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8 records – page 1 of 1.
Level
Item
ID
Item 1864
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1864
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1908]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Admin History/Bio
The Fishkin family lived in Owen Sound for some time, but then returned to Toronto.
Scope and Content
Identified in this photograph, pictured left to right are: Rebecca Fishkin (nee Solway); Bessie Fishkin (m. Greisman); Louis Fishkin; Mina Fishkin (m. Mrs. Abe Squires); Dolly Fishkin (m. Landsberg); Joel Fishkin.
Name Access
Fishkin, Bessie
Fishkin, Dolly
Fishkin family
Fishkin, Joel
Fishkin, Louis
Fishkin, Mina
Fishkin, Rebecca
Greisman, Bessie
Landsberg, Dolly
Solway, Rebecca
Squires, Mrs. Abe
Subjects
Families
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Owen Sound (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1980-1-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2005-7-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2005-7-3
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
ca. 300 slides : col. ; 35 mm
Date
1977-1978
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs taken during visits by CJC Central Region officers to Ontario Jewish communities, and at Canadian Jewish Congress events and meetings in various communities. Accession also includes photos of Jewish interest in Italy.
Subjects
Communities
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region (Toronto, Ont.)
Friedman, Morris
Markish, Esther
Eisenberg, Joe
Wexler, Boris
Acker, Abe
Brownstone, Sam
Klafter, Gershon
Rosen, Marty
Fackenheim, Emil
Rosensweig, Philip
Saiger, Norman
Sadowski, David
Gryfe, Mark
Hillel (Kingston, Ont.)
Frey, Marcus
Horowitz, Shlomo
Katz, Stan
Pliscow, Morris
Places
Cambridge (Ont.)
Chatham (Ont.)
Sudbury (Ont.)
Kirkland Lake (Ont.)
Thunder Bay (Ont.)
Sault Ste. Marie (Ont.)
North Bay (Ont.)
Oshawa (Ont.)
Belleville (Ont.)
Windsor (Ont.)
Pembroke (Ont.)
Peterborough (Ont.)
Guelph (Ont.)
Hamilton (Ont.)
London (Ont.)
Kitchener (Ont.)
Owen Sound (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Barrie (Ont.)
Orillia (Ont.)
Kingston (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-5-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-5-7
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
19 photographs : b&w (jpg)
Date
[ca. 1908-1961]
Scope and Content
This accession consists of digitized photographs depicting four generations of the Rabovsky family of Owen Sound, from the early 1900s to 1961.
The photographs are as follows:
01. Goldie & Nathan Rabovsky, [ca. 1908].
02. Goldie Rabovsky (9) and Gail (9) in summer of 1961 in front of cottage at Sauble Beach, July 1961.
03. Bar Mitzvah of Stan Rabovsky, at Beth Ezekiel Synagogue, Owen Sound, [ca. 1953].
04. Rose Rabovsky, Stan Rabovsky & Irving Rabovsky at Bar Mitzvah of Stan Rabovsky, Owen Sound, [ca. 1953].
05.Rabovskys at Sauble Beach, 1957.
06. Marsha Rabovsky at Harrison Park, Owen Sound, 1957.
07. Group in suits in front of building, [before 1944]. Back row L to R: Lillian Rabovsky, Goldie [Cadesky] Rabovsky, Rose [Schecter] Rabovsky, Nathan Rabovsky, Max Rabovsky, Celia [Gordon] Rabovsky, Sadie Rabovsky, Irving Rabovsky. Front row L to R: Mike [Meyer] Rabovsky, Stan Rabovsky (on shoulders), Moe [Moses] Rabovsky, Bertha Rabovsky
