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Accession Number
2007-10-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-10-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1977-2003
Scope and Content
Accession consists of materials documenting Congregation Iyr Hamelich, the Reform synagogue in Kingston. The records include the constitution, Sunday school minutes and policy documents, synagogue bulletins, correspondence and "Welcome to our Congregation" booklets.
Subjects
Religion
Name Access
Congregation Iyr Hamelich
Places
Kingston, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Rabbi Nachman Shemen fonds
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 103; Series 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rabbi Nachman Shemen fonds
Level
Series
Fonds
103
Series
1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
[192-?]-1993
Physical Description
1.5 m of textual records
35 photographs
Admin History/Bio
The Canadian Federation to Aid Polish Jews in Israel, originally called the Canadian Federation of Polish Jews (CFPJ), was established in 1933 to assist Jews in Poland who were victims of anti-Semitism as expressed in economic boycotts and political discrimination. The CFPJ provided political action and advocacy on behalf of Polish Jews, as well as social help, moral strength and material support. It was a constituent member of the World Federation of Polish Jews, established in 1935, which provided relief and economic assistance to Jews in Poland, and coordinated the assistance given to Jewish communal organizations in Poland. In addition, the CFPJ assisted Canadian landsmanshaften (mutual benefit societies) which were giving support to those communities from which their members had emigrated.
In 1939, following the outbreak of the Second World War, the CFPJ was among those Canadian Jewish organizations which founded the United Jewish Refugee and War Relief Agencies, the purpose of which was to assist in the war effort and to aid war victims. At the conclusion of the war, the UJRWR was renamed the United Jewish Relief Agencies, with an aim to assist refugees in their effort to settle in Canada.
The scope and mandate of the CFPJ has changed over time as new challenges and projects have emerged. In January 1950, its activities expanded to include building homes in Israel for Polish Jewish immigrants, providing local relief to newly arrived Polish Jewish immigrants in Canada, locating relatives and providing legal advice on matters related to passports and visas, contributing to and participating in memorials honouring lost Jewish communities, and maintaining contact with its sister Farbands across the world.
In December 1951, the name of the organization was officially changed to Canadian Federation to Aid Polish Jews in Israel, and as of March 1953, its priorities had shifted to focus increasingly on providing support to Israel.
Scope and Content
Series consists of records documenting the activities of the Canadian Federation to Aid Polish Jews in Israel. Many records provide insight into the relief efforts carried out to assist Jews in Poland and Israel. Included are meeting minutes, agendas, reports, correspondence, speeches, newspaper articles, financial records, conference material, a ledger book, posters and invitations, membership and donation lists, scrapbooks, leaflets, photographs of important events, letters of appeal, visa and identification applications, property claims applications, and letters from individuals requesting aid.
Name Access
Canadian Federation of Polish Jews
Canadian Federation to Aid Polish Jews in Israel
Subjects
Jews--Israel
Jews, Polish
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Places
Israel
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rabbi Nachman Shemen fonds
Canadian Federation to Aid Polish Jews in Israel series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 103; Series 1; File 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rabbi Nachman Shemen fonds
Canadian Federation to Aid Polish Jews in Israel series
Level
File
Fonds
103
Series
1
File
1
Material Format
textual record
Date
1936
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of handwritten lecture notes and a newspaper clipping documenting Shemen's lecture on Polish Jewry and the struggle between existence and ruin. Shemen presented this lecture to the "Not to Worry!" Club (or "Be of Good Cheer!" Club) in Radomer Hall, 210 Beverley Street.
Subjects
Jews--Poland
Lectures and lecturing
Physical Condition
The lecture notes are rolled and difficult to unfurl.
Places
Beverley Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3411
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3411
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1938
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Scope and Content
Many prominent individuals are shown in this photograph, with names written on the bottom.
Name Access
Jewish National Fund
United Jewish Appeal
Subjects
Congresses and conventions
Zionism
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Beverley Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1982-11-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1545
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1545
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1948]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Name Access
Apter Synagogue
Gary, Ethel
Halter, Jack
Zimmerman, Rabbi M.
Subjects
Weddings
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Beverley Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1978-11-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3872
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3872
Material Format
graphic material
Date
31 August, 1935
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Scope and Content
Identified in this photograph are: David Newman; Jack Burke.
For identification, see accession record.
Name Access
Burke, Jack
Newman, David
Young Judaea
Subjects
Congresses and conventions
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Beverley Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1984-1-8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 6031
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
6031
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1952]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of a Labour Zionist banquet at the New Chudleigh House at 126 Beverley St. Invitees are seated around two long banquet tables. Identified are Myer Mandel, Mrs. Myer Mandel, Leibel Bagrad; Leibel Abella; Mr. Levinsky; Chaike Lovinsky; Nachman Lovinsky; Chaim Langer; Leah Langer; Archie Bennett; Sophie Bennett; Ida Krakover; Avrum Green; Charlie Krakover; I. S. Weinrot; and Baylke White.
Subjects
Dinners and dining
Labor Zionism
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Beverley Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1992-2-8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3340
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3340
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[between 1945 and 1949]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Admin History/Bio
Ubby Gold was a Toronto Habonim member who made Aliyah in 1946.
Name Access
Gold, Ubby
Habonim
Subjects
Weddings
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Israel
Accession Number
1982-6-10
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2015-2-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-3
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
15 cm of textual records
ca. 100 photographs
Date
1938-2006
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the Max and Anne Tanenbaum and Wolf families. Included are photographs of family, trips and missions to Israel, the establishment of the John Bassett Sports Centre in Israel and other events; certificates; documents related to Anne and Max's philanthropic work and giving to the Baycrest Centre, the University of Toronto, CHAT and the United Jewish Appeal; newsclippings; and photographs and an invitation documenting the honourary doctorate degree bestowed on Anne Tanenebaum by the Ben Gurion University of the Negev.
Administrative History
Max (1909-1983) and Anne (1909-2009) Tanenbaum were notable philanthropists in Toronto, best known for their support of the Jewish community in the areas of medicine and education.
Max Tanenbaum was born in Poland to Abraham and Chippa Sura Tanenbaum in 1909. He immigrated to Canada with his mother and brother, Joseph, in 1914, three years after his father's arrival in 1911. Max began work in the family steel business at the age of 13 and later went on to found his own steel company; York Steel. Max had two additional siblings, sisters Sarah (m. Sam Kates) and Esther (m. Simon Gottlieb).
Anne Tanenbaum was born in New York in 1909 to Herman and Minnie Wolf. Anne had three siblings: Molly (m. ? Raphael), Dorothy (m. Max Roher) and Jack (m. Ann Korolnek). At the age of 10, Anne's mother passed away and her father remarried. Her father and step-mother had three additional children: Bill (m. Sylvia), Noah (m. Marilyn), and Esther (m. Carmen). The family moved from New York to Montreal and then to Toronto.
Max and Anne met in Toronto and married in 1930. Together they had seven children: Harold, Joey (m. Toby), Howard (m. Carol), Larry (m. Judy), Tauba (m. Sol Spiro), Minda (m. Les Feldman), and Carol.
Descriptive Notes
Anne's stepmother was affectionately referred to by the Tanenbaum grandchildren as "Bubbie from Palestine."
Subjects
Families
Philanthropists
Name Access
Tanenbaum, Anne, 1909-2009
Tanenbaum, Max, 1909-1983
Wolf family
Places
Israel
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-4
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 250 photographs (3 albums) : b&w and col. ; 53 x 43 cm and smaller
9 cm of textual records
Date
(191-)-(197-), 1992
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the Title, Samuels and Fishman families. Included are family photographs, and photos related to involvement with philanthropy and industry, materials related to Reliable Toy Company, Forest Hill Collegiate "Forester" year books, a land deed for the Ansheir Yoisher Misrachi Synagogue in Welland, news clippings relating to Alex Samuels death, a Holy Blossom "Tempelite" year book, a Crown Bakery Bread promotional item, a wedding menu from the marriage of Molly Fishman and Harry Title, Molly Fishman's high school diplomas and JNF certificates. There are a number of photos of the Fishman and Title families in Welland and the United States, photos of the Crowland Volunteer Fire Department with Sam and Frank Fishman, Turk family albums with Moishe Turk and Yeva Fishman, an album of a sefer torah dedication to Baycrest Hospital in memory of Leah Fishman, photos of the Samuels family, their trip to Israel, promotional photos from the Reliable Toy Company, Beth Tzedec founding board photos, and B'nai Brith Women photos.
Administrative History
Samuel (ca. 1882-1929, Russia) and Gussie (nee Moscovitz) (b. ca.1884, Romania) Fishman, immigrated to Welland Ontario from Romania. Both arrived to the USA as teenagers sometime around the turn of the century. Samuel and Gussie were married in the USA and by 1920 immigrated with their young family to the historic township of Crowland in Welland County. Here they opened and operated a men's clothing store. Together they had six children, Molly (b. 1909, USA), Abe (b. 1911, USA), Morris (b. 1916, USA), Ruth (b. 1915, USA), Ann (b. 1920, Ontario) and Ethel. Morris married Pauline and lived in St. Catherines, Ruth married Nate Oelbaum and lived in Tucson Arizona, Anne married Alec Rothman and lived in Port Colborne, Ethel married Eddie Matchtinger and lived in Toronto and Abe never married. Yeva Fishman, the niece of Samuel Fishman married Morris Turk. Her father was (Frank Fishman?) and her mother was Sara Leah Fishman. Molly Fishman married Harry Title (Teitelebaum) (b. ca. 1903). They had three children, Greta (nee Title) Greisman, Sandra (nee Title) Samuels and Stephen (m. Carole Hillman, niece of Ben Hillman). Harry Teitelbaum is the son of Israel and Frumeth Teitelbaum. He was born in Gdansk Poland (b. ca., 1903). Harry Title had four younger siblings Lloyd, Birdie (m. Witlin), Arthur and Lorelle (Lieba) the youngest who was born in Toronto. Harry arrived to Canada shortly after the first world war and worked in the garment industry. He and his brother Arthur founded the Title Dress Company in the late 1920s and operated the business out of 355 Adelaide St. West. In the late 1980s, the business moved from this location to Adelaide and Bathurst. Sandra Title (b. Oct 27, 1936, Toronto), the middle daughter of Molly Fishman and Harry Title, married Lawrence Samuels. Together they had five children Joanna, John, Noah, Tom and Caroline. Lawrence was the eldest son of Alex Samuels (d. 1966) and Kate (nee Goldberg) Samuels. He had two younger siblings Herbie and Florence (m. Bill Goodman). Lawrence's father Alex Samuels immigrated to Canada from Dubrovna, White Russia (present day Dubrouna, Belarus). He immigrated to Canada with his parents Samuel and Chana Samuels and his younger siblings Sol, Ben, Riva and Polly. Alex and his brothers Sol and Ben established Reliable Toy Company in (ca. 1929) on Carlaw Ave. They sold the company in 1990.
Subjects
Business
Charities
Families
Places
Welland, Ont.
Toronto, Ont.
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-5-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-5-13
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
55 photographs : b&w ; 11 x 13 cm
Date
1962
