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4647 records – page 1 of 93.
Part Of
Isaac Matenko fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 89
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Isaac Matenko fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
89
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Date
1911-1971, predominant 1911-1935
Physical Description
6 cm of textual records
17 photographs
Admin History/Bio
Isaac Matenko (1874-1960) was a founder, teacher, and principal of the I.L. Peretz School. He worked tirelessly to preserve and promote secular Jewish culture and the Yiddish language in Toronto. He was also a prominent member of local Jewish organizations, such as the Socialist-Territorialist Club and the Yiddish Kultur Gesellshaft.
Isaac was born on February 1, 1874 in the town of Makarov, Kiev, Ukraine. He married Elke Yelia Moshkevitch (1878- November 19, 1953) on August 4, 1900 in Yakatreneslav. They immigrated from Czarist Russia to Toronto in 1906, passing first through New York with their two children, Percy (June 30, 1901-May 1987) and Theodore (1903-1906, died of measles at Ellis Island), Yelia’s three sisters, Dvora, Bracha, and Celia, and Isaac’s younger half-brother, Paul Frumhartz. They had two more children after arriving: Abraham (August 14, 1908-October 24, 1989) and Shoshana (Sue) (1911-2001). Although he had been a teacher in Russia, Isaac worked as an operator in a cloak factory in Toronto, where he was instrumental in forming the union (likely the Cloakmakers’ Union of Toronto, which later affiliated with the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union).
As a child, Isaac received a traditional Jewish education. This, combined with his self-taught secular education and the teachings of Yiddish Nationalist Dr. Chaim Zhitlovski, informed his future career and philosophies. He was described as an idealist by his friends, whose dedication to Yiddish culture and language motivated him to bring this knowledge to a younger generation.
On July 11, 1911, Isaac and his fellow Socialist-Territorialist members established the Toronto Yiddish National-Radical School. By 1916, it had been taken over by the Workmen’s Circle and renamed the I.L. Peretz School, after the well-known Yiddish author and playwright. The school began in a rented room at the Zionist Institute on Simcoe St., moving to larger locations on Richmond St. W., then Beverley St. as it grew. Eventually, several more branches opened, such as the Maria St. school that Isaac was affiliated with. He taught at the school for free in the evenings after working during the day in a shop. His brother Paul was also a founding teacher at the school.
Isaac was described by family, friends, and community members as a passionate teacher with an iron will: he was well-versed in Jewish knowledge, with a desire to pass it on to a younger generation and his fellow union members. He remained involved in the school and in teaching, even after retirement. He died on June 2, 1960 at the age of 86.
Custodial History
These records were donated to the OJA by Sue Levy, daughter of Isaac Matenko.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting Isaac Matenko's involvement with the Workmen's Circle and other Jewish organizations. Included are photographs, programmes, certificates, I.L. Peretz School jubilee books, a songbook, a yearbook, articles, and newsclippings.
Fonds has been arranged into one series for the Workmen's Circle. There are also two files attached to the fonds-level. The records are described at the series and file-level, with some item-level descriptions.
Name Access
Arbeiter Ring
Arbeiter Ring Schools
Arbeter Ring
Camp Yungvelt
Frumhartz, Paul
I.L. Peretz
Matenko, Isaac, 1874-1960
Matenko, Percy
National Radical School
Peretz Shule
Workman's Circle
Workmen's Circle
Subjects
Schools
Teachers
Yiddish language
Related Material
For additional Workmen's Circle records, see: accessions 1979-4-4, 1980-2-2, 1983-6-3, 1984-10-1, 1986-4-1, 1992-1-2, 1997-2-1, 1998-3-32, 2004-5-41, 2004-5-105, and fonds 30.
For additional Camp Yungvelt records, see: accessions 1979-4-4, 1986-4-1, 1991-12-4, 1993-6-6, 1999-5-1, 2004-5-37, 2005-6-4, 2006-12-3, photographs # 2964, # 4014, # 6021, MG2N1K, Benjamin Brown fonds 49, and Dorothy Dworkin Fonds 10 (item 14).
Creator
Matenko, Isaac, 1874-1960
Accession Number
1987-11-4
1991-4-2
2007-5-3
2007-6-28
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Isaac Matenko fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 89; File 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Isaac Matenko fonds
Level
File
Fonds
89
File
1
Material Format
textual record
Date
12 May 1960-16 July 1961
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of biographical sketches of Isaac Matenko. The bulk of these sketches were written just after Isaac's death in 1960 and were originally published in various newspapers, including; The Vochenblat, Der Yiddisher Zhurnal, and On the Threshold. The Yiddish articles are accompanied by English translations.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Isaac Matenko fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 89; File 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Isaac Matenko fonds
Level
File
Fonds
89
File
2
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1911-1935
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w ; 19 x 24 cm mounted on board 30 x 35 cm or smaller
Scope and Content
File consists of photographs documenting Isaac Matenko's involvement with the Socialist-Territorialist Club and the Yiddish Kultur Gesellshaft.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Isaac Matenko fonds
Workmen's Circle series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 89; Series 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Isaac Matenko fonds
Workmen's Circle series
Level
Series
Fonds
89
Series
1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Date
1911-1971
Physical Description
5 folders of textual records
13 photographs : b&w ; 19 x 23 cm mounted on board 30 x 34 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Workmen's Circle (Arbeiter Ring) is a radical left Jewish fraternal organization founded in 1900. It was originally established to protect the rights of Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe who were entering the North American labour force. The Workmen's Circle's main purpose was to promote the labour movement and ensure economic justice for its members. It also promoted secular Yiddish culture, and ran many schools and summer camps across North America, such as Camp Yungvelt in Pickering.
The I.L. Peretz School began as the Toronto Yiddish National-Radical School in 1911. It was founded by Socialist-Territorialist members Isaac Matenko, Abraham Rhinewine, Paul Frumhartz, Aaron Bromberg, H. Rigelhaupt, L. Goldman, and Louis Koldovsky in order to promote Yiddish culture and language. By 1916, it had been taken over by the Workmen’s Circle and renamed the I.L. Peretz School. The founders overcame many obstacles to establish the school, including opposition from religious groups (which preferred Hebrew over Yiddish); a lack of support from the Jewish community; and a serious lack of funds.
The school began in a rented room in the Zionist Institute on Simcoe St., with about forty students. By the following school year, the number had increased to 330, due to cheap tuition and a good reputation. The growing number of students necessitated several moves to larger spaces, among them 260 Richmond St. W. and 194 Beverley St. Later, other branches and other levels (kindergarten to mittelshul) were established on Maria St., Bellwoods Ave., and St. Clair Ave. The school flourished for about 50 years before its decline and ultimate closure.
Scope and Content
Series consists of records documenting Isaac Matenko's involvement in the Workmen's Circle and the affiliated I.L. Peretz School and Camp Yungvelt. Included are photographs, programmes, certificates, a yearbook, a songbook, and newsclippings.
