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16 records – page 1 of 1.
Accession Number
2015-11-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
2015-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records relating to Holy Blossom Temple and includes an Adult Education Guide (2015), L’Shanah Tovah Bulletin (2015) and Family & Youth Education Centre Programs 2015/2016 – 5776.
Administrative History
Nancy Draper is an active member of the Jewish community and has been a volunteer at the Ontario Jewish Archives for many years.
Subjects
Education
Synagogues
Name Access
Draper, Nancy
Holy Blossom Temple (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Bathurst St. (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-1-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-1-5
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 10 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1957-2015, predominant 1974-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting Claude Heimann's immigration to Canada, career, involvement with Temple Har Zion and family life. Included are photographs, correspondence, newsletters and journals, writings and presentations by Heimann, certificates, newspaper clippings, event and conference programs, and business cards. Also included are documents with the text used for Totum Research's website.
Administrative History
Claude Heimann was born on 21 March 1944 in Johannesburg, South Africa to Wilhelm (Bill) Otto Heimann and Lotte Heimann (nee Rosenberg). He received a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Witwatersrand in 1966. In 1969, he married Adele Masail at the Pine Street Synagogue in Johannesburg. They lived in Windsor Park, Johannesburg and had two children together: Nicole Heidi (now married to Marshall Starkman) and Marc Steven.
Claude initially worked for Market Research Africa interviewing farm workers across the country. In 1971 he joined Reader's Digest in South Africa as a Research Director. Believing there would not be a peaceful solution to apartheid, Claude had decided at a young age that he would evenutally leave South Africa. He hoped that Reader's Digest was a company that might be able to transfer him to work in another country. Ten years later, in 1981, an opportunity came up with the Canadian edition of Reader's Digest in a similar role. Claude accepted the position and immigrated with his family to Toronto in May 1981. For their first few months they lived at Glengrove Manor on Yonge Street between Lawrence and Eglinton. In July, they moved into their home in Thornhill. Adele initially stayed home with the family, but eventually worked as a bookkeeper for a variety of different businesses.
Claude left Reader's Digest in 1990 to become a partner in Totum Research. Throughout his career, Claude has served on the Research Committee of PMB and has been a member of the Board of Directors of CARF for whom he served as Technical Director. He has also served on a number of other media research related committees, including the Technical Committee of AMPS and the Magazines Canada Research Committee. Claude was also active on the Board of Temple Har Zion, holding a variety of positions, including: regular Board member, Vice President for Worship, Vice President, Treasurer, President and Past President for two years on the Executive. He also reported Board decisions for the THZ monthly bulletin.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes 2.3 MB of textual records, 6 photographs, 17 slides, and 26.3 MB of photographs.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Occupations
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Synagogues
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-29
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-29
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one document created by the Adath Israel Congregaion honouring the synagogue's past and present members who are veterans of the Second World War. The document lists approximately 180 names, most of whom are deceased.
Subjects
Synagogues
Veterans--Canada
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Adath Israel Congregation (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-4-21
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-4-21
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
2006-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting the history and activities of Holy Blossom Temple. Included are synagogue bulletins (2014-2016), pamphlets and a calendar of events. Of note are a series of pamphlets created by the Holy Blossom Temple Archives Committee on various topics including, the history of the synagogue, the synagogue building, the history of education at the synagogue and early founders/leaders (Edmund Scheuer, Abraham Nordheimer, Lewis Samuel, Sigmund Samuel, Alfred Benjamin, and Frank D. Benjamin).
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
Holy Blossom Temple (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-5-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-5-8
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 photograph : col. ; 20 x 25 cm
Date
1982-1990, 2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of graphic and textual records documenting the Judelman family and Alan Judelman's involvement with the Men’s Service Group at Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care. Documents include a family photograph (Jan. 2015); two issues of the Baycrest News (December 1982 and May 1990); and an invitation to the 1990 Men’s Service Group at Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care Annual Dinner and Installation of Officers.
Custodial History
Material was in possession of Alan and Lin Judelman. The Judelmans donated it to the OJA.
Administrative History
Alan (b. 1939) and Linda (b. 1945, nee Galland) Judelman were born in Johannesburg, South Africa. They were married on January 5th, 1965. Alan was trained as a chartered account and Lin completed a B.A. degree at Witwatersrand University and teacher training. The Judelmans have three children who were all born in SA: Andrew, Vanessa and Greg.
