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Accession Number
2013-7-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-7-8
Material Format
textual record
moving images
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 optical disc (48:20 min.) : col. ; DVD
35 photographs : col. ; 16 x 11 cm
Date
2006-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the military career of Corporal Tamar Freeman, particularly her 6-month deployment to Kandahar, Afghanistan. Included is postcard and email correspondence sent to her parents detailing issues of camp life, her religious observance, as well as her role as a medic; a DVD of the film "Sisters in Arms" written and directed by Tamar's sister, Beth Freeman; newspaper clippings and articles on Tamar and the film "Sisters in Arms"; photographs of Tamar receiving an award from the Canadian Jewish Congress, of her family greeting her at the airport upon return to Canada, a portrait of Tamar with another soldier and General Hillier, as well as images taken of fellow soldiers and the surroundings while in Afghanistan.
Administrative History
Corporal Tamar Freeman (1967-) is the daughter of Harvey and Gilda Freeman. She began her military career as an army reservist in 1990. As a reservist, she committed one day per week and one weekend per month to working in hospitals on board ships and in defence research facilities. In 2006, she joined the regular infantry as a medic in the Second Field Ambulance unit. She served in Kandahar for 6 months between 2006 and 2007 as a medic treating wounded soldiers, Afghan allies and civilians. She also served as part of the Provincial Reconstruction Team at a village medical clinic. She received the Alan Rose Award for International Human Dignity from the Canadian Jewish Congress in 2007. Corporal Freeman is currently stationed at Base Borden in Ontario.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Use restrictions note: Personal emails are confidential and require the permission of Tamar Freeman before accessing.
Subjects
Afghan War, 2001---Participation, Canadian
Soldiers--Canada
Name Access
Freeman, Tamar
Places
Afghanistan
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-8-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-8-2
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
2.7 m of textual records (35 v.)
6.3 m of photographs : b&w and col.
Date
1949, [197-]-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of bound Canadian Jewish News newspapers from 1996 to 2012; bound copies of the Canadian Jewish Review from 1949 and the Canadian Jewish News' photograph collection. The photographs are arranged alphabetcially by subject, with the exception of two blocks of photographs related to "rabbis" and "places".
Custodial History
The records were in the custody of the Canadian Jewish News.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Newspapers
Name Access
Canadian Jewish News
Places
Canada
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-9-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-9-1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
moving images
Physical Description
ca. 14 cm of textual records
ca. 275 photographs : b&w and col. ; 26 x 21 cm or smaller
1 DVD
Date
[191-?]-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the life of Abe Zukerman and several family members including Abe's father-in-law Elia Rubin and brother-in-law Jack Rubin. Included are: certificates of various sorts, correspondence, a DVD of the dedication of the restored Jewish cemetery in Wachock, eulogies, a family calender, financial documents, identity documents for Abe and Margot Zukerman, memorial books/records for Abe Zukerman and Elia Rubin, photographs, and a small number of administrative and financial records from the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society.
Custodial History
The material that makes up accession 2017-9-1 belonged to Abe Zukerman. Mr. Zukerman's stepson, Mel Perlmutter, gathered the material and donated it to the Archives
Administrative History
Abram "Abe" Zukerman (1914-2009) was born in Wierzbnik, Poland in 1914. He was the only member of his family to survive the Holocaust. In 1948, he came to Canada, where he became involved in the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society and married. His first wife, Esther, predeceased him. In 1975, he married his second wife, Margot, who had two children from a previous marriage. In addition to serving as a senior executive member of the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society for over 50 years, Abe volunteered with United Jewish Appeal and State of Israel Bonds. He passed away 8 Feb. 2009. Photo Caption (001): Abe Zukerman at his store on Queen St. W., Toronto, Ontario, Canada, [196-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (002): Lansdowne Cut Rate Store on Queen St. W., Toronto, Ontario, Canada, [196-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (011): Abe Zukerman at the Western Wall, [199-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (017): Abe Zukerman with others, possibly in Israel, [196-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (018): Abe Zukerman, [193-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Captions (032) - (087): Unidentified individuals, [192-?]-[195-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
A number of photographs have writing in Polish and Yiddish on their opposite side, which might prove useful in their identification.