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting a United Jewish Appeal Young Leadership Mission to Israel in 1962. Identified individuals include Morris Adams, Moe Emer, Paul Baer (the group's guide), Bernie Persiko, Barney Barenholtz, Jeff Cohen, Harvey Wolfe, Albert Mandel, Gerry Halpert, Stan Paulin, Wayne Tanenbaum, Bill Stern, and Murray Rumack.
Images show the group participating in various tours and visiting sites such as the Gadna training camp for teenagers, Israeli Air Force and naval bases, King Solomon's Mines, Yad Vashem, the Herzl memorial, a children's home, the Negev and Galilee, the Timma Copper Mines, the town of Acre, sitting in on an Ulpan Hebrew class for new immigrants, visiting sites of industry, greeting new aliyot disembarking at dock, and meeting with dignitaries and Israeli officials, such as Shimon Peres, Moshe Sharett, Levi Eshkol, and various military generals.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
RELATED MATERIAL NOTE: See fonds 33, series 4 for additional photographs of this same trip.
Subjects
Israel
Travel
Name Access
Adams, Morris
United Jewish Welfare Fund (Toronto, Ont.)
United Jewish Appeal (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-45
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-45
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w ; 22 x 17 cm and 18 x 13 cm
Date
1950-[196-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of three photographs. One photo is of a group of canvassers seated at a meeting for UJWF's Women's Division (1950). The Division broke its area down into districts, which appear on poster boards at the back of the room. The other two photographs appear to date from the 1960s and were taken in Israel. On the reverse side of a photo with three people is the name Prof. Lillian Kingstone, ORT and the other photo depicts Golda Meir, David Ben-Gurion and Aba Eban seated, along with others.
Custodial History
There is no information on the acquisition of this material.
Subjects
Women
Name Access
ORT
United Jewish Welfare Fund (Toronto, Ont.)
Ben-Gurion, David
Eban, Aba
Meir, Golda
Places
Israel
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-2-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-2-13
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 150 photographs : b&w and col ; 21 x 27 cm or smaller
1 photograph : negative print on transparency
1 scrapbook
1 folder of textual records
Date
1925-1996
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting the family life of Henry and Bella Rosenbaum. Included are photos from Poland, Italy, Israel and Canada. In addition, there is a scrapbook of photos prepared by their daughter Brenda on Henry and Bella's thirtieth wedding anniversary in 1976. In addition, there is a more comprehensive biography written by Henry and Bella's son-in-law Eric Bornstein. Individuals identified in photographs include,
Administrative History
Henry "Hanoch" Rosenbaum (1925-2015) was born in Radom Poland. He was the seventh of eight children born to Rachel Rosenbaum (née Katz) and Moshe Rosenbaum. Henry learned the fate of his parents, two siblings and their families, after the war. All were innocent victims murdered during the Holocaust. Most of Radom's Jews were murdered in Treblinka following the August 1942 liquidation of its ghettos.
Henry Rosenbaum met his Bella Rotbard (1925-2012) in Italy in the aftermath of the Second World War. Although Bella was also from Radom, she did not know the Rosenbaum family. Bella's parents, her sixteen-year-old sister and four-year-old brother along with most of her parents' extended families were murdered in the Holocaust.
While in Italy, the Joint Distribution Committee funded 'mock' Kibbutzim, preparing holocaust survivors for immigration to Palestine and Kibbutz life. Bella, a one-time member of the secular Jewish youth movement Hashomer Hatzair in Poland, believed that she was destined to be a kibbutznik. Henry would follow.
Bella and Henry were part of the illegal immigration to Palestine in 1946 and spent their first few days in Atlit, a British Mandate detainee camp. Soon Bella settled on kibbutz, but soon after married Henry. In 1946, Bella and Henry married in their apartment in Ramat Gan. At the time, Henry was serving in the IDF’s motor pool. Finding the weather exasperating her migraine symptoms, Bella, Henry and their toddler daughter Brenda (b. 1949) immigrated to Toronto in 1952.
With the assistance of a relative, Henry gained employment in a print shop sweeping floors. Shortly thereafter he advanced to machine operator and in 1961 he opened his own print shop. Bella found employment in the garment industry sewing collars onto shirts and earning her wages by piece work. Bella stopped working when their son Murray (b. 1961) was born. Henry served as editor for the quarterly Yiddish and English journal the Voice of Radom and was an active life-long member of the Radom Society.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Expo 67 (Montréal, Québec)
Rosenbaum, Henry, 1925-2015
Places
Canada
Israel
Italy
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-8-11
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-8-11
Material Format
object
textual record
Physical Description
1 artifact
1 birth certificate
Date
1929-1977
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the life of Ubby Dashkin of Lipson & Dashkin Architects. Included are: Dashkin's birth certficate (1929), an artifact given in appreciation to Dashkin for supporting the Canadian Centre for Nuclear Physics Weitzman [sic] Institute of Science, Israel (1977).
Administrative History
Ubby Dashkin (1929-1981) was born Aaron Abi Dashkin on 4 April 1929 in Toronto to and David and Ethel Dashkin. As an adult, he was part of Lipson & Dashkin Architects. He passed away on 17 July 1981 and is buried in Dawes Road Cemetery in Scarborough, Ontario. Ubby was the younger brother of Yiddish literature translator Miriam Beckerman (1927- ).
Subjects
Architects
Birth certificates
Name Access
Dashkin, Ubby, 1929-1981
Lipson & Dashkin Architects (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Toronto
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-9-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-9-1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
moving images
Physical Description
ca. 14 cm of textual records
ca. 275 photographs : b&w and col. ; 26 x 21 cm or smaller
1 DVD
Date
[191-?]-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the life of Abe Zukerman and several family members including Abe's father-in-law Elia Rubin and brother-in-law Jack Rubin. Included are: certificates of various sorts, correspondence, a DVD of the dedication of the restored Jewish cemetery in Wachock, eulogies, a family calender, financial documents, identity documents for Abe and Margot Zukerman, memorial books/records for Abe Zukerman and Elia Rubin, photographs, and a small number of administrative and financial records from the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society.
Custodial History
The material that makes up accession 2017-9-1 belonged to Abe Zukerman. Mr. Zukerman's stepson, Mel Perlmutter, gathered the material and donated it to the Archives
Administrative History
Abram "Abe" Zukerman (1914-2009) was born in Wierzbnik, Poland in 1914. He was the only member of his family to survive the Holocaust. In 1948, he came to Canada, where he became involved in the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society and married. His first wife, Esther, predeceased him. In 1975, he married his second wife, Margot, who had two children from a previous marriage. In addition to serving as a senior executive member of the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society for over 50 years, Abe volunteered with United Jewish Appeal and State of Israel Bonds. He passed away 8 Feb. 2009. Photo Caption (001): Abe Zukerman at his store on Queen St. W., Toronto, Ontario, Canada, [196-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (002): Lansdowne Cut Rate Store on Queen St. W., Toronto, Ontario, Canada, [196-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (011): Abe Zukerman at the Western Wall, [199-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (017): Abe Zukerman with others, possibly in Israel, [196-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (018): Abe Zukerman, [193-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Captions (032) - (087): Unidentified individuals, [192-?]-[195-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
A number of photographs have writing in Polish and Yiddish on their opposite side, which might prove useful in their identification.
Subjects
Cemeteries
Families
Societies
Name Access
Rubin, Elia
Rubin, Jack
Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society
Zukerman, Abe, 1914-2009
Zukerman, Margot
Places
Canada
Israel
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-6-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-6-5
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
ca. 30 cm of textual records
89 photographs : b&w and col. (7 negatives) ; 18 x 13 cm or smaller
1 CD-ROM (textual record)
19 videocassettes (ca. 22 hr.)
Date
[19--?]-2008
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Abe and Margot Zukerman, their family, and the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society. Included are: awards, identity documents, legal documents, letters, photographs, publications, videocassettes, and vital records.
Photo Caption (015): Abe Zukerman's father, [19--?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-6-5.
Custodial History
Mel Perlmutter, stepson of Abe Zukerman and son of Margot Zukerman, donated the records to the Archives.
Administrative History
Abe Zukerman (1914-2009) was born in Wierzbnik, Poland in 1914. He was the only member of his family to survive the Holocaust. In 1948, he came to Canada, where he became involved in the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society and married. His first wife, Esther, predeceased him. In 1975, he married his second wife, Margot, who had two children from a previous marriage. In addition to serving as a senior executive member of the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society for over 50 years, Abe volunteered with United Jewish Appeal and State of Israel Bonds. He passed away 8 Feb. 2009. Margot Zukerman (née Rubin) was born in Berlin, Germany on 31 December 1922. Still a child when the National Socialists came to power, she was denied schooling. She arrived in Toronto in 1939 never having received a formal education. Despite this, she was able to learn English and operate her father's small ladies' wear store in Hamilton for at least a dozen years. In 1944, she married her first husband Alexander Perlmutter, with whom she had two children: one in 1945 and another in 1948. In 1970, she moved to Toronto, where she acted as caregiver to her father. In 1974, she met Abe, whom she married on 14 February 1975. Like her husband, Margot was an active member of Toronto's Jewish community.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIALS: Other records relating to Abe Zukerman can be found in Accession 2017-9-1.
Subjects
Families
Societies
Name Access
Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society
Zukerman, Abe, 1914-2009
Zukerman, Esther, 1912-1972
Zukerman, Margot, 1922-
Zukerman family
Places
Canada
Israel
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-12-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-12-1
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
8 videocassettes : Betacam SP and Digital Betacam
Date
1998-2006
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 8 videocassettes that belonged to UJA Federation of Greater Toronto's Creative Department. Cassettes include: United Jewish Appeals The Campaign for Fifty (1998), UJA Federation Symposium of Hope (2003), UJA Federation 2004 "What Will Tomorrow Hold?" Canvasser Training (2003), UJA Federation Tomorrow Campaign "End Video" (2004), UJA Federation Tomorrow Campaign "Tomorrow Campaign" (2004), UJA "Israel Emergency Campaign" (2006)
Custodial History
Amit Louis and Amy Krasin of the Creative Department were cleaning out an old desk in the summer of 2017 and found the tapes. Amit suggested bringing the tapes to the archives, which Amy did sometime thereafter.
Administrative History
UJA Federation's Tomorrow Campaign is Canada’s largest non-profit community development project. It is Federation's response to the need for new facilities and services brought about by the growth of Toronto’s Jewish community.
Subjects
Charities
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Places
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-1-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-1-10
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1953
Scope and Content
Accession consists of correspondence from the acting director of the Children's Aid and Infants' Homes of Toronto located at 32 Isabella Street to the executive director of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society located at 145 Beverly Street. The subject of the correspondence concerns a reference for an applicant for the position of investigator in the Protection Department of the Children's Aid and Infants' Homes.
Custodial History
Item was discovered while processing CJC Fonds 17 holdings.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Subjects
Orphanages
Name Access
Children's Aid and Infants' Homes of Toronto
Places
Beverley Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Isabella Street(Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-1-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-1-6
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
20 photographs : col. ; 10 x 15 cm
1 plaque
Date
1978, 2016-2017
