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92 records – page 1 of 2.
Address
170 Brunswick Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Kalmen Greenspan & Sons was a butcher shop located on Brunswick Avenue.
Address
170 Brunswick Avenue
Scope Note
Kalmen Greenspan & Sons was a butcher shop located on Brunswick Avenue.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
319 Augusta Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Sam Gryfe started out peddling baked goods in Hamilton, Ontario around 1915. A store eventually opened at 319 Augusta Avenue in Kensington Market and operated during the 1930s. The bakery is now located on Bathurst Street. The bakery was also known as Crown Bakery. There was also a location in cottage country at Jackson's Point on Lake Simcoe.
Address
319 Augusta Avenue
Time Period
1930
Scope Note
Sam Gryfe started out peddling baked goods in Hamilton, Ontario around 1915. A store eventually opened at 319 Augusta Avenue in Kensington Market and operated during the 1930s. The bakery is now located on Bathurst Street. The bakery was also known as Crown Bakery. There was also a location in cottage country at Jackson's Point on Lake Simcoe.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
182 Brunswick Avenue
Source
Landmarks
Address
182 Brunswick Avenue
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
295 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Harry and Jennie Shopsowitz started Shopsy's Delicatessen, a family business in 1921. Harry died in October 1945 and the business was passed along to his sons, Sam Shopsowitz and Izzy Shopsowitz. The business grew and became known as Shopsy’s. Eventually, Sam opened a meat processing plant, in addition to the restaurants, and by 1947, he became known as the "the corned beef king" in advertisements. Shopsy's corned beef and hotdogs were sold in grocery stores.
Address
295 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1921-1983
Scope Note
Harry and Jennie Shopsowitz started Shopsy's Delicatessen, a family business in 1921. Harry died in October 1945 and the business was passed along to his sons, Sam Shopsowitz and Izzy Shopsowitz. The business grew and became known as Shopsy’s. Eventually, Sam opened a meat processing plant, in addition to the restaurants, and by 1947, he became known as the "the corned beef king" in advertisements. Shopsy's corned beef and hotdogs were sold in grocery stores.
History
Shopsy's became an institution in the city where the likes of Bob Hope, Al Waxman, Dennis Hull, and Scott Bowman were regular customers. Sam suffered a stroke in 1982 and died in September 1984 at age 63. After 62 years on Spadina, the restaurant moved to Yonge Street at Front Street in March 1983.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
71 Kensington Avenue
Source
Landmarks

This store was owned and operated by Harry Trachter and his wife Becky (Cooper) Trachter.
Address
71 Kensington Avenue
Scope Note
This store was owned and operated by Harry Trachter and his wife Becky (Cooper) Trachter.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
649 College Street
Source
Landmarks

Moishe (Morris) Shternshis (ca. 1893-1976) was married to Fanny Rumianek (ca. 1896-1991). Moishe Stern owned and operated a dairy and delivered milk and other dairy products.
Address
649 College Street
Scope Note
Moishe (Morris) Shternshis (ca. 1893-1976) was married to Fanny Rumianek (ca. 1896-1991). Moishe Stern owned and operated a dairy and delivered milk and other dairy products.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
420 College Street
Source
Landmarks

Joseph Gary and Goldie (nee Lawrence) Gary married in 1921 in Rochester, N.Y. Shortly thereafter they moved to Toronto. Joseph and Goldie had three children; daughters Ethel (Halter) and Shirley (Cohen), and son Leslie. They owned and operated a grocery store on College Street. In 1950, after three years of visiting the region, Joseph and Goldie purchased a home on Amelia Street in Pontypool, ON. As the area was a popular summer resort spot for vacationing Jews from the 1940s to the 1960s, Joseph and Goldie decided to build 10 cottages on their land for rental, which they named Gary's Cottages. The area was relatively cheap and had a pond as its swimming spot. Kosher meals would often be brought in for the vacationers who arrived on two trains daily from Union station. The cottages were sold around 1970 and are no longer in existence, however their home is still standing.
Address
420 College Street
Scope Note
Joseph Gary and Goldie (nee Lawrence) Gary married in 1921 in Rochester, N.Y. Shortly thereafter they moved to Toronto. Joseph and Goldie had three children; daughters Ethel (Halter) and Shirley (Cohen), and son Leslie. They owned and operated a grocery store on College Street. In 1950, after three years of visiting the region, Joseph and Goldie purchased a home on Amelia Street in Pontypool, ON. As the area was a popular summer resort spot for vacationing Jews from the 1940s to the 1960s, Joseph and Goldie decided to build 10 cottages on their land for rental, which they named Gary's Cottages. The area was relatively cheap and had a pond as its swimming spot. Kosher meals would often be brought in for the vacationers who arrived on two trains daily from Union station. The cottages were sold around 1970 and are no longer in existence, however their home is still standing.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
234 Augusta Avenue
Source
Landmarks
Address
234 Augusta Avenue
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
231 Augusta Avenue
Source
Landmarks
Address
231 Augusta Avenue
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
322 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Opened in 1946 when the neighbourhood was still teaming with Jews working and living in the neighbourhood, this deli was one of the last to close in the area, in 1946. The Switzer family lived at 35 Nassau Street.
Address
322 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1946-1991
Scope Note
Opened in 1946 when the neighbourhood was still teaming with Jews working and living in the neighbourhood, this deli was one of the last to close in the area, in 1946. The Switzer family lived at 35 Nassau Street.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
338 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

United Bakers Dairy Restaurant was first established by Aaron and Sarah Ladovsky in 1912 on Dundas Street at Bay Street in the Ward. They moved the restaurant to 338 Spadina Ave. in 1920. Aaron Ladovsky was involved in a number of community organizations. He was instrumental in founding the Kieltzer Society of Toronto in 1913; a community based immigrant-aid association extending aid to Kielcers in Poland and around the world. Ladovsky remained an active member of the organization until his death on April 5, 1960. His restaurant provided a welcome gathering place for the Jewish community, serving traditional dishes and maintaining a friendly open-door policy. Aaron Ladovsky was known for his generosity and claimed that no one, whether they had money or not, left his restaurant hungry. The United Bakers' menu was mainly based on Sarah’s original recipes, and continues to be so to this day.
Address
338 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1920-1986
Scope Note
United Bakers Dairy Restaurant was first established by Aaron and Sarah Ladovsky in 1912 on Dundas Street at Bay Street in the Ward. They moved the restaurant to 338 Spadina Ave. in 1920. Aaron Ladovsky was involved in a number of community organizations. He was instrumental in founding the Kieltzer Society of Toronto in 1913; a community based immigrant-aid association extending aid to Kielcers in Poland and around the world. Ladovsky remained an active member of the organization until his death on April 5, 1960. His restaurant provided a welcome gathering place for the Jewish community, serving traditional dishes and maintaining a friendly open-door policy. Aaron Ladovsky was known for his generosity and claimed that no one, whether they had money or not, left his restaurant hungry. The United Bakers' menu was mainly based on Sarah’s original recipes, and continues to be so to this day.
History
Aaron and Sarah had twin sons, Herman and Samuel. During the Second World War, Herman served overseas as an electrician in the Canadian army show with comics Johnny Wayne and Frank Shuster. After returning from the war, he married Dora Macklin in 1947, a registered nurse from Regina. He also began to take over management of the family business. Later, Herman's son Philip and daughter Ruth would follow in his footsteps, first helping to run the restaurant with him and later taking over management. United Bakers remained on Spadina Avenue for 66 years - until 1986 when it moved to its current location at 506 Lawrence Avenue West, off of Bathurst Street. Herman was an active fixture in the restaurant until his death on January 6, 2002. He also supported and was involved in the work of the Ontario Jewish Archives over the years.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
275 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Goldenberg's restaurant, which was kosher, was located at 275 Spadina Ave and was owned by Mr Joseph S. Goldenberg. He made additions to the restaurant in 1929 and 1935 by architect Benjamin Brown.
Address
275 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1925-
Scope Note
Goldenberg's restaurant, which was kosher, was located at 275 Spadina Ave and was owned by Mr Joseph S. Goldenberg. He made additions to the restaurant in 1929 and 1935 by architect Benjamin Brown.
History
The restaurant was originally located in the Ward at 63 Elizabeth Street.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
350 College Street
Source
Landmarks

