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3 records – page 1 of 1.
Address
216 Beverley Street
Source
Landmarks

The Apter Synagogue was formed by a group of people who came to Toronto from the area of Opatow (Apt) in Poland around the turn of the century. They first established a small synagogue on Centre Avenue near Dundas Street in the Ward. In 1918, in anticipation of more Apter immigrants coming to Toronto after the First World War, the synagogue was sold and a larger one purchased on Beverley Street. Both the synagogue members and the Apter Friendly Society met there.
Address
216 Beverley Street
Time Period
1918-unknown
Scope Note
The Apter Synagogue was formed by a group of people who came to Toronto from the area of Opatow (Apt) in Poland around the turn of the century. They first established a small synagogue on Centre Avenue near Dundas Street in the Ward. In 1918, in anticipation of more Apter immigrants coming to Toronto after the First World War, the synagogue was sold and a larger one purchased on Beverley Street. Both the synagogue members and the Apter Friendly Society met there.
History
In later years, a bitter controversy between the synagogue and society erupted and the building was sold.
Category
Political
Religious
Private Clubs
Source
Landmarks
Accession Number
1976-7-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1976-7-9
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1927-1962
Scope and Content
Accession consists of materials pertaining to the life of Saul Einhorn of Oshawa, Ontario. Included are his Canadian naturalization certificate, ketubah for his first marriage, newspaper obituaries, and a letter of condolence to his widow from the Canadian Jewish Congress.
Subjects
Ketubah
Letters
Obituaries
Name Access
Einhorn, Saul
Places
Oshawa, Ont.
St. Catharines, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Address
44 St. George Street
Source
Landmarks

The Toronto Section of the National Council of Jewish Women initially operated out of 2 rented rooms and then later at a house on McCaul Street. In 1922, on its 25th anniversary, they became officially incorporated and purchased Community House at 44 St. George Street.
Address
44 St. George Street
Time Period
1922-[ca. 1964]
Scope Note
The Toronto Section of the National Council of Jewish Women initially operated out of 2 rented rooms and then later at a house on McCaul Street. In 1922, on its 25th anniversary, they became officially incorporated and purchased Community House at 44 St. George Street.
History
Many activities of the Toronto section of the National Council of Jewish Women operated from this building including Camp Camperdown for Girls, Jewish Girl Guides, a big sister program, classes in sewing, citizenship, and English. There was also a free legal bureau. Additionally, the building was used by a number of youth groups and clubs during a time when adequate meeting and recreation space was hard to find including the Jewish Girls Club. The Jewish Community Centre Association, formed in the fall of 1936, was located at this building. They operated a variety of classes including cooking, sewing, journalism, language, dance and art classes. They also operated a summer nursery school. Under the auspices of the Canadian Jewish Congress, the Community House also became a Service Mens Club, used as a place of refuge during the Second World War for members of the Canadian military on active service. The NCJW moved to a building on Bathurst, north of Sheppard in 1964.
Category
Private Clubs
Organization
Source
Landmarks