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two thank-you notes addressed to Morley Wolfe from Supreme Court Justice Rosalie Abella, as well as a plaque in appreciation presented to Wolfe for inspiring the genesis of CASTS (Canadians Against Slavery and Torture in Sudan), which led to a larger coalition in Canada against the genocide in Darfur. There is also an accompanying photo on printer paper of Wolfe receiving the plaque from Dr. Norman Epstein alongside C. Arthur Dowes. Finally, there is photo scrapbook compiled by Arnold Lipshitz documenting the Advocates Society's trip to Israel. The Advocates Society was made up of judges and lawyers in Ontario. Identified in the photographs are Franz Bowman; Barbara Bowman; Kathy Parkinson; Sandra Newman; Douglas Caruthers; Cecile Goldenberg and Morley Wolfe.
Administrative History
Morley S. Wolfe was born in Winnipeg in 1928 to Cecil (b. 1895) and Betty (nee Davidow) Wolfe. He spent his early childhood in various cities in Saskatchewan and Manitoba until moving to Toronto in 1940. Soon after graduating from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1955 he started his own practice as a senior member of the law firm Burt, Burt, Wolfe and Bowman. In 1971 he was appointed Queen’s Council, and from 1973 to 1977 he served as counsel for B’nai Brith Canada. After his retirement from practice in 1993, the Province of Ontario appointed him presiding Justice of the Peace for Ontario and Deputy Judge in Small Claims Court. His first marriage was to Sandra Newman in 1958 and they had three children together: Leslie, Lee, and Melanie. He later married Joan and became the step-father to her daughter, Erin. Throughout his life Morley was passionate about fighting prejudice and discrimination and became involved with organizations, such as the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews and the Urban Alliance on Race Relations. He was also a member of the Toronto Police Services Board Committee on Race Relations, served as Chair of the North York Committee on Community, Race and Ethnic Relations, and was appointed to the Canadian Multiculturalism Council. In addition, he was the founding president of Toronto Residents in Partnership (TRIP) from 2003 to 2006. His involvement extended to Jewish organizations. He served as National President of B’nai Brith Canada (BBC) from 1982 to 1983 and was a founding member of its League for Human Rights. He was also President of BBC’s Toronto Regional Council and Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998, and of the Jewish Camp Council of Toronto as well as many other organizations. Morley’s hard work and involvement in the community earned him many awards, including, City of Toronto’s William P. Hubbard Race Relations Award, the YMCA Canada Peace Medal, B’nai Brith Canada Service Award, and the Province of Ontario’s Senior Achievement Award. Around 2002, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 began filing a series of appeals with B’nai Brith International (BBI) over concerns that BBC’s national executive was governing undemocratically. Morley played a key role in filing these appeals and was the centre of one appeal filed after BBC censured him without advance notice or the opportunity for a hearing. These appeals were not all successful. Around 2006, Morley became involved in another appeal against BBC that was filed by a group of members who called themselves the Concerned Members of B’nai Brith Canada (CMOBBC). They alleged that BBC’s national executive had too much centralized power, was not governing transparently, failed to provide members with audited financial statements at multiple annual general meetings (AGMs), passed a constitution that members had defeated at the 2005 AGM, and was threatening and harassing some members. BBI’s appeal court rendered its verdict in 2007 in favour of BBC. Soon after this judgment was made BBC took steps to expel all the members of CMOBBC. In response, Morley resigned from the organization. Morley currently resides in Brampton.
Descriptive Notes
SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE: See accession record for page numbers of identified individuals.
Subjects
Lawyers
Name Access
Wolfe, Morley S., 1928-
Places
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-3-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-3-4
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w and col. ; 10 x 15 cm and 12 x 11 cm and 9 x 9 cm
Date
1950, [196-], 1982
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 3 photographs of Henry Weingluck. Included is Weingluck's wedding photo to Rae Simon in 1950, a photo of Henry and Rae at Simon's Restaurant on their 32nd anniversary on 26 March 1982, and a photograph of Weingluck riding a camel in Israel, possibly in the late 1960s.
Subjects
Wedding anniversaries
Portraits
Name Access
Weingluck, Henry, 1902-1987
Places
Israel
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-6-18
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-6-18
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w ; 15 x 10 cm or smaller
2 letters
Date
1930-1948
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Miriam and Moshe Beckerman. Incuded are: one photograph taken of road builders in Palestine in 1930; one photograph of the British Eighth Army (pre-Jewish Brigade), of which Moshe was a part, in the first half of the 1940s; one letter in Hebrew addressed to Miriam by a friend of hers; one photograph (enclosed with the aforementioned letter in an envelope) of Moshe Beckerman, Mrs. Mirsky, and Miriam Beckerman taken in Ramat Gan, Israel in 1948; and one letter sent by Miriam Beckerman, then residing in Tel Aviv, to Esther Berger in Canada and dated January 12, 1948. The last letter briefly mentions the tense situation prevailing in Mandatory Palestine.
Photo Caption (001): British Eighth Army, [194-]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-6-18.
Photo Caption (002): Road builders, Palestine, 1930. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-6-18.
Photo Caption (003): Moshe Beckerman, Mrs. Mirsky, and Miriam Beckerman, Ramat Gan, Israel, 1948. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-6-18.
Administrative History
Miriam Beckerman immigrated to British Mandatory Palestine in 1947. Only nineteen years old, she made her way to Kfar Blum, a kibbutz in Hula Valley. After a few months, she relocated to another kibbutz, Ramat Yochanan. After relocating to Ma'ayan Baruch, another settlement, she mer her husband Moshe Beckerman. Moshe had been with the British Eighth Army, serving in the North Africa campaigns. The couple married in October 1947 and moved to Tel Aviv, where Moshe was originally from. In 1952, Miriam and Moshe made the decision to move to Canada.
Descriptive Notes
Conservation: The archivist removed two sticky notes from the back of photographs for preservation reasons. Prior to removing them, he scanned them so that researchers would be able to read what was written on them.
Language: One of the letters is in Hebrew.
Subjects
Families
Palestine
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Beckerman, Miriam
Beckerman, Moshe
Great Britain. Army. Army, Eighth
Places
Canada
Israel
Palestine
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
20 cm of textual records
Date
1979, 1989-2005
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Shoel Silver's involvement with various committees, including: Project Renewal, NECHAMA. Keren Hayesod, Israel Center for Treatment of Psychotrauma and The Jewish Agency for Israel, UJA and others. Included are reports, correspondence, proposals, a 1979 edition of the Jewish Standard, first edition of the Children's Newspaper in Kfar Gvirol and assorted research material.
Use Conditions
Records are closed for 10 years from date of creation.
Descriptive Notes
Language: Most of the items are in English, with some items partially or fully in Hebrew.
Subjects
Charities
Israel
Name Access
Jewish Agency for Israel
Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto
Project Renewal (Israel)
Silver, Shoel
Toronto Jewish Congress
Places
Israel
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-20
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-20
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
120 cm of textual records (4 boxes)
Date
1987-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material involving Shoel Silver's involvement with various Jewish organizations including B'nai Brith Canada (BBC), the Canada-Israel Committee (CIC), the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs (CIJA), the Jewish Agency for Israel (JAFI), UJA Federation of Greater Toronto (UJA), and the United Israel Appeal (UIA). Included are meeting minutes, reports, memoranda, correspondence, budgets, discussion documents, resource material, newspaper clippings, photocopies of newspaper articles, briefing papers, resolutions.
Custodial History
Records remained in the custody of Shoel Silver until 27 July 2018 when the OJA acquired the records from the former.
Administrative History
Shoel Silver is a Toronto businessman. He formerly co-chaired the Unity of the Jewish People Committee with Natan Sharansky. Prior to that, he was the scholar in residence for the first Federation Shabbaton.
Use Conditions
Accession is closed for 25 years from date of donation.
Subjects
Israel
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
B'nai Brith Canada
Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs
Jewish Agency for Israel
Silver, Shoel
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
United Israel Appeal
Places
Canada
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-24
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-24
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
3 photographs : b&w and col. ; 25 x 20 cm or smaller
Date
1988-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Gerald "Jerry" Rosenberg and his involvement with the Royal Canadian Legion's General Wingate Branch 256. Included are General Wingate Branch 256 meeting agendas (2013-2015), Royal Canadian Legion correspondence (2014), two General Wingate Branch newsletters (October 2015 and March 2016), an annual branch inspection report form (27 September 2015), a branch regulations and clubhouse rules submission form (2012), financial statements and receipts (2013-2015), certificates of merit and appreciation from the Royal Canadian Legion (2002-2009), and a document in Hebrew commemo
In addition to the above documents, there are three photographs for which identification is missing: one of a funeral, one of a demonstrators carrying signs urging recognition of China, and a portrait of an unknown veteran.
Finally, the accession contains an undated letter to the editor of an unspecified newspaper that outline Jerry's views of the Arab-Israeli conflict.
Custodial History
At the time of his death, Jerry Rosenberg was living with his partner Frances Cohen. Frances' daughter Ronda "Rhonnie" Cohen took possession of the records following Jerry's death. Rhonnie subsequently gave the records to author Ellin Bessner who donated them to the Ontario Jewish Archives.
Administrative History
Jerry Rosenberg grew up in Hamilton, Ontario along with his twin sister, two brothers, and older sister. When he was seventeen years old, Rosenberg lied about his age in order to fight in the Second World War. He joined the Royal Canadian Navy and served for the duration of the war.
After the war, Rosenberg approached the Canadian Zionist Organization about volunteering in Palestine. After a circuitous journey that first took him from Montreal to New York to France, he arrived in Haifa in February or March 1948. Rosenberg was part of Machal, a group of overseas volunteers who fought alongside Israeli forces during the 1948 Arab-Israeli War. Rosenberg joined the Haganah and fought in the 52nd Givati Regiment. As part of this unit, he participated in battle in the Arab village of Bashshit.
After the war, Rosenberg made preparations to leave Israel. Upon arriving in Canada, he worked with Jewish organizations and started a family. He became president of the Royal Canadian Legion's Wingate Branch 256. He died on 23 August 2017.
Descriptive Notes
Language: English, French
Subjects
Arab-Israeli conflict
Veterans--Canada
Name Access
Bessner, Ellin, 1961-
Rosenberg, Jerry
Royal Canadian Legion
Places
Canada
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-8-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-8-8
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
2 videocassettes (180 min.)
Date
1986-1997
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two videocassettes.
The first videocassette is titled Anguish to Hope: May 1-19, 1997 and records the travels of forty Canadian university students to Hungary, Poland, and Israel. During their travels, the students visited the birthplace of Theodor Herzl in Budapest, took part in the March of the Living from Auschwitz to Birkenau on Holocaust Remembrance Day, and celebrated Yom Ha'atsmaut in Jerusalem. Anguish to Hope was sponsored by the United Israel Appeal of Canada and local UJA/CJA Federations. Participants included: Gary Abenaim, Lesley Arbus, Andrew Bloom, Jessica Blumberger, Aaron Bockner, Shelly Brenner, Jason Brookman, Neshama Carlebach, Jennifer Cohen, Judy Cohen, Shoshana Cohen, Aliza Dwoskin, Alison Engel, Elissa Flagg, Cindy Goldbenberg, Henry Goldstein, Sarah Gonshor, Itai Hammer, Judy Heilik, Jocelyn Heisel, Daniel Hertzman, Gideon Hess, Naomi Hirshberg, Chaim Indig, Muki Jankelowitz, Andy Koltai, Yonina Machlis, Deborah Mervitz, Marla Munk, Oren Ognigwicz, Marla Pinsky, Bryan Rappaport, Eli Rubenstein, Lauren Schwartz, Ilana Sernick, Tammy Sitcoff, Elan Sloim, Noah Solomon, Julie Stevens, Rachel Stys, Nicole Sussman, Andrea Syrtash, Simone Vigod, and Laura Weinrib. The recording, which ends abruptly, is two hours in length.