Wellts delicatessen was founded by Peter and Fannie Wellts in the 1910s at 350 College Street. Peter Wellts was born in Tarnigrad, Poland in 1888 and Fannie Brown was born in New York City in 1889. They met in New York and moved with Fannie’s family to Toronto in 1910. Peter worked in the garment district prior at the start of the restaurant business. Peter and Fannie married in Toronto on November 26, 1910. They had two daughters Sylvia (b. August 26, 1911) (m. Walfish) and Ethel (b. January 7, 1928) (m. Rochwerg). They lived in an apartment above the delicatessen. When Ethel married her husband Nathan Rochwerg in 1948, they moved in with Fannie and Peter above the deli. Ethel and Nathan had three children Martin, Arlene (m. Kochberg), and Sidney. When Peter was in his 70s, it was decided that the family would move north into the Bathurst Manor and close the deli. Peter had a heart attack on December 26, 1959, before the move, and Fannie moved in with Nathan and Ethel and their three children. The deli closed in 1959.
Address
350 College Street
Time Period
1912-1959
Scope Note
Wellts delicatessen was founded by Peter and Fannie Wellts in the 1910s at 350 College Street. Peter Wellts was born in Tarnigrad, Poland in 1888 and Fannie Brown was born in New York City in 1889. They met in New York and moved with Fannie’s family to Toronto in 1910. Peter worked in the garment district prior at the start of the restaurant business. Peter and Fannie married in Toronto on November 26, 1910. They had two daughters Sylvia (b. August 26, 1911) (m. Walfish) and Ethel (b. January 7, 1928) (m. Rochwerg). They lived in an apartment above the delicatessen. When Ethel married her husband Nathan Rochwerg in 1948, they moved in with Fannie and Peter above the deli. Ethel and Nathan had three children Martin, Arlene (m. Kochberg), and Sidney. When Peter was in his 70s, it was decided that the family would move north into the Bathurst Manor and close the deli. Peter had a heart attack on December 26, 1959, before the move, and Fannie moved in with Nathan and Ethel and their three children. The deli closed in 1959.
History
The deli was known for 5 cent pastrami/corned beef sandwiches sold during the depression. Peter Wellts never let anyone go hungry during this period. They had Vernor's ginger ale on tap during a time when everything was in bottles. Deliveries would come in through the backyard by the garage. It was kosher. Ethel remembers people coming in to use the phone in the kitchen or the washroom in the basement.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
44 St. George Street
Source
Landmarks

The Toronto Section of the National Council of Jewish Women initially operated out of 2 rented rooms and then later at a house on McCaul Street. In 1922, on its 25th anniversary, they became officially incorporated and purchased Community House at 44 St. George Street.
Address
44 St. George Street
Time Period
1922-[ca. 1964]
Scope Note
The Toronto Section of the National Council of Jewish Women initially operated out of 2 rented rooms and then later at a house on McCaul Street. In 1922, on its 25th anniversary, they became officially incorporated and purchased Community House at 44 St. George Street.
History
Many activities of the Toronto section of the National Council of Jewish Women operated from this building including Camp Camperdown for Girls, Jewish Girl Guides, a big sister program, classes in sewing, citizenship, and English. There was also a free legal bureau. Additionally, the building was used by a number of youth groups and clubs during a time when adequate meeting and recreation space was hard to find including the Jewish Girls Club. The Jewish Community Centre Association, formed in the fall of 1936, was located at this building. They operated a variety of classes including cooking, sewing, journalism, language, dance and art classes. They also operated a summer nursery school. Under the auspices of the Canadian Jewish Congress, the Community House also became a Service Mens Club, used as a place of refuge during the Second World War for members of the Canadian military on active service. The NCJW moved to a building on Bathurst, north of Sheppard in 1964.
Category
Private Clubs
Organization
Source
Landmarks
Address
24 Cecil Street
Source
Landmarks

The Labour Zionist Order was an outgrowth of the Labour Zionist party in Israel (the Mapai party). They carried out a number of different functions. They were pro-labour and pro-Zionist. They acted as a mutual benefit society—the Labour Zionist Alliance or Farband, formally known as the Jewish National Workers Alliance or Farband Labour Zionist Order. They also operated a school for children called the Farband Folks Shule (later Bialik Hebrew Day School). There was a fundraising organization that they oversaw called the Israel Histadrut of Toronto whose annual campaign raised money for the Israel Histadrut in Israel (the Federation of Labour in Israel), founded in 1920. The campaign money was used to fund economic, trade union, military, social, and cultural activities in Israel, as well as to provide a comprehensive system of health insurance and hospital services to workers. The Israel Histadrut campaign in Toronto had an autonomous executive board, however it's activities were overseen by the Labour Zionist Order.
Address
24 Cecil Street
Time Period
1922-
Scope Note
The Labour Zionist Order was an outgrowth of the Labour Zionist party in Israel (the Mapai party). They carried out a number of different functions. They were pro-labour and pro-Zionist. They acted as a mutual benefit society—the Labour Zionist Alliance or Farband, formally known as the Jewish National Workers Alliance or Farband Labour Zionist Order. They also operated a school for children called the Farband Folks Shule (later Bialik Hebrew Day School). There was a fundraising organization that they oversaw called the Israel Histadrut of Toronto whose annual campaign raised money for the Israel Histadrut in Israel (the Federation of Labour in Israel), founded in 1920. The campaign money was used to fund economic, trade union, military, social, and cultural activities in Israel, as well as to provide a comprehensive system of health insurance and hospital services to workers. The Israel Histadrut campaign in Toronto had an autonomous executive board, however it's activities were overseen by the Labour Zionist Order.
History
The Labour Zionist Order purchased the house at 24 Cecil Street in 1922 and established a library in it. It was called the Farband Institute.
Category
Political
Organization
Source
Landmarks
Address
15 Brunswick Avenue
Source
Landmarks