In 1978, political unrest in SA prompted the Judelmans to emigrate. Upon immigration to Canada, the family settled in North York. Alan graduated as a chartered accountant in Canada and eventually went on to start an environmental services company (Diproinduca Canada). Lin re-trained as a teacher and pursued a B.Ed. at York University. She specialized in ESL, history and guidance over the course of her 21 year career at the TDSB.
Alan was actively involved with the Men’s Service Group at Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care in his capacity as the organization’s president. He volunteered with HAIT (organization that promotes head injury awareness and knowledge) and served on the Bernard Betel Centre for Creative Living Board of Directors. The Judelmans are members of the Beth Tikvah synagogue and Alan has also volunteered with the congregation.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Societies
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Synagogues
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-8-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-8-9
Material Format
textual record
architectural drawing
Physical Description
1.3 m of textual records
ca. 50 architectural drawings
Date
1974-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the activities, programs and governance of Shaar Shalom Synagogue. Included are financial statements, meeting minutes, by-laws, brochures, architectural drawings, reports, membership lists, forms filled in by participants in life cycle events (such as weddings and conversions), holiday bulletins, invitations, speeches, Yizkor booklets, office manuals and correspondence. Of note is a land title document from 1981.
Administrative History
Shaar Shalom Synagogue was a conservative synagogue in Markham founded in 1972. The synagogue closed in 2016.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
Shaar Shalom Synagogue (Markham, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-11
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-11
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
architectural drawing
Physical Description
ca. 6 m textual records and graphic material
ca. 20 architectural drawings
Date
1972-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the activities, programs and governance of Shaar Shalom Synagogue. Included are financial records, meeting minutes and agendas, architectural drawings, general administrative files, and photographs.
Administrative History
Shaar Shalom Synagogue was a conservative synagogue in Markham founded in 1972. The synagogue closed in 2016.`
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
Shaar Shalom Synagogue (Markham, Ont.)
Places
Markham, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-9-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-9-3
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
13 cm of textual records
5 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 26 or smaller
Date
1912-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the life of Pearl Freedhoff. The bulk of the material are speeches and other writings related to Pearl's position as President of the Goel Tzedec Sisterhood around 1949-1950, as well as material related to her role with the Eastern Canadian Branch of the Women's League of the United Synagogue. Also included is Pearl's hand-written memoir and the final bound copy edited by her daughter Judith Golden. The remaining records relate to Pearl's work as a travel guide and organizer of trips to Israel, East Asia, and the Lido Spa in Florida; dance cards from the 1920s; a small amount of personal correspondence with a friend living in England; Pearl and Samuel's wedding invitation; a letter to Pearl and her sister Hilda from their mother, Esther; newsclippings; photographs; and a book won as a second place prize by Pearl at Edmund Scheuer's Zionist girls' school.
Administrative History
Pearl (nee Narrol) Freedhoff (17 Sept. 1906-18 Dec. 1997) was born in 1906, the daughter of Harry and Esther (nee Newman) Narrol. She had four siblings: Albert, Gertie, Hilda (m. Spivak), and Mendell (died as infant). Pearl married Dr. Samuel Osias Freedhoff (24 July 1903-19 Feb. 1973) in 1927 and had two children: Stephen and Judith. Samuel was the son of Harry and Mollie (nee Bohnen) Freedhoff. Pearl graduated from the University of Toronto, School of Social Work and Samuel graduated from the School of Dentistry. Both were members of Goel Tzedec Synagogue with Pearl serving as Sisterhood President in 1949-1950 and Samuel as President of the Men's Club in 1952.
Subjects
Manuscripts
Speeches, addresses, etc
Synagogues
Travel
Name Access
Freedhoff, Pearl, 1906-1997
Freedhoff, Samuel, 1903-1973
Goel Tzedec Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-2-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-2-3
Material Format
object
Physical Description
1 plaque ; 28 x 35 cm
Date
2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one plaque documenting Shaar Shalom Synagogue's presidents from 1974-2016.
