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Accession Number
2013-8-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-8-2
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
2.7 m of textual records (35 v.)
6.3 m of photographs : b&w and col.
Date
1949, [197-]-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of bound Canadian Jewish News newspapers from 1996 to 2012; bound copies of the Canadian Jewish Review from 1949 and the Canadian Jewish News' photograph collection. The photographs are arranged alphabetcially by subject, with the exception of two blocks of photographs related to "rabbis" and "places".
Custodial History
The records were in the custody of the Canadian Jewish News.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Newspapers
Name Access
Canadian Jewish News
Places
Canada
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-2-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-2-13
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 150 photographs : b&w and col ; 21 x 27 cm or smaller
1 photograph : negative print on transparency
1 scrapbook
Date
1925-1976
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting the family life of Henry & Bella Rosenbaum. Included are photos from Poland, their time in Italy, Israel and finally Canada. In addition, there is a scrapbook of photos prepared by their daughter Brenda on the occasion of their 30th wedding anniversary.
Administrative History
Henry (Henoch) Rosenbaum (1925-2015), was born in Radom Poland and is the 7th child of Moshe Rosenbaum & Rachel (née Katz). In the aftermath of the war Henry met his wife Bella (née Rotbard) in Italy and they moved to Israel in 1946. In 1952, they immigrated to Canada and had two children Brenda and Murray Rosenbaum. Henry was a professional printer and worked for Trio Press Ltd. From 1983-1989, Henry served as editor for the quarterly Yiddish and English journal the Voice of Radom and was an active member of the Radomer society.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Expo 67 (Montréal, Québec)
Rosenbaum, Henry, 1925-2015
Places
Canada
Israel
Italy
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-9-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-9-1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
moving images
Physical Description
ca. 14 cm of textual records
ca. 275 photographs : b&w and col. ; 26 x 21 cm or smaller
1 DVD
Date
[191-?]-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the life of Abe Zukerman and several family members including Abe's father-in-law Elia Rubin and brother-in-law Jack Rubin. Included are: certificates of various sorts, correspondence, a DVD of the dedication of the restored Jewish cemetery in Wachock, eulogies, a family calender, financial documents, identity documents for Abe and Margot Zukerman, memorial books/records for Abe Zukerman and Elia Rubin, photographs, and a small number of administrative and financial records from the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society.
Custodial History
The material that makes up accession 2017-9-1 belonged to Abe Zukerman. Mr. Zukerman's stepson, Mel Perlmutter, gathered the material and donated it to the Archives
Administrative History
Abram "Abe" Zukerman (1914-2009) was born in Wierzbnik, Poland in 1914. He was the only member of his family to survive the Holocaust. In 1948, he came to Canada, where he became involved in the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society and married. His first wife, Esther, predeceased him. In 1975, he married his second wife, Margot, who had two children from a previous marriage. In addition to serving as a senior executive member of the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society for over 50 years, Abe volunteered with United Jewish Appeal and State of Israel Bonds. He passed away 8 Feb. 2009. Photo Caption (001): Abe Zukerman at his store on Queen St. W., Toronto, Ontario, Canada, [196-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (002): Lansdowne Cut Rate Store on Queen St. W., Toronto, Ontario, Canada, [196-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (011): Abe Zukerman at the Western Wall, [199-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (017): Abe Zukerman with others, possibly in Israel, [196-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (018): Abe Zukerman, [193-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Captions (032) - (087): Unidentified individuals, [192-?]-[195-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
A number of photographs have writing in Polish and Yiddish on their opposite side, which might prove useful in their identification.
Subjects
Cemeteries
Families
Societies
Name Access
Rubin, Elia
Rubin, Jack
Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society
Zukerman, Abe, 1914-2009
Zukerman, Margot
Places
Canada
Israel
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-6-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-6-5
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
ca. 30 cm of textual records
89 photographs : b&w and col. (7 negatives) ; 18 x 13 cm or smaller
1 CD-ROM (textual record)
19 videocassettes (ca. 22 hr.)
Date
[19--?]-2008
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Abe and Margot Zukerman, their family, and the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society. Included are: awards, identity documents, legal documents, letters, photographs, publications, videocassettes, and vital records.