At the turn of the twentieth-century, the Jewish population of Toronto grew with large numbers of Eastern European families fleeing hardship back home. Soon, a variety of clubs began forming, providing a place for Jewish boys and girls to participate in athletic and social programming. In 1919, several of the athletic and social groups decided to amalgamate and formed an umbrella organization known as the Hebrew Association of Young Men’s and Young Women’s Clubs. By 1930, they were known as the YM-YWHA (Young Men’s and Young Women’s Hebrew Association. Through the 1920s and 30s, they occupied a number of facilities in the Brunswick Avenue and College Street area.
Address
15 Brunswick Avenue
Time Period
1937
Scope Note
At the turn of the twentieth-century, the Jewish population of Toronto grew with large numbers of Eastern European families fleeing hardship back home. Soon, a variety of clubs began forming, providing a place for Jewish boys and girls to participate in athletic and social programming. In 1919, several of the athletic and social groups decided to amalgamate and formed an umbrella organization known as the Hebrew Association of Young Men’s and Young Women’s Clubs. By 1930, they were known as the YM-YWHA (Young Men’s and Young Women’s Hebrew Association. Through the 1920s and 30s, they occupied a number of facilities in the Brunswick Avenue and College Street area.
History
As a result of the overcrowding and de-centralized facilities, in 1937, the YM-YWHA constructed its own athletic building at 15 Brunswick Avenue, next door to the Talmud Torah, to ease the overcrowding. Similar to the JCCs of today, the early YM-YWHA provided a sense of Jewish identity and camaraderie through physical, educational, cultural and community based programming.
Category
Arts
Education
Private Clubs
Source
Landmarks
Address
12 Major Street
Source
Landmarks

The YM-YWHA used a building on Major Street for their after-school children's programs when they out-grew their space on Brunswick Ave.
Address
12 Major Street
Time Period
[ca. 1940]-1953
Scope Note
The YM-YWHA used a building on Major Street for their after-school children's programs when they out-grew their space on Brunswick Ave.
Category
Education
Private Clubs
Source
Landmarks
Address
179 Beverley Street
Source
Landmarks

The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto (FJPT) was made a charitable organization under the laws of Ontario in March, 1917. Its central goal was to end the frequent, uncontrolled, and competitive fund soliciting by a wide range of individual Toronto Jewish philanthropic and social service institutions and instead substitute a single coordinated city-wide community fundraising effort. This would ensure adequate and accountable funding for all its affiliated organizations and agencies in Toronto. The first office of the FJPT was at 206 Beverley St., but by 1924 it was headquartered at 218 Simcoe St. and by 1928 it had moved to 179 Beverley St., which was renamed "Scheuer House" after the FJPT's first president, Edmund Scheuer.
Address
179 Beverley Street
Time Period
1928-1945
Scope Note
The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto (FJPT) was made a charitable organization under the laws of Ontario in March, 1917. Its central goal was to end the frequent, uncontrolled, and competitive fund soliciting by a wide range of individual Toronto Jewish philanthropic and social service institutions and instead substitute a single coordinated city-wide community fundraising effort. This would ensure adequate and accountable funding for all its affiliated organizations and agencies in Toronto. The first office of the FJPT was at 206 Beverley St., but by 1924 it was headquartered at 218 Simcoe St. and by 1928 it had moved to 179 Beverley St., which was renamed "Scheuer House" after the FJPT's first president, Edmund Scheuer.
History
Original affiliated agencies of the FJPT were: the Ladies Co-operative Board, the Jewish Orphans' Home, the Jewish Girls Club, the Junior Council of Jewish Women, the Hebrew Ladies Maternity Aid and Sewing Circle, the Hebrew Young ladies Boot and Shoe Society, the Sewing Circle, the Jewish Branch of the Big Brotherhood Movement, the Hebrew Free Loan Society, the Jewish Dispensary, and the Hebrew Burial Society. In 1924, six new agencies were added to the FJPT. They were: Mount Sinai Hospital, the Jewish Boys' and Girls' Camp, Jewish Big Sisters, the Family Welfare Bureau, the Federation Health Clinic and the Federation Employment Bureau.
Category
Organization
Social Service
Source
Landmarks
Address
150 Beverley Street
Source
Landmarks

The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto was made a charitable organization under the laws of Ontario in March, 1917. Its central goal was to end the frequent, uncontrolled, and competitive fund soliciting by a wide range of individual Toronto Jewish philanthropic and social service institutions and instead substitute a single coordinated city-wide community fundraising effort. This would ensure adequate and accountable funding for all its affiliated organizations and agencies in Toronto. The first office of the FJPT was at 206 Beverley St., but by 1924 it was headquartered at 218 Simcoe St. and by 1928 it had moved to 179 Beverley St., which was renamed "Scheuer House" after the FJPT's first president, Edmund Scheuer.
Address
150 Beverley Street
Time Period
1948-1983
Scope Note
The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto was made a charitable organization under the laws of Ontario in March, 1917. Its central goal was to end the frequent, uncontrolled, and competitive fund soliciting by a wide range of individual Toronto Jewish philanthropic and social service institutions and instead substitute a single coordinated city-wide community fundraising effort. This would ensure adequate and accountable funding for all its affiliated organizations and agencies in Toronto. The first office of the FJPT was at 206 Beverley St., but by 1924 it was headquartered at 218 Simcoe St. and by 1928 it had moved to 179 Beverley St., which was renamed "Scheuer House" after the FJPT's first president, Edmund Scheuer.
History
They moved to Dundas Square in the late 1940s and then occupied a number of different buildings until they moved into their long term home at 150-152 Beverley Street in 1948 where they remained until July 1983. This building was called the J. Irving Olebaum. As the community moved north, the the J. Irving Oelbaum Centre building was eventually sold in 1983 and the United Jewish Welfare Fund moved to the Lipa Green building at Bathurst and Sheppard. The building on Beverley Street was mysteriously burned down.
Category
Social Service
Organization
Source
Landmarks
Address
29 Cecil Street
Source
Landmarks