Subjects
Cemeteries
Families
Societies
Name Access
Rubin, Elia
Rubin, Jack
Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society
Zukerman, Abe, 1914-2009
Zukerman, Margot
Places
Canada
Israel
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-6-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-6-5
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
ca. 30 cm of textual records
89 photographs : b&w and col. (7 negatives) ; 18 x 13 cm or smaller
1 CD-ROM (textual record)
19 videocassettes (ca. 22 hr.)
Date
[19--?]-2008
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Abe and Margot Zukerman, their family, and the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society. Included are: awards, identity documents, legal documents, letters, photographs, publications, videocassettes, and vital records.
Photo Caption (015): Abe Zukerman's father, [19--?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-6-5.
Custodial History
Mel Perlmutter, stepson of Abe Zukerman and son of Margot Zukerman, donated the records to the Archives.
Administrative History
Abe Zukerman (1914-2009) was born in Wierzbnik, Poland in 1914. He was the only member of his family to survive the Holocaust. In 1948, he came to Canada, where he became involved in the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society and married. His first wife, Esther, predeceased him. In 1975, he married his second wife, Margot, who had two children from a previous marriage. In addition to serving as a senior executive member of the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society for over 50 years, Abe volunteered with United Jewish Appeal and State of Israel Bonds. He passed away 8 Feb. 2009. Margot Zukerman (née Rubin) was born in Berlin, Germany on 31 December 1922. Still a child when the National Socialists came to power, she was denied schooling. She arrived in Toronto in 1939 never having received a formal education. Despite this, she was able to learn English and operate her father's small ladies' wear store in Hamilton for at least a dozen years. In 1944, she married her first husband Alexander Perlmutter, with whom she had two children: one in 1945 and another in 1948. In 1970, she moved to Toronto, where she acted as caregiver to her father. In 1974, she met Abe, whom she married on 14 February 1975. Like her husband, Margot was an active member of Toronto's Jewish community.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIALS: Other records relating to Abe Zukerman can be found in Accession 2017-9-1.
Subjects
Families
Societies
Name Access
Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society
Zukerman, Abe, 1914-2009
Zukerman, Esther, 1912-1972
Zukerman, Margot, 1922-
Zukerman family
Places
Canada
Israel
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-4-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-4-4
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
ca. 35 photographs : b&w and col. ; 33 x 27 cm or smaller
Date
1891-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting members of Harvey Freeman's family, several of whom served in the armed forces. Included are: family photographs, a Krugel family tree, a copy of Itzik Kriegel (Harvey's grandfather)'s army discharge, an attestation paper for Louis Krugel (Harvey's uncle), a signed program for a "stag whoopee dinner and night of blissful freedom" in honour of Lou Krugel's approaching marriage, and printed images of Harvey's daughter Tamar Freeman in Afghanistan. One of the photographs depicts Louis Krugel with professional wrestler and actor Tor Johnson, aka the Swedish Angel.
Photo Caption (001): Wellesley Public School, [ca. 1915]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (002): Louis Krugel. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (003): Buba Sluva with Sara, Moe, Lou, and Harry, 1909. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (004): Berel Krugel in front of 22 Gerard Street West, Toronto, [ca. 1919]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (005): Wedding, 28 September 1926. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (006): Louis Krugel. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (007): Baba Tzluva with Harry, [189-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (008): Louis Krugel. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (009): Shabbat dinner, [ca. 1940]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (010): Norman, Buba Sluva, and Bert, [ca. 1922]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (011): Family portrait, 1909. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (012): Harry and Sara, 1916. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (013): Louis Krugel, [192-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (014): Louis Krugel and unknown man posing with boxing gloves, [1918?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (015): Louis Krugel, 1918. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (016): Harvey Freeman at Camp Borden, 1945. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (017): Unknown. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (018): Louis Krugel and unknown man, 1918. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (019): Louis Krugel with Tor Johnson, aka the Swedish Angel, [194-]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (020): Signed portrait of Louis Krugel. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (021): Louis Krugel, [192-]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Administrative History
Harvey Freeman was born on May 22, 1928. As a youth, he attended Harbord Collegiate and went on to join the militia, where he was the lone Canadian Jewish bagpiper.
Harvey made his living in business, working in different areas including furniture manufacturing and property management. As part of a change in lifestyle, he took up marathons in his early seventies.
Harvey has four children.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIALS: Records for Harvey's daughter Tamar can be found in Accession 2013-7-8.