Photo Caption (015): Abe Zukerman's father, [19--?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-6-5.
Custodial History
Mel Perlmutter, stepson of Abe Zukerman and son of Margot Zukerman, donated the records to the Archives.
Administrative History
Abe Zukerman (1914-2009) was born in Wierzbnik, Poland in 1914. He was the only member of his family to survive the Holocaust. In 1948, he came to Canada, where he became involved in the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society and married. His first wife, Esther, predeceased him. In 1975, he married his second wife, Margot, who had two children from a previous marriage. In addition to serving as a senior executive member of the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society for over 50 years, Abe volunteered with United Jewish Appeal and State of Israel Bonds. He passed away 8 Feb. 2009. Margot Zukerman (née Rubin) was born in Berlin, Germany on 31 December 1922. Still a child when the National Socialists came to power, she was denied schooling. She arrived in Toronto in 1939 never having received a formal education. Despite this, she was able to learn English and operate her father's small ladies' wear store in Hamilton for at least a dozen years. In 1944, she married her first husband Alexander Perlmutter, with whom she had two children: one in 1945 and another in 1948. In 1970, she moved to Toronto, where she acted as caregiver to her father. In 1974, she met Abe, whom she married on 14 February 1975. Like her husband, Margot was an active member of Toronto's Jewish community.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIALS: Other records relating to Abe Zukerman can be found in Accession 2017-9-1.
Subjects
Families
Societies
Name Access
Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society
Zukerman, Abe, 1914-2009
Zukerman, Esther, 1912-1972
Zukerman, Margot, 1922-
Zukerman family
Places
Canada
Israel
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-10-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-10-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
6 cm of textual records
Date
1968
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the lives of Eva and Jack Horwitz. Included are: correspondence and vital records, including birth, citizenship, and marriage certificates as well as passports.
Custodial History
Eva Horwitz took possession of the records that make up the accession following the death of her husband, Jack Horwitz, in 1980. Grace (Gloria) Waldman (née Horwitz) took possession of the records following the death of her mother, Eva Horwitz, in 1983. Marian Horwitz took possession of the records following the death of her sister, Grace Waldman, in 2017. Marian gifted the records to Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre on 4 October 2017.
Administrative History
Eva Horwitz (née Lipshitz, 1897-1983) was born in Mlawa, Poland on 20 June 1897. She married Jack Horwitz in Toronto on 30 October 1924. Thereafter, she raised three children: Gloria, Marvin, and Marian. In addition to her duties as a homemaker, Eva was an active member of the Workmen's Circle with her husband. She passed away on 17 February 1983. Jack Horwitz (1900-1980) was born in Polaniec, Poland on 13 December 1900. In 1920, he set sail from Antwerp and arrived in Canada. Four years later, on 30 October 1924, he married Eva Lipshitz. On 23 April 1927, he was naturalized as a British subject with his occupation listed as tailor. He passed away on 26 February 1980.
Use Conditions
Restricted. See administrative notes.
Descriptive Notes
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH NOTE: Dates of birth for both Eva and Jack Horwitz are uncertain. The dates listed in the Biographical Sketch are taken from Eva and Jack's Canadian passports. Different spellings for both the given names and the family names of Eva and Jack can be found in the records. "Eva Horwitz" and "Jack Horwitz" are the preferred spellings, notwithstanding the fact that their names are spelled otherwise on official documents.
LANGUAGE NOTE: A small number of records are in non-English languages including: French, Polish, and Yiddish.
Subjects
Birth certificates
Immigrants--Canada
Marriage records
Name Access
Horwitz, Eva, 1897-1983
Horwitz, Jack, 1900-1980
Horwitz family
Places
Canada
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-1-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-1-5
Material Format
textual record
object
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
3 objects
Date
[190-?]-1967
Scope and Content
Accession consists of materials documenting the Grosman family, in particular Max Grosman. Included are Max's certificate of naturalization, various Polish-language documents including Max's Polish passport, an old age security application, and an insurance book. The accession also includes a pin commemorating the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union's fortieth anniversary and two rings that belonged to Max.
Custodial History
Max Grosman's son, Wilfred Grosman, came into possession of the records constituting Accession 2018-1-5 following the death of his father. He donated the records to the Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre on 17 January 2018.