The second videocassette is a recording of a Rogers Cable 10 special presentation: The Official Opening of the Baycrest Hospital Ben & Hilda Katz Building. The opening took place on 4 May 1986, where it was broadcast live from the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care in North York. The recording is one hour in length.
Custodial History
The videocassettes were donated to the Ontario Jewish Archives by Elissa Flagg, one of the participants in the Anguish to Hope trip. She is also the great-niece of Ben and Hilda Katz, the couple honoured in the Baycrest opening.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Availability of other formats note: Available as DVD reference copies.
Subjects
Hospitals
Jewish youth--Travel
Name Access
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care
Flagg, Elissa
Jewish Federations of Canada – UIA
Rogers TV
Places
Canada
Hungary
Israel
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-11-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-11-10
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 30 cm of graphic materials and textual records
Date
1936-[2004]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Ray and Rose Wolfe. Included are numerous photographs of Ray and Rose Wolfe with different individuals and at different events as well as a small number of textual records. Individuals identified in the photographs include: Bluma Appel, David Ben-Gurion, George H. W. Bush, Elizabeth Comper, Tony Comper, Mikhail Gorbachev, Golda Meier, Brian Mulroney, Gunthar Plaut, Yitzhak Rabin, Bob Rae, Shimon Peres, Justin Trudeau, Pierre Elliott Trudeau, John Turner, Desmond Tutu, Elizabeth Wolfe, and Morris Wolfe.
Custodial History
Records were in the possession of Elizabeth Wolfe, daughter of Ray and Rose Wolfe, prior to donation.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Availability of other formats: Selected images also available as JPEG and TIFF files.
Subjects
Jewish philanthropists
Married people
Name Access
Wolfe, Ray, 1917-1990
Wolfe, Rose, 1916-2016
Places
Canada
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-12-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-12-1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
moving images
Physical Description
43 cm of graphic material and textual records
1 film reel
1 photograph : b&w ; 24 x 19 cm (sight) in frame 33 x 27 cm
Date
1962-1998
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting events associasted with Ray and Rose Wolfe. Included are photo albums and scrapbooks, four photographs, one folder of certificates, one folder of correspondence, and a recording of a speech Abba Eban gave in 1975 to the Canadian Friends of Haifa University. The albums and scrapbooks document the following: the 1963 UJA campaign; a 1978 event held by the University of Haifa in appreciation of Ray Wolfe; a 1980 Negev Dinner tribute held in honour of Rose Wolfe; a 1981 Hineni conference in Montreal; and a 1982 Europe/Israel tour by a UJA delegation that includes the Belzbergs, the Fienbergs, the Hermans, and the Wolfes. There is also a 1970 memorial book of the official opening of the Samuel Bronfman House commemorating fifty years of service to the Canadian Jewish Congress. The book contains a personal note from Mr. Bronfman to Ray Wolfe.
Custodial History
Records were in the possession of Elizabeth Wolfe, daughter of Ray and Rose Wolfe, prior to donation.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Jewish philanthropists
Name Access
Wolfe, Ray, 1917-1990
Wolfe, Rose, 1916-2016
Places
Europe
Israel
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Sarah (Patlik) Green
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
7 January 1975
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Sarah (Patlik) Green
Number
AC 004
Interview Date
7 January 1975
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Sophie Milgram
AccessionNumber
AC 004
Total Running Time
38 minutes 44 seconds
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Sarah (Patlik) Green grew up living in Toronto's "Junction" neighbourhood. The family home and scrap yard business were both located on Maria St. which served as the centre for Jewish life in the Junction during the early 1900s. Sarah Patlik was involved with numerous charitable organizations including the Ontario Hospital School of Orilla and the Rubinoff and Naftolin Mishpocha.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Green, Sarah
Geographic Access
West Toronto Junction
Kingston, Ont.
Toronto, Ont.
Orillia, Ont.
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
Side A:
0.21: Family arrived from Russia in 1908-1909. Grandfather arrived first. Saved his money and brought family to Canada, one by one. Anshel Wise agency used to help families immigrate to Canada.
3.44: Move to Toronto 1909. Family moved for better employment opportunities. Family lived in rented house on Portland Avenue. Father was a laborer in a junkyard. The junkyard was located around the King area, close to home. Family then moved to Stanley Ave. off Niagara St. Stanley Ave. was a Jewish neighborhood.
6.57: Move to The Junction 1915/1916. (Junction called “Muddy York” but was part of Toronto). Grandfather saved money and opened a junkyard of his own on Maria St. Family lived in 3 different homes on Maria St., one at 225, at 283 and the last house was right in the front of the junkyard, at 202 Maria St.
8.14: Standard of living in the Junction 1915/16. The rents were $20 a month. Mother made her own bread, preserves, and pickles to put away for the winter. She shared whatever we had with some of the poorer Jewish families on Maria St.
8.56: Maria Street Shopkeepers and Services. Two butchers, Mr. Zaitzove? and Mr. Weiner? Mr. Mandel had a Jewish bakery. Mr. Bexter? was the Schochet (ritual slaughterer). A cheder and a Peretz school. Teachers: Mr McKankil, Mr. Brick and Mr. Rigelhof?
11.28: No antisemitism in the Junction recalled by Sara Patlick.
11.34: Transportation in the Junction. No streetcars. There used to be a “jitney” and for 5 cents it took you right to your home. The streets were not paved and the mud came up to our “ears”. Entertainment in the Junction. We had no cars, radios nor televisions but we did have a gramophone, it was our entertainment. Mother bought a piano and paid a quarter a week for it. We all took piano lessons. Attended organized free concerts and dances at the Peretz Shul on Beverley St (first on Crawford St.). Picture shows were 5 cents.
17.27: Sarah Patlik and Charity Work. Secretary for Jewish Ladies Auxillary from the Junction. Raised money for the Weston Sanitorium. Secretary for the Old Folks Home on Cecil St. Secretary for the Antidiluvian Order of Buffalos, Lord Reading Lodge. Lodge did work for War Veterans. Hadassah. Secretary for Pride of Israel. In 1973 was made Woman of the year by the Ontario Hospital School of Orilla.
20.23: Agudath Mishpocha/Rubinoff and Naftolin Families. Families formed organization so that they would all be together and not forget who they were. Formed in 1928. Charity work and donations to: The Bloorview Hospital, Cerebral Palsy, Muscular Dystrophy, The Heart Fund, Princess Margaret, Sick Children’s Hospital, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Baycrest, Jewish Blind, Syrian Jews, State of Israel emergency fund and bonds.
30.12: Affiliation with Pride of Israel. Joined with husband in 1933. Was Synagogue secretary for many years.
34.05: Junction Shul on Maria St. Founded in 1918/1919 by Hyman Naftolin. Shul began in a little house at 84 or 86 Maria St. Shul became too small. Abraham Tenenbaum investor of present day Junction Shul.
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Percy Skuy
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
May 12, 2015
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Percy Skuy
Number
AC 416
Subject
Canada--Emigration and immigration
Jews--South Africa
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Interview Date
May 12, 2015
Interviewer
Naomi Raichyk
Total Running Time
1 hr. 19 min.
Use Restrictions
NONE
Biography
The child of Latvian immigrants to South Africa, Percy grew up in the small town of Vryheid, South Africa with his parents and two siblings. Years later, when asked what the population of Vryheid was, Percy’s mother replied, “Forty Jewish families.” Those families formed a tight-knit community that was able to support not only a synagogue and a rabbi, but a Talmud Torah school and a butcher’s shop with a kosher section.
At seventeen years old, Percy began an apprenticeship to become a pharmacist. He qualified in 1954 and worked for a year before leaving South Africa to travel the world. He never planned on visiting Canada, but found himself in Toronto for a stopover and ended up liking the city so much he decided to stay. In 1959, Percy became the first South African pharmacist registered in Ontario.
Percy met his first wife, Frances Goodman, in 1960 on a blind date and married her that same year. Together, they had two children: Beth (born in 1961) and David (born in 1963). In 1961, Percy began his thirty-four-year career with Johnson and Johnson Corporation, taking on a number of roles in the company during that time. In 1977, Frances passed away. Two years later, he married his second wife, Elsa Ruth Snider.
In addition to his professional accomplishments, Percy is the founder of the only museum devoted exclusively to the history of contraception. The museum is located at the Dittrick Medical History Centre in Cleveland, Ohio.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Skuy, Percy, 1932-
Geographic Access
Canada
Europe
Israel
South Africa
United States
Original Format
Digital file
Copy Format
Digital file
Transcript
00:30 Percy was born in 1932 in Vryheid in northern Natal, South Africa.
00:41 Percy's parents emigrated from Latvia to South Africa in 1929.
00:53 Percy discusses his parents and their early lives in South Africa and the Jewish community in Vryheid.
04:10 Percy discusses his family's practice of Judaism while growing up.
05:02 Percy's father ran a small business. Later he worked with his brother-in-law to run a mill. At age fifty-nine his father was killed in an automobile accident.
06:00 Percy discusses his mother. Percy has two siblings: an older brother, Max, and a younger sister, Rita.
07:19 Percy shares some of his childhood memories.
09:29 Percy was involved in the Habonim youth movement.
11:27 Percy reminisces about the establishment of the State of Israel.
13:23 Percy discusses his impressions of apartheid. He discusses his relationships with black men and women.
15:15 Percy discusses his involvement with an anti-apartheid group.
17:19 Percy shares a story that illustrates his opposition to apartheid. His parents were not politically active.
19:06 Percy discusses how he became interested in pharmacy and the training for pharmacists.
21:21 Percy describes his two years of travel following graduation from pharmacy.
26:58 Percy relates how, en route to a pre-arranged job in the Arctic, he serendipitously secured a job with Glaxo as a medical sales representative on a stop-over in Toronto.
29:49 Percy describes his sales route.
30:46 Percy explains how he became the first South African registered pharmacist in Ontario.
32:31 Percy describes some of his early social/business pursuits in Canada.
34:12 Percy married his wife, Francis, originally from Sudbury. She graduated from the University of Toronto in nursing.
34:26 Following travel to Europe, Israel and South Africa, Percy and Francis decided to return to live in Canada.
35:35 Percy discusses the importance of maintaining family connection despite distance.
36:41 Percy describes the slow trickle of relatives who emigrated from South Africa. He notes that he has no close relatives remaining in South Africa and comments on the disappearance of the Jewish community in Vryheid.
38:39 Percy discusses some of the challenges he faced integrating socially into the Jewish community.
40:36 Percy explains how he became involved with working for the company Ortho.
45:15 Percy explains the factors that guided his integration into Canada.
47:08 Percy discusses his involvement in the Jewish community in Toronto.
48:30 Percy contrasts his own upbringing with how he raised his own children in Toronto.
52:00 Percy discusses his grandchildren.
52:26 Percy is the founder of a museum of the history of contraception. He explains how he developed an interest in the history of contraception and how he collected artifacts.
58:18 Percy describes his work history, his involvement in professional committee work, and his pursuits following his retirement in 1995.
1:00:11 Percy explains how he found a permanent location for the museum at the Dittrick Museum at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio.
1:02:50 Percy married Elsa in 1979. He discusses their range of hobbies.
1:03:38 Percy discusses the three documentaries he created. The topics included the formation of the Jewish pharmacy fraternity, the history of Jewish pharmacists in Canada, and the extracurricular involvement of Jewish pharmacists in Canada.
1:06:47 Percy addresses some of the issues faced by South African Jewish pharmacists who integrated to Canada.
1:09:20 Percy lists the languages he speaks.
1:10:00 Percy reminisces about his mother. He recalls his mother's relationship with their family servant.
1:13:14 Percy describes his training in pharmacy in South Africa.
1:15:27 Percy shares stories about their family's black servants.
1:17:40 Percy reminisces about the opportunities that came his way since his arrival in Canada.
Source
Oral Histories