Subjects
Afghan War, 2001---Participation, Canadian
Families
Soldiers--Canada
Name Access
Freeman, Harvey
Freeman, Tamar
Johnson, Tor, 1903-1971
Places
Afghanistan
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-4-16
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-4-16
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
[199-]-2004
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Glen Eker's work as a genealogical researcher. Included are articles of Glen's that were published in a number of newsletters including Shaviv (the Spark), Generations, Ancestry Magazine, Family History News, Families, the Association of Jewish Libraries Newsletter, and the Jewish Genealogical Society of Hamilton and Area Newsletter. The accession also includes reviews of Glen's books.
Administrative History
Glen Eker was born in Toronto, Ontario to Paul Eker and Dorothy Horwitz. He grew up in the Forest Hill neighbourhood of Toronto before moving with his family to Hamilton. He received two master’s degrees (one in sociology, the other in political science) from McMaster University and a third master’s degree (in library science) from the University of Toronto.
Glen's wife, Deborah Pekilis, was born in Montreal and lived there until her parents moved to Toronto. She was the librarian for the Jewish Genealogical Society and sat on the Hamilton Historical Board. She is currently a writer.
Glen has worked as a research assistant and a teaching assistant at McMaster and has taught at Ryerson University and Mohawk College. At present, he works as an estate and genealogy researcher.
Glen has published a book on Karl Marx, five indexes of Jews in Canada, and one index of Amish and Mennonites in Canada. His genealogy articles have appeared in various magazines and his short stories and poems have appeared in print as well.
Glen has worked on his family genealogy for a number of years. His paternal family line derives from Russia, Ukraine, Lithuania, and Poland while his maternal line derives from Byelorussia and Romania. He is descended from the Horwitz and Strachman families on the latter.
Descriptive Notes
Associated materials: Genealogical articles can also be found in MG 9 (Shem Tov). Other accessions donated by Glen Eker include 2018-3-1, 2018-4-1, 2018-4-2, and 2018-5-1.
Subjects
Genealogy
Name Access
Eker (family)
Eker, Glen
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-6
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
62 photographs : b&w and col. ; 10 x 15 cm or smaller
4 cm of textual records
Date
1920-2018
Scope and Content
Accession contains material documenting Gabriella Szanto and her family. Included are family photographs, vital records, correspondence, and a 2018 Baycrest calendar that features a portrait and short biography of Gabriella.
Custodial History
Shirley Worth served as the executor of Gabriella Szanto's estate. Following Gabriella's death, Shirley donated the records that make up the accession to the Ontario Jewish Archives.
Administrative History
Gabriella "Gabi" Szanto (née Lazlo) was born in Budapest, Hungary on 26 January 1916. Gabriella's parents, Arnold and Ilonka Lazlo (née Diamenstein), were women's clothing manufacturers who employed twenty-five people. Their skills complemented each other: Arnold had studied design in Berlin for two years while Ilonka was a dressmaker. On 18 May 1919, Arnold and Ilonka had their second child, George.
During the Second World War, Gabi and her mother moved to the outskirts of Budapest where they passed as Catholics, rarely leaving their house. Miklos Szanto—the man Gabriella married after the war—was sent to the Mauthausen concentration camp. Gabriella's brother, George, was sent to a camp in Siberia and did not survive. It is not known where or how Gabriella's father survived the war.
After the war, Gabriella, her mother and father, and her husband Miklos reunited in Budapest. The four lived in the family apartment near the city opera house.
During the period of Communist rule, Gabriella and Miklos bribed their way out of Hungary and travelled to Vienna. From Vienna, they travelled to Australia, where they lived for five or six years, working as a short order cook and a seamstress respectively.
At some point, Gabriella and Miklos made the decision to immigrate to Canada. Their first stop—most likely in the 1950s—was Montreal. There, Gabriella worked for a high-end retailer before moving with her husband to Toronto one year later. In Toronto, Miklos worked again as a short order cook at the Noshery Restaurant on Eglinton, holding this job until he retried. Gabriella, meanwhile, worked as a seamstress until she was in her mid-80s.
In their retirement, Gabriella and Miklos spent two months each winter in Florida. Gabriella died in 2018.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
LANGUAGE NOTE: English, Hungarian, German.
