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92 records – page 1 of 2.
Address
23 Henry Street
Source
Landmarks

The Beth Jacob Synagogue (also known as the Henry Street Shul) was founded by Toronto’s Polish-Jewish Community, as the successor of an older, smaller synagogue on Elm Street. It was the first synagogue in Toronto designed by a Jewish architect--Benjamin Brown.
Address
23 Henry Street
Time Period
1922-1969
Scope Note
The Beth Jacob Synagogue (also known as the Henry Street Shul) was founded by Toronto’s Polish-Jewish Community, as the successor of an older, smaller synagogue on Elm Street. It was the first synagogue in Toronto designed by a Jewish architect--Benjamin Brown.
History
The grand new synagogue was dedicated in 1922, at a cost of $156,000, and could accommodate up to 800 worshippers. It was built in the Romanesque style. It was notable for its vaulted ceiling capped by a large dome and four smaller ones; stained glass windows and retractable roof used on Sukkot; a marble-lined mikvah in the basement; and an apartment for the caretaker (shammas) in the rear. The original ark (Aron Kodesh) is in Beth Jacob's current synagogue on Overbrook Ave in the Bathurst Manor. The original building was eventually sold and converted into a church. It is the current site of the Holy Trinity Russian Orthodox Church.
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
187 Brunswick Avenue
Source
Landmarks

During the early 1980s, newcomers to the synagogue introduced an alternative egalitarian service in the basement, which eventually became the main service in the sanctuary. The Synagogue underwent renovations in the early 1980s, and again more recently, in an effort to accommodate its new members and to provide for its future as a neighborhood synagogue. In recent years, the First Narayever has become one of the most well-attended and active synagogues in the downtown area.
Address
187 Brunswick Avenue
Time Period
1914-present
Scope Note
During the early 1980s, newcomers to the synagogue introduced an alternative egalitarian service in the basement, which eventually became the main service in the sanctuary. The Synagogue underwent renovations in the early 1980s, and again more recently, in an effort to accommodate its new members and to provide for its future as a neighborhood synagogue. In recent years, the First Narayever has become one of the most well-attended and active synagogues in the downtown area.
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
25 Bellevue Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The congregation of Rodfei Sholom Anshei Kiev, commonly known as the Kiever, dates back to 1912. The first few members had little means for funding a new synagogue in 1912, so services at this time were held in a rented house on Centre Avenue in the Ward.
Address
25 Bellevue Avenue
Time Period
1927-present
Scope Note
The congregation of Rodfei Sholom Anshei Kiev, commonly known as the Kiever, dates back to 1912. The first few members had little means for funding a new synagogue in 1912, so services at this time were held in a rented house on Centre Avenue in the Ward.
History
In 1917, the Kiever acquired a house at 25 Bellevue Avenue in Kensington Market and by 1923 the Kiever congregation raised enough funds to build a synagogue large enough to accommodate its growing numbers. The Kiever Executive contracted Benjamin Swartz, a Jewish architect, to design the current synagogue at 25 Bellevue, which replaced the two houses that had been used for services. The Synagogue was completed in 1927, after three years of construction. Today, the Kiever is a vibrant synagogue and one of a handful of synagogues remaining in the downtown area.
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
91 Denison Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The Anshei Libavitch Synagogue was formed around 1905 and was first located on Centre Ave in the St. John's Ward. It later moved to Denison Ave where it remained until its merger with Shaarei Tefillah on Bathurst Street in 1976.
Address
91 Denison Avenue
Time Period
1905-1976
Scope Note
The Anshei Libavitch Synagogue was formed around 1905 and was first located on Centre Ave in the St. John's Ward. It later moved to Denison Ave where it remained until its merger with Shaarei Tefillah on Bathurst Street in 1976.
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
134 D'Arcy Street
Source
Landmarks

The Shedlover Shul was a small synagogue established by immigrants from Szydlow, Poland in 1914. The Yiddish and Russian pronunciation is Shidlov.
Address
134 D'Arcy Street
Time Period
1914-
Scope Note
The Shedlover Shul was a small synagogue established by immigrants from Szydlow, Poland in 1914. The Yiddish and Russian pronunciation is Shidlov.
Source
Landmarks
Address
20 Brunswick Avenue
Source
Landmarks
Address
20 Brunswick Avenue
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
327 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The congregation was formed in 1909 and its first building opened on Spadina Ave in 1921. Around 1960, the congregation moved to the Bathurst and Sheppard area after the synagogue wsa damaged by a fire. In 1975, they merged with Beth Emeth Beit Yehuda
Address
327 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1909-1975
Scope Note
The congregation was formed in 1909 and its first building opened on Spadina Ave in 1921. Around 1960, the congregation moved to the Bathurst and Sheppard area after the synagogue wsa damaged by a fire. In 1975, they merged with Beth Emeth Beit Yehuda
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
69 McCaul Street
Source
Landmarks

Beth Hamidrash Hagadol, more commonly known as the McCaul Street Synagogue, was first established in 1887 and was originally located above a grocery store (owned by A. Broudy) at the corner of Richmond and York Streets. Due to financial instability, the location changed frequently during its early years, eventually to the top of a blacksmith shop. In 1899, a new home was purchased at the corner of Simcoe and Pearl Streets.
Address
69 McCaul Street
Time Period
1905-1952
Scope Note
Beth Hamidrash Hagadol, more commonly known as the McCaul Street Synagogue, was first established in 1887 and was originally located above a grocery store (owned by A. Broudy) at the corner of Richmond and York Streets. Due to financial instability, the location changed frequently during its early years, eventually to the top of a blacksmith shop. In 1899, a new home was purchased at the corner of Simcoe and Pearl Streets.
Jews from Russia, Galicia, Bucovina, Poland, Roumania, Latvia, Lithuania, White Russia and other countries, particpated in the establishment of the synagogue. The intenion with this synagogue was for it to be inclusive, regardless of country of origin.
History
In 1905, the enlarged congregation moved into a larger home, the former McCaul Street Methodist Church, which it quickly renovated and remodeled into a synagogue. The synagogue was renamed Beth Hamidrash Hagadol Chevra T'hilim. The shul thrived for the next 50 years on McCaul Street. In September of 1952, the synagogue and its sister synagogue Goel Tzedec amalgamated to form Beth Tzedec.
The first cantor was Yudel Breslin and in 1904, Mr. M. Shulman became the cantor. Rabbi Jacob Gordon was appointed in 1905.
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
58 Cecil Street
Source
Landmarks