As early as 1916 the Ezras Noshem Society (a mutual benefit society for Jewish women) started to raise funds to purchase and renovate what would become The Toronto Jewish Old Folks' Home (Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care’s forerunner) after its members recognized the need for a home in Toronto where the Jewish elderly could receive kosher meals and communicate with staff in their own language. Property at 31 Cecil Street was purchased in 1917 and sometime between September 1918 and January 1920 the Home officially opened there. The Home was run by a small staff and the women of Ezras Noshem who volunteered their time to make beds, cook kosher meals, do laundry and sponsor fundraising events.
Address
29 Cecil Street
Time Period
1917-1954
Scope Note
As early as 1916 the Ezras Noshem Society (a mutual benefit society for Jewish women) started to raise funds to purchase and renovate what would become The Toronto Jewish Old Folks' Home (Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care’s forerunner) after its members recognized the need for a home in Toronto where the Jewish elderly could receive kosher meals and communicate with staff in their own language. Property at 31 Cecil Street was purchased in 1917 and sometime between September 1918 and January 1920 the Home officially opened there. The Home was run by a small staff and the women of Ezras Noshem who volunteered their time to make beds, cook kosher meals, do laundry and sponsor fundraising events.
History
By 1938 the Home had expanded into its neighboring houses at 29, 33, and 35 Cecil Street and was caring for 115 residents. It provided residents with synagogue services, a hospital ward and social activities. At this time the Home also became a member of the United Jewish Welfare Fund. In 1946, the need for a larger and more modern building prompted a fundraising campaign and in 1954, the new building opened at 3650 Bathurst Street.
Category
Organization
Medical
Social Service
Source
Landmarks
Address
41 Willcocks Street
Source
Landmarks

The Primrose Club was founded in Toronto in 1907 as the Cosmopolitan Club, an elite Jewish men's social club. Its members included many prominent leaders of the Jewish community. It was originally located on Beverley Street. In 1921, 41 Willcocks Street which was originally built as a family home, was redesigned by architect Benjamin Brown and Robert McConnell to be the new home of the Primrose Club. In 1959, the club's building at 41 Willcocks Street was expropriated by the University of Toronto (and currently houses the university's Faculty Club), and the club subsequently moved to a new building at Russell Hill Road and St. Clair, designed by Kaplan & Sprachman. This building has since been demolished and replaced with condominiums.
Address
41 Willcocks Street
Time Period
1921-1959
Scope Note
The Primrose Club was founded in Toronto in 1907 as the Cosmopolitan Club, an elite Jewish men's social club. Its members included many prominent leaders of the Jewish community. It was originally located on Beverley Street. In 1921, 41 Willcocks Street which was originally built as a family home, was redesigned by architect Benjamin Brown and Robert McConnell to be the new home of the Primrose Club. In 1959, the club's building at 41 Willcocks Street was expropriated by the University of Toronto (and currently houses the university's Faculty Club), and the club subsequently moved to a new building at Russell Hill Road and St. Clair, designed by Kaplan & Sprachman. This building has since been demolished and replaced with condominiums.
Category
Private Clubs
Architecture
Source
Landmarks
Address
346 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Established in 1913 by Henry Dworkin and Sam Easser, the Labor Lyceum Association sought to advance the interests of the city's Jewish trade union movement. Through the sale of $5.00 stock certificates, the community purchased two houses at 344 and 346 Spadina in 1924, adding a new front and meeting rooms in 1929.
Address
346 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1924-1971
Scope Note
Established in 1913 by Henry Dworkin and Sam Easser, the Labor Lyceum Association sought to advance the interests of the city's Jewish trade union movement. Through the sale of $5.00 stock certificates, the community purchased two houses at 344 and 346 Spadina in 1924, adding a new front and meeting rooms in 1929.
History
The Labor Lyceum operated as the headquarters for the non-Communist unions of the primarily Jewish garment district. The seasonal nature of the textile industry meant that workers had time to socialize and strategize during slow work periods. The Labour Lyceum also served as an important cultural centre for various Jewish societies and fraternal organizations. It hosted a range of activities from lectures and rallies to dances, plays, and concerts. The provincial Cooperative Commonwealth Federation held conventions here in the 1940s. The importance of the Labor Lyceum lessened as the Jewish community began to move out of the Spadina Avenue area, however it remained significant to the continued labour activism taken up by newer immigrant groups. In 1971, the building was sold and the Labor Lyceum moved to Cecil Street.
Category
Political
Source
Landmarks
Address
207 Beverley Street
Source
Landmarks

Murray House was a popular catering and event hall frequently used by the Jewish community before other organizations and synagogues had their own event halls.
Address
207 Beverley Street
Scope Note
Murray House was a popular catering and event hall frequently used by the Jewish community before other organizations and synagogues had their own event halls.
Category
Private Clubs
Source
Landmarks
Address
136 Beverley Street
Source
Landmarks

Chudleigh House was used in the 1930s and 1940s as an event space where people held weddings and various community gatherings like testimonial dinners and fundraisers.
Address
136 Beverley Street
Scope Note
Chudleigh House was used in the 1930s and 1940s as an event space where people held weddings and various community gatherings like testimonial dinners and fundraisers.
Category
Private Clubs
Source
Landmarks
Address
151 Palmerston Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Congregation Agudath Israel Anshei Sfard was established in 1914 and services were first held in a house. In 1924, a building was erected at 151 Palmerston Ave. It was one of the first congregations built west of Spadina Ave. It was a thriving shul until the community began to move North in the 1950s. They decided to close their doors in 1978 and the building was subsequently destroyed the following year.
Address
151 Palmerston Avenue
Time Period
1914-1978
Scope Note
Congregation Agudath Israel Anshei Sfard was established in 1914 and services were first held in a house. In 1924, a building was erected at 151 Palmerston Ave. It was one of the first congregations built west of Spadina Ave. It was a thriving shul until the community began to move North in the 1950s. They decided to close their doors in 1978 and the building was subsequently destroyed the following year.
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
37 Cecil Street
Source
Landmarks

The Folks Farein was first located at 23 Cecil St., however, at some point during the 1940s or 1950s they moved to 37 Cecil Street. In Yiddish Folks Farein translates to People’s Association. It is also known as the Hebrew National Association. They were formed in 1914 by a group of Toronto Jewish immigrants as an organization dedicated to anti-missionary and educational outreach. At this time, a number of Jewish converts to Christianity sought to exploit the situation of poor Jews in the community by making available the services of doctors, midwives and the distribution of direct relief. In addition there was constant street¬corner preaching and proselytizatian. To counteract this, the Folks Ferein was formed. They offered a number of different services including child welfare for working mothers, a reading room, English language classes, and help forJewish hospital patients who could not speak English.
Address
37 Cecil Street
Time Period
1914-[ca. 1977]
Scope Note
The Folks Farein was first located at 23 Cecil St., however, at some point during the 1940s or 1950s they moved to 37 Cecil Street. In Yiddish Folks Farein translates to People’s Association. It is also known as the Hebrew National Association. They were formed in 1914 by a group of Toronto Jewish immigrants as an organization dedicated to anti-missionary and educational outreach. At this time, a number of Jewish converts to Christianity sought to exploit the situation of poor Jews in the community by making available the services of doctors, midwives and the distribution of direct relief. In addition there was constant street¬corner preaching and proselytizatian. To counteract this, the Folks Ferein was formed. They offered a number of different services including child welfare for working mothers, a reading room, English language classes, and help forJewish hospital patients who could not speak English.
History
When the threat from missionaries was no longer an issue, they became a philanthropic society dedicated to ministering to the sick and needy. Under this revised mandate, the Folks Farein provided dentures, eyeglasses, orthopaedic shoes, operative support, crutches, artificial limbs and other related medical appliances wherever needed. They maintained close contact with hospitals, sanatoria, mental institutions, local jails and reformatories to help needy Jewish patients and prisoners. They also distributed kosher meals during Passover; helped seniors get old age pensions and widows and mothers and their children get allowances where fathers were sick or incapacitated; and fed and billeted the unemployed and homeless at the Folks Farein’s premises at 37 Cecil Street. In 1945, when the first group of Jewish refugees from Europe arrived in Toronto, the Folks Farein temporarily accommodated many on its premises and provided them with meals.
Category
Social Service
Source
Landmarks
Address
33 Phoebe Street
Source
Landmarks