Subjects
Families
Holocaust survivors
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Szanto, Gabriella, 1916-2018
Places
Australia
Austria
Canada
Hungary
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-20
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-20
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
120 cm of textual records (4 boxes)
Date
1987-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material involving Shoel Silver's involvement with various Jewish organizations including B'nai Brith Canada (BBC), the Canada-Israel Committee (CIC), the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs (CIJA), the Jewish Agency for Israel (JAFI), UJA Federation of Greater Toronto (UJA), and the United Israel Appeal (UIA). Included are meeting minutes, reports, memoranda, correspondence, budgets, discussion documents, resource material, newspaper clippings, photocopies of newspaper articles, briefing papers, resolutions.
Custodial History
Records remained in the custody of Shoel Silver until 27 July 2018 when the OJA acquired the records from the former.
Administrative History
Shoel Silver is a Toronto businessman. He formerly co-chaired the Unity of the Jewish People Committee with Natan Sharansky. Prior to that, he was the scholar in residence for the first Federation Shabbaton.
Use Conditions
Accession is closed for 25 years from date of donation.
Subjects
Israel
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
B'nai Brith Canada
Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs
Jewish Agency for Israel
Silver, Shoel
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
United Israel Appeal
Places
Canada
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-21
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-21
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
multiple media
Physical Description
113 cm of textual and other records
1 scrapbook
Date
1938-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Act to End Violence Against Women organization. Included are: meeting minutes of the executive board; a ledger containing executive board waivers of notice; meeting minutes and resolutions from the yearly conventions; photographs of Act to End Violence Against Women members; correspondence with other organizations; correspondence, research material, public reactions, and ephemera from various campaigns; a commemorative booklet for a B'nai Brith cantorial concert; a scrapbook on the formation of the B'nai Brith Women Claire Morry Chapter; constitutions, constitutional amendments, reports, budgets, resolutions and other records of Act to End Violence Against Women; member lists and honour roll of past chapters; material and correspondence with B'nai Brith Washington; UJA material concerning assimilation and intermarriage and 2001 Jewish census data results.
Administrative History
The first Canadian chapter of B'nai Brith Women International was formed in Windsor, Ontario in 1923. Other chapters were soon formed throughout Eastern Canada and additional chapters were established in Winnipeg and British Columbia after 1949. The organization was initially administered by the American B'nai Brith Women. In 1976, it finally became autonomous (although still affiliated with the American agency) and changed its name to B'nai Brith Women of Eastern Canada. In 1981, its name was changed again to B'nai Brith Women of Canada. In 1995, the organization became known as Jewish Women International of Canada (JWIC). In November 2011, the organization underwent a final name change to Act to End Violence Against Women.
JWIC is committed to social change, with a particular focus on improving the lives of women and their families. In the 1980s, the agency initiated programs to counter domestic violence and began operating safe housing for Jewish women and children known as ASTEH (Alternative Safe Temporary Emergency Housing). JWIC also runs the JWI Residential Treatment Centre for emotionally disturbed youth.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: Material in English, Russian and French.
Subjects
Charities
Family violence
Women
Name Access
Act to End Violence Against Women
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-24
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-24
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
3 photographs : b&w and col. ; 25 x 20 cm or smaller
Date
1988-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Gerald "Jerry" Rosenberg and his involvement with the Royal Canadian Legion's General Wingate Branch 256. Included are General Wingate Branch 256 meeting agendas (2013-2015), Royal Canadian Legion correspondence (2014), two General Wingate Branch newsletters (October 2015 and March 2016), an annual branch inspection report form (27 September 2015), a branch regulations and clubhouse rules submission form (2012), financial statements and receipts (2013-2015), certificates of merit and appreciation from the Royal Canadian Legion (2002-2009), and a document in Hebrew commemo
In addition to the above documents, there are three photographs for which identification is missing: one of a funeral, one of a demonstrators carrying signs urging recognition of China, and a portrait of an unknown veteran.
Finally, the accession contains an undated letter to the editor of an unspecified newspaper that outline Jerry's views of the Arab-Israeli conflict.
Custodial History
At the time of his death, Jerry Rosenberg was living with his partner Frances Cohen. Frances' daughter Ronda "Rhonnie" Cohen took possession of the records following Jerry's death. Rhonnie subsequently gave the records to author Ellin Bessner who donated them to the Ontario Jewish Archives.