This building was originally a church, built in 1981. The Ostrovtzer Society (a group of new immigrants from Ostrowiec, Poland bought the church in 1924. They changed the steeple to a dome. The synaogogue was known to have the best acoustics for cantors and many visiting cantors sang there.
Address
58 Cecil Street
Time Period
1924-1966
Scope Note
This building was originally a church, built in 1981. The Ostrovtzer Society (a group of new immigrants from Ostrowiec, Poland bought the church in 1924. They changed the steeple to a dome. The synaogogue was known to have the best acoustics for cantors and many visiting cantors sang there.
History
The building was sold 1966 and is currently used as a community centre for the Chinese community. The founders plaques and a chandelier with stars of David are still in place. The upper floor Ladies gallery was converted to office space and a library.
Source
Landmarks
Address
397 Markham Street
Source
Landmarks

The Shaarei Tzedek Congregation was founded by new Russian immigrants around 1901. The congregation’s first shul was situated originally on 29 Centre Avenue, south of Dundas on the east side of the street, in the vicinity of present-day Nathan Philips Square. Louis Gurofsky (1871-1934), a prominent member of the Jewish community and a business man, lived in a house at 397 Markham Street with his family. In 1937, following Gurofsky’s death in 1934, Shaarei Tzedek occupied the Markham Street house of the Gurofsky family and renovations were soon undertaken to convert the residence into a synagogue, designed by Benjamin Swartz.
Address
397 Markham Street
Time Period
1937-present
Scope Note
The Shaarei Tzedek Congregation was founded by new Russian immigrants around 1901. The congregation’s first shul was situated originally on 29 Centre Avenue, south of Dundas on the east side of the street, in the vicinity of present-day Nathan Philips Square. Louis Gurofsky (1871-1934), a prominent member of the Jewish community and a business man, lived in a house at 397 Markham Street with his family. In 1937, following Gurofsky’s death in 1934, Shaarei Tzedek occupied the Markham Street house of the Gurofsky family and renovations were soon undertaken to convert the residence into a synagogue, designed by Benjamin Swartz.
History
Following the Second World War, a second wave of Russian immigrants, many of whom were Holocaust survivors, found spiritual refuge at the Markham Street shul, and membership again began to rise. In the 1950s the shul employed the services of Rabbi Israel Frankel, a prominent Jewish scholar and one of the founders of the Toronto Jewish Public Library. As the Jewish community increasingly moved to the northern and outlying suburbs of Toronto, this general trend began to take its toll on the membership of the Shaarei Tzedek into the 1960s. The congregation was obliged to declare bankruptcy in 1968. However, a concerted fund-raising effort by Jewish community leaders in the area re-established the congregation in 1970, under the spiritual and administrative leadership of the shul’s president, Dr. Joseph Greenberg.
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Address
371 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Hyman's Books and Art was a popular locale for the literary crowd. Hebraists were known to spend time here, discussing the latest trends in the world of literature. The owner Ben Zimon Hyman was also a Hebrew teacher but had originally trained as an engineer both in Russia and at the University of Toronto.
Address
371 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1925-1973
Scope Note
Hyman's Books and Art was a popular locale for the literary crowd. Hebraists were known to spend time here, discussing the latest trends in the world of literature. The owner Ben Zimon Hyman was also a Hebrew teacher but had originally trained as an engineer both in Russia and at the University of Toronto.
History
The store was operated by Ben Zion Hyman and his wife Fanny. Their hours were 8:30 a.m. to 1pm daily (except for Saturday). There was a mimeograph machine, pop cooler, newspapers and a bar mitzvah registry. They carried Yiddish and Hebrew books, Judaica, tickets for the Standard Theatre, stationary, and school supplies. The store later moved to 412 Spadina Ave. (Donegan, Spadina Ave., p.138)
Category
Education
Arts
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Address
525 Dundas Street West
Source
Landmarks

Henry (Harry) Dworkin, husband of Dorothy (Goldstick) Dworkin, was born in 1886 in Russia and came to Canada in 1905. In the early years, Henry dispersed food to the hungry and helped people from Poland, Rumania, and Latvia after they settled in Canada. Henry opened E. & H. Dworkin Steamship and Bankers in 1917 with his brother Edward. The business continued as Dworkin Travel at 525 Dundas Street West. Dworkin Travel was the oldest travel agency in Toronto which also carried a wholesale tobacco business at the rear.
Address
525 Dundas Street West
Time Period
1917-1940s
Scope Note
Henry (Harry) Dworkin, husband of Dorothy (Goldstick) Dworkin, was born in 1886 in Russia and came to Canada in 1905. In the early years, Henry dispersed food to the hungry and helped people from Poland, Rumania, and Latvia after they settled in Canada. Henry opened E. & H. Dworkin Steamship and Bankers in 1917 with his brother Edward. The business continued as Dworkin Travel at 525 Dundas Street West. Dworkin Travel was the oldest travel agency in Toronto which also carried a wholesale tobacco business at the rear.
History
Henry was also the founder of the Labour Lyceum. Henry and Dorothy had one daughter, Ellen, whose nickname was Honey. He died in an auto accident in 1928 and 20,000 people attended the funeral.
Category
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Address
339 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The variety store was run by Mr. Coopersmith and his wife. Mrs. Coopersmith was involved in organizing the Mother's Day celebrations for the Labour League.
Address
339 Spadina Avenue
Scope Note
The variety store was run by Mr. Coopersmith and his wife. Mrs. Coopersmith was involved in organizing the Mother's Day celebrations for the Labour League.
Source
Landmarks
Address
305 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The Standard Barber Shop was owned by Benjamin and Gittel (nee Stillman) Barsh. Benjamin Barsh was also the music director for the Standard Theatre and played viola with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra.
Address
305 Spadina Avenue
Scope Note
The Standard Barber Shop was owned by Benjamin and Gittel (nee Stillman) Barsh. Benjamin Barsh was also the music director for the Standard Theatre and played viola with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra.
Category
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Address
374 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Gordon Melamed (6 Apr. 1927-16 Nov. 2004) was born to Morris and Zena Melamed. The Melamed family was originally from Russia. Morris Melamed served in the Russian army during the Russo-Japanese War. He was married to Zena Melamed and they had eleven children, Gordon being the only boy. Morris Melamed owned a dry goods store and the family were active members of the Toronto Jewish community.
Address
374 Spadina Avenue
Scope Note
Gordon Melamed (6 Apr. 1927-16 Nov. 2004) was born to Morris and Zena Melamed. The Melamed family was originally from Russia. Morris Melamed served in the Russian army during the Russo-Japanese War. He was married to Zena Melamed and they had eleven children, Gordon being the only boy. Morris Melamed owned a dry goods store and the family were active members of the Toronto Jewish community.
Category
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Address
332 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Walerstein's ice cream parlour was owned by Abraham Walerstein, who was originally from Hamilton, Ontario. He opened it in 1917 and it became a hang out for Social Democrats.
Address
332 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1917-unknown
Scope Note
Walerstein's ice cream parlour was owned by Abraham Walerstein, who was originally from Hamilton, Ontario. He opened it in 1917 and it became a hang out for Social Democrats.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
400 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks
Address
400 Spadina Avenue
Category
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Address
376 College Street
Source
Landmarks

