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4 records – page 1 of 1.
Address
216 Beverley Street
Source
Landmarks

The Apter Synagogue was formed by a group of people who came to Toronto from the area of Opatow (Apt) in Poland around the turn of the century. They first established a small synagogue on Centre Avenue near Dundas Street in the Ward. In 1918, in anticipation of more Apter immigrants coming to Toronto after the First World War, the synagogue was sold and a larger one purchased on Beverley Street. Both the synagogue members and the Apter Friendly Society met there.
Address
216 Beverley Street
Time Period
1918-unknown
Scope Note
The Apter Synagogue was formed by a group of people who came to Toronto from the area of Opatow (Apt) in Poland around the turn of the century. They first established a small synagogue on Centre Avenue near Dundas Street in the Ward. In 1918, in anticipation of more Apter immigrants coming to Toronto after the First World War, the synagogue was sold and a larger one purchased on Beverley Street. Both the synagogue members and the Apter Friendly Society met there.
History
In later years, a bitter controversy between the synagogue and society erupted and the building was sold.
Category
Political
Religious
Private Clubs
Source
Landmarks
Name
Isidore Kaplan
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
3 June 1975
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Isidore Kaplan
Number
AC 009
AC 010
Subject
Business
Communities
Interview Date
3 June 1975
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Sophie Milgram
Total Running Time
009A: 29 minutes 009B: 41 minutes 010A: 30 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
Reduced sound quality at times.
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Isidore Kaplan was born in Vilna in 1910. His father was the first Jew to settle in Kirkland Lake, Ontario. Isidore's father, a successful businessman, opened a general store in 1915 and a movie theatre in 1923. The Jewish community of Kirkland Lake grew to 135 families and was able to support a synagogue, kosher butcher and after-school cheder at its peak.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Kaplan, Isidore
Milgram, Sophie
Geographic Access
Kirkland Lake, Ont.
Cobalt, Ont.
Englehart, Ont.
Krugerdorf, Ont.
Swastika, Ont.
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
AC 009: Side 1
0.20: Isidore was born in a town near Vilna in 1910.
0.40: Isidore had 2 brothers and 1 sister, all immigrated to Canada.
1.20: Isidore’s father came alone to America initially in 1907, went back to Europe to take care of a leather business. Returned a second time to America (New York) in 1912. Came to Toronto because of a contact.
6.15: Isidore’s father and friend, Mr. Teitlebaum, moved to Cobalt in northern Ontario to pursue employment opportunities that were the result of the growth of the mining industry. Mentioned the mining of cobalt and silver.
7.50: Isidore’s father and Teitlebaum walked from Cobalt to Timmins via Engelhart and Swastika. Described the development of the Jewish community in northern Ontario. Existing Jewish cemetery. Were offered land to farm by the government in Krugerdorf. 25-30 Jewish families started farming.
9.43: Explained that some of the Jews who settled the area had escaped from the Russo-Japanese war.
10.27: Reported that the Ontario government helped to bring out Jewish prisoners who had been captured by the Japanese.
11.55: Related a story of Isadore’s father rooming with a Jewish woman, Mrs. Rosa Brown in Swastika.
14.11: Listed names (?) of the agents for the town site and explained about the purchase of lots.
15.50: Isidore’s father was the first Jew in Kirkland Lake. He opened a general store in 1915. Related a story about how he acquired the materials to build the store. Described the construction of the store.
23.00: Isidore’s father’s brother-in-law, Max, became a partner in the business in 1915.
25.45: Isidore’s father traveled to Toronto to purchase supplies. Ordered groceries from Rubin and Fine who were in the grocery business in Toronto.