Administrative History
Max Grosman was born 25 March 1884 in Novoradomsk, Poland. He became a naturalized British subject in 1914. Max's wife, Minnie "Majja" Grosman (née Bocian), came to Canada in 1913. Together, they had four sons: Jack, Morris, Samuel, and Wilfred. Max made his living as a tailor. He passed away on 17 October 1960 at the age of seventy-seven.
Descriptive Notes
LANGUAGE: Accession contains records in both English and Polish.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Bocian, Majja
Bocian, Minnie
Grosman, Majja
Grosman, Minnie
Grosman, Max
Grosman, Wilfred
International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union
Places
Canada
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-4-16
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-4-16
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
[199-]-2004
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Glen Eker's work as a genealogical researcher. Included are articles of Glen's that were published in a number of newsletters including Shaviv (the Spark), Generations, Ancestry Magazine, Family History News, Families, the Association of Jewish Libraries Newsletter, and the Jewish Genealogical Society of Hamilton and Area Newsletter. The accession also includes reviews of Glen's books.
Administrative History
Glen Eker was born in Toronto, Ontario to Paul Eker and Dorothy Horwitz. He grew up in the Forest Hill neighbourhood of Toronto before moving with his family to Hamilton. He received two master’s degrees (one in sociology, the other in political science) from McMaster University and a third master’s degree (in library science) from the University of Toronto.
Glen's wife, Deborah Pekilis, was born in Montreal and lived there until her parents moved to Toronto. She was the librarian for the Jewish Genealogical Society and sat on the Hamilton Historical Board. She is currently a writer.
Glen has worked as a research assistant and a teaching assistant at McMaster and has taught at Ryerson University and Mohawk College. At present, he works as an estate and genealogy researcher.
Glen has published a book on Karl Marx, five indexes of Jews in Canada, and one index of Amish and Mennonites in Canada. His genealogy articles have appeared in various magazines and his short stories and poems have appeared in print as well.
Glen has worked on his family genealogy for a number of years. His paternal family line derives from Russia, Ukraine, Lithuania, and Poland while his maternal line derives from Byelorussia and Romania. He is descended from the Horwitz and Strachman families on the latter.
Descriptive Notes
Associated materials: Genealogical articles can also be found in MG 9 (Shem Tov). Other accessions donated by Glen Eker include 2018-3-1, 2018-4-1, 2018-4-2, and 2018-5-1.
Subjects
Genealogy
Name Access
Eker (family)
Eker, Glen
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-6-18
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-6-18
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w ; 15 x 10 cm or smaller
2 letters
Date
1930-1948
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Miriam and Moshe Beckerman. Incuded are: one photograph taken of road builders in Palestine in 1930; one photograph of the British Eighth Army (pre-Jewish Brigade), of which Moshe was a part, in the first half of the 1940s; one letter in Hebrew addressed to Miriam by a friend of hers; one photograph (enclosed with the aforementioned letter in an envelope) of Moshe Beckerman, Mrs. Mirsky, and Miriam Beckerman taken in Ramat Gan, Israel in 1948; and one letter sent by Miriam Beckerman, then residing in Tel Aviv, to Esther Berger in Canada and dated January 12, 1948. The last letter briefly mentions the tense situation prevailing in Mandatory Palestine.
Photo Caption (001): British Eighth Army, [194-]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-6-18.
Photo Caption (002): Road builders, Palestine, 1930. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-6-18.
Photo Caption (003): Moshe Beckerman, Mrs. Mirsky, and Miriam Beckerman, Ramat Gan, Israel, 1948. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-6-18.
Administrative History
Miriam Beckerman immigrated to British Mandatory Palestine in 1947. Only nineteen years old, she made her way to Kfar Blum, a kibbutz in Hula Valley. After a few months, she relocated to another kibbutz, Ramat Yochanan. After relocating to Ma'ayan Baruch, another settlement, she mer her husband Moshe Beckerman. Moshe had been with the British Eighth Army, serving in the North Africa campaigns. The couple married in October 1947 and moved to Tel Aviv, where Moshe was originally from. In 1952, Miriam and Moshe made the decision to move to Canada.