Leon Koffler was born in Romania. He moved to Canada and settled in the Toronto area at the age of fifteen with his mother and his three sisters. He graduated from the Ontario College of Pharmacy in 1921, and two years later, opened his first pharmacy at 376 College Street. Leon lived in the apartment above his store with his wife Tiana [née. Reinhorn] and their son Murray.
Address
376 College Street
Time Period
1923
Scope Note
Leon Koffler was born in Romania. He moved to Canada and settled in the Toronto area at the age of fifteen with his mother and his three sisters. He graduated from the Ontario College of Pharmacy in 1921, and two years later, opened his first pharmacy at 376 College Street. Leon lived in the apartment above his store with his wife Tiana [née. Reinhorn] and their son Murray.
Category
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Address
9 Brunswick Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The Toronto Hebrew Religious School was established in 1907 to provide children with a Jewish education based on non-denominational, Zionist, and traditional Torah values. The school’s curriculum focused on the importance of the Jewish community and people (klal yisrael), as well as the responsibilities and privileges that being a Canadian citizen entailed. Being a staunchly Zionistic institution, all lessons were taught in Hebrew (ivrit bi ivrit). Originally situated on Simcoe Street, the school moved to its Brunswick Avenue location in 1925, and was known from then on as the Toronto Hebrew Free School and more informally as the Brunswick Avenue Talmud Torah. The building was designed by Jewish architect, Benjamin Brown.
Address
9 Brunswick Avenue
Time Period
1925-1946
Scope Note
The Toronto Hebrew Religious School was established in 1907 to provide children with a Jewish education based on non-denominational, Zionist, and traditional Torah values. The school’s curriculum focused on the importance of the Jewish community and people (klal yisrael), as well as the responsibilities and privileges that being a Canadian citizen entailed. Being a staunchly Zionistic institution, all lessons were taught in Hebrew (ivrit bi ivrit). Originally situated on Simcoe Street, the school moved to its Brunswick Avenue location in 1925, and was known from then on as the Toronto Hebrew Free School and more informally as the Brunswick Avenue Talmud Torah. The building was designed by Jewish architect, Benjamin Brown.
History
In 1946 the school became known officially as the Associated Hebrew Schools of Toronto. Having started initially as an afternoon and weekend school, in the 1940s the school began offering a full day program with its’ first grade 8 day school class graduating in 1951. From the Brunswick location, Associated branched out, and opened up branches further north, eventually establishing campuses on Finch Ave. and Neptune, where the schools are currently located.
Category
Education
Source
Landmarks
Address
494 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

In 1952, Edell married Dolly Weinstock, the daughter of Moishe and Sylvia Weinstock. They lived in the newly developed suburb of North York with their four children: Ethel, Simcha, Malka and Joseph. After 10 years of marriage, Dolly died and in 1966, he married Celia Rogen Hoffman.
Address
494 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1948
Scope Note
In 1952, Edell married Dolly Weinstock, the daughter of Moishe and Sylvia Weinstock. They lived in the newly developed suburb of North York with their four children: Ethel, Simcha, Malka and Joseph. After 10 years of marriage, Dolly died and in 1966, he married Celia Rogen Hoffman.
History
Sol Edell was a founding member and first president of the Clanton Park Congregation. He was actively involved in the construction of the synagogue and its development. He continued to be affiliated with Shomrai Shabbos where his grandfather Rabbi Yosef Weinreb had been the rabbi. He was also involved with Adas Israel, the synagogue in Hamilton where his wife Celia had been an active member. He was chair of the Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region -- Toronto Jewish Congress Archives Committee, which subsequently became the Ontario Jewish Archives.
Category
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Address
320 Bathurst Street
Source
Landmarks
Address
320 Bathurst Street
Time Period
1920-
Source
Landmarks
Address
355 College Street
Source
Landmarks
Address
355 College Street
Time Period
1930-
Source
Landmarks
Address
542 Dundas Street West
Source
Landmarks