Administrative History
Shaar Shalom Synagogue was a conservative synagogue in Markham founded in 1972. The synagogue closed in 2016.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
Shaar Shalom Synagogue (Markham, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-3-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-3-1
Material Format
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
2 photographs : col. (1 jpg) ; 10 x 15 cm
Date
[2012?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a photograph taken by Jack Hecker of the site of the former Agudath Israel Anshei Sfard Shul (151 Palmerston Ave.). A duplex house currently occupies the site. The text on the duplex building was added in by Jack Hecker.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Architecture
Synagogues
Name Access
Agudath Israel Anshei Sfard Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-5-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-5-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
10 cm of textual records and other material
Date
2011-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the 100th anniversary celebration of Congregation Knesseth Israel. The records were compiled in an indexed binder by Edwin Goldstein, president of the synagogue. Included are newsclippings, press releases and advertisements; invitations and programs; a commemorative calendar; a volunteer t-shirt, a kippa and a gift bag; correspondence with the Ontario Trillium Foundation; information on a guided architectural walking tour of the area; an Israel Today DVD featuring the synagogue; the book "One Hundred Years at the Junction Shul" written by Neil Ross and Lorne Miller; and a DVD compilation featuring video and photographic highlights from the various anniversary events.
Administrative History
Congregation Knesseth Israel was established in 1911 at 56 Maria Street in the West end of Toronto. Early 20th century membership in the synagogue consisted mainly of new jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe, many of whom lived and worked in the Junction as artisans, peddlers, shop owners and scrap and metal collectors. Known as the Junction Shul, Knesseth Israel Synagogue was built with the labour and funds provided by the founding members and their families.
Orthodox services first began in 1913 and since the 1930s the synagogue has functioned without a rabbi, with services being led by a cantor or the congregants themselves. Some family names associated with this early period include: Alexandroff, Goldstein, Nickolaevsky, Kronis, Greenblatt, Usprich, Tanenbaum, and Naftalin.
Knesseth Israel is the oldest Toronto synagogue still in use as a synagogue today and is now cared for by the descendents of these founding families. Although members of the synagogue are now few (as the Jewish population of the Junction has waned greatly since the 1960s), the synagogue still performs High Holiday services for some 75-80 full members and 300 associate members.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes 1 text, 3 objects and 2 DVDs.
Subjects
Anniversaries
Synagogues
Name Access
Knesseth Israel (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-12-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-12-9
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 cm of textual records
Date
2009-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting UJA Federation's Maot Chittin program in Cuba and a campaign event featuring Shimon Peres.
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Subjects
Presidents--Israel
Prime ministers--Israel
Name Access
Peres, Shimon, 1923-2016
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-3
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
40 cm textual records
ca. 50 photographs
Date
1940-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records of Canadian Young Judaea. Records include correspondence, camp committee meeting minutes, camp committee and staff lists, the CYJ constitution, organizational newsletters, donation lists, flyers and camp reunion ephemera. Records also include clippings and reproductions from the Zionist Archives, and Camp Solelim photographs, as well as publications from other Jewish organizations.
Administrative History
Canadian Young Judaea was founded in 1909 as a Zionist movement for Canadian youth by members of the Herzl Zion Club. As a Zionist organization, Young Judaea continues to be committed to fostering a sense of Jewish identity and values in today's Jewish youth and to encouraging a lifelong commitment to Israel. In order to foster a closer connection to Israel, Canadian Young Judaea employs educational Shlichim from Israel who are posted to various Jewish communities throughout Canada and to offices at the national level in Toronto Young Judaea also operates several Zionist summer camps located in each region of Canada, and a summer leadership institute called Camp Biluim in Quebec. In addition to the social programme of the organization, Young Judaea also offers educational seminars and conferences.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Access restriction note: Files contain personal information of donors, campers, committee members and applicants for subsidies.
Subjects
Camps
Youth
Zionism
Name Access
Canadian Young Judaea
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-12
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
2.1 m of textual records and graphic material
Date
1904-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the precursor synagogues of Congregation Or Shalom: B'nai Israel and B'nai Moses ben Judah. Records include committee records, board meeting minutes, flyers and invitations, newsletters and bulletins, by-laws, sisterhood records, men's club records, photographs, Board of Education minutes, records related to the London Talmud Torah, minute books of the Daughters of Israel, correspondence, financial records and scrapbooks. There is also a small amount of material related to the National Council of Jewish Women, London Chapter and the London Jewish Community Council and Federation.
Custodial History
Records were donated to the OJA by Congregation Or Shalom, who has an archival repository at the synagogue under the guidance of Dr. Jack Rosen.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
B'nai Israel Synagogue, (London, Ont.)
B'nai Moses ben Judah (London, Ont.)
Congregation Or Shalom (London, Ont.)
Rosen, Jack
Places
London, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-18
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-18
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
85 cm of textual records
184 photographs : b&w and col. (tif and jpg)
ca. 200 photographs : b&w and col.