Ogden Public School, previously known as the Phoebe Street School, is located just east of Spadina Ave and north of Queen Street. Many Jewish children from the Kensington Market neighbourhood went to school there.
Address
33 Phoebe Street
Scope Note
Ogden Public School, previously known as the Phoebe Street School, is located just east of Spadina Ave and north of Queen Street. Many Jewish children from the Kensington Market neighbourhood went to school there.
History
A 1944 study shows that 165 Jewish students attended Ogden School in that year.
Category
Education
Source
Landmarks
Address
18 Orde Street
Source
Landmarks

A 1944 report showed that 361 Jewish children attended Orde Street Public School, located east of Spadina and south of College.
Address
18 Orde Street
Scope Note
A 1944 report showed that 361 Jewish children attended Orde Street Public School, located east of Spadina and south of College.
Category
Education
Source
Landmarks
Address
96 Dension Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Many Jewish children attended Ryerson Public School. A 1944 study shows that 471 students were Jewish at the school.
Address
96 Dension Avenue
Scope Note
Many Jewish children attended Ryerson Public School. A 1944 study shows that 471 students were Jewish at the school.
Category
Education
Source
Landmarks
Address
33 Robert Street
Source
Landmarks

Lansdowne Public School at one time had a high concentration of Jewish students due to its close proximity to Kensginton Market. A 1944 study shows that 778 Jewish students attended Lansdowne Public School (now known as Lord Lansdowne Public School) in that year.
Address
33 Robert Street
Time Period
1888-
Scope Note
Lansdowne Public School at one time had a high concentration of Jewish students due to its close proximity to Kensginton Market. A 1944 study shows that 778 Jewish students attended Lansdowne Public School (now known as Lord Lansdowne Public School) in that year.
Category
Education
Source
Landmarks
Address
112 Lippincott Street
Source
Landmarks

King Edward Public School was located in the heart of the Jewish neighbourhood, just north of Kensington Market. A 1944 study shows that 581 Jewish children attended King Edward Public School in that year.
Address
112 Lippincott Street
Scope Note
King Edward Public School was located in the heart of the Jewish neighbourhood, just north of Kensington Market. A 1944 study shows that 581 Jewish children attended King Edward Public School in that year.
Category
Education
Source
Landmarks
Address
286 Harbord Street
Source
Landmarks
Address
286 Harbord Street
Category
Education
Source
Landmarks
Address
150 Beverley Street
Source
Landmarks

By 1919 the plight of post-war Eastern European Jewry and the need for a united community voice for Canadian Jewry led to the creation of the Canadian Jewish Congress. Its founding meeting was held on March 16, 1919 in Montreal. Though it briefly maintained a tiny regional office in Toronto, the CJC remained inactive until 1933, when it fully reconvened by opening offices in Winnipeg, Montreal, and Toronto. Egmont L. Frankel was the first President of the new Central Division in Toronto. While the National Office in Montreal focused on the overarching issues of the social and economic rights of European Jewry, assistance for Jewish immigrants, and combating prejudice in Canada, the Toronto office dealt with local violent anti-Jewish demonstrations as well as continuing discrimination both in employment and in access to public recreational facilities. The structure was based on regular national biennial plenary conferences at which policies were delineated and national and regional executives were elected. Between plenary sessions, National and Regional Councils were in charge.
Address
150 Beverley Street
Time Period
1919-2012
Scope Note
By 1919 the plight of post-war Eastern European Jewry and the need for a united community voice for Canadian Jewry led to the creation of the Canadian Jewish Congress. Its founding meeting was held on March 16, 1919 in Montreal. Though it briefly maintained a tiny regional office in Toronto, the CJC remained inactive until 1933, when it fully reconvened by opening offices in Winnipeg, Montreal, and Toronto. Egmont L. Frankel was the first President of the new Central Division in Toronto. While the National Office in Montreal focused on the overarching issues of the social and economic rights of European Jewry, assistance for Jewish immigrants, and combating prejudice in Canada, the Toronto office dealt with local violent anti-Jewish demonstrations as well as continuing discrimination both in employment and in access to public recreational facilities. The structure was based on regular national biennial plenary conferences at which policies were delineated and national and regional executives were elected. Between plenary sessions, National and Regional Councils were in charge.
History
During the 1930s the Central Division Office moved several times and occupied offices in the following locations; Yonge St., the Bond St. Synagogue, Scheuer House, the Zionist Building, and its long-term home at 150-152 Beverley Street where it remained until its July, 1983 move to the Lipa Green Building in North York. Its activities expanded to include taking responsibility for Jewish educational standards but, by 1941, its main efforts shifted to support for Canada’s war effort. Immediately after the end of the war, the focus again shifted to Jewish immigration projects and the maintenance of Jewish identity in small communities.By 1950, the CJC’s use of the title “division” was changed to “region” to accommodate internal operational “divisions” within each region. Also, by then, the Central Region was busy expanding its programs for all Ontario Jewish communities, creating a province-wide council of youth groups, and working with the newly-created Bureau of Jewish Education (later Board of Jewish Education).
Category
Organization
Source
Landmarks
Address
194 Beverley Street
Source
Landmarks

The precursor to the Peretz School, the Jewish National Radical School was opened in 1911. It was founded on the principles of sympathy for the working classes, secularism, and the desire to perpetuate secular Jewish culture through the Yiddish language. The curriculum consisted mainly of secular subjects--Jewish history and Yiddish language.
Address
194 Beverley Street
Time Period
1911-1960
Scope Note
The precursor to the Peretz School, the Jewish National Radical School was opened in 1911. It was founded on the principles of sympathy for the working classes, secularism, and the desire to perpetuate secular Jewish culture through the Yiddish language. The curriculum consisted mainly of secular subjects--Jewish history and Yiddish language.
History
Due to financial problems, in 1916 the school was taken over by the Workman’s Circle (Arbeiter Ring) and renamed the I.L. Peretz School after the well-known Yiddish author and playwright Isaac Leib Peretz. After seeing great popularity and strong attendance, the school expanded to other branches around the city. After around 50 years as an educational institution, the I.L Peretz School saw a decline and eventually closed its doors. Isaac Matenko (1874-1960) was one of the founding teachers and later, the principal of the Toronto Yiddish National Radical School. He was later affiliated with the Junction branch of the Peretz School, where he was a teacher and principal. He worked tirelessly to preserve and promote secular Jewish culture and the Yiddish language in Toronto.
Category
Education
Source
Landmarks
Address
68 D'Arcy Street
Source
Landmarks