08. Sauble Beach, Ontario, [1954]. Celia Rabovsky, Marsha Rabovsky, Max Rabovsky.
09. Sadie Rabovsky, Miriam Levison Rabovsky, Celia Rabovsky, Marsha Rabovsky, Molly Cadesky, Max Rabovsky, [1954].
10. Joel Cadesky, Debbie Cadesky, Marsha Rabovsky, Goldie Rabovsky (toddler) Sauble Beach, 1954.
11. Nathan Rabovsky & Goldie Rabovsky in front of their furniture store, Owen Sound, [193-?].
12. L to R: Moses (Moe) Rabovsky, Bertha Rabovsky, Max Rabovsky, Nathan Rabovsky, Owen Sound, [ca. 1940].
13. Max Rabovsky & Celia (Gordon) Rabovsky, Owen Sound, [193-?].
14. Ezekiel Cadesky, Owen Sound, [194-?].
15. Max & Celia Rabovsky, Owen Sound, [193-?].
16. Four young men in suits; second from left is Max Rabovsky, [ca. 1930].
17. Max Rabovsky & Nettye Podnick, Owen Sound, [ca. 1930]
18. Rabovsky family downtown Owen Sound, [before 1944]. Back row L to R: Lillian Rabovsky, Rose Rabovsky, Nathan Rabovsky, Irving Rabovsky, Goldie Rabovsky, Max Rabovsky, Celia Rabovsky, Sadie Rabovsky. Front row L to R: Meyer (Mike) Rabovsky, Stanley Rabovsky (on shoulders), Pvt. Moses (Moe) Rabovsky, Bertha Rabovsky (hugging).
19. Isaac Ezekiel Cadesky, [195-?].
Administrative History
The Rabovsky family is one of the oldest in the Owen Sound Jewish community. Nathan Rabovsky arrived with his brother in 1907; his marriage to Goldie Cadesky in 1909 was the first Jewish wedding in Owen Sound, for which a rabbi was brought in from Toronto. Goldie was the eldest daughter of Ethel Lewisky and Isaac Ezekiel Cadesky, for whom the Beth Ezekiel Synagogue is named. Nathan and Goldie had seven children: Sadie, Meyer (Mike), Irving, Lillian, Moses (Moe), Bertha and Max. Moses, a pilot in the Second World War, was killed in 1944. Max married Celia Gordon, and their granddaughter is donor Julie Gonik.
Use Conditions
None
Descriptive Notes
Related records: 2007-5-5, 2007-6-37
Subjects
Communities
Families
Name Access
Rabovsky family
Places
Owen Sound (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-37
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-37
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w (jpg)
Date
1942
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one scanned photograph of three generations of the Rabovsky family of Owen Sound, headed by Nathan and Goldie (nee Cadesky) Rabovsky. In the back row are Celia, Max, Meyer (Mike), Moe, Irving, and Rose Rabovsky. In the front row are Lillian, Nathan, Sadie, Stanley (son of Irving and Rose), Goldie, and Bertha Rabovsky.
Administrative History
The Rabovsky family is one of the oldest in the Owen Sound Jewish community. Nathan Rabovsky arrived with his brother in 1907; his marriage to Goldie Cadesky in 1909 was the first Jewish wedding in Owen Sound, for which a rabbi was brought in from Toronto. Goldie was the eldest daughter of Ethel Lewisky and Isaac Ezekiel Cadesky, for whom the Beth Ezekiel Synagogue is named. Nathan and Goldie had seven children: Sadie, Meyer (Mike -- the donor of this photo), Irving, Lillian, Moses (Moe), Bertha and Max. Moses, a pilot in the Second World War, was killed in 1944.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Descriptive Notes
Related records note: See also accession 2007-5-5 and 2007-5-7
Subjects
Communities
Families
Name Access
Rabovsky family
Places
Owen Sound (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Ontario synagogues series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 64; Series 2; File 29
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Ontario synagogues series
Level
File
Fonds
64
Series
2
File
29
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1979
Physical Description
17 photographs : col. slides, b&w prints, (1) b&w negative ; 35 mm and 12 x 9 cm
Subjects
Synagogues
Places
Owen Sound (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2015-9-18
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-18
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
85 cm of textual records
184 photographs : b&w and col. (tif and jpg)
ca. 200 photographs : b&w and col.