14 moving images : mov and mp4
Date
[192-]-2015, predominant 1983-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the records related to the activities and operations of the First Narayever Congregation. Included are board and general meeting minutes (1984-1996); general correspondence, high holiday tickets and membership lists (1970s-1990s); membership and dues ledger (1929-1983); Ritual Committee meeting minutes (1984-1988); Implementation Committee records (1970s-1980s); constitutions (1980s); newsletters (1983-2004); a blank seat deed (1920s); a cemetery map (1950s?); records regarding burial rights for the Owen Sound Hebrew Congregation (1966-1980); records regarding a court case filed by members of the congregation surrounding the egalitarian changes being planned; an album documenting SHTICK! A Celebration of Jewish Playrights (2005-2006); an album documenting the congregation's participation in a UJA Mission to Israel (2003-2004); a binder of material containing photocopied and original records in support of the research for the congregation's 100th anniversary celebrations (1970s-2014); photographs and a video recording of the 100th Anniversary exhbition opening at the Miles Nadal JCC; photographs of events hosted by the congregation; and 9 video interviews with individuals connected to the shul conducted by Sharoni Siboney for the anniversary celebrations. Interviewees are: Peter Gold, Sharon Weintraub, Murray Teitel, Rosalyn Katz, Julia Gluck, Shaya Petroff, Stuart Schoenfeld, Sylvia Solomon and Ben Rothman. Also included are family photographs and written transcripts of oral interviews conducted with members of the Hersh Petersiel family, who lived in Hastings, Ontario and had early connections to the Narayever Congregation.
Custodial History
The records related to Hersh Petersiel were given to the First Narayever by Marsha Beck for their upcoming 100th anniversary. Marsha agreed to donate them to the OJA along with the Narayever records.
Administrative History
In 1914, Jews from eastern Galicia (now in modern Ukraine) established the First Narayever Congregation in Toronto as a landsmanshaf, i.e. a society of Jewish immigrants from the same town or region. The synagogue takes its name from the small market town of Narayev, which is located in eastern Galicia. The synagogue's founders belonged to the working class and many worked in Toronto's garment industry.
Initially, congregation members met in different locations, but by 1923 their numbers and financial means had grown such that they were able to rent a small house at 70 Huron Street at the corner of Huron and Dundas. This house served as the congregation's home for twenty years.
The congregation's first president was Israel Chaim Katz and its first meeting was held at the Katz home at 156 William Street. The congregation's first rabbi was Solomon Langner, who was hired by the congregation in 1923. He retained this affiliation despite serving the Kiever Synagogue as a full-time rabbi from 1929 until he died in 1973.
In 1943, the congregation purchased property at 187-189 Brunswick Avenue from Bethel Church. This is where the the synagogue is located today.
In 1950, Henry Young became president of the congregation. He occupied that position until his death in 1976. Shalom Langner, the son of Rabbi Solomon Langner, succeeded Young as president.
As Toronto's Jewish population began to move north, the First Narayever continued to serve Orthodox Jews living downtown. In the 1980s, the congregation struggled to balance the needs of this older generation with the young generation's desire to make the synagogue more egalitarian with respect to gender. In 1983, the congregation's new leadership team successfully advanced a proposal to allow the full participation of women in traditional services. This innovation led to several long-standing members taking legal action, but their case was dismissed on the grounds that it was not a matter for civil law.
The First Narayever's identity continued to evolve. In 2009, its membership voted to allow its rabbi, Edward Elkin, who began serving the congregation in 2000, to officiate at same-sex marriages.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
First Narayever Congregation (Toronto, Ont.)
Petersiel, Hersh
Places
Hastings (Ont.)
Owen Sound (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-7
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 70 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1928-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the activities of Ben Zion Shapiro and his family. The bulk of the records document the Shapiro family's involvement in Young Judea. Young Judea material includes: yearbooks, photographs, correspondence, meeting minutes, event programmes, song books, newsletters, and two Camp Biluim flags made by Bunny Shapiro. One flag contains Camp Biluim's crest (1951) and the other one was created for Camp Biluim's colour war and contains the text "We will try and we will succeed Camp Biluim" (1954?). Also included is a VHS tape containing a copy of the Toronto Zionist Council's video about Camp Shalom (1991?). Of note are minute books maintained by Roy Shapiro for the Toronto Young Judea Administrative Board (1928-1934) and for the Leadership Club (1940-1948).