Administrative History
Jerry Rosenberg grew up in Hamilton, Ontario along with his twin sister, two brothers, and older sister. When he was seventeen years old, Rosenberg lied about his age in order to fight in the Second World War. He joined the Royal Canadian Navy and served for the duration of the war.
After the war, Rosenberg approached the Canadian Zionist Organization about volunteering in Palestine. After a circuitous journey that first took him from Montreal to New York to France, he arrived in Haifa in February or March 1948. Rosenberg was part of Machal, a group of overseas volunteers who fought alongside Israeli forces during the 1948 Arab-Israeli War. Rosenberg joined the Haganah and fought in the 52nd Givati Regiment. As part of this unit, he participated in battle in the Arab village of Bashshit.
After the war, Rosenberg made preparations to leave Israel. Upon arriving in Canada, he worked with Jewish organizations and started a family. He became president of the Royal Canadian Legion's Wingate Branch 256. He died on 23 August 2017.
Descriptive Notes
Language: English, French
Subjects
Arab-Israeli conflict
Veterans--Canada
Name Access
Bessner, Ellin, 1961-
Rosenberg, Jerry
Royal Canadian Legion
Places
Canada
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-8-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-8-6
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
90 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1988-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Jewish Book Awards (JBA). Included are minutes of the JBA committee, book reviews, award night programs, and miscellaneous correspondence.
Custodial History
Records were in the possession of jury member Judith Ghert prior to donation to the Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Literary prizes
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Book Awards
Canadian Jewish Literary Awards
Ghert, Judith
Koffler Centre of the Arts
Vine Awards for Canadian Jewish Literature
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-10-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-10-13
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
63 cm of textual records
Date
1997-2007
Scope and Content
Accession consists of paper issues of the Afterword, a national Jewish student newspaper in Canada.
Descriptive Notes
Associated material: Issues of the Afterword are also held by the Jewish Public Library Archives in Montreal.
Subjects
Jewish students--Canada--Periodicals
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-5-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-5-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
ca 90 cm of textual records
Date
1952-2017
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting General Wingate Branch 256 of the Royal Canadian Legion. Included are member records of Jewish Second World War veterans and others; thank you cards written by students to members of the veterans; a pamphlet titled Portraits of Bravery that contains portraits of veterans, a short history of the branch, and a brief biography of Major General Orde Charles Wingate (1903-44); a certificate issued by the Royal Canadian Legion establishing a ladies' auxiliary within its General Wingate Branch; and a certificate issued by the Canadian Legion establishing General Wingate Branch, Ontario No. 2561.
Administrative History
The Jewish Brigade was a member of the Great War Association in the 1920s. After its first president was installed in the early 1930s, the Royal Canadian Legion granted a charter for a Jewish veterans' branch. The brigade was renamed the General Wingate Branch in the mid-1940s after the British army officer Major General Orde Charles Wingate, DSO. Although Major Wingate was not Jewish, he was a passionate Zionist, hence the name.
At first, the branch met at a veteran’s hall at Crawford and College Streets in Toronto, but later purchased its own house at 1610 Bathurst Street. In 1968, the branch moved to Eglinton Avenue West. It was then located at the Zionist Centre on Marlee Avenue.
The branch held an annual memorial march and service at the Mt. Sinai Cemetery, and distributed poppies to raise funds for veterans and their families, hospitals and medical research. Members also gave speeches at schools on Remembrance Day. It closed in September 2018 after more than eighty years.
Subjects
Jewish veterans--Canada
Name Access
Royal Canadian Legion. General Wingate Branch 256
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-5-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-5-9
Material Format
object
Physical Description
2 objects
Date
[between 1940 and 2019]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two flags that belonged to Royal Canadian Legion General Wingate Branch 256. The first is a flag of Israel. The second is a blue ensign bearing the name of the branch. (The blue ensign is a blue flag with the Union Jack in the top corner next to the flagpole; it is similar to the red ensign, which was the flag of Canada until 1965, when it was replaced by the maple leaf.)
Administrative History
The Jewish Brigade was a member of the Great War Association in the 1920s. After its first president was installed in the early 1930s, the Royal Canadian Legion granted a charter for a Jewish veterans' branch. The brigade was renamed the General Wingate Branch in the mid-1940s after the British army officer Major General Orde Charles Wingate, DSO. Although Major Wingate was not Jewish, he was a passionate Zionist, hence the name.