Descriptive Notes
Conservation: The archivist removed two sticky notes from the back of photographs for preservation reasons. Prior to removing them, he scanned them so that researchers would be able to read what was written on them.
Language: One of the letters is in Hebrew.
Subjects
Families
Palestine
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Beckerman, Miriam
Beckerman, Moshe
Great Britain. Army. Army, Eighth
Places
Canada
Israel
Palestine
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-6
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
62 photographs : b&w and col. ; 10 x 15 cm or smaller
4 cm of textual records
Date
1920-2018
Scope and Content
Accession contains material documenting Gabriella Szanto and her family. Included are family photographs, vital records, correspondence, and a 2018 Baycrest calendar that features a portrait and short biography of Gabriella.
Custodial History
Shirley Worth served as the executor of Gabriella Szanto's estate. Following Gabriella's death, Shirley donated the records that make up the accession to the Ontario Jewish Archives.
Administrative History
Gabriella "Gabi" Szanto (née Lazlo) was born in Budapest, Hungary on 26 January 1916. Gabriella's parents, Arnold and Ilonka Lazlo (née Diamenstein), were women's clothing manufacturers who employed twenty-five people. Their skills complemented each other: Arnold had studied design in Berlin for two years while Ilonka was a dressmaker. On 18 May 1919, Arnold and Ilonka had their second child, George.
During the Second World War, Gabi and her mother moved to the outskirts of Budapest where they passed as Catholics, rarely leaving their house. Miklos Szanto—the man Gabriella married after the war—was sent to the Mauthausen concentration camp. Gabriella's brother, George, was sent to a camp in Siberia and did not survive. It is not known where or how Gabriella's father survived the war.
After the war, Gabriella, her mother and father, and her husband Miklos reunited in Budapest. The four lived in the family apartment near the city opera house.
During the period of Communist rule, Gabriella and Miklos bribed their way out of Hungary and travelled to Vienna. From Vienna, they travelled to Australia, where they lived for five or six years, working as a short order cook and a seamstress respectively.
At some point, Gabriella and Miklos made the decision to immigrate to Canada. Their first stop—most likely in the 1950s—was Montreal. There, Gabriella worked for a high-end retailer before moving with her husband to Toronto one year later. In Toronto, Miklos worked again as a short order cook at the Noshery Restaurant on Eglinton, holding this job until he retried. Gabriella, meanwhile, worked as a seamstress until she was in her mid-80s.
In their retirement, Gabriella and Miklos spent two months each winter in Florida. Gabriella died in 2018.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
LANGUAGE NOTE: English, Hungarian, German.
Subjects
Families
Holocaust survivors
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Szanto, Gabriella, 1916-2018
Places
Australia
Austria
Canada
Hungary
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-20
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-20
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
120 cm of textual records (4 boxes)
Date
1987-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material involving Shoel Silver's involvement with various Jewish organizations including B'nai Brith Canada (BBC), the Canada-Israel Committee (CIC), the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs (CIJA), the Jewish Agency for Israel (JAFI), UJA Federation of Greater Toronto (UJA), and the United Israel Appeal (UIA). Included are meeting minutes, reports, memoranda, correspondence, budgets, discussion documents, resource material, newspaper clippings, photocopies of newspaper articles, briefing papers, resolutions.
Custodial History
Records remained in the custody of Shoel Silver until 27 July 2018 when the OJA acquired the records from the former.
Administrative History
Shoel Silver is a Toronto businessman. He formerly co-chaired the Unity of the Jewish People Committee with Natan Sharansky. Prior to that, he was the scholar in residence for the first Federation Shabbaton.
Use Conditions
Accession is closed for 25 years from date of donation.
Subjects
Israel
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
B'nai Brith Canada
Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs
Jewish Agency for Israel
Silver, Shoel
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
United Israel Appeal
Places
Canada
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-21
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-21
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
multiple media
Physical Description
113 cm of textual and other records
1 scrapbook
Date
1938-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Act to End Violence Against Women organization. Included are: meeting minutes of the executive board; a ledger containing executive board waivers of notice; meeting minutes and resolutions from the yearly conventions; photographs of Act to End Violence Against Women members; correspondence with other organizations; correspondence, research material, public reactions, and ephemera from various campaigns; a commemorative booklet for a B'nai Brith cantorial concert; a scrapbook on the formation of the B'nai Brith Women Claire Morry Chapter; constitutions, constitutional amendments, reports, budgets, resolutions and other records of Act to End Violence Against Women; member lists and honour roll of past chapters; material and correspondence with B'nai Brith Washington; UJA material concerning assimilation and intermarriage and 2001 Jewish census data results.