28.00: Business was very slow for several months. Competed with ?Labarge?
29.00: Mrs. Brown suggested that Isidore’s father start to sell meat.
AC 009: Side 2
0.40: Mrs. Rosa Brown helped solicit customers who were uneasy about doing business with Jews.
2.55: Isidore’s father offered more competitive prices. Business increased.
5.26: Expanded business to sell ice cream. Business prospered.
7.17: Described incident which he suspected was anti-Semitic involving the deliberate starting of a fire in the store in 1917. The store was destroyed.
8.35: Isidore’s uncle Max Kaplan, brother to his mother was his father’s business partner.
9.30: Isidore’s father rebuilt store. Once again the business prospered.
11.45: In 1921 ?Percussis? opened a store
12.48: Isidore’s father bought furs (e.g.beaver) and sold them to Hudson’s Bay outlet.
13.30: In 1921 Isidore’s father purchased 2 lots across the street from Harry Oaks to build a movie theatre.
15.20: Related problems regarding the purchase (e.g. inability to secure a mortgage, difficulty acquiring building supplies, leveling the property, etc.). Described how Harry Oaks (who was described as a very wealthy man) arranged for Isidore’s father to borrow money from the Royal Bank. Isidore attributed this to their trusting relationship.
19.50: The building was also used as a meeting hall for 2 Lodges, Masonic and ?
20.53: The theatre was completed in 1923.
23.40: Brought the family from Poland to Kirkland Lake, 4 children, his wife and Isidore’s aunt in 1923. Isidore’s grandmother was unable to come due to health reasons. Initially, Isidore’s father purchased tickets from ?Jurovski?, local travel agent but all was lost so he purchased tickets directly from White Star line.
25.30: 1 other Jewish family in Kirkland Lake, ?Stotts?
26.00: Other Jewish families moved into Kirkland Lake around 1924 to 1927.
27.00: By 1927, there were enough Jews to have a Minyan for Yontif in Kirkland Lake. Held services in the first theatre. Before 1927, Jews traveled to Englehart for religious services.
27.55: Mentioned a large fire in northern Ontario in 1922. (Kirkland Lake was spared.) The original synagogue in Englehart was destroyed. Rented another hall for religious services.
28.28: Mentioned a pious Jew who was a farmer who acted as prayer leader, Baal Tefilah.
AC 010: Side 1
0.22: Mr. Finkleman and Mr. Levinsky paid $350 for a lot and built a synagogue in 1928 in Kirkland Lake. Originally, held services in the back of Mr. Levinsky’s candy store.
2.55: About 12-14 Jewish families in Kirkland Lake by 1927.
3.20: Jews worked as merchants or miners. Isidore’s father helped find jobs for miners. Listed names of local merchants.
6.50: Reported 135 Jewish families in Kirkland Lake. Cited incidents of antisemitism. E.g. Isidore’s uncle who served on town council could not be elected Mayor because he was Jewish, antisemitic comments.
7.58: In 1975, reported that 8 Jewish families remained in Kirkland Lake, Shul was closed. Jews have moved from surrounding areas.
9.23: First Rabbi, Ruben, came to Kirkland Lake in 1928.
11.55: Next Rabbi, ?Luvich? originated from Holland. Related story about how Isidore’s, uncle Max approached a member of parliament, Russell Gordon, in order to prevent the Rabbi from being sent back to Europe.
13.45: Jewish community in Kirkland Lake continued to grow until 1937. Reported community decline with a downturn in the economy with the outbreak of the Second World War, a mining strike and closures of mines.
18.50: Synagogue rebuilt in 1945. The bima was purchased from a synagogue in Montreal by Mr. Stott. The bima had been built in Hungary.
21.10: Kirkland Lake supported a local kosher butcher, Turkin
22.06: The Rabbi from Kirkland Lake traveled by train to Jewish communities in outlying areas.
22.55: Discussed high rate of intermarriage.
24.35: Jewish education taught by Rabbi in after-school program.
25.16: Reported that children of founding Jewish families tended to be University educated. Children left Kirkland Lake and did not return.
Source
Oral Histories