Name Access
Arbeòter-ring Y.L. Perets-Shuln
Workmen's Circle (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Isaac Matenko fonds
Workmen's Circle series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 89; Series 1; File 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Isaac Matenko fonds
Workmen's Circle series
Level
File
Fonds
89
Series
1
File
1
Material Format
textual record
Date
16 Oct. 1936, 17 Oct. 1971
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of two programmes commemorating the 25th and 60th jubilees of the I.L. Peretz School.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Isaac Matenko fonds
Workmen's Circle series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 89; Series 1; File 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Isaac Matenko fonds
Workmen's Circle series
Level
File
Fonds
89
Series
1
File
2
Material Format
textual record
Date
1926, Mar. 1928
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of an I.L. Peretz School graduation certificate (class of 1926) and graduation yearbook (class of 1928).
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Isaac Matenko fonds
Workmen's Circle series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 89; Series 1; File 5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Isaac Matenko fonds
Workmen's Circle series
Level
File
Fonds
89
Series
1
File
5
Material Format
textual record
Date
Apr. 1955
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of newsclippings and a programme book commemmorating Matenko's 80th birthday celebration, organized for him by the Workmen's Circle Peretz Schools. Also included are English translations for some of the articles published in the programme book.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 92
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
92
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1914-1993
Physical Description
1.2 m of textual records (2 v.) and other material
Admin History/Bio
Joseph Baruch Salsberg (1902-1998) was a labour leader, political activist, politician, insurance salesman, and journalist. He was also active in various Jewish organizations, including: the Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC), the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto, and the New Fraternal Jewish Association. He is well-remembered by contemporaries, such as Sam Lipshitz, as a “champion of the people”, committed to social justice, the plight of the working class, and the preservation of Jewish culture.
J. B. was born in Lagov, Poland on November 5, 1902 to Abraham and Sarah-Gittel Salsberg. Abraham immigrated to Toronto in 1910 and J. B. followed with his mother and two younger sisters in 1913. They settled at 73 Cecil Street. Abraham and Sarah-Gittel had additional children in Canada: Nathan (b. 1915), Reuven (Bob or Robert, b. 1917), Betty, and Thelma. Abraham worked as a peddler in Toronto.
J. B. briefly attended Landsdowne Public School, but dropped out around 1915, against his parents' wishes, and took a job in a leather goods factory to contribute to his family’s income. J. B.’s parents had hoped he would become a rabbi and, despite his full-time employment, J.B. continued to study the Torah with scholars at the synagogue on Centre Avenue.
In 1917, J. B. decided to pursue the ideas of Zionism and socialism and, abandoning his plans to become a rabbi, became involved in establishing the Young Poale Zion organization, a Labour Zionist youth group dedicated to secular aims. Around 1922, J. B. was made secretary general of the Young Poale Zion of America in New York, where he worked for one year. Shortly after returning to Toronto, he became the organizer for the Hat, Cap, and Millinery Workers Union of North America in Chicago. While in Chicago, around 1925, J. B. married Dora Wilensky.
In 1926, J. B. joined the Communist Party of Canada (CPC). He was an active member of the CPC for 30 years, serving as the head of its Trade Union Department for two decades. In 1929 he was suspended from the party for one year as a dissenter. In 1932, he became the Southern Ontario District union organizer for the Communist Workers' Unity League.
It was as a member of the CPC that J. B. entered electoral politics. After a series of failed bids in municipal and provincial elections between 1935 and 1937, J. B. was elected alderman of Ward 4 in Toronto in 1938. He only held the position for one year. In 1943, J. B. was elected to the Ontario Legislature as the representative for the St. Andrew riding. J. B. sat as Member of Provincial Parliament for the Labor-Progressive Party (the provincial wing of the CPC) for 12 years. For several years, he was the only elected Communist in North America. As MPP, he helped create legislation banning discrimination in public places and introduced a bill that would ensure fair employment practices in the province. He lost his seat to Allan Grossman in 1955 and unsuccessfully ran in the federal election later that year. Remembered by journalist Gordon Sinclair as “one of the best debaters in the house”, J. B. was well-respected by members of all political parties. Out of admiration for J. B., Conservative Premier Leslie Frost named Salsberg Township in Northern Ontario in his honour.
Throughout the 1930s and 1940s, J. B. had grown increasingly concerned about reports of Soviet antisemitism and privately urged party leaders to pursue the issue. In 1956, when Soviet First Secretary Nikita Khrushchev exposed the transgressions of Stalin’s regime, J. B. went to Moscow as part of a CPC delegation. After meeting with Khrushchev himself, it became clear to J. B. that antisemitism was indeed a problem in the USSR and that his efforts to probe the situation were being stonewalled.
J. B. publicly expressed his concerns about Soviet antisemitism in a series of articles published in the Vochenblatt from October 25, 1956 to December 13, 1956. He finally left the Communist Party in 1957. However, he remained a member of the United Jewish People’s Order (UJPO), a Communist Jewish fraternal organization.
Entering the business world, J. B. established the Model Insurance Agency Limited in 1957, where he served as president for several years. In 1959 J. B.’s wife, Dora, passed away. Around this time J. B. also resigned from the UJPO, along with other members who felt the organization needed to be more critical of the Soviet Union. They founded an alternative, non-Communist left-wing Jewish organization, the New Fraternal Jewish Association, where J. B. served as president for several terms and edited its publication “Fraternally Yours”.
In his later life, J. B. was active as an executive member of organizations, such as the CJC and the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care. He was the first chairman for the CJC Ontario Region’s Soviet Jewry Committee and the Committee for Yiddish. He also began writing an award-winning weekly column for the Canadian Jewish News. J. B. was awarded the CJC’s Samuel Bronfman Medal for distinguished service, and the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto’s Ben Sadowski Award of Merit. A strong supporter of Israel, he was involved in the creation of two Israeli medical centres that are named in his honour. He also helped establish the J. B. and Dora Salsberg Fund and the J. B. Salsberg Fund for Yiddish at the Jewish Foundation of Greater Toronto. J. B. passed away in 1998.
Custodial History
The records were donated to the OJA in a series of accessions. Material from accessions 1991-5-4 and 1992-9-4 were donated by J. B. Salsberg. The remaining material was donated by his estate after his death.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting J. B. Salsberg's personal, professional and Jewish communal activities. The bulk of the records are textual and relate to his membership in the CPC (later LPP), election campaigns, and Jewish communal work. Included is correspondence; photographs; reports; political writings; certificates; agendas; pamphlets; brochures; booklets; flyers; campaign literature; campaign notes; posters; newspaper clippings; press releases; articles; transcripts; speeches; telegrams; political platforms, briefs and submissions; statements; constitutions; resolutions; newspapers; meeting minutes; bulletins; periodicals; notebooks; notes; course guides and outlines; medallions; pins; plaques; donation receipts; event invitations and programmes; lists; blank employment applications; a school test; a study; a coin; a drawing; a sketch; an audio cassette; and a delegate card.
Records are arranged into the following five series: 1. Personal ; 2. Labour Zionism and union activities ; 3. Political career ; and, 4. Jewish community involvement. There are also four files and one item attached directly to the fonds.
Notes
Physical Description Note: Includes 53 photographs, 7 medallions, 11 pins, 4 posters, 2 plaques, 1 sketch, 1 drawing, 1 audio cassette, 1 desk name plate, and 1 coin.
