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2847 records – page 1 of 57.
Accession Number
2014-8-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-8
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder textual records
2 photographs: b&w ; 13 cm x 8 cm & 9 cm x 6 cm
Date
1932-1945
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the military careers of David Heaps, and the political and personal items of his father, Abraham Albert Heaps. Items related to David and Heaps include military currency, guidebooks and telegrams, and 2 unidentified photographs. Items related to Abraham Albert Heaps include Abraham's business cards and postcards from abroad.
Administrative History
David Heaps was born in Winnipeg in 1916 to A.A. Heaps and Bessie Heaps (nee Morris). He attended the University of Manitoba, University of Southern California and the Ecole Libre de Sciences Politiques in Paris. He worked as a journalist prior to enlisting in the Canadian army in 1942. In 1943, he was promoted to Sergeant and served in the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division in the Allied Expeditionary Force. He was the only soldier in his regiment to serve for the entire European campaign, and fought at Caen, Channel Ports, Brussels, Antwerp, Falaise Gap, the Schelde and the final campaigns in Holland and Northern Germany. Heaps was awarded the Royal Military Cross, and his brother Leo also achieved the same distinction, thereby making David and Leo the only Jewish brothers during the Second World War to win the decoration.
Abraham Albert Heaps (1885-1954), known as A. A. Heaps, was a founder of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, the forerunner of the New Democratic Party. He was arrested for his involvement in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike, but late acquitted of all charges. He began his political career as an alderman and member of the Trade Union Council and later was elected to the federal House of Commons representing Winnipeg North. He fought against antisemitism and quotas and advocated for the acceptance of Jewish refugees in Canada. He was defeated in 1940 and retired from public life and lived the rest of his days in Montreal.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder textual records
Date
1937-1970
Scope and Content
Accession consists of personal records of Bunny Bergstein. Included is his certificate of graduation from "shule", or Yiddish school, and documents related to the B'Nai Brith Lodge.
Subjects
Education
Yiddish language
Name Access
Bergstein, Bunny
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-4
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1 m textual records and other materials
Date
1915-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of personal and professional materials of Gerald Tulchinsky. Documents include agendas and journals written between 1958 and 2013, clippings, research notes, articles, correspondence and vacation souvenirs. Among the resarch materials are notes, oral histories and films on Joe Salsberg for Tulchinsky's book, Joe Salsberg: A Life of Commitment. Photographs pertain mainly to Tulchinsky's Salsberg research material but there are also personal photographs of Tulchinsky family gatherings. The audio cassettes include several oral histories used for Tulchinsky's research. The stamps appear on empty envelopes addressed to different recipients, including Tulchinsky's parents, Harry and Anne Tulchinsky, with return addresses from all over the world.
Administrative History
Dr. Gerald Tulchinsky is Professor Emeritus at Queen's University, Department of History, and author of several books on the history of Canadian Jewry and labour issues in Canada. His books include: Shtetl on the Grand (2015); Joe Salsberg: A Life of Commitment (2013); Canada's Jews: A People's Journey (2008); Branching Out: The Transformation of the Canadian Jewish Community (1998); Taking Root: The Origins of the Canadian Jewish Community (1992); and The River Barons: Montreal Businessmen and the Growth of Industry and Transportation, 1837-53 (1977).
Tulchinsky was born in Brantford, Ontario in 1933 to Harry and Anne Tulchinsky. He currently resides in Kingston, Ontario.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: Includes textual records, ca. 50 stamps, ca. 20 photographs, 2 video cassettes, 6 audio cassettes
Name Access
Tulchinsky, Gerald, 1933-
Salsberg, Joseph, 1902-1998
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-16
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-16
Material Format
textual record
sound recording
Physical Description
ca. 20 cm textual records
1 audio cassette
Date
[19--]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of files related to the musical careers of musicians and composers including John Weinzweig, Nathan Appleby, Cantor Norman Summers, and Boris Charloff. Materials include audio cassettes, sheet music, concert programmes, correspondence, and lyrics.
Custodial History
Found in storage with donor unknown, presumed to have been left in music room of Latner Jewish Public Library.
Subjects
Arts and popular culture
Name Access
Weinzweig, John
Appleby, Nathan
Summers, Norman
Charloff, Boris
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-11
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-11
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
7 photographs : b&w
Date
1931-1935
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting the activities of Motel Bergstein and Borris Litman. Included are images documenting Hat Cap and Milinery workers banquets, conventions and Executive members, as well as images documenting Camp Yungvelt and the Workmen's Circle 35th anniversary. Motel Bergstein is identified in the photos.
Custodial History
The photographs were in the possession of Carrie Grossman, the daughter of Motel Bergstein and step-daughter of Borris Litman.
Administrative History
Motel Bergstein was born in 1898 in Buckawchevitz, Galicia. He came to Toronto in 1920 or 1921 and initially worked as an operator in a hat factory. He met and married Rita Katz in 1922. Motel was a member of the communist party and in the early 1930s he replaced JB Salsberg as the union organizer for the Hat, Cap and Millinery Workers Union. He was eventually excommunicated from the communist party for refusing to call a strike after the party's headquarters ordered him to. After his excommunication, he became an active member of the Workmen's Circle. Around 1937 or 1938, Motel began selling life insurance as a sub-agent for his uncle, Max Bergstein. Motel passed away on December 25, 1941.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
Labour and unions
Name Access
Bergstein, Motel, 1898-1941
Litman, Boris
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-4
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1.2 m of textual records and other material
Date
[ca. 1936]-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the activities of Eitz Chaim. Included are photographs, yearbooks, class lists and registers, teachers record books and student grade reports, curriculum materials, anniversary books and 2 DVDs from a gala dinner and fundraising event. Also included is the Beth Jacob High School dedication and founders dinner book.