The Yiddisher Zhurnal (or the Daily Hebrew Journal) was the primary organ for the Yiddish-speaking population in Toronto. This newspaper covered events in the Jewish world in Toronto and abroad. The paper was also a forum for Yiddish essayists. The long-time editor of the newspaper was Abraham Rhinewine (1887-1932). Born in Poland in 1887, he immigrated to London, England in 1902 and then came to Toronto with his wife Amy in 1907.
Address
542 Dundas Street West
Time Period
1910-1975
Scope Note
The Yiddisher Zhurnal (or the Daily Hebrew Journal) was the primary organ for the Yiddish-speaking population in Toronto. This newspaper covered events in the Jewish world in Toronto and abroad. The paper was also a forum for Yiddish essayists. The long-time editor of the newspaper was Abraham Rhinewine (1887-1932). Born in Poland in 1887, he immigrated to London, England in 1902 and then came to Toronto with his wife Amy in 1907.
History
The newspaper eventually moved to 409 College Street West (at Lippincott). The OJA has the Yiddisher Zhurnal on microfiche from 1915-1959.
Category
Political
Education
Arts
Source
Landmarks
Address
665 College Street
Source
Landmarks

Henry Weingluck (1902-1987) was an artist and Toronto art gallery owner, who immigrated to Canada in 1948 after being imprisoned in concentration camps in France during the Second World War. He studied at art academies in Crakow, Copenhagen, and Berlin and was a pupil of Professor Max Lieberman, president of Berlin's Academy of Arts prior to the Nazi takeover of Germany. Weingluck often depicted Jewish themes in his paintings, in a style he called "academic impressionism." He exhibited in Paris with Kandinsky and Chagall, as well as at the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Jewish Museum, Berlin. He painted portraits of such prominent figures as Albert Einstein, Max Schmelin, Yehudi Menuhin, and Chaim Weizmann.
Address
665 College Street
Scope Note
Henry Weingluck (1902-1987) was an artist and Toronto art gallery owner, who immigrated to Canada in 1948 after being imprisoned in concentration camps in France during the Second World War. He studied at art academies in Crakow, Copenhagen, and Berlin and was a pupil of Professor Max Lieberman, president of Berlin's Academy of Arts prior to the Nazi takeover of Germany. Weingluck often depicted Jewish themes in his paintings, in a style he called "academic impressionism." He exhibited in Paris with Kandinsky and Chagall, as well as at the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Jewish Museum, Berlin. He painted portraits of such prominent figures as Albert Einstein, Max Schmelin, Yehudi Menuhin, and Chaim Weizmann.
History
From 1933 to 1942, Weingluck lived in France and, during the Nazi occupation of France, was imprisoned in eight concentration camps from 1942 to 1945. The Nazis made use of his artistic talent as a barracks designer and portraitist. During this time, the Germans confiscated 375 of his paintings. After the war, Weingluck moved to Tangiers, Morocco, and then immigrated to Canada to join his brother in Toronto. Henry opened H. W. Art Gallery, at 665 College Street, around 1948, and then Weingluck's Art Gallery and Gift Shoppe at 623 College Street, in the 1950s. In 1950, he married his wife Rae (née Simon), whom he met in Canada. Henry died in Toronto in 1987.
Category
Arts
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Address
399 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

N. Hoffman Grocery was owned and operated by Nathan (Nahum) Hoffman and his wife Rivka. They first owned a grocery store at 339 Centre Avenue in St. John's Ward. In 1915, they moved their store to Spadina Ave.
Address
399 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1915-
Scope Note
N. Hoffman Grocery was owned and operated by Nathan (Nahum) Hoffman and his wife Rivka. They first owned a grocery store at 339 Centre Avenue in St. John's Ward. In 1915, they moved their store to Spadina Ave.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
193 Baldwin Street
Source
Landmarks

The Perlmutar Bakery was opened in 1911 by Arrin Perlmutar who had immigrated to Canada from the Ukraine by way of London, England. He opened the bakery on the main floor of his home while his family of seven lived upstairs. The bakery had a wood-burning brick oven until the 1960s, when the city forced them to convert to electric.
Address
193 Baldwin Street
Time Period
1911-1974
Scope Note
The Perlmutar Bakery was opened in 1911 by Arrin Perlmutar who had immigrated to Canada from the Ukraine by way of London, England. He opened the bakery on the main floor of his home while his family of seven lived upstairs. The bakery had a wood-burning brick oven until the 1960s, when the city forced them to convert to electric.
History
The bakery was best known for their onion buns and rye bread. Electric mixers were used for cakes and bread but almost every other step was done by hand. Bread baking was started by 10:00 pm so that there would be fresh bread to deliver in the morning. The bakery closed in 1974.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
29 Baldwin Street
Source
Landmarks

Mandel’s opened between 1913-1920. It was initially owned by Harry Mandel. After 1944, it was owned by one of his sons William Mandel. And, in the 1950s, it was owned by the brothers Saul, Abraham, Ben, and William Mandel, from approx. From 1960 to approximately 1965, it was owned by William Mandel (exclusively).
Address
29 Baldwin Street
Time Period
1915-1970
Scope Note
Mandel’s opened between 1913-1920. It was initially owned by Harry Mandel. After 1944, it was owned by one of his sons William Mandel. And, in the 1950s, it was owned by the brothers Saul, Abraham, Ben, and William Mandel, from approx. From 1960 to approximately 1965, it was owned by William Mandel (exclusively).
History
Mandel's Creamery manufactured cream cheese, cottage cheese, sour cream, and butter milk under the labels Mandel Bros. & Silver Brand. They also manufactured for private label brands and other wholesale and retail customers. They also sold wholesale butter, eggs, and hard cheese which they did not manufacture. Low salt & low fat cottage was a specialty sold to institutions such as Baycrest Hospital. Their customers included supermarkets, bakeries, restaurants, institutions, resorts, and summer camps. There were also retail sales out of the store front at 29 Baldwin St. The business was sold around 1965 to Mr. Bricks and Mr. Caplan who then sold it to Western Creamery some years later.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
170 Brunswick Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Kalmen Greenspan & Sons was a butcher shop located on Brunswick Avenue.
Address
170 Brunswick Avenue
Scope Note
Kalmen Greenspan & Sons was a butcher shop located on Brunswick Avenue.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
319 Augusta Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Sam Gryfe started out peddling baked goods in Hamilton, Ontario around 1915. A store eventually opened at 319 Augusta Avenue in Kensington Market and operated during the 1930s. The bakery is now located on Bathurst Street. The bakery was also known as Crown Bakery. There was also a location in cottage country at Jackson's Point on Lake Simcoe.
Address
319 Augusta Avenue
Time Period
1930
Scope Note
Sam Gryfe started out peddling baked goods in Hamilton, Ontario around 1915. A store eventually opened at 319 Augusta Avenue in Kensington Market and operated during the 1930s. The bakery is now located on Bathurst Street. The bakery was also known as Crown Bakery. There was also a location in cottage country at Jackson's Point on Lake Simcoe.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
182 Brunswick Avenue
Source
Landmarks
Address
182 Brunswick Avenue
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
295 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Harry and Jennie Shopsowitz started Shopsy's Delicatessen, a family business in 1921. Harry died in October 1945 and the business was passed along to his sons, Sam Shopsowitz and Izzy Shopsowitz. The business grew and became known as Shopsy’s. Eventually, Sam opened a meat processing plant, in addition to the restaurants, and by 1947, he became known as the "the corned beef king" in advertisements. Shopsy's corned beef and hotdogs were sold in grocery stores.
Address
295 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1921-1983
Scope Note
Harry and Jennie Shopsowitz started Shopsy's Delicatessen, a family business in 1921. Harry died in October 1945 and the business was passed along to his sons, Sam Shopsowitz and Izzy Shopsowitz. The business grew and became known as Shopsy’s. Eventually, Sam opened a meat processing plant, in addition to the restaurants, and by 1947, he became known as the "the corned beef king" in advertisements. Shopsy's corned beef and hotdogs were sold in grocery stores.
History
Shopsy's became an institution in the city where the likes of Bob Hope, Al Waxman, Dennis Hull, and Scott Bowman were regular customers. Sam suffered a stroke in 1982 and died in September 1984 at age 63. After 62 years on Spadina, the restaurant moved to Yonge Street at Front Street in March 1983.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
71 Kensington Avenue
Source
Landmarks