Physical Extent Note: Fonds was reduced from approximately 7 metres to 1.5 metres. The culled material consisted primarily of published books, periodicals and pamphlets that had been collected by J. B. Salsberg. For further details about what was culled please view the accession records.
Associated Material Note: Queen's University Archive also has a J. B. Salsberg fonds, 14 hours of interview tapes with J. B. Salsberg and records of the UJPO are held by the Multicultural Historical Society of Ontario (MHSO).
Name Access
Salsberg, J. B. (Joseph B.), ca. 1903-1998
Subjects
Labor leaders
Politicians
Related Material
For additional records in OJA's holdings, see: Ben Kayfetz fonds 62, series 8, file 2 ; accession 2008-11-2 ; accession 2004-1-4 ; and oral histories AC 71 and AC 226.
Creator
Salsberg, Joseph Baruch, 1902-1998
Accession Number
1991-5-4
1992-9-4
1998-2-2
1998-12-5
2004-5-28
2010-4-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 92; File 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Level
File
Fonds
92
File
2
Material Format
textual record
Date
1939-1992, predominant 1981-1987
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of J.B. Salsberg's personal and professional correspondence.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Labour Zionism and union activities series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 92; Series 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Labour Zionism and union activities series
Level
Series
Fonds
92
Series
2
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
object
Date
1918-1981
Physical Description
5 cm of textual records (1 v.) and other material
Scope and Content
Series consists of records related to J.B. Salsberg's labour Zionism and union activities. Of note are records documenting Salsberg's early Poale Zion activities in New York. Included are photographs, correspondence, a medallion, pins, bulletins, newsletters, booklets, a book, and a pamphlet.
Notes
Physical description note: includes 11 b&w photographs (3 negatives), 3 pins, and 1 medallion.
Subjects
Labor Zionism
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Labour Zionism and union activities series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 92; Series 2; File 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Labour Zionism and union activities series
Level
File
Fonds
92
Series
2
File
2
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Date
1923-1981
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
2 photographs : b&w ; 11 x 7 cm
Admin History/Bio
Poale Zion (Workers of Zion) was a Marxist Zionist Jewish workers movement that originated in the Russian Empire around 1900. This movement spread around the world and in late 1905 the Socialist Jewish Labour Party (Poale Zion) was formed in Canada.
In 1919, the Poale Zion Zionist labour movement split into two factions – Left Poale Zion (later Achdut Avodah Poale Zion) and Achdut Avodah (later Mapai). J.B. Salsberg affiliated with the Left Poale Zion, which was founded on the principals established by Ber Borochov and became known as the Borochov Movement. In Canada the Borochov Movement consisted of various organizations – political, cultural and educational. The political branch was the Achdut Avodah Poale Zion. It promoted Zionism and Socialism both in Canada and Israel.
Scope and Content
File consists of records documenting J.B. Salsberg's involvement in the Achdut Avodah Poale Zion movement. Included is correspondence with the Jewish Socialist Labor Party Poale-Zion of America, Undzer Veg bulletins, Hashomer Hatzair newsletters, and a Yiddish booklet by Chaim Zhitlovsky entitled "From Assimilation to Labour Zionism" (published in New York, 1919). Also included are two photographs of J.B. Salsberg that were taken in Boston likely at the second annual convention of the Poale-Zion of America (1923).
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Labour Zionism and union activities series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 92; Series 2; File 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Labour Zionism and union activities series
Level
File
Fonds
92
Series
2
File
4
Material Format
textual record
object
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1920]-1927
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records (1 v.)
1 pin : ribbon with hanging medallion, red and gold ; 13 cm
7 photographs : b&w (3 negatives) ; 13 x 18 cm or smaller
Scope and Content
File consists of records documenting J.B. Salsberg's involvement in the United Cloth Hat, Cap and Millinery Workers' International Union and its affiliated local unions in Toronto. Included is a 25th anniversary book of the Cloth Hat, Cap, and Millinery Workers by I.M. Budish and published in New York (1925), a delegate pin for the 16th Bi-Convention of the Cloth, Hat, Cap and Millinery Workers International Union (1927), photographs of committees of the Canadian Headgear Workers Central Bureau, a copy photograph of the Executive Board of the Millinery and Ladies Straw Hat Workers Union Local 46, and a copy photograph of the Toronto Executive Board Local 41.
Notes
Artifact number 152
Some of the photographs in this file appear in the 25th anniversary book.
Subjects
Labor unions
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Physical Condition
Book is in fragile condition and binding is starting to come loose.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 92; Series 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
Series
Fonds
92
Series
3
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Date
1930-1969
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records and other material
Scope and Content
Series consists of records documenting J.B. Salsberg's political career. The bulk of the records are textual and cover such topics as: Salsberg's membership, suspension and resignation from the Communist Party of Canada (later the Labour Progressive Party); Salsberg's election campaigns; and, Salsberg's activities as MPP for the riding of St. Andrew. Included is: correspondence; photographs; reports; political writings; agendas; pamphlets; booklets; flyers; campaign literature; campaign notes; campaign posters; newspaper clippings; press releases; speeches; telegrams; political platforms, briefs and submissions; statements; constitutions; resolutions; newspapers; bulletins; periodicals; notebooks; notes; course guides and outlines; donation receipts; event invitations; blank employment applications; and a delegate card.
Notes
Physical description note: includes 7 b&w photographs, 3 pins, and 3 posters.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 92; Series 3; File 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
File
Fonds
92
Series
3
File
1
Material Format
textual record
Date
[ca. 1950] - 1958
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of J. B. Salsberg's published and unpublished political writings. Topics covered include: Metropolitan Toronto taxes, the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU), the Soviet Union, Soviet antisemitism, Palestine, the provincial Department of Lands and Forests and provincial fair practices legislation.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 92; Series 3; File 12
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
File
Fonds
92
Series
3
File
12
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1943
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
3 posters (1 copy) : 28 x 36 cm
Scope and Content
File consists of campaign material documenting J.B. Salsberg's bid in the St. Andrew riding during the 1943 provincial election. Included are campaign posters and copy of the Progressive Conservative Party's platform.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 92; Series 3; File 18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
File
Fonds
92
Series
3
File
18
Material Format
textual record
Date
1948-1957
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of records documenting J.B. Salsberg's involvement in the UJPO. Included is correspondence, reports, statements, and a national convention agenda. Also included is a 25th anniversary booklet of Toronto's Morris Winchevsky Schools, which contains a message from Salsberg.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 92; Series 3; File 24
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
File
Fonds
92
Series
3
File
24
Material Format
textual record
Date
1955
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of newspaper clippings documenting J.B. Salsberg's failed bid for re-election in the St. Andrews riding as Member of Provincial Parliament.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 92; Series 3; File 25
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
File
Fonds
92
Series
3
File
25
Material Format
textual record
Date
1955
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of records documenting J.B. Salsberg's failed bid for re-election in the St. Andrew riding as Member of Provincial Parliament. Included is correspondence, Labour Progressive Party campaign notes, and the returning officer's report on the votes polled and rejected in the St. Andrew riding.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 92; Series 3; File 26
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
File
Fonds
92
Series
3
File
26
Material Format
textual record
Date
1955
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of records documenting J.B. Salsberg's failed bid for re-election in the St. Andrew riding as Member of Provincial Parliament. Included are news clippings, and pamphlets and flyers that were distributed by Salsberg to constituents.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 92; Series 3; File 27
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
File
Fonds
92
Series
3
File
27
Material Format
textual record
Date
1955
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of records documenting J.B. Salsberg's failed bid for re-election in the St. Andrew riding as Member of Provincial Parliament. Included are donation receipts, campaign literature, event invitations, a Souvenir Song Book of Salsberg's campaign, and correspondence.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 92; Series 3; File 30
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
File
Fonds
92
Series
3
File
30
Material Format
textual record
Date
1955
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of one piece of campaign literature documenting J.B. Salsberg's failed bid for re-election in the St. Andrew riding as Member of Provincial Parliament.