14 moving images : mov and mp4
Date
[192-]-2015, predominant 1983-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the records related to the activities and operations of the First Narayever Congregation. Included are board and general meeting minutes (1984-1996); general correspondence, high holiday tickets and membership lists (1970s-1990s); membership and dues ledger (1929-1983); Ritual Committee meeting minutes (1984-1988); Implementation Committee records (1970s-1980s); constitutions (1980s); newsletters (1983-2004); a blank seat deed (1920s); a cemetery map (1950s?); records regarding burial rights for the Owen Sound Hebrew Congregation (1966-1980); records regarding a court case filed by members of the congregation surrounding the egalitarian changes being planned; an album documenting SHTICK! A Celebration of Jewish Playrights (2005-2006); an album documenting the congregation's participation in a UJA Mission to Israel (2003-2004); a binder of material containing photocopied and original records in support of the research for the congregation's 100th anniversary celebrations (1970s-2014); photographs and a video recording of the 100th Anniversary exhbition opening at the Miles Nadal JCC; photographs of events hosted by the congregation; and 9 video interviews with individuals connected to the shul conducted by Sharoni Siboney for the anniversary celebrations. Interviewees are: Peter Gold, Sharon Weintraub, Murray Teitel, Rosalyn Katz, Julia Gluck, Shaya Petroff, Stuart Schoenfeld, Sylvia Solomon and Ben Rothman. Also included are family photographs and written transcripts of oral interviews conducted with members of the Hersh Petersiel family, who lived in Hastings, Ontario and had early connections to the Narayever Congregation.
Custodial History
The records related to Hersh Petersiel were given to the First Narayever by Marsha Beck for their upcoming 100th anniversary. Marsha agreed to donate them to the OJA along with the Narayever records.
Administrative History
In 1914, Jews from eastern Galicia (now in modern Ukraine) established the First Narayever Congregation in Toronto as a landsmanshaf, i.e. a society of Jewish immigrants from the same town or region. The synagogue takes its name from the small market town of Narayev, which is located in eastern Galicia. The synagogue's founders belonged to the working class and many worked in Toronto's garment industry.
Initially, congregation members met in different locations, but by 1923 their numbers and financial means had grown such that they were able to rent a small house at 70 Huron Street at the corner of Huron and Dundas. This house served as the congregation's home for twenty years.
The congregation's first president was Israel Chaim Katz and its first meeting was held at the Katz home at 156 William Street. The congregation's first rabbi was Solomon Langner, who was hired by the congregation in 1923. He retained this affiliation despite serving the Kiever Synagogue as a full-time rabbi from 1929 until he died in 1973.
In 1943, the congregation purchased property at 187-189 Brunswick Avenue from Bethel Church. This is where the the synagogue is located today.
In 1950, Henry Young became president of the congregation. He occupied that position until his death in 1976. Shalom Langner, the son of Rabbi Solomon Langner, succeeded Young as president.
As Toronto's Jewish population began to move north, the First Narayever continued to serve Orthodox Jews living downtown. In the 1980s, the congregation struggled to balance the needs of this older generation with the young generation's desire to make the synagogue more egalitarian with respect to gender. In 1983, the congregation's new leadership team successfully advanced a proposal to allow the full participation of women in traditional services. This innovation led to several long-standing members taking legal action, but their case was dismissed on the grounds that it was not a matter for civil law.
The First Narayever's identity continued to evolve. In 2009, its membership voted to allow its rabbi, Edward Elkin, who began serving the congregation in 2000, to officiate at same-sex marriages.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
First Narayever Congregation (Toronto, Ont.)
Petersiel, Hersh
Places
Hastings (Ont.)
Owen Sound (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Research Records sub-series
Small Ontario Jewish Communities sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
5-4-8
File
54
Material Format
textual record
Date
1969
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of correspondence regarding Jewish related issues in Sarnia. Of special interest is the correspondence about the recent rise of antisemitism among black Americans.
Notes
Previously processed and cited as part of MG8 S.
Subjects
African Americans
Antisemitism
Places
Owen Sound (Ont.)
Sarnia (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Address
1485 Murphy Rd.
Source
Landmarks

Camp Moshava was founded in 1962 in the Kawartha Lakes Region on Lake Buckhorn. Affiliated with the Zionist youth movement B’nei Akiva, Moshava is one of several camps they operate in North America.
Address
1485 Murphy Rd.
Time Period
1962-present
Scope Note
Camp Moshava was founded in 1962 in the Kawartha Lakes Region on Lake Buckhorn. Affiliated with the Zionist youth movement B’nei Akiva, Moshava is one of several camps they operate in North America.
History
Historically, the primary aim of the movement was to promote avodah, specifically agricultural work in the field and aliyah, migration to Israel. Today, Camp Moshava provides an informal environment for campers to encounter Judaism through programming and observances that promote Torah education, prayer and Zionist ideals.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
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