This store was owned and operated by Harry Trachter and his wife Becky (Cooper) Trachter.
Address
71 Kensington Avenue
Scope Note
This store was owned and operated by Harry Trachter and his wife Becky (Cooper) Trachter.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
649 College Street
Source
Landmarks

Moishe (Morris) Shternshis (ca. 1893-1976) was married to Fanny Rumianek (ca. 1896-1991). Moishe Stern owned and operated a dairy and delivered milk and other dairy products.
Address
649 College Street
Scope Note
Moishe (Morris) Shternshis (ca. 1893-1976) was married to Fanny Rumianek (ca. 1896-1991). Moishe Stern owned and operated a dairy and delivered milk and other dairy products.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
420 College Street
Source
Landmarks

Joseph Gary and Goldie (nee Lawrence) Gary married in 1921 in Rochester, N.Y. Shortly thereafter they moved to Toronto. Joseph and Goldie had three children; daughters Ethel (Halter) and Shirley (Cohen), and son Leslie. They owned and operated a grocery store on College Street. In 1950, after three years of visiting the region, Joseph and Goldie purchased a home on Amelia Street in Pontypool, ON. As the area was a popular summer resort spot for vacationing Jews from the 1940s to the 1960s, Joseph and Goldie decided to build 10 cottages on their land for rental, which they named Gary's Cottages. The area was relatively cheap and had a pond as its swimming spot. Kosher meals would often be brought in for the vacationers who arrived on two trains daily from Union station. The cottages were sold around 1970 and are no longer in existence, however their home is still standing.
Address
420 College Street
Scope Note
Joseph Gary and Goldie (nee Lawrence) Gary married in 1921 in Rochester, N.Y. Shortly thereafter they moved to Toronto. Joseph and Goldie had three children; daughters Ethel (Halter) and Shirley (Cohen), and son Leslie. They owned and operated a grocery store on College Street. In 1950, after three years of visiting the region, Joseph and Goldie purchased a home on Amelia Street in Pontypool, ON. As the area was a popular summer resort spot for vacationing Jews from the 1940s to the 1960s, Joseph and Goldie decided to build 10 cottages on their land for rental, which they named Gary's Cottages. The area was relatively cheap and had a pond as its swimming spot. Kosher meals would often be brought in for the vacationers who arrived on two trains daily from Union station. The cottages were sold around 1970 and are no longer in existence, however their home is still standing.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
234 Augusta Avenue
Source
Landmarks
Address
234 Augusta Avenue
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
231 Augusta Avenue
Source
Landmarks
Address
231 Augusta Avenue
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
322 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Opened in 1946 when the neighbourhood was still teaming with Jews working and living in the neighbourhood, this deli was one of the last to close in the area, in 1946. The Switzer family lived at 35 Nassau Street.
Address
322 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1946-1991
Scope Note
Opened in 1946 when the neighbourhood was still teaming with Jews working and living in the neighbourhood, this deli was one of the last to close in the area, in 1946. The Switzer family lived at 35 Nassau Street.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
338 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