Administrative History
Known then as the Poylishe Talmud Torah, Eitz Chaim began in 1915 with a few students in one classroom guided by one teacher. The school’s first premises were in the Elm Street Shul. Within a year, a second teacher, Reb Leibish Noble, was hired, and he remained actively involved in Eitz Chaim for 30 years. There were now 30 students in two classes. The four-hour nightly sessions were held at the end of the regular public school day with an additional six hours on Sunday. Classes continued throughout the summer as well.
The school’s first building on Chestnut Street was inaugurated in August 1916, with additional classes held at a branch on Simcoe Street. The second president of the school, Yosef Shidlowsky, in a move to be more inclusive of all Orthodox Jews, changed the name of the school to Talmud Torah Eitz Chaim.
In 1917, Mr. Shidlowsky, Itshe Meyer Korolnek, and Joseph Cooper managed not only to obtain a provincial charter to open a religious school, but were also instrumental in purchasing the Italian Club at 68 D’Arcy St. to accommodate the school’s growing enrollment.
In 1920, Rabbi Yehuda Leib Graubart arrived from Stashow, Poland, and assumed the post of spiritual leader of the Talmud Torah. He introduced more Hebrew instruction and a more intensive Torah curriculum.
In 1926, Rabbi Pinchas Ravad became the next principal, a position he retained for the next nine years. During that time, a separate girls’ class was formed and the first female teacher was hired. Although a fire in 1927 destroyed the wooden school building on D’Arcy St., a new, larger school was constructed on the same site and dedicated on December 30, 1927. After moving into the new building, student enrollment increased dramatically. Beginning with 300 students in 1929, the student body grew to 400 in 1931, 503 in 1933, and 600 in 1938.
After the passing of Rabbi Graubart, an evening high school yeshiva, the Maharil Graubart Yeshiva, was founded in 1939 to serve boys 14 years of age and up with Rav Yaakov Kamenetsky acting as rosh yeshiva beginning in 1941. The building next door to the Talmud Torah, at 80 D’Arcy Street, was purchased to provide space for the yeshiva and was connected via a walkway to the Talmud Torah. As the students of Eitz Chaim Talmud Torah graduated from the elementary school, they would eventually attend the Maharil Graubart Yeshiva. That same year, Rabbi Jacob I. Wohlgelernter became principal of the Talmud Torah and a kindergarten was added in 1942.
Seven years later, Rabbi Chaim Nussbaum officially assumed the role of principal of Eitz Chaim Schools. Beginning with only a grade 1, new grades were added every year until grades 1 through 9 were in place. Eitz Chaim gradually broadened its scope, welcoming Jewish students from many diverse backgrounds and establishing afternoon and day classes beginning in 1950 at a branch on Burnside Ave. To meet the growing demand for classes, the Torath Emeth Jewish Centre was established at 1 Viewmount Avenue in 1956.
By 1958, in response to the geographical shift of the Jewish population northward, the Tanenbaum Building was added to the complex, followed by the Korolnek Building in 1961, both at 1 Viewmount Avenue. By this time, Eitz Chaim had two principals: Rabbi Nussbaum, who oversaw Hebrew studies, and Rabbi Shlomo Jakubovitz, who oversaw general studies.
The two buildings on D’Arcy St. were sold in 1966 and the proceeds were designated toward purchasing a new school building to the north of the city. Rabbi Shlomo Jakobovits, Avraham Bleeman, Joe Goldwasser and Sam Wortsman led the way in persuading the Board of Directors to purchase the land at Patricia and Bathurst Streets. Patricia and Bathurst Streets served as the temporary location for portable units until the large, permanent building was completed in 1970. This location evolved into the boys’ campus, servicing students from all areas of the city.
Rabbi Shneur Weinberg succeeded Rabbi Nussbaum in 1969 and served as the Hebrew principal until his retirement in 1995, when Rabbi Aaron Levine took over. The position of Hebrew studies principal for the girls’ school was created in 1974 and was held by Rabbi Leibish Adler for 26 years. Rabbi Mordechai Gewirts succeeded Rabbi Adler in 2002 and was principal of the girls’ school until 2012. Eitz Chaim Schools developed rapidly and acquired an excellent reputation among North American day schools.
The female graduates of Eitz Chaim, for the most part, attended public high school. To counter this trend, Beth Jacob High School, with the guidance of Eitz Chaim, was launched in 1963, with classes conducted near the Viewmount branch. In 1966, the Beth Jacob High School and Teacher’s Seminary was completed on Lawrence Avenue, culminating in the opening of a girls’ high school that became completely independent of Eitz Chaim. Today, many female graduates of Etiz Chaim continue their education at Beth Jacob High School.
The Spring Farm campus, named for the farm formerly on that site, opened its doors in 1988. Currently, Eitz Chaim serves primarily as an elementary educational institute under the guidance of Rabbi Isser Pliner.
History from http://www.eitzchaim.com/index.php?page=history (viewed Oct. 6, 2014)
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Physical Description note: Includes ca. 500 photographs, texts, 2 DVDs and 1 betacam cassette.
Use Conditions note: student grade reports are closed until 30 years after the death of the individual.