Isidore Kaplan's father was the first Jewish resident of Kirkland Lake, Ontario. In this clip, Isidore relates his father's journey in 1912 from Toronto to Kirkland Lake in northern Ontario via Engelhart and Swastika.

In this clip, Isidore Kaplan describes the decline of Kirkland Lake, Ontario

Name
Barney and Tillie Nosov [with Wilfred Kideckel]
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
22 September 1975
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Barney and Tillie Nosov [with Wilfred Kideckel]
Number
AC 011
Subject
Families
Religion
Interview Date
22 September 1975
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Fred Schaeffer
Total Running Time
side 1: 43:39 minutes
side 2: 43:36 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
Most of the interview is conducted with Barney Nosov. Wilfred Kideckel is also featured on the tape, and Tillie Nosov is interviewed briefly.
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Conditional access. Researchers must receive permission from the interviewee or his/her heir prior to accessing the interview. Please contact the OJA for more information.
Biography
Barney Nosov arrived in Canada in 1916. Nosov lived in Ansonville, Ontario. He was a merchant, owned a store, and was also in politics for many years.
Wilfred Kideckel was born in Kreugerdorf on a farm in 1917. His father was one of the first immigrants to the area. Kideckel had 10 people in his family. He moved to Ansonville and got married. Kideckel moved to Toronto in 1942.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Nosov, Barney
Nosov, Tillie
Kideckel, Wilfred
Geographic Access
Kriegerdorf, Ont.
Cochrane, Ont.
Cobalt, Ont.
Ansonville, Ont.
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Transcript
AC 011: SIDE 1
BARNEY NOSOV
0.24: Nosov talks about how he came to Ansonville, Ontario. Talks about his aunt, Mrs. Perkiss?
1.14: Nosov talks about the families in Cochrane – was about 6 families. Rothchild, Kurtzer? Perkiss, Bernstein. Rothchild’s son was mayor at that time.
2.16: First Jewish people in Cochrane were peddlers. Cochrane is close to Cobalt, which had more Jews.
3.29: Nosov arrived in Canada in 1916. Opened a store in 1917.
4.37: Nosov talks about other Jewish families who were there when he arrived, and who came later. Mentions Korman.
5.18: There was religious instruction at that time; was a cheder; Korman was a teacher.
5.46: 1922 Korman decided to build a synagogue. Was about 16 Jewish families at that time.
6.44: Rabbi Gordon donated a sefer Torah .
7.25: Nosov tells a story about the Lubachitcher Rabbi.
8.10: Nosov talks about children being sent (conscripted?) into the army [unsure where this took place]. When the children were allowed to leave the army, they all prayed at a specific synagogue.
9.56: Nosov talks about a synagogue located on Synagogue Street.
10.52: Nosov talks about the synagogue they built. Rabbi was named Rabinovitch.
11.44: Congregation functioned until 1930, and then Nosov sold the building.
11.55: Nosov talks about himself – he was a merchant, owned a general store, was in politics. Nosov was a councilor for many years from 1930 to 1944.
13.43: Nosov explains how he got started in politics – he felt discriminated against in business, so he decided to tell the public what was going on. He ran for fun; never believed he would even get elected.
16.25: Nosov talks about antisemitism
19.43: Nosov tells a story to describe the antisemitism. a Jewish dentist wanted to go to a small town (Hansville?). Came to Nosov’s store and Nosov told him he had no chance of getting a job, because he was Jewish. No Jewish dentists allowed in that time. They would rather have no dentist at all in town.
22.23: Nosov talks about the first mayor of Ansonville who was a gentile; used to hire Jews in early 1920s.
23.18: Nosov talks about talked about a farming settlement in Kreugerdorf (most settlers there were Russian immigrants)
25.25: Kreuger was a German (not Jewish), and he taught people how to work the land. That’s why the land is named Kreugerdorf
WILFRED KIDECKEL
Born in Kreugerdorf on a farm in 1917. His father was one of the original immigrants. Family of 10. Doesn’t have too many memories of the farm.
26.57: Kideckel talks about how his father got to Krugerdorf (thought he would get free land).
27.45: Kideckel talks about Jewish life in Kriegerdorf. Talks about how his father used to chop wood in return for someone teaching his children to read Hebrew. Still a cemetery there, but no people living there.
28.57: Kideckel moved to Ansonville, got married, moved to Toronto in 1942.
30.17: [no sound audible for the rest of the recording]
43.39: End
AC 011: SIDE 2
TILLIE NOSOV
0.08: Nosov came to farm in Kreugerdorf in 1906. Maiden name Abromson?, 11 children in her family.
0.59: Nosov talks about her childhood and her family; what her house looked like.
2.15: Nosov talks about her father working on the railroad and on the farm.
2.54: Nosov talks about what she did on the farm; life on the farm; religious life on the farm. People kept kosher; women’s roles on the farm equal to men.
WILFRED KIDECKEL
4.33: Kideckel talks about inter-dating – the Jewish mayor used to discourage it.
5.05: [no sound audible for the rest of the recording]
43.36: End
Source
Oral Histories
Accession Number
1975-006
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1975-006
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
Date
1912-1922
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a financial and meeting minute ledger book (1912-1922) and a photocopy of a financial and meeting minute ledger book (1914-1922) of the B'nai Zion Synagogue in Cobalt, Ontario.
MG_RG
MG3 B15
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
B'nai Zion Synagogue (Cobalt, Ont.)
Places
Cobalt, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
4 records – page 1 of 1.

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