Physical Condition
Document is in very fragile condition and should be looked at by a paper conservator. The brochure's interior has part of an envelope glued to it which obscures some of the text.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 92; Series 3; File 31
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
File
Fonds
92
Series
3
File
31
Material Format
textual record
Date
1955
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of records documenting the election campaign of J.B. Salsberg's opponent, Allan Grossman. Included are news clippings, Grossman's campaign literature, and telegrams.
Name Access
Grossman, Allan, 1910-1991
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 92; Series 3; File 32
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
File
Fonds
92
Series
3
File
32
Material Format
textual record
Date
1955
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of campaign literature of various candidates in the 1955 provincial election. Included is the campaign literature of J.B. Salsberg's opponents Elizabeth Langfield and Boris Mather. Also included is the campaign literature of Joseph Gould, Bruce Hewlett, Kelso Roberts, and Harry Hunter.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 92; Series 3; File 41
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Political Career series
Level
File
Fonds
92
Series
3
File
41
Material Format
textual record
Date
1956-1958, 1965
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of records that were collected by J.B. Salsberg documenting the transgressions of Stalin's Soviet Union and the Communist Party of the Soviet Union's 20th congress. Included are articles, newspaper clippings, news bulletins, booklets, and press releases of the Labour Progressive Party.
Name Access
Communist Party of Canada
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Jewish community involvement series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 92; Series 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Jewish community involvement series
Level
Series
Fonds
92
Series
4
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Date
1914-1993
Physical Description
11 cm of textual records (1 v.) and other material
Scope and Content
Series consists of records documenting J.B. Salsberg's involvement with various Jewish organizations, including: the I.L. Peretz School, the Canadian Jewish Congress, UJA Federation, the New Fraternal Jewish Association, the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care and the Canadian Zionist Federation. Included are medallions, pins, a coin, a poster, certificates, photographs, meeting minutes, a test, booklets, event programmes, a transcript, bulletins, notes, newspaper clippings, articles, reports, newsletters, a brochure, and a flyer.
Notes
Physical description note: includes 17 photographs, 4 pins, 4 medallions, 1 coin, 1 poster, and 1 certificate.
Related Material
For other records documenting the CJC's Committee for Soviet Jewry see also fonds 17, series 3.
For other NFJA records see MG 2B-1P and MG9 ("Fraternally Yours" publications).
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Jewish community involvement series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 92; Series 4; Item 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Jewish community involvement series
Level
Item
Fonds
92
Series
4
Item
1
Material Format
object
Date
1963
Physical Description
1 medallion : bronze ; 6 cm in diam. + 1 wooden stand
Scope and Content
Item is a ghetto uprising medallion.
Notes
Artifact number 145.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Jewish community involvement series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 92; Series 4; Item 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Jewish community involvement series
Level
Item
Fonds
92
Series
4
Item
2
Material Format
object
Date
[ca. 1980]
Physical Description
1 medallion : bronze ; 5 cm in diam. + 1 cardboard box
Scope and Content
Item is a JNF Canada Park medallion.
Notes
Artifact number 142.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Jewish community involvement series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 92; Series 4; File 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Jewish community involvement series
Level
File
Fonds
92
Series
4
File
1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1914-1975
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records (1 v.)
2 photographs : b&w ; 13 x 9 cm
Scope and Content
File consists of records documenting J.B. Salsberg's involvement with the I.L. Peretz school in Toronto. Included is a minute book of the National Radical School Pupil's Council (the Peretz School's predecessor) from 1914-1916, a test, an anniversary book that is either for the school's 25th or 50th anniversary, a program for the 60th anniversary celebrations of the Jewish People's Schools and Peretz Schools, and two copies of a photograph of Salsberg delivering a speech at the school's 60th anniversary celebration.
Physical Condition
Minute book is in fragile condition, with a weak spine and loose pages.
Anniversary souvenir book is also in fragile condition with loose pages.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Jewish community involvement series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 92; Series 4; File 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Jewish community involvement series
Level
File
Fonds
92
Series
4
File
4
Material Format
textual record
Date
[ca. 1961]-1970, Nov. 1990
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of records documenting J.B. Salsberg's involvement in the CJC's Committee for Yiddish. Included are handwritten notes regarding Yiddish secular culture, a list of Yiddish resources, correspondence, and a study entitled "Jews Reporting Yiddish as Mother Tongue in 1961". Also included is a CJC certificate honouring Salsberg for his work for Yiddish that is signed by Philip Givens.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Jewish community involvement series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 92; Series 4; File 6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Jewish community involvement series
Level
File
Fonds
92
Series
4
File
6
Material Format
textual record
Date
1967-1973
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
In 1970 many Jewish groups in Ontario organized to help refusniks who were being persecuted in the Soviet Union and to pressure local, national and international governments to address Soviet antisemitism. In early 1971, the Action Committee for Soviet Jewry (ACSJ) was formed by the (then) Central Region of the CJC to coordinate the activities of, and provide stable funding and administrative support for, these various ad hoc committees and action groups that had sprung up across Ontario.
The ACSJ originally reported to the CJC’s Steering Committee for Soviet Jewry (SCSJ), but by the mid-1970s the reporting of the two committees was reversed, with the steering committee reporting to the action committee. By 1977, the action committee and the steering committee were merged into the newly-renamed CJC Ontario Region’s Committee for Soviet Jewry (occasionally referred to as the Toronto Committee). J. B. Salsberg was the first SCSJ Chairman, serving in this capacity until 1976.
Scope and Content
File consists of records documenting J. B. Salsberg's involvement in the CJC's Committee for Soviet Jewry. Included are booklets, handwritten notes, newspaper clippings, articles, correspondence, meeting minutes of the National Committee on Soviet Jewry and the Steering Committee for Soviet Jewry, reports, newsletters, conference booklets, and a brochure.
Subjects
Committees
Jews--Soviet Union
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Jewish community involvement series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 92; Series 4; File 7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Jewish community involvement series
Level
File
Fonds
92
Series
4
File
7
Material Format
textual record
Date
1975
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
In 1970 many Jewish groups in Ontario organized to help refusniks who were being persecuted in the Soviet Union and to pressure local, national and international governments to address Soviet antisemitism. In early 1971, the Action Committee for Soviet Jewry (ACSJ) was formed by the (then) Central Region of the CJC to coordinate the activities of, and provide stable funding and administrative support for, these various ad hoc committees and action groups that had sprung up across Ontario.
