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7 records – page 1 of 1.
Address
44 St. George Street
Source
Landmarks

The Toronto Section of the National Council of Jewish Women initially operated out of 2 rented rooms and then later at a house on McCaul Street. In 1922, on its 25th anniversary, they became officially incorporated and purchased Community House at 44 St. George Street.
Address
44 St. George Street
Time Period
1922-
Scope Note
The Toronto Section of the National Council of Jewish Women initially operated out of 2 rented rooms and then later at a house on McCaul Street. In 1922, on its 25th anniversary, they became officially incorporated and purchased Community House at 44 St. George Street.
History
Many activities of the Toronto section of the National Council of Jewish Women operated from this building including Camp Camperdown for Girls, Jewish Girl Guides, a big sister program, classes in sewing, citizenship, and English. There was also a free legal bureau.
Additionally, the building was used by a number of youth groups and clubs during a time when adequate meeting and recreation space was hard to find including the Jewish Girls Club. The Jewish Community Centre Association, formed in the fall of 1936, was located at this building. They operated a variety of classes including cooking, sewing, journalism, language, dance and art classes. They also operated a summer nursery school.
Under the auspices of the Canadian Jewish Congress, the Community House also became a Service Mens Club, used as a place of refuge during the Second World War for members of the Canadian military on active service.
Category
Private Clubs
Organization
Source
Landmarks
Address
15 Brunswick Avenue
Source
Landmarks

At the turn of the twentieth-century, the Jewish population of Toronto grew with large numbers of Eastern European families fleeing hardship back home. Soon, a variety of clubs began forming, providing a place for Jewish boys and girls to participate in athletic and social programming. In 1919, several of the athletic and social groups decided to amalgamate and formed an umbrella organization known as the Hebrew Association of Young Men’s and Young Women’s Clubs. By 1930, they were known as the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A (Young Men’s and Young Women’s Hebrew Association. Through the 1920s and 30s, they occupied a number of facilities in the Brunswick Avenue and College Street area.
Address
15 Brunswick Avenue
Time Period
1937
Scope Note
At the turn of the twentieth-century, the Jewish population of Toronto grew with large numbers of Eastern European families fleeing hardship back home. Soon, a variety of clubs began forming, providing a place for Jewish boys and girls to participate in athletic and social programming. In 1919, several of the athletic and social groups decided to amalgamate and formed an umbrella organization known as the Hebrew Association of Young Men’s and Young Women’s Clubs. By 1930, they were known as the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A (Young Men’s and Young Women’s Hebrew Association. Through the 1920s and 30s, they occupied a number of facilities in the Brunswick Avenue and College Street area.
History
As a result of the overcrowding and de-centralized facilities, in 1937, the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. constructed its own athletic building at 15 Brunswick Avenue, next door to the Talmud Torah, to ease the overcrowding. Similar to the JCCs of today, the early Y.M-Y.W.H.A provided a sense of Jewish identity and camaraderie through physical, educational, cultural and community based programming.
Category
Arts
Education
Private Clubs
Source
Landmarks
Address
12 Major Street
Source
Landmarks

The Y.M-Y.W.H.A used a building on Major Street for their after-school children's programs when they out-grew their space on Brunswick Ave.
Address
12 Major Street
Time Period
[ca. 1940]-1953
Scope Note
The Y.M-Y.W.H.A used a building on Major Street for their after-school children's programs when they out-grew their space on Brunswick Ave.
Category
Education
Private Clubs
Source
Landmarks
Address
41 Wilcocks Street
Source
Landmarks

The Primrose Club was founded in Toronto in 1907 as the Cosmopolitan Club, an elite Jewish men's social club. Its members included many prominent leaders of the Jewish community. It was originally located on Beverley Street. In 1921, 41 Wilcocks Street which was originally built as a family home, was redesigned by architect Benjamin Brown and Robert MConnelI to be the new home of the Primrose Club. 1959, the club's building at 41 Willcocks Street was expropriated by the University of Toronto (and currently houses the university's Faculty Club), and the club subsequently moved to a new building at Russell Hill Road ajd St. Clair, designed by Kaplan & Sprachman. This building has since been demolished and replaced with condominiums.
Address
41 Wilcocks Street
Time Period
1921-1959
Scope Note
The Primrose Club was founded in Toronto in 1907 as the Cosmopolitan Club, an elite Jewish men's social club. Its members included many prominent leaders of the Jewish community. It was originally located on Beverley Street. In 1921, 41 Wilcocks Street which was originally built as a family home, was redesigned by architect Benjamin Brown and Robert MConnelI to be the new home of the Primrose Club. 1959, the club's building at 41 Willcocks Street was expropriated by the University of Toronto (and currently houses the university's Faculty Club), and the club subsequently moved to a new building at Russell Hill Road ajd St. Clair, designed by Kaplan & Sprachman. This building has since been demolished and replaced with condominiums.
Category
Private Clubs
Architecture
Source
Landmarks
Address
207 Beverley Street
Source
Landmarks

This building was used as a catering and event hall before the other organizations and synagogues had their own event halls.
Address
207 Beverley Street
Scope Note
This building was used as a catering and event hall before the other organizations and synagogues had their own event halls.
Category
Private Clubs
Source
Landmarks
Address
136 Beverley Street
Source
Landmarks

Chudleigh House was used in the 1930s and 40s as an event space where people held weddings and various community gatherings like testimonial dinners and fundraisers.
Address
136 Beverley Street
Scope Note
Chudleigh House was used in the 1930s and 40s as an event space where people held weddings and various community gatherings like testimonial dinners and fundraisers.
Category
Private Clubs
Source
Landmarks
Address
216 Beverley Street
Source
Landmarks

The Apter Synagogue was formed by a group of people who came to Toronto from the area of Opatow (Apt) in Poland around the turn of the century. They first established a small synagogue on Centre Avenue near Dundas Street in the Ward. In 1918, in anticipation of more Apter immigrants coming to Toronto after the First World War, the synagogue was sold and a larger one purchased on Beverley Street. Both the synagogue members and the Apter Friendly Society met there.
Address
216 Beverley Street
Time Period
1918-unknown
Scope Note
The Apter Synagogue was formed by a group of people who came to Toronto from the area of Opatow (Apt) in Poland around the turn of the century. They first established a small synagogue on Centre Avenue near Dundas Street in the Ward. In 1918, in anticipation of more Apter immigrants coming to Toronto after the First World War, the synagogue was sold and a larger one purchased on Beverley Street. Both the synagogue members and the Apter Friendly Society met there.
History
In later years, a bitter controversy between the synagogue and society erupted and the building was sold.
Category
Political
Religious
Private Clubs
Source
Landmarks
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