The Eitz Chaim School was established in 1915 in temporary quarters on Chesnut st. In 1917, Eitz Chaim was moved to its more permanent location on D’Arcy St. Eitz Chaim was established as an alternative to the already existing Orthodox Talmud Torahs like the Simcoe St. Talmud torah (which later amalgamated into the Associated Hebrew Schools).
Address
68 D'Arcy Street
Time Period
1917-1966
Scope Note
The Eitz Chaim School was established in 1915 in temporary quarters on Chesnut st. In 1917, Eitz Chaim was moved to its more permanent location on D’Arcy St. Eitz Chaim was established as an alternative to the already existing Orthodox Talmud Torahs like the Simcoe St. Talmud torah (which later amalgamated into the Associated Hebrew Schools).
History
Like the Simcoe St. Talmud Torah, Eitz Chaim initially offered classes outside of normal school hours, and catered exclusively to boys. The school catered to the more conservative Polish families interested in providing a more traditional education for their children similar to the pedagogical styles of the Yeshivas in Poland. Unlike the Simcoe St. Talmud Torah that taught its’ curriculum in Hebrew (Ivrit bi’ Ivrit), Eitz Chaim taught its’ lessons in Yiddish and focused heavily on religious studies and de-emphasized Hebrew grammar and secular studies. In 1928, the D’Arcy Street location rebuilt its’ facilities to accommodate the growing population of students seeking enrollment. The 1966 the D'Arcy Street location was sold. The Eitz Chaim Schools have expanded to multiple branches around the city and are still in operation today.
Category
Education
Source
Landmarks
Address
56 Maria Street
Source
Landmarks

Congregation Knesseth Israel was built in 1911 at 56 Maria Street in the Junction. Its architect was James Ellis, who between 1890 and 1912 designed over fifty buildings in the area. Early 20th century membership consisted mainly of new Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe, many of whom lived and worked in the Junction as artisans, peddlers, shop owners and scrap and metal collectors. It is the oldest Toronto synagogue still in use as a synagogue today. The synagogue was restored in the early 1990s and remains active today. It is cared for by the descendants of the founding families.
Address
56 Maria Street
Time Period
1911-present
Scope Note
Congregation Knesseth Israel was built in 1911 at 56 Maria Street in the Junction. Its architect was James Ellis, who between 1890 and 1912 designed over fifty buildings in the area. Early 20th century membership consisted mainly of new Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe, many of whom lived and worked in the Junction as artisans, peddlers, shop owners and scrap and metal collectors. It is the oldest Toronto synagogue still in use as a synagogue today. The synagogue was restored in the early 1990s and remains active today. It is cared for by the descendants of the founding families.
Category
Religious
Architecture
Source
Landmarks
Address
131 Maria Street
Source
Landmarks

The precursor to the Peretz School, the Jewish National Radical School was opened in 1911. It was founded on the principles of sympathy for the working classes, secularism, and the desire to perpetuate secular Jewish culture through the Yiddish language. The curriculum consisted mainly of secular subjects - Jewish history and Yiddish language.
Address
131 Maria Street
Time Period
1911-1960
Scope Note
The precursor to the Peretz School, the Jewish National Radical School was opened in 1911. It was founded on the principles of sympathy for the working classes, secularism, and the desire to perpetuate secular Jewish culture through the Yiddish language. The curriculum consisted mainly of secular subjects - Jewish history and Yiddish language.
History
Due to financial problems, in 1916 the school was taken over by the Workman’s Circle (Arbeiter Ring) and renamed the I.L. Peretz School after the well-known Yiddish author and playwright Isaac Leib Peretz. After seeing great popularity and strong attendance, the school expanded to other branches around the city, including this branch at 131 Maria Street in the west Toronto Junction. After about 50 years as an educational institution, the I.L. Peretz School closed its doors. Isaac Matenko (1874-1960) was one of the founding teachers and later, the principal of the Toronto Yiddish National Radical School. He was later affiliated with the Junction branch of the Peretz School, where he was a teacher and principal. He worked tirelessly to preserve and promote secular Jewish culture and the Yiddish language in Toronto.
Category
Education
Source
Landmarks
Address
336 Annette Street
Source
Landmarks

The Jewish Orphanage was established in 1909 in a rented house in the Ward, later moving to 218 Simcoe St. In 1921 the name was changed to Jewish Childrens' Home, and in 1922 a stately house at 336 Annette St. was purchased, called "Oakland". It had been designed by James Ellis. The house could accommodate 35 children.
Address
336 Annette Street
Time Period
1922-1935
Scope Note
The Jewish Orphanage was established in 1909 in a rented house in the Ward, later moving to 218 Simcoe St. In 1921 the name was changed to Jewish Childrens' Home, and in 1922 a stately house at 336 Annette St. was purchased, called "Oakland". It had been designed by James Ellis. The house could accommodate 35 children.
History
The children went to local schools and attended Jewish Sunday School, as well as having Bar Mitzvah training. They were provided with clothing and meals, and had the opportunity to enjoy activities taking place within the home, such as cooking and drama. The Home was closed in 1935 due to disagreements between the newly established Jewish Children's Bureau's (JCB) and the Jewish Childrens' Home (JCH) around child welfare policies, as well as a need for the Federation to cut costs.
Category
Social Service
Source
Landmarks
Address
119 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The Balfour Building is a Toronto landmark and designated heritage building that is located at 119 Spadina Avenue. It was designed by Benjamin Brown and was one of his most important commissions.
Address
119 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1930-Present
Scope Note
The Balfour Building is a Toronto landmark and designated heritage building that is located at 119 Spadina Avenue. It was designed by Benjamin Brown and was one of his most important commissions.
History
Built in 1930, the building is twelve storeys high and crowned by a two storey tower. It is considered one of the finest examples of Art Deco architecture in Toronto. Initially, many Jewish garment businesses were located in the building. It currently houses offices for several graphic design and advertising firms, shops and a post office. The Balfour Building was declared a heritage building by order of City Council in July of 1989.
Category
Architecture
Manufacturer
Source
Landmarks
Address
225 Richmond Street West
Source
Landmarks