Subjects
Education
Children
Name Access
Eitz Chaim Schools (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-5-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-5-8
Material Format
textual record
moving images
graphic material
Physical Description
2 m of textual records
10 film reels : 8mm
ca. 300 photographs
Date
[192-]-[200-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Steinberg family. The bulk of the material was collected and created by Elise Steinberg. Included are photographs and slides, family films, Israel and Miriam's wedding album and honeymoon scrapbook, correspondence and greeting cards, newsletters, Holy Blossom Temple bulletins, newsletters, certificates, Elise's school notebooks and assignments, and financial and legal records pertaining to the estate of Joseph Steinberg. Of particular note are Elise Steinberg's diaries which span the years from 1974 to 1984. Also of note is material documenting the family's resignation from Holy Blossom Temple.
Custodial History
The material came into the possession of Charles Levi and his parents after the death of Israel and Miriam Steinberg.
Administrative History
Irving (Israel) Steinberg was born to Joseph and Leah Steinberg (Schindermann) on January 16, 1919. Joseph and Leah had immigrated to Canada in 1914. They initially lived in Peterborough, but moved to Toronto by 1921. They lived in Toronto for a few years, but evetually settled in Sudbury and opened the Toronto Bargain Store.
Irving joined the Canadian army in 1942 and served in Canada. He married Miriam (from Philadelphia) and they lived in Toronto. They had one daughter, Elise, on September 25, 1955. Israel worked as an accountant and Miriam was a musician and patron of the arts. In her teen years, Elise developed an intellectual and physical disability (possibly scoliosis). Elise was an avid doll collector and volunteered for many years at Holy Blossom Temple's library. The family were members of Holy Blossom Temple for many years and tried advocating for better access to the synagogue for individuals with disabilities. They resigned thier membership in the 1990s.
Elise passed away on April 5, 2005. Miriam passed away on February 28, 2011. Irving passed away the following day on March 1, 2011.
Subjects
Diaries
Education
Human rights
Jewish families
Newsletters
Photography of families
Synagogues
Name Access
Steinberg, Irving, 1919-2011
Steinberg, Miriam, ?-2011
Steinberg, Elise, 1955-2005
Holy Blossom Temple (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
40 cm of textual records and other material
Date
[192-]-[200-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the life and career of David Green and the Jaffey family. Records include sound and video recordings of events, Goodwill Sales accounting ledgers, meeting minutes from the Jewish Canadian Military Archives and Museum, David Green's military ephemera, manuals and reports of the Jewish Federation Board of Trustees and Bequest and Endowment Fund, and Jaffey family correspondence and photographs. Records also include certificates of appreciation awarded to David Green, mainly from UJA Federation.
Administrative History
David Green (1919-2014) was born in the Junction in west Toronto. He served as a private in the Canadian army as part of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. He was captured and designated MIA when he was held as a POW in Belgium. He became a member of General Wingate Branch 256 Jewish Canadian Legion. In the mid-1940s he married his wife, Sylvia (nee Jaffey) (d. 2010) and they had a daughter, Miriam. He was a longtime volunteer for the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto. In 1990, he was one of the first individuals to establish an Endowment Fund at the Jewish Foundation of Greater Toronto.
The Jaffey family consisted of Kaby Jaffey, his wife, Nellie, and their children Sylvia, Jess and Albert.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: Accession also consists of photographs and textiles.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
Charities
Jewish families
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Green, David, 1919-2014
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-17
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-17
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1930-1965
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting the immigration and settlement of Max Smith (Szmidt, Szmit, Szmita) and Pearl (nee Apelbaum?) Smith and their family. Included are Polish identification papers and correspondence with Canadian immigration officials. Also included is correspondence relating to Alexander Najmanowicz.
Custodial History
The records were found by UJA Federation employee Leanne Campbell while she was cleaning out her office for a move. She believes the records belonged to someone who had her office before her. The original owner/source of the records is unknown.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: Polish and English.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Smith, Max
Smith, Pearl
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-1
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1917-1964
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting Samuel Berger and his family. Included is Sam's marriage certificate, wedding invitation, naturalization certificates, and pay book and discharge papers from the First World War. Also included is a copy of the birth certificate for Sam's wife, Rebecca (nee Rotenberg) and a newsclipping of the obituary for Rebecca's father, Lazar Rotenberg.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Goldie Berger, the daughter-in-law of Samuel Berger and wife of Leonard Berger.
Administrative History
Samuel Berger enlisted in the Canadian army in Oct. 1918. He was discharged in Dec. 1918. He married Rebecca Rotenberg in 1917.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
World War, 1914-1918
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
20 cm of textual records
Date
1934-1966
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the records created or accumulated by Suzann (Cohen) Hutner related to the operations of the Canadian Jewish Review. Included are circulation reports, financial records, correspondence related to advertisers and the sale of the publication, issue summaries prepared by Suzann and a history of the paper written by Suzann. There also a few issues of the CJR from the 1930s.
Custodial History
The records were in the custody of Harold Hutner, the stepson of Suzann Hutner.
Administrative History
The Canadian Jewish Review was established in 1921 by George and Florence Cohen. The couple had founded the short-lived Buffalo Jewish Review prior to them immigrating to Canada. The CJR was not bound by any particular religion or organization. Their offices were located in teh Hermant Building at Dundas Square. The paper was sold to the Canadian Jewish Chronicle in 1966.