Administrative History
The first Canadian chapter of B'nai Brith Women International was formed in Windsor, Ontario in 1923. Other chapters were soon formed throughout Eastern Canada and additional chapters were established in Winnipeg and British Columbia after 1949. The organization was initially administered by the American B'nai Brith Women. In 1976, it finally became autonomous (although still affiliated with the American agency) and changed its name to B'nai Brith Women of Eastern Canada. In 1981, its name was changed again to B'nai Brith Women of Canada. In 1995, the organization became known as Jewish Women International of Canada (JWIC). In November 2011, the organization underwent a final name change to Act to End Violence Against Women.
JWIC is committed to social change, with a particular focus on improving the lives of women and their families. In the 1980s, the agency initiated programs to counter domestic violence and began operating safe housing for Jewish women and children known as ASTEH (Alternative Safe Temporary Emergency Housing). JWIC also runs the JWI Residential Treatment Centre for emotionally disturbed youth.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: Material in English, Russian and French.
Subjects
Charities
Family violence
Women
Name Access
Act to End Violence Against Women
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-24
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-24
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
3 photographs : b&w and col. ; 25 x 20 cm or smaller
Date
1988-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Gerald "Jerry" Rosenberg and his involvement with the Royal Canadian Legion's General Wingate Branch 256. Included are General Wingate Branch 256 meeting agendas (2013-2015), Royal Canadian Legion correspondence (2014), two General Wingate Branch newsletters (October 2015 and March 2016), an annual branch inspection report form (27 September 2015), a branch regulations and clubhouse rules submission form (2012), financial statements and receipts (2013-2015), certificates of merit and appreciation from the Royal Canadian Legion (2002-2009), and a document in Hebrew commemo
In addition to the above documents, there are three photographs for which identification is missing: one of a funeral, one of a demonstrators carrying signs urging recognition of China, and a portrait of an unknown veteran.
Finally, the accession contains an undated letter to the editor of an unspecified newspaper that outline Jerry's views of the Arab-Israeli conflict.
Custodial History
At the time of his death, Jerry Rosenberg was living with his partner Frances Cohen. Frances' daughter Ronda "Rhonnie" Cohen took possession of the records following Jerry's death. Rhonnie subsequently gave the records to author Ellin Bessner who donated them to the Ontario Jewish Archives.
Administrative History
Jerry Rosenberg grew up in Hamilton, Ontario along with his twin sister, two brothers, and older sister. When he was seventeen years old, Rosenberg lied about his age in order to fight in the Second World War. He joined the Royal Canadian Navy and served for the duration of the war.
After the war, Rosenberg approached the Canadian Zionist Organization about volunteering in Palestine. After a circuitous journey that first took him from Montreal to New York to France, he arrived in Haifa in February or March 1948. Rosenberg was part of Machal, a group of overseas volunteers who fought alongside Israeli forces during the 1948 Arab-Israeli War. Rosenberg joined the Haganah and fought in the 52nd Givati Regiment. As part of this unit, he participated in battle in the Arab village of Bashshit.
After the war, Rosenberg made preparations to leave Israel. Upon arriving in Canada, he worked with Jewish organizations and started a family. He became president of the Royal Canadian Legion's Wingate Branch 256. He died on 23 August 2017.
Descriptive Notes
Language: English, French
Subjects
Arab-Israeli conflict
Veterans--Canada
Name Access
Bessner, Ellin, 1961-
Rosenberg, Jerry
Royal Canadian Legion
Places
Canada
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-8-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-8-6
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
90 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1988-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Jewish Book Awards (JBA). Included are minutes of the JBA committee, book reviews, award night programs, and miscellaneous correspondence.