The Gelber Brothers, Louis and Moses, were born in what is now Austria in the late nineteenth century. Together they founded the Imperial Clothing Company, which later became Gelber Brothers Woolens. Their head office was designed by Benjamin Brown and was located in the Gelber Building at 217-225 Richmond Street West. Although selling woolens was their main business, the brothers had other investments, including ownership of a service station at Simcoe and Richmond and a public garage at 287 Spadina Avenue.
Address
225 Richmond Street West
Time Period
1923-present
Scope Note
The Gelber Brothers, Louis and Moses, were born in what is now Austria in the late nineteenth century. Together they founded the Imperial Clothing Company, which later became Gelber Brothers Woolens. Their head office was designed by Benjamin Brown and was located in the Gelber Building at 217-225 Richmond Street West. Although selling woolens was their main business, the brothers had other investments, including ownership of a service station at Simcoe and Richmond and a public garage at 287 Spadina Avenue.
History
The Gelber Brothers were prominent members of the Toronto Jewish community. They were involved in many philanthropic and charitable activities and were active in many Jewish organizations.
Category
Architecture
Manufacturer
Source
Landmarks
Address
197/199 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The Empire Clothing Company building was another fine example of commercial buildings designed by Benjamin Brown. The building was located at 197/199 Spadina Avenue at the corner of Phoebe Street and Spadina Avenue. Brown built the original and a later addition to the building.
Address
197/199 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1923-present
Scope Note
The Empire Clothing Company building was another fine example of commercial buildings designed by Benjamin Brown. The building was located at 197/199 Spadina Avenue at the corner of Phoebe Street and Spadina Avenue. Brown built the original and a later addition to the building.
History
Mr. Abraham M. Schiffer and Mr. William Leibel were the co-owners of Empire Clothing Co. and Cornell Tailored Clothing Ltd. The Empire Clothing Company Building served as the headquarters for both businesses. The Empire Clothing Company manufactured men's clothing and sold it wholesale. Leibel and Schiffer were also close neighbours, living only a few houses apart. William Leibel was a prominent member of the Toronto Jewish community. He was involved in many philanthropic and charitable activities and was active in many Jewish organizations, particularly in the area of Jewish education.
Category
Architecture
Manufacturer
Source
Landmarks
Address
21 Dundas Square
Source
Landmarks

The six-storey Hermant Annex and 14-storey eastern tower were designed by Benjamin Brown in 1920 and 1930 respectively. The building is named after Percy Hermant and served as the headquarters for his company, Imperial Optical. The Hermant Building was built at Wilton Square - which was later renamed Dundas Square. Benjamin Brown's office was located in the Hermant Building in the 1940s. The offices of the Canadian Jewish Review were housed in the building on Dundas Square. The buildings were designated as heritage buildings in 1990.
Address
21 Dundas Square
Time Period
1930-present
Scope Note
The six-storey Hermant Annex and 14-storey eastern tower were designed by Benjamin Brown in 1920 and 1930 respectively. The building is named after Percy Hermant and served as the headquarters for his company, Imperial Optical. The Hermant Building was built at Wilton Square - which was later renamed Dundas Square. Benjamin Brown's office was located in the Hermant Building in the 1940s. The offices of the Canadian Jewish Review were housed in the building on Dundas Square. The buildings were designated as heritage buildings in 1990.
History
Percy Hermant was born in Mogilev, Russia in 1882. In 1897, he immigrated to Canada, arriving in New Brunswick, where he began working as a dry goods peddler. In 1900, he founded the Imperial Optical Company, the first prescription lens business in the Maritimes. This company eventually grew to be the largest company of its kind in the British Commonwealth. In addition to his successful business, he was very involved with philanthropic and community activities within Jewish and non-Jewish circles. He sponsored academic and musical scholarships.
Category
Architecture
Manufacturer
Medical
Source
Landmarks
Address
42 St George Street
Source
Landmarks

In 1919, Mr. Mendel Granatstein commissioned Benjamin Brown and Robert McConnell to design a three storey Classical Georgian style house located at 42 St. George Street. The house contained a unique feature -- a retractable roof used on Sukkoth. In 1947, the house was acquired by the University of Toronto and was used for a variety of purposes until it was demolished in 1999. The Bahen Centre for Information Technology now stands in its place.
Address
42 St George Street
Time Period
1919-1999
Scope Note
In 1919, Mr. Mendel Granatstein commissioned Benjamin Brown and Robert McConnell to design a three storey Classical Georgian style house located at 42 St. George Street. The house contained a unique feature -- a retractable roof used on Sukkoth. In 1947, the house was acquired by the University of Toronto and was used for a variety of purposes until it was demolished in 1999. The Bahen Centre for Information Technology now stands in its place.
History
Mr. Mendel Granatstein was a member of one of the early Jewish families of Toronto. In 1895, he founded M. Granatstein and Sons, Ltd., a junk dealing company, and by the early 20th century, he had become one of the most prosperous Jews in Toronto. Mr. Granatstein was also a community leader, having a hand in the foundation of Beth Jacob Synagogue.
Category
Architecture
Residences
Source
Landmarks
Address
Dundas and Elizabeth Streets
Source
Landmarks

Dr. Max Kates was a Jewish dentist in Toronto. He was married to Lillian Kates, who was the founder of Camp Arowhon, a popular Jewish summer camp in Algonquin Park.
Address
Dundas and Elizabeth Streets
Time Period
ca. 1921-present
Scope Note
Dr. Max Kates was a Jewish dentist in Toronto. He was married to Lillian Kates, who was the founder of Camp Arowhon, a popular Jewish summer camp in Algonquin Park.
History
This building was designed by Benjamin Brown and was commissioned by Dr. Kates to house several stores and offices. It still stands today at the corner of Dundas and Elizabeth Streets in the heart of Toronto’s former St. John’s Ward; the area that first received the thousands of Jewish immigrants fleeing the pogroms in Russia and Eastern Europe.
Category
Architecture
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Address
254-256 Victoria Street
Source
Landmarks

The six-storey Hermant Annex and 14-storey eastern tower were designed by Benjamin Brown in 1920 and 1930 respectively. The building is named after Percy Hermant and served as the headquarters for his company, Imperial Optical. The Hermant Building was built at Wilton Square - which was later renamed Dundas Square. Benjamin Brown's office was located in the Hermant Building in the 1940s. The offices of the Canadian Jewish Review were housed in the building on Dundas Square. The buildings were designated as heritage buildings in 1990.
Address
254-256 Victoria Street
Time Period
1920-present
Scope Note
The six-storey Hermant Annex and 14-storey eastern tower were designed by Benjamin Brown in 1920 and 1930 respectively. The building is named after Percy Hermant and served as the headquarters for his company, Imperial Optical. The Hermant Building was built at Wilton Square - which was later renamed Dundas Square. Benjamin Brown's office was located in the Hermant Building in the 1940s. The offices of the Canadian Jewish Review were housed in the building on Dundas Square. The buildings were designated as heritage buildings in 1990.
History
Percy Hermant was born in Mogilev, Russia in 1882. In 1897, he immigrated to Canada, arriving in New Brunswick, where he began working as a dry goods peddler. In 1900, he founded the Imperial Optical Company, the first prescription lens business in the Maritimes. This company eventually grew to be the largest company of its kind in the British Commonwealth. In addition to his successful business, he was very involved with philanthropic and community activities within Jewish and non-Jewish circles. He sponsored academic and musical scholarships.
Category
Architecture
Manufacturer
Medical
Source
Landmarks
Address
1110 Brydon Bay Road
Source
Landmarks