At first, the branch met at a veteran’s hall at Crawford and College Streets in Toronto, but later purchased its own house at 1610 Bathurst Street. In 1968, the branch moved to Eglinton Avenue West. It was then located at the Zionist Centre on Marlee Avenue.
The branch held an annual memorial march and service at the Mt. Sinai Cemetery, and distributed poppies to raise funds for veterans and their families, hospitals and medical research. Members also gave speeches at schools on Remembrance Day. It closed in September 2018 after more than eighty years.
Subjects
Flags--Canada
Flags--Israel
Jewish veterans--Canada
Name Access
Royal Canadian Legion. General Wingate Branch 256
Places
Canada
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-5-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-5-13
Material Format
textual record
object
graphic material
Physical Description
7 cm of textual records and other material
3 objects
Date
[194-]-[201-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Nathan Isaacs. Included are letters, photographs, service records, a sight log, a book with photographs of fighter planes active in the Second World War, and telegrams congratulating Nathan's family on Nathan coming home. Also included are a number of objects: Nathan's dog tags, navigator wings, and crest; a flask with Nathan's initials on it; another item with Nathan's initials that he received upon enlisting in 1942 and which would have held a mirror, nail file, and possibly a comb; a cigarette lighter made from an empty shell by ground crew; and, finally, a Bomber Command bar that was issued to Nathan in 2013.
Administrative History
Nathan Isaacs (né Isaacovitch) was born on November 20, 1922. He enlisted on August 5, 1942. After training, Nathan worked in the kitchen at a Royal Canadian Air Force base in Aylmer, Ontario, while awaiting deployment to Europe. After being flown to Yorkshire, England, Nathan went on to fly thirty-five missions. He was twenty-one when he flew his first.
Following the war, bombers like Nathan received little in the way of recognition on account of the heavy civilian casualties caused by bombing. In 2013, Julian Fantino, minister of veterans affairs, gave out the Bomber Command bar to recognize Second World Bombers, including Nathan. That same year, thanks to a photograph that accompanied a Toronto Star article about Second World War bombers, Nathan was reunited with John Mulholland, the pilot with whom he flew his final mission.
Descriptive Notes
Availability of other formats: Six of the photographs and four of the textual records have been scanned and are available as JPEG, TIFF, and/or PDF files.
Subjects
Bomber pilots
Jewish veterans--Canada
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Isaacs, Nathan, 1922-
Places
Canada
Europe
Source
Archival Accessions
Address
1950 Bathurst St.
Source
Landmarks

Holy Blossom was the first Jewish congregation in Ontario, established in September 1856 as the Toronto Hebrew Congregation. Many of Toronto’s earliest Jewish families were members of this congregation and were also responsible for establishing the city’s first Jewish cemetery on Pape Avenue. For 20 years, the congregation rented space over a drug store on Yonge Street until 1876 when a Synagogue was built on Richmond Street West. As the congregation grew, it moved to a new building on Bond Street in 1897, designed in the Byzantine Revival style (this building is now St. George’s Greek Orthodox Church).
Address
1950 Bathurst St.
Time Period
1937-present
Scope Note
Holy Blossom was the first Jewish congregation in Ontario, established in September 1856 as the Toronto Hebrew Congregation. Many of Toronto’s earliest Jewish families were members of this congregation and were also responsible for establishing the city’s first Jewish cemetery on Pape Avenue. For 20 years, the congregation rented space over a drug store on Yonge Street until 1876 when a Synagogue was built on Richmond Street West. As the congregation grew, it moved to a new building on Bond Street in 1897, designed in the Byzantine Revival style (this building is now St. George’s Greek Orthodox Church).
History
While Holy Blossom was first established as an Orthodox congregation, in the late 1800s a move toward Reform practices began, including changes to services and the introduction of music and family seating. In 1920, Holy Blossom became a Reform Congregation affiliated with the Union of American Hebrew Congregations (now the Union for Reform Judaism), and has remained a leading Reform Synagogue in Canada ever since. By the 1930s, Holy Blossom had outgrown its Bond Street location and a fundraising campaign began to raise money to purchase property and build a new larger synagogue. In 1937, Holy Blossom moved to its present location on Bathurst south of Eglinton, designed in the the Romanesque Revival style by architects Chapman and Oxley with Maurice Dalvin Klein.
Category
Religious
Architecture
Source
Landmarks
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