Custodial History
Records were in the possession of jury member Judith Ghert prior to donation to the Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Literary prizes
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Book Awards
Canadian Jewish Literary Awards
Ghert, Judith
Koffler Centre of the Arts
Vine Awards for Canadian Jewish Literature
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-8-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-8-8
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
2 videocassettes (180 min.)
Date
1986-1997
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two videocassettes.
The first videocassette is titled Anguish to Hope: May 1-19, 1997 and records the travels of forty Canadian university students to Hungary, Poland, and Israel. During their travels, the students visited the birthplace of Theodor Herzl in Budapest, took part in the March of the Living from Auschwitz to Birkenau on Holocaust Remembrance Day, and celebrated Yom Ha'atsmaut in Jerusalem. Anguish to Hope was sponsored by the United Israel Appeal of Canada and local UJA/CJA Federations. Participants included: Gary Abenaim, Lesley Arbus, Andrew Bloom, Jessica Blumberger, Aaron Bockner, Shelly Brenner, Jason Brookman, Neshama Carlebach, Jennifer Cohen, Judy Cohen, Shoshana Cohen, Aliza Dwoskin, Alison Engel, Elissa Flagg, Cindy Goldbenberg, Henry Goldstein, Sarah Gonshor, Itai Hammer, Judy Heilik, Jocelyn Heisel, Daniel Hertzman, Gideon Hess, Naomi Hirshberg, Chaim Indig, Muki Jankelowitz, Andy Koltai, Yonina Machlis, Deborah Mervitz, Marla Munk, Oren Ognigwicz, Marla Pinsky, Bryan Rappaport, Eli Rubenstein, Lauren Schwartz, Ilana Sernick, Tammy Sitcoff, Elan Sloim, Noah Solomon, Julie Stevens, Rachel Stys, Nicole Sussman, Andrea Syrtash, Simone Vigod, and Laura Weinrib. The recording, which ends abruptly, is two hours in length.
The second videocassette is a recording of a Rogers Cable 10 special presentation: The Official Opening of the Baycrest Hospital Ben & Hilda Katz Building. The opening took place on 4 May 1986, where it was broadcast live from the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care in North York. The recording is one hour in length.
Custodial History
The videocassettes were donated to the Ontario Jewish Archives by Elissa Flagg, one of the participants in the Anguish to Hope trip. She is also the great-niece of Ben and Hilda Katz, the couple honoured in the Baycrest opening.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Availability of other formats note: Available as DVD reference copies.
Subjects
Hospitals
Jewish youth--Travel
Name Access
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care
Flagg, Elissa
Jewish Federations of Canada – UIA
Rogers TV
Places
Canada
Hungary
Israel
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-10-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-10-13
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
63 cm of textual records
Date
1997-2007
Scope and Content
Accession consists of paper issues of the Afterword, a national Jewish student newspaper in Canada.
Descriptive Notes
Associated material: Issues of the Afterword are also held by the Jewish Public Library Archives in Montreal.
Subjects
Jewish students--Canada--Periodicals
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Sarah (Patlik) Green
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
7 January 1975
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Sarah (Patlik) Green
Number
AC 004
Interview Date
7 January 1975
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Sophie Milgram
AccessionNumber
AC 004
Total Running Time
38 minutes 44 seconds
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Sarah (Patlik) Green grew up living in Toronto's "Junction" neighbourhood. The family home and scrap yard business were both located on Maria St. which served as the centre for Jewish life in the Junction during the early 1900s. Sarah Patlik was involved with numerous charitable organizations including the Ontario Hospital School of Orilla and the Rubinoff and Naftolin Mishpocha.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Green, Sarah
Geographic Access
West Toronto Junction
Kingston, Ont.
Toronto, Ont.
Orillia, Ont.
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
Side A:
0.21: Family arrived from Russia in 1908-1909. Grandfather arrived first. Saved his money and brought family to Canada, one by one. Anshel Wise agency used to help families immigrate to Canada.
3.44: Move to Toronto 1909. Family moved for better employment opportunities. Family lived in rented house on Portland Avenue. Father was a laborer in a junkyard. The junkyard was located around the King area, close to home. Family then moved to Stanley Ave. off Niagara St. Stanley Ave. was a Jewish neighborhood.