Camp Shalom was founded in 1948 by the Zionist Organization of Canada as a summer camp for youth between the ages of 9 and 13. Located in Gravenhurst, Ontario, Camp Shalom was one of the most successful of the Zionist camps. Camp Shalom was administered by the National Camps Association in conjunction with a regional committee, although, the daily operation and staffing of the camp was provided by Canadian Young Judaea. The camp still exists today and is jointly operated by the Toronto Zionist Council and Canadian Young Judaea.
Address
1110 Brydon Bay Road
Time Period
1948-present
Scope Note
Camp Shalom was founded in 1948 by the Zionist Organization of Canada as a summer camp for youth between the ages of 9 and 13. Located in Gravenhurst, Ontario, Camp Shalom was one of the most successful of the Zionist camps. Camp Shalom was administered by the National Camps Association in conjunction with a regional committee, although, the daily operation and staffing of the camp was provided by Canadian Young Judaea. The camp still exists today and is jointly operated by the Toronto Zionist Council and Canadian Young Judaea.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
367 Niece Road
Source
Landmarks

Camp Kvutza was established in 1944 by Habonim, a Labour Zionist youth movement, on a farm on the northeastern shores of Lake Erie in Lowbanks, Ontario. The camp was sponsored by the Pioneer Women (now Na’amat), the Poalei Zion and the Farband -- groups affliated with the Toronto Labour Zionist Movement. A major part of the programming at Camp Kvutza involved the celebration of Jewish history and culture and the teaching of Zionist ideals. Kvutza campers were taught to appreciate the values of hard work and love for Israel with an eye on encouraging aliyah. The camp closed in 1965.
Address
367 Niece Road
Time Period
1944-1965
Scope Note
Camp Kvutza was established in 1944 by Habonim, a Labour Zionist youth movement, on a farm on the northeastern shores of Lake Erie in Lowbanks, Ontario. The camp was sponsored by the Pioneer Women (now Na’amat), the Poalei Zion and the Farband -- groups affliated with the Toronto Labour Zionist Movement. A major part of the programming at Camp Kvutza involved the celebration of Jewish history and culture and the teaching of Zionist ideals. Kvutza campers were taught to appreciate the values of hard work and love for Israel with an eye on encouraging aliyah. The camp closed in 1965.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
Church St. and Rossland Road, west side of Duffins Creek
Source
Landmarks

The Toronto Workmen’s Circle was established in 1909 to promote workers rights, the Yiddish language and secular Jewish culture. In addition to running schools, the group founded Camp Yungvelt (Young World) on Lake Wilcox in 1925. A year later, the camp moved to a parcel of land in Pickering donated by a group of Workmen’s Circle members who had purchased the land to establish a Jewish cottage colony. The Workmen’s Circle relied on the generous support of its members at a time when the Jewish community supported the study of Hebrew over Yiddish. In addition to recreational activities, the camp focused on teaching Yiddish language and culture. The camp closed in 1971.
Address
Church St. and Rossland Road, west side of Duffins Creek
Time Period
1925-1971
Scope Note
The Toronto Workmen’s Circle was established in 1909 to promote workers rights, the Yiddish language and secular Jewish culture. In addition to running schools, the group founded Camp Yungvelt (Young World) on Lake Wilcox in 1925. A year later, the camp moved to a parcel of land in Pickering donated by a group of Workmen’s Circle members who had purchased the land to establish a Jewish cottage colony. The Workmen’s Circle relied on the generous support of its members at a time when the Jewish community supported the study of Hebrew over Yiddish. In addition to recreational activities, the camp focused on teaching Yiddish language and culture. The camp closed in 1971.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
Morrison Lake
Source
Landmarks

Irene Granovsky, known to staff and campers as “Mrs. G”, founded Balfour Manor Camp on Morrison Lake in the Muskoka Region in 1935. Having previous experience running a day camp on Lake Simcoe, she set out with her husband Ted to create an overnight camp. The property, which had an existing log cabin thought to resemble an English Manor, along with Lord Balfour (architect of the Balfour Declaration that established Palestine as a home for Jewish people in 1917), served as inspiration for the camp name.
Address
Morrison Lake
Time Period
1935-1952
Scope Note
Irene Granovsky, known to staff and campers as “Mrs. G”, founded Balfour Manor Camp on Morrison Lake in the Muskoka Region in 1935. Having previous experience running a day camp on Lake Simcoe, she set out with her husband Ted to create an overnight camp. The property, which had an existing log cabin thought to resemble an English Manor, along with Lord Balfour (architect of the Balfour Declaration that established Palestine as a home for Jewish people in 1917), served as inspiration for the camp name.
History
In addition to activities such as swimming, tennis and horseback riding at Balfour Manor Camp, there were adventurous canoe tripping expeditions down the Severn River to destinations such as Port Carling, Gloucester Pool and Lake Huron. Above all, the camp was recognized for its arts program. At the end of each summer, campers would perform in lavish large-scale productions of musicals and operas. Parents and local cottagers were always invited to enjoy the end of summer performances. The camp closed in 1952.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
2401-05 Ontario Street
Source
Landmarks

The Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home located in Bronte and then Tollandale, was first organized in 1919 by Dora Till, Ida Siegel and Lillian Clavir, members of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society. It was formed in order to provide convalescent care for victims of the influenza epidemic by offering a two week holiday to mothers and young children. First located in a home in Bronte, now Oakville, the Rest Home was officially brought under the auspices of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society in 1921. By this time the Home had moved from being a convalescent home to being a place of respite in the country for women and children of modest means, although they continued to assist those with poor health.
Address
2401-05 Ontario Street
Time Period
1919-1941
Scope Note
The Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home located in Bronte and then Tollandale, was first organized in 1919 by Dora Till, Ida Siegel and Lillian Clavir, members of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society. It was formed in order to provide convalescent care for victims of the influenza epidemic by offering a two week holiday to mothers and young children. First located in a home in Bronte, now Oakville, the Rest Home was officially brought under the auspices of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society in 1921. By this time the Home had moved from being a convalescent home to being a place of respite in the country for women and children of modest means, although they continued to assist those with poor health.
History
By the late 1930s, a search for a replacement location was underway, as the Bronte Rest Home became ill equipped to deal with the increased demand, primarily due to unsuitable grounds and facilities. In 1941, after selling the home in Bronte, the Mothers' and Babes' Rest Home Committee built a second home on eleven acres of lakefront property in Tollandale, near Barrie. In 1948, the Rest Home was admitted into the Jewish Camp Council, which helped the Committee administer the camp and fill staffing vacancies. Following this move, the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society changed its name to the Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home Association, to better reflect the fact that the home was their only remaining activity. In 1957, the camp expanded its mandate to include the addition of two new programs at its facilities: Camp Family Fun for fathers, mothers, and children up to the age of nine and Camp Good Fellowship, a program for senior citizens over the age of 60. Dora Till was the Rest Home's founding president for a total of 15 years and remained active with the home until it ultimately closed in 1977.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
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