Subjects
Jewish newspapers
Name Access
Hutner, Suzann
Cohen, Florence
Cohen, George
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-7
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
ca. 20 photographs
Date
1929-1982
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the Heaps family. Included are general letters and postcards, wartime correspondence, political materials, photographs, and newsclippings. Of note is a 1948 letter written (but perhaps not sent) to David Ben-Gurion describing various issues he was finding with the Israeli army. There is also a great deal of correspondence between Leo, David and A. A. during the war, including some letters describing his escape from Arnhem and a letter describing the Bergen-Belsen Concentration Camp in 1945.
Administrative History
Leo Heaps (1923-1995) was born in Winnipeg in 1923, the son of A. A. Heaps and Bessie Morris. His father A. A. was a founder of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, the forerunner of the New Democratic Party. Leo Heaps was raised in Winnipeg and received an education at Queen's University, the University of California, and McGill University. During the Second World War, at the age of 21, Heaps was seconded to the British Army and found himself commanding the 1st Battalion's Transport. He participated in the Battle of Arnhem as a paratrooper.
Leo Heaps was awarded the Royal Military Cross for his work with the Dutch Resistance. His brother, David, had also achieved the same distinction, thereby making them the only Jewish brothers during the Second World War to win the decoration. After the war, Heaps went to Israel and aided their army in the establishment of mobile striking units. Whilst there, he met his wife-to-be, Tamar (1927-). Together they had one son, Adrian, and three daughters, Karen, Gillian, and Wendy.
During the Hungarian Revolution he led a special rescue team to bring refugees out and across the border. In the mid-1960s he returned to Britain where he dabbled in various entrepreneurial projects as well as writing several books, notably "The Grey Goose of Arnhem", telling his own story of Arnhem, the aftermath of the battle, and also the stories of other Arnhem evaders and their dealings with the Resistance.
Leo Heaps spent most of his life in Toronto, Canada, and was amongst the forty Canadian veterans who returned to Arnhem in 1994 to mark the 50th anniversary. He died in 1995.
Subjects
Concentration camps
World War, 1939-1945
Zionism
Name Access
Heaps, Leo, 1923-1995
Heaps, David
Heaps, A. A.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-3
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
15 cm of textual records
ca. 100 photographs
Date
1938-2006
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the Max and Anne Tanenbaum and Wolf families. Included are photographs of family, trips and missions to Israel, the establishment of the John Bassett Sports Centre in Israel and other events; certificates; documents related to Anne and Max's philanthropic work and giving to the Baycrest Centre, the University of Toronto, CHAT and the United Jewish Appeal; newsclippings; and photographs and an invitation documenting the honourary doctorate degree bestowed on Anne Tanenebaum by the Ben Gurion University of the Negev.
Administrative History
Max (1909-1983) and Anne (1909-2009) Tanenbaum were notable philanthropists in Toronto, best known for their support of the Jewish community in the areas of medicine and education.
Max Tanenbaum was born in Poland to Abraham and Chippa Sura Tanenbaum in 1909. He immigrated to Canada with his mother and brother, Joseph, in 1914, three years after his father's arrival in 1911. Max began work in the family steel business at the age of 13 and later went on to found his own steel company; York Steel. Max had two additional siblings, sisters Sarah (m. Sam Kates) and Esther (m. Simon Gottlieb).
Anne Tanenbaum was born in New York in 1909 to Herman and Minnie Wolf. Anne had three siblings: Molly (m. ? Raphael), Dorothy (m. Max Roher) and Jack (m. Ann Korolnek). At the age of 10, Anne's mother passed away and her father remarried. Her father and step-mother had three additional children: Bill (m. Sylvia), Noah (m. Marilyn), and Esther (m. Carmen). The family moved from New York to Montreal and then to Toronto.
Max and Anne met in Toronto and married in 1930. Together they had seven children: Harold, Joey (m. Toby), Howard (m. Carol), Larry (m. Judy), Tauba (m. Sol Spiro), Minda (m. Les Feldman), and Carol.
Descriptive Notes
Anne's stepmother was affectionately referred to by the Tanenbaum grandchildren as "Bubbie from Palestine."
Subjects
Jewish families
Photography of families
Philanthropy and fundraising
Name Access
Tanenbaum, Max, 1909-1983
Tanenbaum, Anne, 1909-2009
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-2
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 100 photographs
1 folder of textual records
Date
1920-1980
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of the Hersch family, a screenplay by Phillip Hersch, school certificates from Landsdowne School, Canadian naturalization certificates, thank you notes, a New Year's greeting card, and a Polish passport. Included are photographs of weddings, Europe vacations, class photos, houses in Toronto, bar mitzvah, Niagara falls, Channukah, Farms, studio sets, the beach, and snow scenes
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Norman Hersch until his death in the mid-1980s, at which point the donor took possession of the records and stored them until donating them to the OJA in March 2015.
Administrative History
Norman Hersch was a special effects technician for the CBC from the early 1950s until his retirement in the mid-1980s. He was married to a French woman from Western Canada named Margaret. He is buried in the Mount Albert area with his wife. He served in the Canadian military during the Second World War and graduated from Central Technical School upon his return. In later years, he started P & M Display in Yorkville. Norman's older brother Phillip was a screenwriter in Toronto. He wrote the CBC series Wojek. Their mother Lily (Polish) volunteered at Mount Sinai Hospital. Their father Alexander (Romanian) worked in stainless steel manufacturing. They lived around Cecil Street. Doug Wardle was a friend and colleague of Hersch's at CBC in the Special Effects Department.
