmarie Road
Source
Landmarks

Located on the Lake of Bays in Muskoka, Camp New Moon began as a family lodge in the early 1930s. It was transformed into a children’s camp in the 1950s. In 1959, the camp was purchased by Al Goodman and Bert Fine (who ran Bathurst Manor Day Camp, later renamed to Forest Valley) who operated the camp together until around 1960 when Goodman assumed full ownership. Since the 1990s, the camp has been operated by Al’s son Jack and his wife Sue. The camp continues to flourish, providing campers the same experience that has existed for 60 years. There are now third generation campers attending.
Address
1068 Burlmarie Road
Time Period
1959-present
Scope Note
Located on the Lake of Bays in Muskoka, Camp New Moon began as a family lodge in the early 1930s. It was transformed into a children’s camp in the 1950s. In 1959, the camp was purchased by Al Goodman and Bert Fine (who ran Bathurst Manor Day Camp, later renamed to Forest Valley) who operated the camp together until around 1960 when Goodman assumed full ownership. Since the 1990s, the camp has been operated by Al’s son Jack and his wife Sue. The camp continues to flourish, providing campers the same experience that has existed for 60 years. There are now third generation campers attending.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
Eldorado Park
Source
Landmarks

In 1936 the Labour League (later the United Jewish People's Order) bought Eldorado Park near Brampton, Ontario from the Canadian National Railway to establish Camp Naivelt. It functioned as a camp for children and families and ran a teacher training facility. Political and social activism was a significant part of Camp Naivelt. Its mission was to promote progressive socialist philosophy, tightly integrated with secular Jewish and Yiddish cultural traditions. A key element of the Camp Naivelt mission was to foster a deep and meaningful understanding of secular Jewish culture and folklore, the Yiddish language, music, folk art and dance.
Address
Eldorado Park
Time Period
1936-present
Scope Note
In 1936 the Labour League (later the United Jewish People's Order) bought Eldorado Park near Brampton, Ontario from the Canadian National Railway to establish Camp Naivelt. It functioned as a camp for children and families and ran a teacher training facility. Political and social activism was a significant part of Camp Naivelt. Its mission was to promote progressive socialist philosophy, tightly integrated with secular Jewish and Yiddish cultural traditions. A key element of the Camp Naivelt mission was to foster a deep and meaningful understanding of secular Jewish culture and folklore, the Yiddish language, music, folk art and dance.
History
At its peak in the 1950s, Camp Naivelt had approximately 90 small cottages, a communal dining hall, a dance hall, a youth recreation hall, a grocery store and a camp office. The community also included a camp director’s cabin, arts and crafts cabin, infirmary, and a communal washroom and shower area known as, “The Ritz”. Activities ranged from lectures on current issues, films, poetry readings, Yiddish theatre, kultur vinkls (cultural corners), folk dancing and singing to boating and swimming, volleyball and other sports tournaments, hikes and nature walks and campfires. Some 300 children would attend camp during the summer and, at its height during the 1940s and 1950s, as many as 5000 people would fill Camp Naivelt on a summer weekend.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1485 Murphy Rd.
Source
Landmarks

Camp Moshava was founded in 1962 in the Kawartha Lakes Region on Lake Buckhorn. Affiliated with the Zionist youth movement B’nei Akiva, Moshava is one of several camps they operate in North America.
Address
1485 Murphy Rd.
Time Period
1962-present
Scope Note
Camp Moshava was founded in 1962 in the Kawartha Lakes Region on Lake Buckhorn. Affiliated with the Zionist youth movement B’nei Akiva, Moshava is one of several camps they operate in North America.
History
Historically, the primary aim of the movement was to promote avodah, specifically agricultural work in the field and aliyah, migration to Israel. Today, Camp Moshava provides an informal environment for campers to encounter Judaism through programming and observances that promote Torah education, prayer and Zionist ideals.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1 Arowhon Road
Source
Landmarks

Camp Arowhon has been owned and operated by the Kates family since 1934. It is located on a private lake in Algonquin Provincial Park. Matriarch Lillian Kates established this family business, three generations long, in 1934. A formidable entrepreneur, Kates was undeterred by obstacles of the day such as adventurous travel through Ontario’s wilderness, anti-Semitism, sexism and a lack of financial resources. She passionately pursued her dream of creating a unique Canadian summer camp and single handedly recruited all of its first campers.
Address
1 Arowhon Road
Time Period
1934-present
Scope Note
Camp Arowhon has been owned and operated by the Kates family since 1934. It is located on a private lake in Algonquin Provincial Park. Matriarch Lillian Kates established this family business, three generations long, in 1934. A formidable entrepreneur, Kates was undeterred by obstacles of the day such as adventurous travel through Ontario’s wilderness, anti-Semitism, sexism and a lack of financial resources. She passionately pursued her dream of creating a unique Canadian summer camp and single handedly recruited all of its first campers.
History
When Kates’ son Eugene took over as director, he set up Arowhon’s unique system where campers independently chose their daily activities. True to the inspiration of its name-Samuel Butler’s Utopian novel “Nowhere” spelt backwards “Erehwon”-Arowhon did indeed become “a perfect world for children”. Today the camp is operated by Eugene’s daughter Joanne Kates, the celebrated food critic.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1612 Dudley Rd
Source
Landmarks

In 1958, Camp Timberlane was founded by Barry and Philomena Lowes on the shores of the Lake of Two Islands in the Haliburton Highlands. Their vision was to create a camping experience that would build confidence, spirit and leadership. They strived to provide a nurturing environment that recognized a person’s uniqueness and where values would be learned that would benefit them over a lifetime. The tradition continues today and is being carried out by the present Director and Owner Corey Mandell who attended Timberlane as a camper and counselor.
Address
1612 Dudley Rd
Time Period
1958-present
Scope Note
In 1958, Camp Timberlane was founded by Barry and Philomena Lowes on the shores of the Lake of Two Islands in the Haliburton Highlands. Their vision was to create a camping experience that would build confidence, spirit and leadership. They strived to provide a nurturing environment that recognized a person’s uniqueness and where values would be learned that would benefit them over a lifetime. The tradition continues today and is being carried out by the present Director and Owner Corey Mandell who attended Timberlane as a camper and counselor.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1335 Camp White Pine Ct.
Source
Landmarks

Camp White Pine, a children’s summer camp located in the Haliburton Highlands outside of Toronto was founded by Joe Kronick in 1956. Joe's son, Adam, took over as director of Camp White Pine in 1987. He has run the camp with his wife, Dana, as co-Director since 1990.
Address
1335 Camp White Pine Ct.
Time Period
1956-present
Scope Note
Camp White Pine, a children’s summer camp located in the Haliburton Highlands outside of Toronto was founded by Joe Kronick in 1956. Joe's son, Adam, took over as director of Camp White Pine in 1987. He has run the camp with his wife, Dana, as co-Director since 1990.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1030 Lower Lions Club Road
Source
Landmarks

Camp Kadimah is a day camp for children between the ages of 2-14 operated by the Hamilton Jewish Community Centre.
Address
1030 Lower Lions Club Road
Time Period
1949-present
Scope Note
Camp Kadimah is a day camp for children between the ages of 2-14 operated by the Hamilton Jewish Community Centre.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
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