6.57: Move to The Junction 1915/1916. (Junction called “Muddy York” but was part of Toronto). Grandfather saved money and opened a junkyard of his own on Maria St. Family lived in 3 different homes on Maria St., one at 225, at 283 and the last house was right in the front of the junkyard, at 202 Maria St.
8.14: Standard of living in the Junction 1915/16. The rents were $20 a month. Mother made her own bread, preserves, and pickles to put away for the winter. She shared whatever we had with some of the poorer Jewish families on Maria St.
8.56: Maria Street Shopkeepers and Services. Two butchers, Mr. Zaitzove? and Mr. Weiner? Mr. Mandel had a Jewish bakery. Mr. Bexter? was the Schochet (ritual slaughterer). A cheder and a Peretz school. Teachers: Mr McKankil, Mr. Brick and Mr. Rigelhof?
11.28: No antisemitism in the Junction recalled by Sara Patlick.
11.34: Transportation in the Junction. No streetcars. There used to be a “jitney” and for 5 cents it took you right to your home. The streets were not paved and the mud came up to our “ears”. Entertainment in the Junction. We had no cars, radios nor televisions but we did have a gramophone, it was our entertainment. Mother bought a piano and paid a quarter a week for it. We all took piano lessons. Attended organized free concerts and dances at the Peretz Shul on Beverley St (first on Crawford St.). Picture shows were 5 cents.
17.27: Sarah Patlik and Charity Work. Secretary for Jewish Ladies Auxillary from the Junction. Raised money for the Weston Sanitorium. Secretary for the Old Folks Home on Cecil St. Secretary for the Antidiluvian Order of Buffalos, Lord Reading Lodge. Lodge did work for War Veterans. Hadassah. Secretary for Pride of Israel. In 1973 was made Woman of the year by the Ontario Hospital School of Orilla.
20.23: Agudath Mishpocha/Rubinoff and Naftolin Families. Families formed organization so that they would all be together and not forget who they were. Formed in 1928. Charity work and donations to: The Bloorview Hospital, Cerebral Palsy, Muscular Dystrophy, The Heart Fund, Princess Margaret, Sick Children’s Hospital, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Baycrest, Jewish Blind, Syrian Jews, State of Israel emergency fund and bonds.
30.12: Affiliation with Pride of Israel. Joined with husband in 1933. Was Synagogue secretary for many years.
34.05: Junction Shul on Maria St. Founded in 1918/1919 by Hyman Naftolin. Shul began in a little house at 84 or 86 Maria St. Shul became too small. Abraham Tenenbaum investor of present day Junction Shul.
Source
Oral Histories
Address
216 Beverley Street
Source
Landmarks

The Apter Synagogue was formed by a group of people who came to Toronto from the area of Opatow (Apt) in Poland around the turn of the century. They first established a small synagogue on Centre Avenue near Dundas Street in the Ward. In 1918, in anticipation of more Apter immigrants coming to Toronto after the First World War, the synagogue was sold and a larger one purchased on Beverley Street. Both the synagogue members and the Apter Friendly Society met there.
Address
216 Beverley Street
Time Period
1918-unknown
Scope Note
The Apter Synagogue was formed by a group of people who came to Toronto from the area of Opatow (Apt) in Poland around the turn of the century. They first established a small synagogue on Centre Avenue near Dundas Street in the Ward. In 1918, in anticipation of more Apter immigrants coming to Toronto after the First World War, the synagogue was sold and a larger one purchased on Beverley Street. Both the synagogue members and the Apter Friendly Society met there.
History
In later years, a bitter controversy between the synagogue and society erupted and the building was sold.
Category
Political
Religious
Private Clubs
Source
Landmarks
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 64
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
64
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1859-1980, predominant 1977-1979
Physical Description
ca. 5178 photographs and other material
Admin History/Bio
The “Shuls Project” was the work of three University of Toronto architecture students, who in 1977 wrote a research paper on the eight Toronto synagogues built before World War II. Concerned at the lack of resources on these synagogues, Sidney Tenenbaum, Lynn Milstone and Sheldon Levitt foresaw the loss of communities’ recorded history as membership dwindled and elders passed on. The students conceived a project that would photograph and document every synagogue in Canada, gathering visual evidence, memorabilia, plaques and stories before they disappeared and history was lost. The students’ goal was to document synagogues’ architecture, art, and historical development through research, interviews and site visits.