Subjects
Art and popular culture
Bar mitzvah
Immigrants--Canada
Jewish families
Name Access
Hersch, Norman
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
7 photographs : b&w ; 23 x 36 cm or smaller
Date
1928-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the life and cantorial career of Rev. Alexander Steinberg, and to a lesser extent his son, Ben Steinberg. Included are photographs of Cantor Steinberg, fellow cantors and the Shaarei Shomayim cheder class; Cantor Steinberg's scrapbook; hand-copied solo and choral music books; correspondence; and materials relaing to Ben Steinberg's cantata Echoes of Children memorializing the children who perished in the Holocaust.
Administrative History
Chazzan Alexander Steinberg was born Eliyahu Steinberg in Zhitomeir, Ukraine in 1893 to Chava and Chaim Steinberg. His father was the owner and operator of a lumber yard and, as a devout Jew, brought his son Eliyahu regularly to the synagogue where he developed a love of chazzanut and, in the then traditional apprenticeship method, studied the skills which would lead him eventually to a lifetime career in the music of the traditional synagogue.
At the age of 15 he emigrated to Winnipeg, Canada and worked in a men's clothing store until he could find employment as a cantor. He began his professional life as a visiting cantor in the 1920s, travelling to smaller communities in Alberta and Saskatchewan, officiating at services for Shabbat, High Holy Days and the Fesitvals, as well as presenting concerts of Hebrew and Yiddish song.
By the 1930s, he officiated regularly at the Atereth Yisrael Synagogue in Winnipeg and appeared as a concert cantor throughout the western Canadian provices (Lethbridge, Regina, Prince Albert, Edenbridge, Melville, Edmonton, Calgary, etc.) as well as Ontario (London, Hamilton, Kitchener, Sarnia, Ottawa, Fort William and Toronto) and as far away as St. Louis, Missouri and Detroit, Michigan.
He was appointed cantor of Atereth Yisrael Congregation of Winnipeg in 1930 and maintained a relationship with that Shul throughout his time in Toronto, visiting regularly to daven and present concerts.
After the death of his first wife, he married Polly Shapiro in 1928, and in 1933 he moved his family including four children (three, Sam, Ida and Laurie from his previous marriage) to Toronto, where for a time he served as cantor at Goel Tzedec Congregation.
In Toronto, Cantor Steinberg became renowned for his beautiful tenor voice and his knowledge of the liturgy. He was much sought after and officiated througout the Toronto area in synagogues such as the Hebrew Men of England, Ostrovtzer, Beth Jacob, Kiever, Goel Tzedec, Palmerston, Anshei Minsk and Lubavitcher. All this activity brought him to the attention of various synagogues in the United States as well and he travelled to Detroit and Rochester on several occasions.
In 1941, he was appointed Cantor at Shaarei Shomayim on St. Clair Ave., a congreation he served until 1950. He continued to serve outlying congregations in Hamilton, London and Sarnia until he was invited in 1953 to establish the King David Congregation in Toronto, to serve the unaffiliated during the High Holy Days. His cantorial career came to an end in April 1960 when he experienced a heart attach in London, Ontario while leading that community's Pesach service. He died at home in Toronto two days before Yom Kippur in 1960.
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Benjamin Steinberg is a composer, conductor, organist, and teacher. He was born in Winnipeg on 22 January 1930 and received his Bachelor of Music from the University of Toronto in 1961. He and his wife Mildred have two children.
A soloist at age 8 in the synagogue choir conducted by his father, Cantor Alexander Steinberg, he began conducting choirs himself at age 12. At the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto from 1948-1951 and 1957-1960 he studied composition with John Weinzweig, piano with Samuel Dolin, and voice with Weldon Kilburn. After teaching from 1953-1958 in public schools in the Toronto area and studying music education at the University of Toronto, he served from 1961-1964 as head of the music department at Winston Churchill Collegiate Institute and from 1961-1964 and in the same capacity at Forest Hill Collegiate Institute from 1964-1986. He was director of school music (1950-1960) and music director (1960-1969) at Holy Blossom Temple, and in 1970 he became music director at Temple Sinai. His method for youth choirs, "Together Do They Sing" (New York 1961), was commissioned and published by the Union of American Hebrew Congregations.
Steinberg's music includes five sacred services (four published - 1963, 1969, 1969, and 1990 - by Transcontinental Music); works for choir and/or soloist and organ or orchestra (some published by Transcontinental Music and Israeli Music Publications); The Vision of Isaiah (1970) for tenor, choir, and organ or instrumental ensemble; Yerushalayim (1973) for soprano, choir, and orchestra; Echoes of Children (1979), a cantata for soloist, narrator, chorus, and orchestra (which won the International Gabriel Award and has twice been televised on PBS); and instrumental works including a suite for flute and string trio based on Israeli folksongs. Steinberg was invited by the city of Jerusalem to be an artist-in-residence in 1978 and 1980; he received the Kavod (Honour) Award of the Cantor's Assembly in 1983, and that same year received a composer's award from the American Harp Society for his Suite for Flute, Viola and Harp (1981, commissioned by Suzanne Shulman). A number of temples, synagogues, and congregations in the USA commissioned some 18 works from Steinberg between 1980 and 1991. He has also received commissions from Paul Brodie (Suite Sephardi 1980), the Chamber Players of Toronto (Suite for String Orchestra 1983), and Lawrence Cherney (Invocations 1990). Baritone Richard Allen recorded several of Steinberg's works on the cassette A Ben Steinberg Concert. (ca 1989, Transcontinental unnumbered).
Of Steinberg's music Michael Isaacson wrote, 'While conservative, pragmatic and always well-mannered, it is also gratefully mindful of its tradition in a deeply lyrical way' (Journal of Synagogue Music, June 1973). Steinberg has presented Jewish music on the CBC, has published articles on it, and has given many lecture-recitals on it in Australia, Canada, Japan, and the USA. He is a contributor to EMC, a member of the CLComp, and an associate of the Canadian Music Centre.