The ACSJ originally reported to the CJC’s Steering Committee for Soviet Jewry (SCSJ), but by the mid-1970s the reporting of the two committees was reversed, with the steering committee reporting to the action committee. By 1977, the action committee and the steering committee were merged into the newly-renamed CJC Ontario Region’s Committee for Soviet Jewry (occasionally referred to as the Toronto Committee). J. B. Salsberg was the first SCSJ Chairman, serving in this capacity until 1976.
Scope and Content
File consists of records documenting J. B. Salsberg's involvement in the CJC's Committee for Soviet Jewry. Included are newspaper clippings, bulletins, executive committee meeting minutes of the Committee for Soviet Jewry, a booklet, and a programme for the 23rd anniversary of the execution of Soviet Jewish poets, novelists and artists at the Beth Tzedec Synagogue.
Subjects
Committees
Jews--Soviet Union
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Jewish community involvement series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 92; Series 4; File 9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Jewish community involvement series
Level
File
Fonds
92
Series
4
File
9
Material Format
object
Date
1974, [ca. 1975]
Physical Description
2 pins : 6 cm in length
Scope and Content
File consists of a pin commemorating the 40th anniversary of the establishment of the Jewish Autonomous Region in Birobidzhan, and a gold star pin honouring Eduard Kuznetsof, an USSR prisoner of conscience.
Notes
Artifact numbers 148 and 154
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Writing and lecturing series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 92; Series 5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Writing and lecturing series
Level
Series
Fonds
92
Series
5
Material Format
textual record
object
Date
[195-?]-[1990?]
Physical Description
4 cm of textual records
1 plaque
Scope and Content
Series consists of records documenting J.B. Salsberg's writing and lecturing activities. The bulk of the records are textual and include: correspondence, newspaper clippings, booklets, a Smolar Award plaque, notes, articles, transcripts, lists, and a course outline.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Writing and lecturing series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 92; Series 5; File 12
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Writing and lecturing series
Level
File
Fonds
92
Series
5
File
12
Material Format
textual record
Date
1951-1952, [1990?]
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of newspaper clippings and correspondence between N. Shemen and J.B. Salsberg regarding Salsberg's review of Shemen's work.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
9
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1925-1989
Physical Description
31.8 m of textual records
319 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Immigrant Aid Society of Canada was established in 1920 by the newly-formed Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC). A Toronto branch was established in Toronto in a storefront office on Spadina Avenue, but the organization was rudimentary, and as the enthusiasm that spurred the founding of CJC died out, JIAS soon faltered. Then in 1922 it was taken over and reactivated under the cooperative support of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto, B'nai B'rith and the Council of Jewish Women. JIAS was legally incorporated on 30 August 1922. It also operated under the moniker of the Emergency Jewish Immigrant Aid Committee, and it changed its name to Jewish Immigrant Aid Services in 1954.
Charged with organizing emergency relief for European Jews in distress, JIAS became the central agency of the Jewish community to facilitate the lawful entry of Jewish immigrants into Canada, and provided them with welfare services, transportation, and assistance with accommodation and employment after their arrival. In addition, JIAS offered consultation services for sponsors of potential immigrants, ran a competitive foreign remittance service, and campaigned to counter the activities of unscrupulous steamboat agents, lawyers and influence peddlers, or “shtadlanim,” who often victimized immigrants and sponsors alike.
In conjunction with similar efforts by the CJC, JIAS was also actively engaged in negotiating for the increased admission of Jewish immigrants to Canada. In 1923, the federal government instituted a permit-based immigration program and JIAS competed with travel agents and solicitors in the private sector for these limited quota permits. After combating the anti-immigration policies of the Depression era, the outbreak of war in 1939 virtually closed the already limited avenues for immigration.
JIAS Canada was organized into a National Office in Montreal and regional offices in Winnipeg (Western Region), Toronto (Central Region) and Halifax (Eastern Region). The Central Region covered Ontario, and established a full-time head office in 1935 at 399 Spadina Avenue in Toronto (hence the Central Region was sometimes called simply the Toronto Office). The office later moved to 265 Spadina Avenue. JIAS Toronto’s board of directors met on a regular basis at different locations in Toronto, including 206 Beverley Street and in the Talmud Torah building at 9 Brunswick Avenue. The first JIAS Toronto board included notable Toronto residents such as Henry Dworkin, Mrs. Draiman, Mr. Kronick, Dr. Brodey and Mrs. Willinsky. The role of the board was to oversee the operations of the Central Region. It rendered decisions on issues relating to finances, procedures and policies, negotiations with the federal Immigration Branch, as well as individual cases that required their attention.
General meetings of the Central Region membership were held annually. The 1943 JIAS constitution states that regional annual meetings were to be held for “receiving and considering reports,” holding nominations and elections for the executive, and discussing JIAS’s program and policies.
In the post-war era, JIAS shifted its focus to renewed efforts on behalf of individual claimants and community support, while the focus for lobbying for a reversal of Canada's immigration policy fell increasingly under the jurisdiction of the CJC. A boom in immigration between 1947 and 1952 saw the arrival of large numbers of Jewish immigrants to all parts of Canada and the Toronto Office of JIAS renewed its efforts to meet the needs of this new influx. Major world events also sparked other waves of immigration from Hungary, Czechoslovakia, North Africa and Russia, to which JIAS responded in turn. JIAS worked in conjunction with other immigrant aid societies such as HIAS, the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, in the United States, to facilitate immigration to the United States, and later to Israel, where many of the immigrants and refugees coming to Canada had family and ultimately settled.
Custodial History
Custody of these records was transferred to the Ontario Jewish Archives by JIAS in 1983, as preparations were under way for the move to a new facility in North York. Much of the material was in four-cubic-foot boxes and in file cabinets.
The accession was divided into three sections: files which were at the JIAS office and had been retained in their original order; files which had been retrieved from a flood in the basement of 152 Beverley St. and consequently had been thrown into dry boxes without regard to order; files discovered in the furnace rooms at 150 and 152 Beverley St., intact but covered in coal dust. The bulk of the records were stored off-site, with dirty files being isolated from the rest.
The dust-covered materials were cleaned at an off-site location, placed in temporary boxes and transferred to the Archives and restored, as far as was possible, to their original order.
Clips were removed and replaced as appropriate with archivally acceptable ones. All materials were transferred to acid-free folders and boxes.
Scope and Content
Fonds contains the records of the Toronto Office (Central region) of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Canada. The fonds consists primarily of textual records: minutes, correspondence, financial records, reports, immigration files, naturalization case files, social service case files and the records of attempts to trace missing individuals. There are also photographs of special events, speakers and arriving immigrants.
The fonds represents an important resource for the study of Canadian Jewry, especially when taken in conjunction with the JIAS National Office records at the Canadian Jewish Congress National Archives in Montreal, and those of the Western Office at the Library and Archives of Canada. It documents the means by which a particular Canadian ethnic community has dealt with the problems of rescue, settlement and government relations. These records also offer insight into the relationship between the Toronto Office and the other branches of JIAS, and invite comparison with similar agencies in the United States, as well as those of other ethnic groups in Canada.