Becoming Canadian

The History of Contraception

40 Jewish Families

Not Long Before the Police Arrived

Name
Richard Stern
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
23 Feb. 2016
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Richard Stern
Number
AC 426
Subject
Immigrants--Canada
Occupations
Interview Date
23 Feb. 2016
Interviewer
Lisa Newman
Total Running Time
AC 426 part 1: 22 min.
AC 426 part 2: 22 min.
AC 426 part 3: 21 min.
AC 426 part 4: 1 min.
AC 426 part 5: 4 min.
AC 426 part 6: 3 min.
AC 427 part 7: 10 min.
AC 428 part 8: 2 min.
Use Restrictions
Waiting for Richard to Sign Waiver
Biography
The firstborn twin (he insists he and his brother are not competitive), Richard grew up in the small town of Muizenberg in an old house on the seafront with his parents and four siblings. Born in 1937, Richard’s childhood was untainted by apartheid, which came into effect eleven years later in 1948. As a child, he played with children of colour on his grandfather’s farm; by adolescence, those same childhood friends were obliged to call him Boss on account of his race.
After completing high school at Kingswood College, a Methodist boarding school five hundred miles from where he grew up, Richard returned to Muizenburg where he worked on a farm before going back to school to obtain a diploma in agriculture. Around this time, he had a small mishap working at a winery. He had been warned not to fall asleep while the grapes were fermenting; sure enough, he did just that and the next morning the winery found itself with ten thousand gallons of vinegar.
Richard gained more experience in different wineries after completing a tour of Europe with the National Union of South African Students. He stayed in England and worked at a winery located under the Tower of London and later at wine farms in Bordeaux and the Champagne region of France. While in Europe, his twin brother told him about agriculture in Israel, which prompted him to go there. It was in Israel that he met his first wife with whom he had three children.
Richard worked at several jobs in Israel and opened three of the first Supersol supermarkets there. He also served in the Israel Defense Forces. Eventually though, he decided to come to Canada, which he did with his family in 1963. In Ottawa, he operated a supermarket for a short time before going to work for the head office of Loeb. Through this position, he got to see a good deal of Canada and developed a sense of its geography and a feel for its people.
In the early 1970s, Richard made a living as his own boss in a brokerage business before the Department of Industry, Trade and Commerce recruited him to market Canadian grocery and alcohol products. It was while working for the department that he became a Canadian citizen.
Today, Richard is retired and married to Doris. They have four children and eight grandchildren. He considers himself a Canadian Jew, but retains a strong affection for South Africa and its natural beauty. Since leaving, he has been back to South Africa between twenty and thirty times with Doris.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Stern, Richard, 1937-
Geographic Access
Cape Town (South Africa)
England
France
Israel
Muizenberg (South Africa)
Ottawa (Ont.)
Original Format
Digital file
Transcript
0Part 1:
00:00 Richard was born in Muizenberg, South Africa on 5 January 1937. He was the first of a set of twins.
00:57 Richard discusses his grandfather's business in Cape Town.
01:38 Richard reminisces about his childhood in Muizenberg. He shares memories about school, after-school activities, and his school performance.
04:06 Richard discusses his siblings: Robert, Maxwell, Peter, and Jean.
06:11 Richard studied viticulture. He describes the challenges he faced realizing his dreams after leaving his country and support system.
08:37 Richard reminisces about growing up in Muizenberg.
09:30 Richard discusses Jewish life and education in Muizenberg.
10:23 Richard discusses his bar mitzvah.
11:11 Richard describes the history of his parents' home.
12:07 Richard recalls his family celebrating Jewish holidays.
12:42 Richard discusses his affiliation with the Second Muizenberg Jewish Boy Scout group and camp.
13:15 Richard notes that his father was a leader in the Habonim youth movement, but did not want his children to participate in Habonim.
14:18 Richard discusses his father's involvement with the scouting movement in Cape Town. His father was involved in Jewish communal affairs. He describes his father's involvement with an entertainment group.
15:59 Richard discusses the make-up of the Jewish community in Muizenberg.
16:30 Richard shares stories involving his personal relationships with black or "coloured" Africans. He relates an incident that occurred during his first work experience.
19:40 Richard discusses the changes that arose with the introduction of apartheid in 1948. He refers to the risks associated with political involvement against the government.
22:09 Richard discusses Klingswood College, the boarding school he attended.
Part 2:
00:00 Richard continues to reminisce about attending boarding school. There were about twelve Jewish students.
03:42 Richard mentions the Sharpeville massacre.
04:12 Richard describes the student mix at Kingswood College. He describes exemptions made for Jewish students as well as mandatory church services.
06:33 Richard describes his pursuits after graduating from Kingswood College. He describes working on farms and vineyards. He earned a diploma in agricultural science from the College of Agriculture at the University of Stellenbosch. He relates stories from his college years.
11:44 Richard speaks of his travels and work experience in England, France, and Israel after graduating from college.
14:19 Richard speaks of his contact with Israel's first ambassador to Canada, Michael Comay, and his first marriage to Michael's daughter, Jill. They had two children.
15:49 Richard discusses his decision to remain in Israel and his early work experience in Israel.
17:22 Richard describes suffering from jaundice while completing his army training in Israel.
18:14 Richard was in Canada for six months and then returned to Israel.
18:18 Richard describes some of the challenges he encountered as manager of some of the newly-opened chain of Supersol supermarkets in Israel.
21:26 Richard discusses his decision to apply for immigration to Canada.
Part 3:
00:00 Richard discusses the breakup between the Bronfsmans and Bert Loeb.
00:58 Richard describes his ten years of work for Loeb's in Ottawa.
02:50 Richard opens up a brokerage business in 1971.
03:11 Richard describes how and why he was approached by the government of Canada to work in industry, trade, and commerce.
03:57 Richard explains how he became a Canadian citizen.
04:45 Richard describes his involvement in marketing alcoholic beverages and grocery products on behalf of the government of Canada.
06:01 Richard discusses his post chairing Canada-Israel agreements.
06:29 Richard describes the events that led to his wife and children returning to Israel in 1967. He notes the likelihood of his moving back to South Africa had his wife not decided to return to Canada.
07:06 Richard discusses his attachment to South Africa and offers his impressions of the country.
11:37 Richard praises the liberal political position taken by Jews in South Africa.
12:30 Richard discusses his ancestry. His paternal and maternal grandfathers came from Germany to South Africa. His paternal grandmother came from New York. He tells some stories about his grandparents.
14:42 Richard muses about his lack of awareness of different Jewish groups while growing up.
16:50 Richard discusses his identity as a Canadian Jew.
18:30 Richard discusses some of his philanthropic support.
19:55 Richard recalls memories about his grandparents.
Part 4:
00:00 Richard displays and describes two photographs of himself and his siblings.
Part 5:
00:00 Richard displays a photograph of the opening of the Voortrekker monument commemorating the Afrikaner scouting movement. Richard discusses his involvement with the movement and his attendance at the opening of the monument.
01:45 Richard displays and discusses a photograph of his school cadets band.
03:03 Richard displays and discusses a photograph of his rugby team.
03:49 Richard displays a photograph of himself and his brother-in-law, Yochanan, while serving in the Israel Defense Forces (IDF). Richard discusses how Yochanan was killed in the Golan Heights in 1967.
Part 6:
00:00 Richard displays and discusses a plaque that was present to his grandfather, Max Sonnenberg, for his service in parliament for twenty years.
01:38 Richard displays and discusses a book that was written by his grandfather.
Part 7:
00:00 Richard discusses his work with Agriculture Canada as director of processed food and later director of international marketing. He took early retirement in 1990.
01:23 Richard displays and discusses a photograph from the International Dairy Congress in 1994. He shares a story about Stephen Lewis, who was a guest speaker.
03:14 Richard displays and discusses a photograph of Richard presenting a cheque to the deputy minister of agriculture repaying the grant for the Dairy Congress.
04:12 Richard displays and discusses a photograph that related to his work with the sheep council in 1997.
05:44 Richard displays and discusses a photograph that related to his work with the cervidae industry.
06:50 Richard displays and discusses a trophy honouring his father for his contributions to the Community Chest Carnival. Richard shares some stories related to the Masque Theatre in Muizenberg that was started by his father.
09:56 Richard displays and discusses a program relating to the re-opening of the Masque Theatre in 1999.
Part 8:
00:00 Richard displays and discusses a photograph from his parents' wedding.
Source
Oral Histories