Accession also contains material relating to Roy and Ben Zion's involvement with the following organizations: the Coordinated Services to the Jewish Elderly (Circle of Care), B'nai Israel Beth David Congregation, Beth Tzedec's Mispacha Program, Beth Tzedec's Israel Action Program, Congregation Beth Haminyan, and Holy Blossom Temple's Department for Jewish Living. These records include, minutes, correspondence, newsletters and publications, evaluation reports and other reports. Also included is a demographic report entitied, "Rapid Growth and Transformation: Demographic Challenges Facing the Jewish Community of Greater Toronto" (1995), material from a conference at the University of Toronto on the university's partnership with Israel, CHAT alumni directories, and a CHAT book entitled, "Voices: Jewish Teens of the 90's". Of note are buttons, photographs, reports and correspondence documenting Bunny and Ben Zion's trip to the Soviet Union on behalf of the CJC's Committee for Soviet Jewry.
Finally accession includes material documenting family activities of the Shapiro and Sherman family. Included is a transcript of Bessie Sherman telling her life story (1978), haggadot, PowerPoint presentations created by Ben Zion for his grandchildren and for a family reunion outlining the family history of his family and Bunny's family. There is also a video of Ben Zion presenting his PowerPoint at the Michalski / Cohen family reunion. Also included are family films and videos containing footage of Bunny and Ben Zion's wedding and honeymoon, Camp Biluim, Young Judea events, Bunny on Machon, family wedding anniversaries and birthday parties, trips to Israel, the United States, and Europe as well as footage of the Cousin's Club. Also included is a VHS tape containing a recorded segment from CityPulse News featuring the family's Pesach festivities in 1995.
Photo identification: Back row, left to right: Ray Markus, Michelle Landsberg, Menachem ?, Frank Narrol. Front row, left to right: Gilda Mitchell, Bunny Shapiro, BenZion Shapiro, Malka Rabinowitz.
Administrative History
Ben Zion Shapiro was born in Toronto in 1931 to Roy and Beck (nee Cohen) Shapiro. He has a younger brother, Morden (Mort) Shapiro (b. 1940). His father worked as an office manager at Rotstein Furniture and Maple Leaf Cleaners and his mother worked as a legal secretary until marriage. Roy was active in a number of organizations including: Young Judea, Sons of Jacob Society, Toronto Camera Club, a founding member of Beth David Synagogue, Coordinated Services to the Jewish Elderly (Circle of Care) and President of the Association of Jewish Seniors. Beck was active in Young Judea and Pioneer Women (President of the Golda Meir Club).
Ben Zion received a Master of Social Work from the University of Toronto and attended the Jewish Agency Institute for Youth Leaders from Abroad in Jerusalem, Israel (1951-1952). He has worked for a number of organizations throughout his career, including: Young Judea (he was Director of both Camp Shalom (1962-1969) and Camp Biluim (1954-1956)), B'nai Brith Youth Organization, University Settlement, St. Christopher's House and Director of the Novomeysky Centre in Jerusalem (1957-1961). He was also Professor and Associate Dean of Social Work at the University of Toronto and three times Visiting Professor at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.
Ben married Bunny (Bernice) Shaprio in 1955. Bunny was born in 1934 in Noranda, Quebec to Irving and Bessie (nee Consky) Sherman. Bunny attended public school in Noranda, Noranda High School and Forest Hill Collegiate in Toronto, University of Toronto (BA), the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (M.Ed. in Special Education), and the Jewish Agency Institute for Jewish Leaders from Abroad (1952-1953).
Bunny graduated from the first Camp Biluim Institute for leadership training in 1951 and worked with Ben Zion at Camp Shalom as Camp Mother in 1962 and from 1964-1969. She also worked at Camp Biluim from 1955-1956. In 1983, Bunny and Ben Zion went to the Soviet Union to visit Refuseniks on behalf of the Soviet Jewry Committee of the Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region.
Bunny and Ben have two children: Ayala and Ilan. Since Ben Zion's retirement in 1996, he and Bunny have been living in Jerusalem for half of each year. In 2015, they moved full-time to Jerusalem.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes ca. 300 photographs (256 tiff), 2 PowerPoint presentations, 1 textual record (doc), 4 buttons, 2 flags, 5 VHS tapes, and 18 film reels (8 mm).
Subjects
Camps
Youth
Zionism
Name Access
Shapiro, Ben Zion, 1931-
Source
Archival Accessions
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