The material collected includes information about the countries of origin, transportation routes, settlement and employment patterns of Jewish immigrants to Canada in the twentieth century. The documents also touch upon important related issues such as advocacy, sponsorship, admission processes, health and social problems.
These records cover several waves of immigration following the Second World War: Holocaust survivors in the late 1940s, Sephardic (North African) and Hungarian Jews in the 1950s, Russian and Czechoslovakian Jews in the 1960s, and additional Russians in the 1970s.
The records also contain significant information for those researchers looking to conduct genealogical research into Jewish immigrants and their descendents.
The fonds has been arranged with one sous-fonds, which contains the records of the National JIAS office in Montreal. In total there are 17 series. The Toronto office (main fonds) series are: 1. Board of Directors and Executive Committee Minutes; 2. Annual meeting proceedings; 3. Reports; 4. Legal ; 5. Administration; 6. JIAS Committees; 7. External committees; 8. Financial ; 9. Arrivals; 10. Immigration case files; 11. Social service assistance case files; 12. Photographs; 13. Miscellaneous. The National Office sous-fonds is divided into the following series: 1. National executive meeting minutes; 2. National annual meeting proceedings; 3. National annual reports; 4. Publications; and Photographs.
Notes
Physical description note: Physical extent is based on fully processed records. Additional accessions are not included (see Related Material note below).
Associated material note: The CJC National Archive, in Montreal, has additional JIAS records from 1920-1989 including 275 m of textual records and graphic materials (3250 photos): collection number I0037; alpha-numeric designation MA 4. The National Archives of Canada, Manitoba branch, in Winnipeg, has Jewish Historical Society of Western Canada JIAS textual records from 1923-1950 on 18 microfilm reels: Former archival reference number MG28-V114 (no replacement listed). The originals of these records are maintained by the Jewish Historical Society of Western Canada.
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
Other OJA records relating to JIAS may be found in the following accessions: 1979-9-5; 1988-5-2; 1991-10-5; 2006-3-11.
Creator
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto
Accession Number
1983-8-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Annual meeting proceedings series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 9; Series 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Annual meeting proceedings series
Level
Series
Fonds
9
Series
2
Material Format
textual record
Date
1926, 1940-1984
Physical Description
17 cm of textual records
Scope and Content
Series consists of records pertaining to the JIAS Toronto annual meetings in 1926, and 1940 through 1984. Missing are meetings for 1944-1949, 1951, 1952, 1954-1959, and 1979. The records include agendas, proceedings, addresses of the president and executive director, secretary’s reports, financial reports, invitations, programmes, member and committee lists, and correspondence. There is often also a short biography of the guest speaker. The speeches of the various executive members give an overview of the issues of concern in a particular period.
Notes
This series was formerly known as MG2 I1a C.
Arrangement
The records are arranged chronologically
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Sous-fonds
ID
Fonds 9-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Sous-fonds
Fonds
9-1
Material Format
textual record
Date
1926-1982
Physical Description
51 cm of textual records
14 photographs : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Immigrant Aid Society of Canada was organized into a national office in Montreal and regional offices in Winnipeg (Western Region), Toronto (Central Region) and Halifax (Eastern Region). The national office was responsible for directing and managing all the affairs of the organization, including defining national and international policy; administration of regional offices; national budget; fundraising; external relations with other organizations, such as the United Jewish Relief Agencies (UJRA) and Jewish Family & Child Services (JF&CS); and publicity. It also organized the annual meeting, special events and conventions.
Membership in JIAS was open to individuals, organizations or companies who paid an annual fee. General meetings of the membership were held at least once every two years, where reports were presented and considered, nominations and elections held for national officers and the national executive committee, policies, programs and problems discussed, and decisions taken.
The National Executive Committee of JIAS was composed of the following members: national president; three vice-presidents (the presidents of the Western, Central and Eastern regions), with the addition in the 1950s of a vice-president at large; three regional treasurers, eventually reduced to one national treasurer; secretary; and twelve members comprising four representatives from each region. In 1929 the ‘executive secretary’ position was renamed ‘executive director.’ According to the 1943 constitution, the executive was required to hold meetings at least three times a year, in alternate cities. In 1954 this was amended to twice a year.
During the early stages of JIAS's operations, it had to face the difficulty of being overstretched financially, as it sought to respond to and to change the often oppressive living conditions of new immigrants and the situation of those held in federal detention centres. The organization’s principled approach to immigrant welfare won JIAS much of its early success, as it became the preferred contact for government officials who had formerly dealt with numerous independent agencies, many of which had profited from the exploitation of desperate immigrants. This situation also profited the government, however, as the responsibility for establishing the priority of applications reverted increasingly to JIAS as it had to limit its appeals by the quotas imposed by the federal government.
JIAS was one of the founding organizations responsible for the establishment of the Canadian Council for Refugees (CCR) in 1978, which has since operated as a non-profit umbrella organization to coordinate the efforts of immigrant and refugee advocacy groups. JIAS continues to operate offices across Canada in Calgary, Edmonton, Halifax, Hamilton, London, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Vancouver, Windsor and Winnipeg. The JIAS National Office moved from Montreal to Toronto in 1989, with the appointment of Susan Davis to National Director, and is now located at 4580 Dufferin St., Suite 306, Toronto, Ontario.
Scope and Content
Sous-fonds consists of National Office records retained by the Toronto JIAS office as reference copies. Records include meeting minutes, speeches and reports from annual meetings, and the published annual reports produced from the annual meetings. The sous-fonds covers the years 1926 to 1982 and is divided into the following series: 1. National Executive meeting minutes; 2. National annual meeting proceedings; 3. National annual reports; 4. Publications; and 5. Photographs.
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Canada (creator)
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Hillel Foundation, University of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 65
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Hillel Foundation, University of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
65
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
architectural drawing
Date
1945-1988
Physical Description
3.72 m of textual records, graphic material and architectural drawings
Admin History/Bio
The B’nai Brith Hillel Foundation was founded at the University of Illinois in 1923 by Rabbi Benjamin Frankel. The University of Toronto chapter was established in 1946, by which point there were over one thousand Jewish undergraduates at the university. Hillel’s mandate was to foster students’ Jewish identity, creating a religious, cultural and communal environment and coordinating the activities of many affiliated sub-groups. Hillel was supported by the B’nai Brith Foundation and the United Jewish Welfare Fund (later the Toronto Jewish Congress), with increasing operational funding from the latter as the decades passed.
Hillel’s predecessor at the University of Toronto was the Menorah Society, founded in 1917 and disbanded in 1931 due to waning interest. In 1944 the Jewish Student Fellowship was formed, and on January 23, 1946 it was transformed into the University of Toronto B’nai B’rith Hillel Foundation.
Hillel chapters were run with the guidance of a professional appointed by the B’nai Brith Hillel Foundations at American and Canadian Universities. During the period covered by this fonds, U of T Hillel had four directors: Rabbi Aaron Kamerling (director 1946-1970), Rabbi Eliyahu Eliezri (1970-1971), Ben Mayer (1971-1978) and Gerry Fisher (1978-1981). The director answered to a board of advisors, drawn from the university and Jewish communities, that was responsible for maintaining Hillel House, overseeing staffing, and representing the Foundation to the public. Early chairmen of this board included Edward E. Gelber, Jack D. Pearlstein, Cyril Houser, Dr. Alexander Lipson, Sidney Midanik, and E. M. Sprackman.