Descriptive Notes
Biographical Note: Further biographical information on Ben Steinberg is available with the accession record.
Subjects
Cantors (Judaism)
Heder
Religion
Name Access
Steinberg, Alexander, 1893-1960
Steinberg, Ben
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-6
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
5 cm textual records and other material
Date
[ca.1890]-[ca. 1940]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of personal records of Hyman (Ben) Benjamin, and records documenting Arthur Benjamin's miltiary service. Records include ca. 30 photographs of three generations of the Benjamin family, Rosh Hashanah greeting cards, Hyman Benjamin's birth certificate and first aid certificate. Records also include corespondence between several branches of the Canadian government and Arthur's mother, Annie, regarding the circumstances of Arthur's death; his grave site and his army pension.
Custodial History
The records were donated to the Archives by Nancy Rose, daughter of the great-nephew of Hyman (Ben) Benjamin.
Administrative History
Hyman "Ben" Benjamin (ca. 1884-1969) was born in Leeds, England to Lazuras and Annie Benjamin. He married Hilda (Holds) Benjamin, and they immigrated to Canada in 1911. He worked as a car mechanic. They had two daugthers, Laura (b.1911) and Florence (b.1912).
Arthur "Abraham" Benjamin (ca.1882-1917) was Hyman Benjamin's brother. He immigrated to Toronto from Leeds some time after 1911 and worked with Hyman as a car cleaner. He joined the 198th Battalion of the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force in 1916, and was killed in the First World War.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
World War, 1914-1918
Name Access
Benjamin, Arthur, 1882-1917
Benjamin, Hyman, 1884-1969
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
34 photographs (tiff)
Date
[between 1914 and 1916?], 1986-1998
Scope and Content
Accssion consists of photographs documenting the Levine family's immigration to Canada and activities in Saskatchewan and Ontario. Included are images of Mark and Bev during their first few years in Melford, Saskatchewan, family holiday celebrations (Chanukah and Pesach dinners), shabbat dinners, the Edenbridge synagogue, trips to Niagara Falls, and images taken during trips Elfreda and Alec made to Canada from South Africa to visit Mark. Of note are images taken of Mark and Bev with other South African immigrants at a ski hill in Saskatchewan and at shabbat dinners in Melford. Also included is a Sweiden family portrait taken in South Africa in the early 1900s.
Administrative History
Leible and Esther Sweiden moved from Lithuania to Capetown in 1890. Leible's brother, Jacob followed him to Capetown around 1902. In 1906, Jacob and his wife Fanny (nee Vickers) immigrated with a small group of other Jewish South Africans to Edenbridge, Saskatchewan. Leible remained in South Africa. Leible's son Israel married Edith (Eadie) in 1934. Israel and Edith's daughter Elfreda (b. 1936) married Alec Levine in 1958. Elfreda was a bookkeeper for various companies and Alec worked for his family's plumbing business. They had three children together: Mark (b. 1959), Carol (b. 1962), and Adrian ( b. 1966).
Mark Levine married Beverley in 1983. They immigrated to Melford, Saskatchewan in 1986. Mark did not know at the time that his great grandfather's brother had immigrated to a nearby area decades earlier and only learned of his story and the Edenbridge Jewish community soon after arriving there. Mark worked as a physician at a local hospital. Beverley had been a pharmacist in South Africa, however, her qualifications were not recognized in Canada and she focused on raising her family. Mark and Bev's daughter, Romi, was born in August 1987. After 18 months in Melford, they moved to Toronto after Mark found work as a pediatric anesiologist at Sick Kids Hospital. In 1998, thier second daughter, Jade, was born. Mark's parents, Elfreda and Alec, immigrated to Toronto in 1999. Mark and other relatives encouraged them to immigrate due to the increasingly dangerous political situation in South Africa. Mark is also an assoicate professor at the University of Toronto. Alec and Elfreda's daughter Carol lives in England and their son Adrian remains in South Africa.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Levine, Mark
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-7
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
moving images
Physical Description
7.2 m of textual records and other material
Date
1923-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the Alpha Omega Fraternity, Pi Chapter, the Ladies Auxiliary, the AO Alumni Association, the AO Foundation and the AO House Association. Records include meeting minutes and reports, convention programs, general correpondence, newsletters, membership rosters, legal records, programs, photographs, budgets and other financial records, scrapbooks, AORTA yearbooks and efficiency reports detailing the activities of the AO during the year. Of particular note are the meeting minutes of the Mount Sinai Dental Society (1939-1946) and the Toronto Jewish Dental Society (1934-1935). There are also early photographs of John Sherman, one of the original founders of the AO, which were collected for an event in his honour.
Custodial History
The records were housed at the Fraternity House on Willowdale Rd. until its sale and the Fraternity's move to 4600 Bathurst St.
Administrative History
Alpha Omega is an international dental fraternity. It is the oldest international dental organization and was founded in Baltimore, Maryland in 1907 by a group of dental students originally to fight discrimination in dental schools. Today, with headquarters relocated to Glen Rock, NJ, it is primarily an educational and philanthropic organization. There are chapters and members in cities and dental schools in the United States, Canada, South America, Europe, Israel, South Africa and Australia/New Zealand. Alpha Omega represents about 6,000 active dentists worldwide.