United Bakers Dairy Restaurant was first established by Aaron and Sarah Ladovsky in 1912 on Dundas Street at Bay Street in the Ward. They moved the restaurant to 338 Spadina Ave. in 1920. Aaron Ladovsky was involved in a number of community organizations. He was instrumental in founding the Kieltzer Society of Toronto in 1913; a community based immigrant-aid association extending aid to Kielcers in Poland and around the world. Ladovsky remained an active member of the organization until his death on April 5, 1960. His restaurant provided a welcome gathering place for the Jewish community, serving traditional dishes and maintaining a friendly open-door policy. Aaron Ladovsky was known for his generosity and claimed that no one, whether they had money or not, left his restaurant hungry. The United Bakers' menu was mainly based on Sarah’s original recipes, and continues to be so to this day.
Address
338 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1920-1986
Scope Note
United Bakers Dairy Restaurant was first established by Aaron and Sarah Ladovsky in 1912 on Dundas Street at Bay Street in the Ward. They moved the restaurant to 338 Spadina Ave. in 1920. Aaron Ladovsky was involved in a number of community organizations. He was instrumental in founding the Kieltzer Society of Toronto in 1913; a community based immigrant-aid association extending aid to Kielcers in Poland and around the world. Ladovsky remained an active member of the organization until his death on April 5, 1960. His restaurant provided a welcome gathering place for the Jewish community, serving traditional dishes and maintaining a friendly open-door policy. Aaron Ladovsky was known for his generosity and claimed that no one, whether they had money or not, left his restaurant hungry. The United Bakers' menu was mainly based on Sarah’s original recipes, and continues to be so to this day.
History
Aaron and Sarah had twin sons, Herman and Samuel. During the Second World War, Herman served overseas as an electrician in the Canadian army show with comics Johnny Wayne and Frank Shuster. After returning from the war, he married Dora Macklin in 1947, a registered nurse from Regina. He also began to take over management of the family business. Later, Herman's son Philip and daughter Ruth would follow in his footsteps, first helping to run the restaurant with him and later taking over management. United Bakers remained on Spadina Avenue for 66 years - until 1986 when it moved to its current location at 506 Lawrence Avenue West, off of Bathurst Street. Herman was an active fixture in the restaurant until his death on January 6, 2002. He also supported and was involved in the work of the Ontario Jewish Archives over the years.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
275 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Goldenberg's restaurant, which was kosher, was located at 275 Spadina Ave and was owned by Mr Joseph S. Goldenberg. He made additions to the restaurant in 1929 and 1935 by architect Benjamin Brown.
Address
275 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1925-
Scope Note
Goldenberg's restaurant, which was kosher, was located at 275 Spadina Ave and was owned by Mr Joseph S. Goldenberg. He made additions to the restaurant in 1929 and 1935 by architect Benjamin Brown.
History
The restaurant was originally located in the Ward at 63 Elizabeth Street.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
350 College Street
Source
Landmarks

Wellts delicatessen was founded by Peter and Fannie Wellts in the 1910s at 350 College Street. Peter Wellts was born in Tarnigrad, Poland in 1888 and Fannie Brown was born in New York City in 1889. They met in New York and moved with Fannie’s family to Toronto in 1910. Peter worked in the garment district prior at the start of the restaurant business. Peter and Fannie married in Toronto on November 26, 1910. They had two daughters Sylvia (b. August 26, 1911) (m. Walfish) and Ethel (b. January 7, 1928) (m. Rochwerg). They lived in an apartment above the delicatessen. When Ethel married her husband Nathan Rochwerg in 1948, they moved in with Fannie and Peter above the deli. Ethel and Nathan had three children Martin, Arlene (m. Kochberg), and Sidney. When Peter was in his 70s, it was decided that the family would move north into the Bathurst Manor and close the deli. Peter had a heart attack on December 26, 1959, before the move, and Fannie moved in with Nathan and Ethel and their three children. The deli closed in 1959.
Address
350 College Street
Time Period
1912-1959
Scope Note
Wellts delicatessen was founded by Peter and Fannie Wellts in the 1910s at 350 College Street. Peter Wellts was born in Tarnigrad, Poland in 1888 and Fannie Brown was born in New York City in 1889. They met in New York and moved with Fannie’s family to Toronto in 1910. Peter worked in the garment district prior at the start of the restaurant business. Peter and Fannie married in Toronto on November 26, 1910. They had two daughters Sylvia (b. August 26, 1911) (m. Walfish) and Ethel (b. January 7, 1928) (m. Rochwerg). They lived in an apartment above the delicatessen. When Ethel married her husband Nathan Rochwerg in 1948, they moved in with Fannie and Peter above the deli. Ethel and Nathan had three children Martin, Arlene (m. Kochberg), and Sidney. When Peter was in his 70s, it was decided that the family would move north into the Bathurst Manor and close the deli. Peter had a heart attack on December 26, 1959, before the move, and Fannie moved in with Nathan and Ethel and their three children. The deli closed in 1959.
History
The deli was known for 5 cent pastrami/corned beef sandwiches sold during the depression. Peter Wellts never let anyone go hungry during this period. They had Vernor's ginger ale on tap during a time when everything was in bottles. Deliveries would come in through the backyard by the garage. It was kosher. Ethel remembers people coming in to use the phone in the kitchen or the washroom in the basement.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
44 St. George Street
Source
Landmarks

The Toronto Section of the National Council of Jewish Women initially operated out of 2 rented rooms and then later at a house on McCaul Street. In 1922, on its 25th anniversary, they became officially incorporated and purchased Community House at 44 St. George Street.
Address
44 St. George Street
Time Period
1922-[ca. 1964]
Scope Note
The Toronto Section of the National Council of Jewish Women initially operated out of 2 rented rooms and then later at a house on McCaul Street. In 1922, on its 25th anniversary, they became officially incorporated and purchased Community House at 44 St. George Street.
History
Many activities of the Toronto section of the National Council of Jewish Women operated from this building including Camp Camperdown for Girls, Jewish Girl Guides, a big sister program, classes in sewing, citizenship, and English. There was also a free legal bureau. Additionally, the building was used by a number of youth groups and clubs during a time when adequate meeting and recreation space was hard to find including the Jewish Girls Club. The Jewish Community Centre Association, formed in the fall of 1936, was located at this building. They operated a variety of classes including cooking, sewing, journalism, language, dance and art classes. They also operated a summer nursery school. Under the auspices of the Canadian Jewish Congress, the Community House also became a Service Mens Club, used as a place of refuge during the Second World War for members of the Canadian military on active service. The NCJW moved to a building on Bathurst, north of Sheppard in 1964.
Category
Private Clubs
Organization
Source
Landmarks
Address
24 Cecil Street
Source
Landmarks