At the day-to-day operations level, Hillel was run by an elected council of thirteen students under the director’s guidance. At U of T, the Hillel student council created and implemented a yearly program, edited the literary magazine and Hillelite bulletin, and over the years maintained the following standing committees: religious; cultural; house; social; publicity; art, music and drama; United Jewish Appeal; debates; membership; and seminar. The council met monthly and was required to call general meetings bi-monthly.
Hillel’s first administrative offices were at 492 Spadina Avenue, with programs held in various locations, including the B’nai Brith Youth Organization space at 750 Spadina Avenue, and local synagogues. From the beginning, Hillel joined forces with the B’nai Brith Youth Organization to raise funds for a permanent home on campus for Hillel. Programs in the early years included Shabbat services and lectures, arts performances, dances, personal counseling, and courses such as Jewish Literature and Hebrew. Three times a year Hillel published the Scribe, a literary magazine addressing topics of Jewish heritage, life, and prominent figures. This was replaced in the 1950s by an annual magazine named Reflections. The Hillelite bulletin informed members of activities and events. Hillel continued to build the Judaica collection of its Norman Raitblat Memorial Library. It also sent delegates each year to the Hillel Summer Institute in New York State; the Brandeis Camp Institute, a leadership training program sponsored by the American Zionist Youth Commission; and, beginning in 1948, the Inter-Hillel Conference, which was hosted alternately by Queen’s University, McGill University, and U of T.
In 1950, Hillel acquired a house at 186 St. George Street. Hillel House was formally dedicated at Convocation Hall on January 21, 1951. In December 1977 Hillel House was destroyed by fire, after which its offices were moved to space in the YMHA building at Bloor and Spadina. Programs were hosted for several years at ‘The Lower East Side’, in the Newman Centre at 89 St. George Street. In June 1979 Hillel acquired office space in a house at 604 Spadina Avenue.
In the 1970s Hillel’s numbers across North America were in decline. In 1974 the Jewish student population at U of T was approximately 3000, but only 400 were registered members. This slump was apparently reversed by the end of the decade, however, when student interest grew enough that a general council of forty students was established to supplement the elected student council (steering committee). 1970s programs included conventions and retreats, United Jewish Appeal fundraising campaigns, a Shabbat co-op, a choir, the Coffeehouse lounge, a film series, a music club, a library society, an annual Purim Bash, an art festival, and counseling groups.
Hillel also served as the voice of Jewish students at the university. The U of T chapter participated in the fight against quotas for Jewish students and faculty, advocated for Kosher food availability on campus, and was successful in persuading the university to avoid having examinations on Jewish holidays. In addition, Hillel often represented the views of the Jewish community to the general student population. It has been involved in the dissemination of Holocaust awareness material and in counteracting propaganda against Israel.
In 1970, partnering with the Jewish Student Federation of York University, Hillel established the Free Jewish University. Its courses were held on the U of T and York campuses and featured free courses covering a range of intellectual, personal and practical topics. Also in conjunction with York, Hillel published Or monthly newspaper and the Masada quarterly magazine. The latter evolved into a non-partisan newspaper, Migdal, which in turn became Images in the early 1980s. In addition, the Jewish Students’ Enquirer was published monthly, a joint publication of Jewish students at U of T, York University, Ryerson Polytechnical Institute, and Seneca College.
In 1978, with a view to modernize and reinvigorate its image, Hillel changed its name to the Jewish Students’ Union–B’nai Brith Hillel. The decision involved some contention with the Hillel advisory board, and reflected a closer association with the Toronto Jewish Congress. A third unofficial organization name, J.U.S.T. (Jewish University Students of Toronto), was used for the monthly newsletter, J.U.S.T. News. This newsletter was briefly renamed The Rolling Scribe before being discontinued in 1980.
The 1980s saw Hillel coordinating the efforts and activities of a large number of interest groups: Student United Jewish Appeal, Toronto Student Zionists, Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry, Jewish Residence Council, Jewish Studies Course Union, Student Mobilization for Jews in Arab Lands, Moadon Aliyah, Canadian Branch: North American Jewish Students Network, and Israeli Students Organization. Hillel is now represented on three Toronto universities and three college campuses.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists mainly of textual records created, received and maintained by Hillel directors from 1945 through 1988. The records document the directors’ administration and programming activities, Hillel events, and relations with outside organizations. The most concentrated set of records are those of Rabbi Kamerling from the 1940s and 1950s. The fonds is comprised of correspondence, memoranda, reports, newspapers and newsletters, publicity material, calendars of events, financial records, event programmes, and catalogues. There are blueprints of the proposed extension to Hillel House in the 1960s, the mid-1970s renovations, and the new Hillel House on Huron Street considered in 1978. The fonds also includes annual reports for 1953-1955 and 1960-1970, and a number of publications (incomplete sets): the Hillelite and the Hillel Scribe from the 1940s, the J.U.S.T. (Jewish University Students of Toronto) News, its successor The Rolling Scroll, and newspapers Masada, Migdal, Reflections, Or, and the Jewish Students’ Enquirer.
The fonds contains 130 photographs, predominantly black and white, in the form of prints, contact sheets and 35mm negatives. Aside from 32 head shots of speakers and performers from 1950s events, the photographs date from the 1970s. There are images of plays, meetings, special events, and executive members.
Fonds is arranged with each director’s files separate and in approximate alphabetical order by file name. The files are loosely based on subject/function, likely as they were originally created. Rabbi Kamerling’s records are in two groups since they were acquired in two accessions (see note below).
Name Access
B'nai Brith Hillel Foundation at the University of Toronto (Toronto, Ont.)
Related Material
See MG 9 for a more complete run of publications with which Hillel was involved (eg. Midgal, Images).
Arrangement
Processing of the collection maintained each director’s files separate and in their original order. Following the Hillel House fire in 1978, Rabbi Kamerling’s records (1945-1955) were acquired by the Archives. In 1986, additional Kamerling files were acquired (1946-1970). These overlapping sets of records were described and processed separately.
Creator
B'nai Brith Hillel Foundation at the University of Toronto (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1978-3-7
1981-5-2
1988-11-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 62
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
62
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1919-2001
Physical Description
93 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Benjamin Gershon Kayfetz was born on December 24, 1916 in Toronto, graduating from the University of Toronto in 1939, with a B.A. in modern languages. Between the years 1941 and 1943, he worked as a high school teacher in Huntsville and Niagara Falls. In 1943, he joined the war effort, working for the Department of National Defense in Postal Censorship and was responsible for reviewing prisoner of war mail. After the war, Kayfetz traveled to British Occupied Germany where he worked as a censor of telecommunications with the Control Commission until 1947.