Scouting

Racism?

Name
Adele and Alan Farber
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
13 Apr. 2016
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Adele and Alan Farber
Number
AC 428
Subject
Canada--Emigration and immigration
Jews--South Africa
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Interview Date
13 Apr. 2016
Interviewer
Lisa Newman
Total Running Time
AC 428 part 1: 18 min.
AC 428 part 2: 19 min.
AC 428 part 3: 22 min.
AC 428 part 4: 3 min.
Biography
Adele and Alan met when she was fifteen and he was seventeen years old. They married a few years later, and lived in Johannesburg until Alan qualified as a chartered accountant. In 1975, they immigrated to Toronto.
Adele arrived in Canada with an honours degree in psychology. She initially completed a one-year program at a Canadian teaching college. After having three children, she went back to university, and obtained an honours degree in social work from York University and a master’s degree in social work from the University of Toronto. She worked with teenagers for several years at an agency and in 2001 opened a private practice as a psychotherapist. Today she works part-time.
Alan requalified as a chartered accountant in Canada, and became a trustee in bankruptcy. In 1979, he founded a firm, which is currently called Farber Group. The firm provides business advisory services from eleven business units and operates in Ontario, British Columbia, and Alberta.
Adele and Alan are members of Kehillat Shaarei Torah and have engaged in philanthropy through the United Jewish Appeal, Canadian Friends of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, and other Jewish and community charitable organizations.
Their oldest son, Jonathan, lives in Israel while their two younger children, Steven and Sherri, live in Canada. They have seven grandchildren.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Farber, Adele, 1952-
Farber, Alan, 1951-
Geographic Access
Israel
Johannesburg (South Africa)
Toronto (Ont.)
Original Format
Digital file
Copy Format
Digital file
Transcript
00:02 Adele was born in Johannesburg, South Africa in 1952. She has one brother, ten years her junior.
00:32 Adele explains why her family moved several times during her childhood: to London, England in 1962; to Herzliya Pituach, Israel in 1964; and back to Johannesburg in 1967.
02:55 Adele discusses her parents' family histories. Her paternal grandfather came from Lithuania at the turn of the century. Her paternal grandmother came from England. They married in South Africa. Her father was the youngest of five children. Adele's maternal grandparents came from Poland prior to the Second World War. Her mother was the middle of six children, all born in Poland.
05:26 Adele discusses her extended family, their cloneness, and regular family get-togethers.
07:17 Adele outlines her Jewish education.
08:13 Adele speaks Hebrew fluently and majored in Hebrew and psychology at university.
08:41 Adele has a son who lives in Israel.
09:07 Adele discusses how she met her husband, Alan. They married young: Adele was nineteen; Alan was twenty-one. They lived in Johannesburg for three years before moving to Canada.
11:10 Adele discusses the reasons they decided to leave South Africa.
14:40 Adele explains why they chose to immigrate to Canada.
16:36 Adele discusses the rocky start to their immigration due to her father's illness and death. They entered Canada in June 1975, returned to South Africa for six months, and returned to Canada at the end of 1975.
17:59 Adele's mother immigrated to Canada in 1980. Adele's brother moved to the United States.
18:12 Adele discusses return trips to South Africa.
Part 2:
00:00 Alan was born in 1951 in Johannesburg. Alan has two older sisters.
00:20 Alan briefly outlines his primary and secondary education.
00:54 Alan fondly reminisces about a friendship he has maintained since childhood.
02:43 Alan discusses growing up in Johannesburg: his neighbourhood, his friends, and his interest in sports.
03:44: Alan discusses his family's origins. Alan's father was born in South Africa. His paternal grandparents came from Lithuania. Alan's mother and maternal grandfather were born in South Africa. His maternal grandparents came from Latvia.
04:35 Alan describes his observance of Judaism while growing up.
06:15 Alan discusses his bar mitzvah. He had a private Hebrew teacher.
07:54 Alan explains that he and his family had limited involvement in Jewish community activity.
09:00 Alan explains how he became more involved in Jewish community organizations in Toronto. He describes his involvement.
11:38 Alan describes his professional training to become an accountant in South Africa, a chartered accountant in Canada, and a trustee in bankruptcy.
13:52 Alan discusses his career development in Canada. He describes his business, the Farber Financial Group.
17:09 Alan discusses the optiosn he considered before ultimately choosing Canada as an immigration destination.
Part 3:
00:03 Adele discusses her post-secondary education, including an honour's degree in psychology earned in South Africa, a teaching degree, a bachelor of social work, and a master's of social work earned in Canada. Adele discusses her various jobs and her private practice.
03:20 Adele discusses their young family: Jonathon (1978), Steven (1980), and Sherry (1983).
05:34 Alan warmly describes raising his children.
06:31 Adele discusses their family's Jewish life when they first arrived in Toronto: the neighbourhood, Shabbat observance, and synagogue attendance. Adele and Alan explain that, for financial reasons, they sent their children to public school, with the exception of Sherry who attended the Community Hebrew Academy of Toronto (CHAT).
09:29 Alan and Adele discuss how they established social connections when they first arrived in Canada, welcomed by distant cousins and with other young Jewish couples who had recently immigrated from South Africa.
11:13 Adele and Alan discuss how they were received by Canadians.
12:26 Alan describes their efforts to help other immigrants including sponsoring a family from Vietnam in 1981, sponsoring a Russian Jew through Jewish Immigrant Aid Services (JIAS), and helping sponsor Syrian refugees through their synagogue.
14:29 Adele discusses the supports offered by South African Jews in Canada to South African immigrants, specifically through the Southern African Jewish Association of Canada (SAJAC).
15:57 Alan explains how he served as a contact person for other South African accountants when they arrived in Canada. Also, many of his business employees are from South Africa.
18:03 Alan and Adele belong to Kehillah Shaarei Torah.
18:48 Adele and Alan discuss their grown children. Their oldest son, Jonathon (Israel) is a rabbi in Bet Shemesh, Israel. Steven is a professor of urban geography at the University of Toronto. Sherry, who studied medicine at Ben-Gurion University, returned to Canada to practice medicine.
20:37 Alan shares his hopes for the future.
Part 4:
00:39 Adele expounds on her appreciation of living in Canada.
Source
Oral Histories

The Kensington of Johannesburg

Maybe Canada?