The Labour Zionist Order was an outgrowth of the Labour Zionist party in Israel (the Mapai party). They carried out a number of different functions. They were pro-labour and pro-Zionist. They acted as a mutual benefit society—the Labour Zionist Alliance or Farband, formally known as the Jewish National Workers Alliance or Farband Labour Zionist Order. They also operated a school for children called the Farband Folks Shule (later Bialik Hebrew Day School). There was a fundraising organization that they oversaw called the Israel Histadrut of Toronto whose annual campaign raised money for the Israel Histadrut in Israel (the Federation of Labour in Israel), founded in 1920. The campaign money was used to fund economic, trade union, military, social, and cultural activities in Israel, as well as to provide a comprehensive system of health insurance and hospital services to workers. The Israel Histadrut campaign in Toronto had an autonomous executive board, however it's activities were overseen by the Labour Zionist Order.
Address
24 Cecil Street
Time Period
1922-
Scope Note
The Labour Zionist Order was an outgrowth of the Labour Zionist party in Israel (the Mapai party). They carried out a number of different functions. They were pro-labour and pro-Zionist. They acted as a mutual benefit society—the Labour Zionist Alliance or Farband, formally known as the Jewish National Workers Alliance or Farband Labour Zionist Order. They also operated a school for children called the Farband Folks Shule (later Bialik Hebrew Day School). There was a fundraising organization that they oversaw called the Israel Histadrut of Toronto whose annual campaign raised money for the Israel Histadrut in Israel (the Federation of Labour in Israel), founded in 1920. The campaign money was used to fund economic, trade union, military, social, and cultural activities in Israel, as well as to provide a comprehensive system of health insurance and hospital services to workers. The Israel Histadrut campaign in Toronto had an autonomous executive board, however it's activities were overseen by the Labour Zionist Order.
History
The Labour Zionist Order purchased the house at 24 Cecil Street in 1922 and established a library in it. It was called the Farband Institute.
Category
Political
Organization
Source
Landmarks
Address
15 Brunswick Avenue
Source
Landmarks

At the turn of the twentieth-century, the Jewish population of Toronto grew with large numbers of Eastern European families fleeing hardship back home. Soon, a variety of clubs began forming, providing a place for Jewish boys and girls to participate in athletic and social programming. In 1919, several of the athletic and social groups decided to amalgamate and formed an umbrella organization known as the Hebrew Association of Young Men’s and Young Women’s Clubs. By 1930, they were known as the YM-YWHA (Young Men’s and Young Women’s Hebrew Association. Through the 1920s and 30s, they occupied a number of facilities in the Brunswick Avenue and College Street area.
Address
15 Brunswick Avenue
Time Period
1937
Scope Note
At the turn of the twentieth-century, the Jewish population of Toronto grew with large numbers of Eastern European families fleeing hardship back home. Soon, a variety of clubs began forming, providing a place for Jewish boys and girls to participate in athletic and social programming. In 1919, several of the athletic and social groups decided to amalgamate and formed an umbrella organization known as the Hebrew Association of Young Men’s and Young Women’s Clubs. By 1930, they were known as the YM-YWHA (Young Men’s and Young Women’s Hebrew Association. Through the 1920s and 30s, they occupied a number of facilities in the Brunswick Avenue and College Street area.
History
As a result of the overcrowding and de-centralized facilities, in 1937, the YM-YWHA constructed its own athletic building at 15 Brunswick Avenue, next door to the Talmud Torah, to ease the overcrowding. Similar to the JCCs of today, the early YM-YWHA provided a sense of Jewish identity and camaraderie through physical, educational, cultural and community based programming.
Category
Arts
Education
Private Clubs
Source
Landmarks
Address
12 Major Street
Source
Landmarks

The YM-YWHA used a building on Major Street for their after-school children's programs when they out-grew their space on Brunswick Ave.
Address
12 Major Street
Time Period
[ca. 1940]-1953
Scope Note
The YM-YWHA used a building on Major Street for their after-school children's programs when they out-grew their space on Brunswick Ave.
Category
Education
Private Clubs
Source
Landmarks
Address
179 Beverley Street
Source
Landmarks

The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto (FJPT) was made a charitable organization under the laws of Ontario in March, 1917. Its central goal was to end the frequent, uncontrolled, and competitive fund soliciting by a wide range of individual Toronto Jewish philanthropic and social service institutions and instead substitute a single coordinated city-wide community fundraising effort. This would ensure adequate and accountable funding for all its affiliated organizations and agencies in Toronto. The first office of the FJPT was at 206 Beverley St., but by 1924 it was headquartered at 218 Simcoe St. and by 1928 it had moved to 179 Beverley St., which was renamed "Scheuer House" after the FJPT's first president, Edmund Scheuer.
Address
179 Beverley Street
Time Period
1928-1945
Scope Note
The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto (FJPT) was made a charitable organization under the laws of Ontario in March, 1917. Its central goal was to end the frequent, uncontrolled, and competitive fund soliciting by a wide range of individual Toronto Jewish philanthropic and social service institutions and instead substitute a single coordinated city-wide community fundraising effort. This would ensure adequate and accountable funding for all its affiliated organizations and agencies in Toronto. The first office of the FJPT was at 206 Beverley St., but by 1924 it was headquartered at 218 Simcoe St. and by 1928 it had moved to 179 Beverley St., which was renamed "Scheuer House" after the FJPT's first president, Edmund Scheuer.
History
Original affiliated agencies of the FJPT were: the Ladies Co-operative Board, the Jewish Orphans' Home, the Jewish Girls Club, the Junior Council of Jewish Women, the Hebrew Ladies Maternity Aid and Sewing Circle, the Hebrew Young ladies Boot and Shoe Society, the Sewing Circle, the Jewish Branch of the Big Brotherhood Movement, the Hebrew Free Loan Society, the Jewish Dispensary, and the Hebrew Burial Society. In 1924, six new agencies were added to the FJPT. They were: Mount Sinai Hospital, the Jewish Boys' and Girls' Camp, Jewish Big Sisters, the Family Welfare Bureau, the Federation Health Clinic and the Federation Employment Bureau.
Category
Organization
Social Service
Source
Landmarks
Address
150 Beverley Street
Source
Landmarks