The Alpha Omega International Dental Fraternity is dedicated to the following: to be "The Voice of the Jew In Dentistry"; to be "The Voice of Dentistry in all problems concerned with the Jewish Fate"; to uphold "The Image of the Jew in Dentistry"; to fight discrimination in the graduation of dental students from their respective schools, in procedures of licensing boards, in organized dentistry and in the private practice of dentistry.
The objectives of the Fraternity are to promote the profession of dentistry; to establish, foster and develop high standards of Scholarship, Leadership and Character; to inculcate a spirit of fellowship amongst all its members; to create and bind together a body of professional people, who, by scholarly attainments, faithful service and the maintenance of ethical ideals and principles, have achieved distinction; to honour achievement in others; to strive for breadth of vision, unity in action and accomplishment of ideals; to commend all worthy deeds, and if fraternal welfare demands, to call and counsel with its members; to accept, sponsor and develop the cultural and traditional achievements of our faith; to build within our fraternity a triangle, the base of which is Judaism, the supporting sides, professionalism and fraternalism.
The Toronto undergraduate chapter was founded in 1921 at the University of Toronto and the alumni chapter in 1924. The alumni continue to meet regularly and organize a variety of educational, networking, fundraising and social events for its membership.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Physical Description Note: Accession inclucdes scrapbooks, graphic material and a film reel.
Use Conditions Note: Financial materials and executive meeting minutes are closed for 15 years from date of creation. Membership rosters are closed for 50 years from date of creation.
Subjects
Greek letter societies
Occupations
Name Access
Alpha Omega Dental Society (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-5
Material Format
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
6 photographs : b&w and col. ; 9 x 13 cm or smaller
1 photograph (electronic) : b&w
Date
[193-]-[197-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of six photographs and one scanned photograph of architect Benjamin Brown with various members of his extended family. The scanned photograph pictures Meyer Brown, Benjamin's father, with his brother.
Administrative History
Benjamin Brown was one of the first Jewish architects in Toronto. Alice Waldman is the daughter of Brown's sister, Sophie Blackstone.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Architects
Photography of families
Name Access
Brown, Benjamin
Lewis, Alice Waldman
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-7
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
4 photographs : b&w and col. ; 77 x 57 cm or smaller
1 VHS cassette
1 object
Date
1939-1998
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to David and Anna Lang. Included are calendars from their pharmacy, two wedding portraits and VHS transfer of their wedding film from 1946, a photograph of Anna and her daughter Karen, a graduation ring and program book for Anna's graduation from the Ontario College of Pharmacy, and a photograph of the Ontario College of Pharmacy in Detroit, Michigan.
Custodial History
The records were donated by Don Perrier, a family friend. They were entrusted to him by Karen Lang upon her death.
Administrative History
David Lang (9 Jan. 1912-11 Dec. 1984) was the son of Abraham Leon Layefsky and Molly Forman. He had three siblings: Fay, Hyem and Sarah. He married Anna Shaw (ca. 1916-17 Nov. 2002) on 16 June 1946 at the Beth Medrosh Hagodol Chevra Tehillim (McCaul Street Synagogue) in Toronto. David and Anna were both practicing pharmacists and jointly owned Lang's Pharmacy on 745 Pharmacy Ave. Anna gradutated from the Ontario College of Pharmacy in 1939. The couple had one child, Karen Lang.
Subjects
Business
Pharmacists
Photography of families
Occupations
Weddings
Name Access
Layefsky, David
Layefsky, Anna
Lang, David
Lang, Anna
Lang, Karen
Beth Medrosh Hagodol Chevra Tehillim (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-5-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-5-2
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
98 photographs (tiff)
1 folder of textual records
Date
1932-2014, predominant 1947-1978
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the personal and professional activities of Percy Skuy. Photographs include: family portraits, school photographs, images of Percy as an apprentice pharmacist, images of Habonim camp in Vryheid, images of Frances as a child in Sudbury, images of Percy and Frances's honeymoon, images of Percy with his family in Toronto, images of trips back to South Africa, photos from the cottage, images of Percy receiving awards, and street scenes of Kensington Market (1978).
Also included is Percy's memoir entitled "My Story Unfolds", articles written by Percy for the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada, and a book wrtiien by Percy entitled "Tales of Contraception."
Administrative History
Percy Skuy was born in Vryheid, South Africa on February 17, 1932 to Benjamin and Chana (nee Cilevitz) Skuy. Percy is the middle of three children. His siblings are Max (b. 1929) and Rita (b. 1942). At seventeen, Percy began his apprenticeship and education to be a pharmacist. After qualifying as a pharmacist in 1954, he worked for a year at a pharmacy near Johannesburg before starting his travels through Europe, Australia and the United States. He had planned to return to South Africa, however, he did not have enough money for the fare back. Although he did not originally intend to visit Canada, he headed to Toronto to find a job so he could earn money for the passage home. He eventually secured a job with Glaxo Pharmaceuticals as a Medical Sales Representative and decided to stay. In 1959 he completed his requirements to become a liscenced pharmacist in Ontario and was the first South African pharmacist registered in Ontario.
Percy met Frances Goodman in 1960 on a blind date and they married that same year. Frances was a nurse from Sudbury. They had two children together: Beth (b. 1961) and David (b. 1963).
In 1961, Percy began his 34-year long career with the Johnson and Johnson Corporation. He had a variety of roles within the company and was President for 22-years with two Johnson & Johnson affiliate companies, namely Ortho Pharmaceutical (Canada) Ltd and Ortho-McNeil Inc. Percy is also the founder of the only museum devoted exclusively to the history of contraception located at the Dittrick Medical History Centre in Cleveland, Ohio.