Immigrants Sponsoring Immigrants

Kiss the Ground

Name
Anthony Lipschitz
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
10 May 2016
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Anthony Lipschitz
Number
AC 430
Subject
Canada--Emigration and immigration
Jews--South Africa
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Interview Date
10 May 2016
Interviewer
Melissa Caza
Total Running Time
1 hr. 4 min.
Biography
Like many South African boys, Anthony Lipschitz’s life revolved around sports. He grew up in Victory Park, a Jewish neighbourhood in Johannesburg whose claim to fame was that it had a Jewish day school. Though not especially devout, the neighbourhood had a strong traditional Jewish identity and Anthony fondly remembers walking across the street with his sister to attend Shul on holidays.
As a child, Anthony played sports with a diverse group of friends that included Jews, Italians, Greeks, and Lebanese. It was through sports, and especially soccer, that Anthony came to view athletic pursuits as “the ultimate equalizer” because it brought people together from different backgrounds. This was especially true as he advanced in his career as a soccer player and began playing in mixed-race teams.
As an adult, Anthony lived and studied in several countries including Israel and the United States. He studied Media Arts at Long Island University on a full soccer scholarship and co-founded a software business called Advanceware Solutions with a childhood friend, which they sold in 2006. Since then, Anthony has held leadership roles at numerous companies including Brightspark Ventures, iStopOver, a peer-to-peer vacation rentals marketplace that he co-founded, and StubHub, an eBay, Inc. company. Today, he is a Partner at FirePower Capital, where he runs their Private Equity practice.
In 2000, Anthony met his future wife, Lisa, whom he married in March 2003. In 2004,the couple moved to Toronto which is where Lisa grew up. Anthony has two sons, both of whom attend Bialik Hebrew Day School.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Lipschitz, 1973-
Geographic Access
Israel
Johannesburg (South Africa)
Toronto (Ont.)
United States
Original Format
Digital file
Copy Format
Digital file
Transcript
00:33 Anthony's grandparents came to South Africa from Vilnius, Lithuania in the late 1800s to escape pogroms.
01:02 Anthony was born in Johannesburg on 17 October 1973.
01:15 Anthony's parents were born in Johannesburg. His father was a lawyer. Anthony's mother was a legal secretary. They divorced when Anthony was five. Anthony has a brother in Johannesburg and a sister in Sydney, Australia.
02:28 Anthony discusses Victory Park, his neighbourhood in Johannesburg.
03:22 Anthony discusses the make-up his childhood friends.
03:55 Anthony shares memories from his childhood in Johannesburg.
05:34 Anthony discusses his involvement in soccer.
08:03 Anthony describes the make-up of his soccer teams. He discusses the impact of playing on a mixed-race sports team on his personal growth.
10:28 Anthony explains why, with political changes in South Africa, the make-up of his team became more mixed-race.
11:20 Anthony discusses the role of Judaism in his youth while growing up in Johannesburg. Anthony attended a Jewish day school.
12:50 Anthony describes his bar mitzvah.
14:28 Anthony discusses the impact of apartheid in his life. He describes the challenge of filtering out propaganda while growing up in a liberal home.
16:45 Anthony describes his education. He attended Jewish nursery and Jewish day school.
17:43 Anthony attended Betar summer camp for seven years.
18:55 Anthony explains some of the factors that contributed to his decision to leave South Africa.
20:30 Anthony briefly attended Boston University in South Africa.
21:05 Anthony left South Africa at age nineteen for Israel with the intention of soccer.
22:55 Anthony describes his mother's reaction to his decision to leave South Africa.
23:00 Anthony describes his five month stay in Israel and the factors that influenced his decision to move to the United States.
25:47 Anthony discusses his travels to London and the United States.
26:45 Anthony received a scholarship to play soccer at a university in the United States.
27:15 Anthony discusses his first impressions of the United States.
29:30 Anthony attended Long Island University in Brooklyn, New York to study media arts. He discusses his university stay.
33:50 Anthony discusses his first job after graduation.
37:27 Anthony explains how he partnered with a childhood friend to start their own web design business in 1998. He discusses the growth and metamorphosis of the business. They sold the company in 2006.
40:30 Anthony describes how he met his wife, Lisa, in July 2000. They married in March 2003.
42:33 Anthony explains their decision to move to Toronto in January 2004.
43:55 Anthony shares his impressions of Toronto.
44:50 Anthony explains why they chose to live in the Annex.
45:40 Anthony has two sons: Zachary and Matthew.
46:28 Anthony discusses their decision to send their children to Bialik Hebrew Day School.
47:53 Anthony describes his sons' involvement in sports.
48:50 Anthony discusses his own involvement in sports.
49:40 Anthony discusses his business pursuits in Toronto.
54:50 Anthony shares points of pride from his career.
55:26 Anthony describes his Jewish life in Toronto.
57:10 Anthony explains why his family chose to become members of the Temmy Latner Centre in Forest Hill.
58:40 Anthony describes South African traditions that he has passed on to his children.
1:01:00 Anthony discusses his ongoing connection with South Africa. He notes that his mother, brother, father, and grandmother continues to live in South Africa.
1:01:58 Anthony discusses his impressions of current day South Africa.
1:03:00 Anthony muses about what it means to be Canadian.
Source
Oral Histories

Sport as an Equalizer

Jewish Day School

Raising Jewish Children

Food and South African Identity

Name
Anne Stein
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
10 Dec. 2018
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Anne Stein
Number
AC 450
Subject
Arab-Israeli conflict
Beauty operators
Canadian newspapers
Immigrants--Canada
Jewish neighborhoods
Refugees
Revisionist Zionism
United States--Politics and government
Interview Date
10 Dec. 2018
Interviewer
Naomi Raichyk
Total Running Time
1 hr. 25 min.
Biography
Anne Stein was born in Ostrowitz, Poland in 1919. She immigrated to Canada in 1936 and worked as a hairdresser in Toronto's Kensington Market. She married her husband in 1941. After the war, she had two children, the first born in 1945 and the second in 1950. It was in the 1950s that Anne moved to the Cedarvale area of Toronto. Anne continued to be involved in the Jewish community after the move.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Abella, Irving, 1940-
Betar
Beth Sholom Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Clinton, Hillary Rodham
Hebrew Men of England Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Jabotinsky, Vladimir, 1880-1940
King, William Lyon Mackenzie, 1874-1950
Klein, Naomi, 1970-
Obama, Barack
Shaarei Tefillah (Toronto, Ont.)
Stein, Anne, 1919-
Trump, Donald, 1946-
Geographic Access
Augusta Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
Chicago (Ill.)
Kensington Market (Toronto, Ont.)
Israel
Poland
Spadina Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
Original Format
Digital file
Transcript
00:25 Anne discusses where and when she was born.
00:54 Anne discusses her older sisters.
01:19 Anne discusses growing up in Poland.
01:46 Anne discusses anti-Jewish violence that would erupt on Christmas.
01:58 Anne discusses her schooling.
02:35 Anne discusses wanting to be with Jewish kids.
02:39 Anne discusses how she developed political ideas at an early age.
03:13 Anne discusses her involvement in the Revisionist Zionist youth movement Betar.
04:10 Anne discusses the reason she agreed with Vladimir Jabotinsky, the leader of the Revisionist Zionist movement.
04:52 Anne discusses her mother’s death.
05:58 Anne discusses her father coming to Canada and his desire to bring over family.
06:32 Anne discusses Mackenzie King’s anti-Jewish immigration policies.
06:45 Anne discusses other family members who thought her father was crazy for bringing his family to Canada.
07:10 Anne discusses how her father came to meet a prominent figure in Ottawa who shared Anne’s father’s story with a minister. That minister helped bring the family to Canada. This was in 1936.
09:13 Anne returns to the subject of how certain family members thought her father was crazy.
09:19 Anne discusses None Is Too Many, Irving Abella’s book.
09:56 Anne discusses a speech she gave honouring different people.
11:39 Anne discusses some of the challenges she faced settling in Canada.
12:35 Anne discusses going to night school while going to another school to learn to to be a hairdresser.
12:45 Anne discusses her father’s circumstances in Canada.
13:00 Anne discusses her career.
13:40 Anne discusses meeting a woman who introduced Anne to her husband.
14:28 Anne discusses where she lived in Toronto.
15:13 Anne discusses who lived in the family home.
15:50 Anne discusses buying a house with her husband.
17:06 Anne discusses living in the house from 1939 to 1945/46.
17:26 Anne discusses saving money for her husband so that he could go into business when he returned from the war.
18:00 Anne discusses her husband and a partner buying a small hardware store. Anne also discusses subsequent business ventures.
19:45 Anne discusses how she went out to New Brunswick to visit her husband during the war. He was subsequently sent to university and took up public speaking.
21:22 Anne compares her neighbours in Kensington Market to her neighbours today.
23:20 Anne discusses the geographical boundaries of Kensington Market. She names some of the people she knew there.
26:17 Anne discusses some of the businesses that used to exist in Kensington Market.
29:02 Anne discusses how Kensington Market used to be.
29:45 Anne discusses some other businesses in the market.
30:45 Anne mentions the Kiever synagogue and the Labor Lyceum.
31:05 Anne discusses her husband’s work.
32:08 Anne lists some of the languages her husband spoke. He used to interpret German for the army.
33:31 Anne discusses ome of the friends she and her husband had.
35:02 Anne discusses how her husband was able to bring refugees to Canada. She also discusses her husband’s decision to join the Conservatives.
37:36 Anne discusses a family that came to Canada only to return to Kielce, Poland, the site of a post-war pogrom.
38:07 Anne discusses other refugees her husband helped come to Canada.
39:50 Anne discusses religious observance: “Everyone was Orthodox.”
40:35 Anne discusses joining various synagogues including the London Shul (Hebrew Men of England Synagogue), Beth Sholom, and Shaarei Tefillah.
41:30 Anne discusses her observance of the Jewish holidays.
42:00 Anne discusses her living situation during the war.
42:53 Anne discusses how long she worked as a hairdresser. She also explains why she stopped working as a hairdresser.
43:36 Anne discusses when she had her two children.
44:32 Anne shares her views on Naomi Klein and other critics of Israel.
46:02 Anne continues to discuss Naomi Klein.
47:00 Anne discusses meeting Vladimir Jabotinsky.
47:28 Anne shares her views on Canadian newspapers including the Canadian Jewish News, the National Post, and the Toronto Star.
47:56 Anne discusses her reasons for joining Jabotinsky’s movement.
48:15 Anne shares her views on peacemaking.
48:37 Anne discusses how her husband moved from a Labour position to one closer to her own.
48:50 Anne discusses her connections to Israel.
50:48 Anne discusses her opposition to labour.
51:05 Anne discusses how she forms her opinions.
51:52 Anne recounts a disagreement she had with her daughter-in-law’s niece. Anne shares her views on the policies of Barack Obama and Donald Trump. She also shares her views on Hillary Clinton.
53:28 Anne discusses why she’s a rebel.
54:54 Anne discusses being in Israel during the Yom Kippur War.
55:36 Anne discusses the clothes she wore when she lived in Kensington Market.
56:18 Anne discusses how she was admired for her looks when she was young.
57:15 Anne discusses her decision to become a hairdresser.
58:13 Anne discusses how she knows what she wants and where she stands.
59:16 Anne discusses her approach to resolving problems within the family. She also discusses praise she received for bringing up her children.
1:00:50 Anne discusses her daughter-in-law in Vancouver.
1:01:33 Anne discusses her decision to leave Kensington Market.
1:03:07 Anne discusses the neighbourhood she moved to.
1:04:03 Anne discusses Beth Sholom and Shaarei Tefillah. She identifies as Conservative rather than Orthodox.
1:05:21 Anne discusses volunteering, including doing hair at Baycrest.
1:06:23 Anne discusses going back to Kensington Market with her grandson. She used to go back when her sister lived there.
1:07:44 Anne reminisces about Czech and Slovak neighbours.
1:08:08 Anne discusses more businesses in Kensington Market.
1:09:36 Anne discusses where her stepmother bought chickens in Kensington Market.
1:10:09 Anne discusses how she used to make fish from scratch.
1:10:31 Anne shares her mother and father’s names. She also discusses her sisters.
1:12:25 Anne discusses a family she knew in Kensington Market.
1:13:19 Anne discusses who her clients were back when she was a hairdresser. She also discusses what they talked about.
1:14:46 Anne discusses going to Baycrest for a few months.
1:16:16 Anne discusses her love of music, books, and honesty. She also returns to the subject of resolving problems inside the family.
1:17:21 Anne discusses different events she attended.
1:18:31 Anne discusses what she wore when she went dancing. She also discusses dancing with her husband.
1:19:14 Anne returns to the subject of her current neighbours.
1:21:15 Anne discusses how her house was not a house but a home.
1:21:55 Anne returns to the subject of her current neighbours.
1:22:49 Anne shares her view of herself.
1:23:55 Anne discusses the importance of being menschen.
1:25:36 Anne shares some concluding thoughts.
Source
Oral Histories
Address
216 Beverley Street
Source
Landmarks