Upon returning to Toronto, he was hired as the National Director of Community Relations by the Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC), and as the Executive (National) Director of the Joint Community Relations Committee (JCRC), a CJC - B'nai B'rith cooperative organization. He also served as the Central Region Executive Director of the CJC between 1973 and 1978. During his tenure, he worked with various churches, unions and minority groups to develop anti-discrimination laws and for the protection of minority and religious rights. Kayfetz was also actively involved in promoting the welfare of Jewish Communities worldwide, and made visits to Cuba in 1962 and 1965, and Russia in 1985, to study and report on the state of these Jewish Communities. After his retirement in 1985, he was awarded the Samuel Bronfman Medal by the Canadian Jewish Congress. In recognition of his efforts to promote Human Rights, he was also awarded the Order of Canada in 1986.
In addition to his professional activities, Kayfetz wrote articles for various Jewish publications under both his own name and the pseudonym, Gershon B. Newman, and gave a weekly radio address on CHIN radio addressing various contemporary Jewish issues. He was also actively involved in the Toronto Jewish Historical Society (serving as its president), Canadian Jewish Historical Society and Yiddish Luncheon Circle. Ben Kayfetz died in 2002.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of materials produced or acquired by Ben Kayfetz in both his personal and professional capacity. It includes biographical materials, minutes, correspondence, recorded CJC and JCRC meetings, memorabilia, transcripts and recorded versions of CHIN radio broadcasts he delivered, as well as various interviews, speeches, articles, book reviews and works he composed. Fonds also consists of minutes, agendas and other records of various Yiddish and historical associations Mr. Kayfetz was involved in.
Notes
Physical Description note: includes 20 photographs, 107 audio cassettes, 1 Beta video cassette and 1 object.
Fonds includes audio tapes 1-5, 7-32, 35-37, 39-42, 44-45, 47-50, 53-56, 58-64, 66-67, 70-85, A1-A5, A7-A9, A12-A14, A16-A20, A23-A28, A30, A32-A38 and A40-A43.
Name Access
Kayfetz, Ben, 1916-2002
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
Audio tapes AC 246-AC 275 belonged to Ben Kayfetz and are related to this fonds.
Creator
Kayfetz, Ben, 1916-2002
Accession Number
1975-012, 1976-10-4, 1980-12-13, 1982-2-2, 1983-6-2, 1985-4-2, 1987-2-3, 1996-5-4, 1998-3-22, 2000-11-4, 2004-3-1, 2004-5-20, 2006-2-9, 2006-8-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Personal series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 62; Series 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Personal series
Level
Series
Fonds
62
Series
1
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1933-1999
Physical Description
5 cm of textual records and other material
Scope and Content
Series consists of biographical materials and memorabilia relating to Ben Kayfetz and his family. Materials include newspaper articles, a taped interview, certificates, awards, university examinations, personal memorabilia from his service in Germany and materials relating to the Bronfman Medal and Order of Canada he received. This series also contains the video "The Life and the Times of Ben Kayfetz".
Notes
Audio tape A14 is part of this series.
Physical description note: includes 1 photograph, 1 audio tape and 1 Beta video cassette.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Speeches series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 62; Series 5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Speeches series
Level
Series
Fonds
62
Series
5
Material Format
textual record
sound recording
Date
1962-1999
Physical Description
2 cm of textual records
2 audio cassettes
Scope and Content
Series consists of transcripts, drafts and audio recordings of addresses delivered by Ben Kayfetz to various audiences and organizations as well as a brochure for a speech he gave at a Brotherhood breakfast.
Notes
Audio tapes A16 and A20 are part of this series.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Associations series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 62; Series 7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Associations series
Level
Series
Fonds
62
Series
7
Material Format
textual record
sound recording
Date
1980-1995
Physical Description
4 cm of textual records
30 audio cassettes
Scope and Content
Series consists of correspondence, minutes and other materials accumulated by Ben Kayfetz during his involvement with various organizations, including the Toronto Jewish Historical Society, Canadian Jewish Historical Society, Learned Society and Yiddish Luncheon Circle.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Published and unpublished works and research series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 62; Series 8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Published and unpublished works and research series
Level
Series
Fonds
62
Series
8
Material Format
textual record
sound recording
Date
1974-2000
Physical Description
26 cm of textual records
34 audio cassettes
Scope and Content
Series consists of articles, book reviews and works written in Yiddish and English by Ben Kayfetz for various publications, including the Jewish Western Bulletin, Jewish Standard, Fraternally Yours and others. This series also consists of biographical and autobiographical works he composed and translated. These include a first person account of the Kielce pogrom as experienced by Moses Kwasnievski and a biographical work on J.B. Salsberg. Also included in this series are various interviews conducted by Kayfetz with members of the Jewish community, many of which he used as source material to compose his written works.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Correspondence series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 62; Series 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Correspondence series
Level
Series
Fonds
62
Series
2
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1942-1996
Physical Description
13 cm of textual records
1 photograph
Scope and Content
Series consits of incoming and outgoing correspondence between Ben Kayfetz and various individuals and organizations, and includes correspondence during his service in British-occupied Germany. Correspondence relating to Canadian Jewish Congress/Joint Public Relations Committee and correspondence relating to the various societies and associations Ben Kayfetz belonged to, are located in their respective series.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Collected materials series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 62; Series 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Collected materials series
Level
Series
Fonds
62
Series
3
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Date
1919-1970
Physical Description
11 cm of textual records
18 photographs
1 object
Scope and Content
Series consists of various materials collected by Ben Kayfetz. It includes various items from Nazi Germany including a Jewish yellow star and number on a badge, Nazi hymn book and a service book of a Nazi Stormtrooper. Among the other materials are photographs of the Bronfman family, World War II enlistment posters, Peretz School Composition books and Jewish Old Folks Home Committee minutes.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Speeches series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 62; Series 5; File 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Speeches series
Level
File
Fonds
62
Series
5
File
2
Material Format
textual record
Date
1962-1999
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of various speeches delivered by Ben Kayfetz in both Yiddish and English. These were delivered on such topics as his retirement from the CJC, antisemitism, the development of Ontario's Jewish community, anti-hate legislation, the Jewish press in Toronto, Jewish immigration to Canada and others.
Subjects
Speeches, addresses, etc
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Associations series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 62; Series 7; File 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Associations series
Level
File
Fonds
62
Series
7
File
3
Material Format
textual record
Date
1980-1995
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of meeting notices, correspondence and a membership list of the Yiddish Luncheon Circle, of which Ben Kayfetz was a founding member.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Personal series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 62; Series 1; File 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Personal series
Level
File
Fonds
62
Series
1
File
2
Material Format
textual record
Date
[1985?]
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Personal series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 62; Series 1; File 6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Personal series
Level
File
Fonds
62
Series
1
File
6
Material Format
textual record
Date
1945-1947
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of materials relating to Ben Kayfetz's service with the Control Commission in British Occupied Germany. Materials include troop movement orders, a berthing card, an immigration identification card and other materials.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Published and unpublished works and research series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 62; Series 8; File 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Published and unpublished works and research series
Level
File
Fonds
62
Series
8
File
1
Material Format
textual record
Date
[n.d.]
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File contains articles written by Moses Kwasnievski, describing his account of the Kielce Pogrom, and his experiences in World War 2 Poland. The articles were translated by Ben Kayfetz.
Source
Archival Descriptions
4647 records – page 1 of 93.

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