The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto was made a charitable organization under the laws of Ontario in March, 1917. Its central goal was to end the frequent, uncontrolled, and competitive fund soliciting by a wide range of individual Toronto Jewish philanthropic and social service institutions and instead substitute a single coordinated city-wide community fundraising effort. This would ensure adequate and accountable funding for all its affiliated organizations and agencies in Toronto. The first office of the FJPT was at 206 Beverley St., but by 1924 it was headquartered at 218 Simcoe St. and by 1928 it had moved to 179 Beverley St., which was renamed "Scheuer House" after the FJPT's first president, Edmund Scheuer.
Address
150 Beverley Street
Time Period
1948-1983
Scope Note
The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto was made a charitable organization under the laws of Ontario in March, 1917. Its central goal was to end the frequent, uncontrolled, and competitive fund soliciting by a wide range of individual Toronto Jewish philanthropic and social service institutions and instead substitute a single coordinated city-wide community fundraising effort. This would ensure adequate and accountable funding for all its affiliated organizations and agencies in Toronto. The first office of the FJPT was at 206 Beverley St., but by 1924 it was headquartered at 218 Simcoe St. and by 1928 it had moved to 179 Beverley St., which was renamed "Scheuer House" after the FJPT's first president, Edmund Scheuer.
History
They moved to Dundas Square in the late 1940s and then occupied a number of different buildings until they moved into their long term home at 150-152 Beverley Street in 1948 where they remained until July 1983. This building was called the J. Irving Olebaum. As the community moved north, the the J. Irving Oelbaum Centre building was eventually sold in 1983 and the United Jewish Welfare Fund moved to the Lipa Green building at Bathurst and Sheppard. The building on Beverley Street was mysteriously burned down.
Category
Social Service
Organization
Source
Landmarks
Address
29 Cecil Street
Source
Landmarks

As early as 1916 the Ezras Noshem Society (a mutual benefit society for Jewish women) started to raise funds to purchase and renovate what would become The Toronto Jewish Old Folks' Home (Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care’s forerunner) after its members recognized the need for a home in Toronto where the Jewish elderly could receive kosher meals and communicate with staff in their own language. Property at 31 Cecil Street was purchased in 1917 and sometime between September 1918 and January 1920 the Home officially opened there. The Home was run by a small staff and the women of Ezras Noshem who volunteered their time to make beds, cook kosher meals, do laundry and sponsor fundraising events.
Address
29 Cecil Street
Time Period
1917-1954
Scope Note
As early as 1916 the Ezras Noshem Society (a mutual benefit society for Jewish women) started to raise funds to purchase and renovate what would become The Toronto Jewish Old Folks' Home (Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care’s forerunner) after its members recognized the need for a home in Toronto where the Jewish elderly could receive kosher meals and communicate with staff in their own language. Property at 31 Cecil Street was purchased in 1917 and sometime between September 1918 and January 1920 the Home officially opened there. The Home was run by a small staff and the women of Ezras Noshem who volunteered their time to make beds, cook kosher meals, do laundry and sponsor fundraising events.
History
By 1938 the Home had expanded into its neighboring houses at 29, 33, and 35 Cecil Street and was caring for 115 residents. It provided residents with synagogue services, a hospital ward and social activities. At this time the Home also became a member of the United Jewish Welfare Fund. In 1946, the need for a larger and more modern building prompted a fundraising campaign and in 1954, the new building opened at 3650 Bathurst Street.
Category
Organization
Medical
Social Service
Source
Landmarks
Address
41 Willcocks Street
Source
Landmarks

The Primrose Club was founded in Toronto in 1907 as the Cosmopolitan Club, an elite Jewish men's social club. Its members included many prominent leaders of the Jewish community. It was originally located on Beverley Street. In 1921, 41 Willcocks Street which was originally built as a family home, was redesigned by architect Benjamin Brown and Robert McConnell to be the new home of the Primrose Club. In 1959, the club's building at 41 Willcocks Street was expropriated by the University of Toronto (and currently houses the university's Faculty Club), and the club subsequently moved to a new building at Russell Hill Road and St. Clair, designed by Kaplan & Sprachman. This building has since been demolished and replaced with condominiums.
Address
41 Willcocks Street
Time Period
1921-1959
Scope Note
The Primrose Club was founded in Toronto in 1907 as the Cosmopolitan Club, an elite Jewish men's social club. Its members included many prominent leaders of the Jewish community. It was originally located on Beverley Street. In 1921, 41 Willcocks Street which was originally built as a family home, was redesigned by architect Benjamin Brown and Robert McConnell to be the new home of the Primrose Club. In 1959, the club's building at 41 Willcocks Street was expropriated by the University of Toronto (and currently houses the university's Faculty Club), and the club subsequently moved to a new building at Russell Hill Road and St. Clair, designed by Kaplan & Sprachman. This building has since been demolished and replaced with condominiums.
Category
Private Clubs
Architecture
Source
Landmarks
Address
346 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Established in 1913 by Henry Dworkin and Sam Easser, the Labor Lyceum Association sought to advance the interests of the city's Jewish trade union movement. Through the sale of $5.00 stock certificates, the community purchased two houses at 344 and 346 Spadina in 1924, adding a new front and meeting rooms in 1929.
Address
346 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1924-1971
Scope Note
Established in 1913 by Henry Dworkin and Sam Easser, the Labor Lyceum Association sought to advance the interests of the city's Jewish trade union movement. Through the sale of $5.00 stock certificates, the community purchased two houses at 344 and 346 Spadina in 1924, adding a new front and meeting rooms in 1929.
History
The Labor Lyceum operated as the headquarters for the non-Communist unions of the primarily Jewish garment district. The seasonal nature of the textile industry meant that workers had time to socialize and strategize during slow work periods. The Labour Lyceum also served as an important cultural centre for various Jewish societies and fraternal organizations. It hosted a range of activities from lectures and rallies to dances, plays, and concerts. The provincial Cooperative Commonwealth Federation held conventions here in the 1940s. The importance of the Labor Lyceum lessened as the Jewish community began to move out of the Spadina Avenue area, however it remained significant to the continued labour activism taken up by newer immigrant groups. In 1971, the building was sold and the Labor Lyceum moved to Cecil Street.
Category
Political
Source
Landmarks
Address
207 Beverley Street
Source
Landmarks

Murray House was a popular catering and event hall frequently used by the Jewish community before other organizations and synagogues had their own event halls.
Address
207 Beverley Street
Scope Note
Murray House was a popular catering and event hall frequently used by the Jewish community before other organizations and synagogues had their own event halls.
Category
Private Clubs
Source
Landmarks
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