The Apter Synagogue was formed by a group of people who came to Toronto from the area of Opatow (Apt) in Poland around the turn of the century. They first established a small synagogue on Centre Avenue near Dundas Street in the Ward. In 1918, in anticipation of more Apter immigrants coming to Toronto after the First World War, the synagogue was sold and a larger one purchased on Beverley Street. Both the synagogue members and the Apter Friendly Society met there.
Address
216 Beverley Street
Time Period
1918-unknown
Scope Note
The Apter Synagogue was formed by a group of people who came to Toronto from the area of Opatow (Apt) in Poland around the turn of the century. They first established a small synagogue on Centre Avenue near Dundas Street in the Ward. In 1918, in anticipation of more Apter immigrants coming to Toronto after the First World War, the synagogue was sold and a larger one purchased on Beverley Street. Both the synagogue members and the Apter Friendly Society met there.
History
In later years, a bitter controversy between the synagogue and society erupted and the building was sold.
Category
Political
Religious
Private Clubs
Source
Landmarks
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 83; File 9; Item 33
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
83
File
9
Item
33
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[195-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 9 x 6 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of Ora and Zvi Ladovsky dressed up in costumes for Purim, in Israel. Both children are relatives of the Ladovsky family of Toronto.
Notes
Originally cited as photo # 3845
Subjects
Children
Costume
Purim
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Israel
Accession Number
1983-11-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 543
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
543
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1946
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative); 13 x 18 cm and 4 x 5 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of the Belzer Rebbe walking with Chassidim in Israel.
Name Access
Belzer Rebbe
Subjects
Hasidism
Rabbis
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Israel
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 544
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
544
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1946
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative); 13 x 18 cm and 4 x 5 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of the Belzer Rebbe looking out of a window on a train to Jersusalem
Notes
.
Name Access
Belzer Rebbe
Subjects
Hasidism
Rabbis
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Israel
Accession Number
Acquired Feb. 25, 1976.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3968
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3968
Material Format
graphic material
Date
7 June 1951
Physical Description
1 photograph
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of the first annual Board of Jewish Eduacation dinner at Murray House in Torotno. The dinner took place on 7 June 1951. The speaker is Sam Posluns, to his left (partially hidden) is Joe Diamond and Rabbi Bernard Rosensweig.
Name Access
Board of Jewish Education (Toronto, Ont.)
Subjects
Dinners and dining
Places
Beverley Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1986-4-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1306
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1306
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[1906 or 1907]
Physical Description
1 photograph: b&w (1 negative)
Scope and Content
Photograph of a domestic science class at Lord Dufferin School on Berkeley St. Second from the left in the front row is Mattie Levi.
Name Access
Levi, Mattie
Lord Dufferin School
Subjects
Children
Education
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Beverley Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1977-5-7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 39; Item 7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
39
Item
7
Material Format
graphic material
Date
January 14, 1953
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 9 x 6 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph is of Joseph Baratz leaning on Rose Dunkelman's headstone. The gravesite is covered with flowers.
Joseph Baratz was co-founder of Degania in 1909, the first Kibbutz in Israel.
Name Access
Baratz, Joseph
Dunkelman, Benjamin
Dunkelman, David
Subjects
Sepulchral monuments
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Israel
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 39; Item 8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
39
Item
8
Material Format
graphic material
Date
January 14, 1953
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 17 x 12 cm and 13 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph is of Ben Dunkleman saying Kadish at the gravesite of his mother Rose Dunkelman. Abe Friedgut, Joseph Baratz and a few young children look on.
Joseph Baratz was co-founder of Degania in 1909, the first Kibbutz in Israel.
Mr. Abe Friedgut was the Israel representative of the Zionist Organization of Canada.
Notes
Writing on the back of the photo reads: Shoshana Rose Dunkelman the daughter of Miller from Toronto died [date] devoted all her life to the building of the country only after her death were her wishes fulfilled. This is probably the inscription on Rose's tombstone.
Name Access
Baratz, Joseph
Dunkelman, Benjamin
Dunkelman, David
Friedgut, Abe
Subjects
Sepulchral monuments
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Israel
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 39; Item 9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
39
Item
9
Material Format
graphic material
Date
January 14, 1953
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 16 cm and 10 x 13 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph is of Israeli students of the Canadian agricultural school in Nahalal carrying a wreath to be placed on the grave of Rose Dunkelman. The group of youth are being led by their choll principal, Mrs. Hanna Maisel-Schochat.
Name Access
Dunkelman, Benjamin
Dunkelman, David
Maisel-Schochat, Hanna
Subjects
Processions
Students
Youth
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Israel
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 39; Item 10
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
39
Item
10
Material Format
graphic material
Date
January 14, 1953
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 17 x 13 cm and 13 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph is of two children from Canadian Wizo's youth village "Hadassim" carrying a wreath, on behalf of the pupils and staff of Hadassim, to the gravesite of Rose Dunkelman.
Name Access
Dunkelman, Rose
Dunkelman, David
Dunkelman, Benjamin
Subjects
Children
Wreaths
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Israel
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 39; Item 11
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
39
Item
11
Material Format
graphic material
Date
January 14, 1953
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 17 x 12 cm and 13 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph is of Mrs. Rose Ginossar, speaking at the gravesite of Rose Dunkelman. To her right is Joseph Baratz. Behind him is Shimon Hacohen.
Mrs. Rose Ginossar was chairman of the World WIZO executive. Mr. Joseph Baratz was co-founder of Degania in 1909, the first Kibbutz in Israel.
Name Access
Baratz, Joseph
Dunkelman, David
Dunkelman, Benjamin
Ginossar, Rose
Hacohen, Shimon
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Israel
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 39; Item 12
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
39
Item
12
Material Format
graphic material
Date
January 14, 1953
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 17 x 13 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph is of several graves at Degania Aleph where Rose Dunkelman was re-interred in 1953. The graveyard also houses the remains of several leading figures of the Yishuv.
Name Access
Dunkelman, Benjamin
Dunkelman, David
Subjects
Sepulchral monuments
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Israel
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 39; Item 13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
39
Item
13
Material Format
graphic material
Date
January 14, 1953
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 12 x 16 cm and 10 x 13 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph is of a group of Wizo executive members at the gravesite of Rose Dunkelman.
Left to right: Zila Shoham (executive member); Dr. Eva Kirstein (secretary of the publicity department); Tonie Zeissler-Hauser (chairman of the fundraising department); Nanny Margulies (chairman of the publicity department); Hanna Maisel-Shochat (principal of Nahalal, the Canadian Wizo's agricultural school); Rachel Kagan (chairman of the Israel Wizo Federation); Dr. Salomea Levite (vice-chairman of the World Wizo executive); Rahel Shapira (Hadassim); Rose Ginossar (chairman of World Wizo executive); Mr. Yeremiahu Shapiro (principal of Hadassim); Fay Grovem (chairman of the organization and cultural department).
Name Access
Dunkelman, Benjamin
Dunkelman, David
Ginossar, Rose
Grovem, Fay
Kagan, Rachel
Kirstein, Dr. Eva
Levite, Dr. Salomea
Maisel-Shochat, Hanna
Margulies, Nanny
Shoham, Zila
Shapiro, Rahel
Shapiro, Mr. Yeremiahu
Zeissler-Hauser, Tonie
Subjects
Sepulchral monuments
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Israel
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 39; Item 15
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
39
Item
15
Material Format
graphic material
Date
January 14, 1953
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 6 x 9 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of the headstone at Rose Dunkelman's gravesite. The headstone is covered with a wreath brought by the children of the Hadassah youth village "Hadassim".
Name Access
Dunkelman, Benjamin
Dunkelman, David
Subjects
Sepulchral monuments
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Israel
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 39; Item 16
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
39
Item
16
Material Format
graphic material
Date
January 14, 1953
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 10 cm and 6 x 6 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph is of the gravesite of Rose Dunkelman strewn with flowers.
Name Access
Dunkelman, Benjamin
Dunkelman, David
Subjects
Sepulchral monuments
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Israel
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 39; Item 17
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
39
Item
17
Material Format
graphic material
Date
January 14, 1953
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 10 cm and 9 x 6 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph of Rose Dunkelman's headstone in Israel. There are flowers laying on the grave.
Name Access
Dunkelman, Benjamin
Dunkelman, David
Subjects
Sepulchral monuments
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Israel
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Levine and Cass family fonds
Thuna family series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 25; Series 7; Item 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Levine and Cass family fonds
Thuna family series
Level
Item
Fonds
25
Series
7
Item
1
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[192-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 9 x 14 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of a man and boy standing in front of Dr. Thuna Nature Remedies at 298 Danforth Avenue in Toronto. The man on the right is likely Jack Thuna.
Notes
Postcard photograph
Name Access
Dr. Thuna Nature Remedies
Thuna, Jack
Subjects
Storefronts
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Danforth Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
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