The students secured a large portion of the required funding for the project from the Samuel and Saidye Bronfman Family Foundation in Montreal, funding which was matched by the Canadian Jewish Congress. This financial support enabled Levitt, Milstone and Tenenbaum to begin their study, named “Shuls… A Study of Canadian Synagogue Architecture.” They began in the summer of 1977, traveling through the Western provinces. The next summer, they visited eight Maritime cities, Montreal and other Quebec communities. Financial support in the project’s second year was again provided by the Bronfman Family Foundation, along with the Canadian government and donations in kind from businesses, including Benjamin Photo Finishers in Toronto, and Polaroid. The summer of 1979 was spent in Ontario, with an added grant from Wintario. In total, the Shuls project team traveled over 24,000 kilometres, taking thousands of photographs and conducting several hundred interviews. Photographs were taken by Tenenbaum, with Levitt and Milstone assuming primary responsibility for researching synagogues’ history and gathering historic records. Interviews were conducted by all three researchers, in both English and Yiddish.
With no handy index of every shul in Canada, the researchers located small shuls by word of mouth. They spread word of their project and solicited assistance using press releases, letters to known communities, and slideshow presentations as they traveled. They would first examine a building to get an idea of a community’s character and heritage, then conduct interviews with designers, architects, rabbis and other prominent community members.
With the research and photographs created, the team compiled three catalogues of the Western, Eastern/Quebec, and Ontario phases of the project. These catalogues have entries on each synagogue that include historical summaries highlighting the founding, growth, mergers and decline of Jewish communities, their changing needs, changing architectural expressions and trends, and the evolving uses of synagogues over the course of the twentieth century. There are also building descriptions, some with critical comments by the authors, and lists of the photographs and slides produced.
The compilation of materials and preparation of these catalogues took place at the Project’s offices at 26 Ava Road in Toronto, and continued through the summer of 1980 when the Ontario catalogue was completed. In 1985, Tenenbaum, Milstone and Levitt published a book highlighting their work, called Treasures of a People: The Synagogues of Canada.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of the records created and collected by the team of students conducting the Shuls study from 1977 to 1980. The majority of the fonds is made up of graphic material, in the form of 35mm colour slides and black-and-white Polaroid prints and (print-size) negatives. There are approximately 5110 photographs in the fonds. Fonds also consists of notes and inventory forms of buildings' architectural features. There are no interview transcripts, but the fonds does include three audio cassettes with recorded interviews and shul tours. Reference materials used in researching the history of the shuls include dedication and anniversary commemorative books and programmes, newsletters, articles and newspaper clippings. In addition the fonds contains 47 blueprints, the majority from Montreal synagogues. The fonds is arranged in the following series: 1. Quebec synagogues; 2. Ontario synagogues; 3. Western Canada synagogues; 4. Eastern Canada synagogues; 5. Reference.
Notes
Physical description note: includes 92 cm of textual records, 42 architectural drawings, 3 audio cassettes, and 1 drawing.
Physical extent note: many of the slides were culled because they were felt to be reproductions. Some of the synagogue images in the research book may therefore not be included in the fonds.
Name Access
Shuls Project
Subjects
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Creator
Levitt, Sheldon
Milstone, Lynn
Tenenbaum, Sidney T.
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2007-10-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-10-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1977-2003
Scope and Content
Accession consists of materials documenting Congregation Iyr Hamelich, the Reform synagogue in Kingston. The records include the constitution, Sunday school minutes and policy documents, synagogue bulletins, correspondence and "Welcome to our Congregation" booklets.
Subjects
Religion
Name Access
Congregation Iyr Hamelich
Places
Kingston, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Anti-Semitism Cases sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 5-3; File 66
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Anti-Semitism Cases sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
5-3
File
66
Material Format
textual record
Date
[1991?]
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of profile of the Canadian extreme right wing prepared by the Joint Community Relations Committee.
Notes
Previously processed and cited as part of MG8 S.
Subjects
Right-wing extremists
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Descriptions
20 records – page 1 of 1.

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