Throughout his career, Percy has been appointed to a number of government and research councils including: the Premier's Council of Ontario, the Federal National Advisory Council on Pharmaceutical Research, and the Board of Governors of the Riverdale Hospital. In September 1995, Percy was inducted as a Candian Pioneer in Family Planning. He has also been an active member of the Rokeah Chapter of the Rho Pi Phi fraternity.
in 1977, Frances passed away. Percy eventually re-married to Elsa Ruth Snider on December 16, 1979.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Skuy, Percy, 1932-
Places
Vryheid, South Africa
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-2
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
39 photographs (tiff)
Date
1923, [1950?]-[2011?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting Martin Charney and his family. Included are portraits of Martin as a child and young man, wedding photographs of Martin's grandparents in Johannesburg (1923), images of Martin's bar mitzvah and weddings, photographs of Matin's family in London en route to Montreal, images of Martin and his family in Montreal, images of Camp Timberlands (New York), images of the Anglo-African Glass Company, images of Martin with his family in South Africa and images of Martin's family at weddings and bar mitzvah's in Toronto. Of note is an image from the dedication of Chabad Lubavitch in Thornill (2011). Identified in the images are: Martin Charney, Jack Frenkel, Doris Levinstein, Max Charney, Leah Charney, Candy Charney, Rabbi Gansberg, and Norman Charney.
Administrative History
Martin was born in Johannesburg in 1947 to Max and Joan Lena (nee Frenkel) Charney. He has a younger brother, Norman. Max owned a glass manufacturing business called Anglo-African Glass. In 1963, the family left South Africa and immigrated to Montreal, Canada. They left South Africa because Max anticipated a future of political uncertainty. The family remained in Montreal for 7 years, before returning to South Africa in 1970. During this time, Martin graduated from high school and attended Sir George Williams University (now Concordia) where he studied for a 4 year Bachelor of Commerce Degree. Max built three office buildings in Sherbrooke, Kingston and Valleyfield and had six One Hour Martinizing laudromats. Joan was a Home Maker - never having done domestic work before.
Soon after returning to South Africa in 1970, Martin married Yaffa (nee Franco). They had one daughter, Candyce Jasmine. They divorced in 1980. In 1982 Martin married his second wife, Basia (nee Sztrom). They had four children together: Candy, Leah, Avi Jack and Mirelle Feiga. All 5 children were born in Johannesburg. Martin worked as a real estate broker in South Africa and as a finance resource consultant concentrating on factoring accounts receivable in Toronto.
Due to the worsening violence in South Africa, Martin immigrated to Thornhill with his family in 1999. Martin and Basia divorced soon after immigrating here and Martin eventually re-married to a Canadian Judy Rosenberg. Martin continued in the same line of work once he arrived in Canada, however, he had to build his business back up again from scratch. Martin volunteers with a variety of organizations, including: Circle of Care, Tomchei Shabbos, HOD (Hebrew Order of David - Lodge Ramon) and Benjamin's Park memorial Chapel. He is a member of Chabad Lubavitch at 770 Chabad Gate in Thornhill.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Charney, Martin, 1947-
Places
Johannesburg, South Africa
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-12
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
2.1 m of textual records and graphic material
Date
1904-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the precursor synagogues of Congregation Or Shalom: B'nai Israel and B'nai Moses ben Judah. Records include committee records, board meeting minutes, flyers and invitations, newsletters and bulletins, by-laws, sisterhood records, men's club records, photographs, Board of Education minutes, records related to the London Talmud Torah, minute books of the Daughters of Israel, correspondence, financial records and scrapbooks. There is also a small amount of material related to the National Council of Jewish Women, London Chapter and the London Jewish Community Council and Federation.
Custodial History
Records were donated to the OJA by Congregation Or Shalom, who has an archival repository at the synagogue under the guidance of Dr. Jack Rosen.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
B'nai Israel Synagogue, (London, Ont.)
B'nai Moses ben Judah (London, Ont.)
Congregation Or Shalom (London, Ont.)
Rosen, Jack
Places
London, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-13
Material Format
moving images (electronic)
Physical Description
1 moving image (18 min., 53 sec.) : si., b&w ; mp4
Date
15 July 1930
Scope and Content
Accession consists of footage of the wedding of Lyla Rotenberg to Lou Rasminsky in Forest Hill at Lyla’s home at 181 Warren Road. Included is footage of a procession of the married couple and their guests just after the wedding ceremony, guests having lunch in the garden, wedding toasts, the cutting of the cake, and the couple leaving for their honeymoon. Identified in the footage is: Lou Rasminsky, Lyla Rasminsky, Meta Rotenberg, Lil Salamon, Moe Salamon, Alec Rasminsky, Ken Rotenberg, Arthur Rotenberg, and Phyllis Greisman.
Custodial History
The video was in the possession of Michael Rasminsky, the son of Lyla and Lou. This file was created off of a VHS copy of the wedding film. The donor is not sure where the original film reels are.
Administrative History
Lyla Rotenberg and Lou Rasminsky were sweethearts at the University of Toronto. Lyla’s father, Harry Rotenberg, was a prosperous builder and developer. Lou’s father, David Rasminsky, a small business man. After graduation Lou spent two years at the London School of Economics and returned to Toronto to marry Lyla on July 15, 1930. They were both 22 years old. They went immediately to Geneva where Lou had his first job at the League of Nations. They remained in Geneva until 1939 when they returned to Ottawa and Lou’s initial appointment at the Bank of Canada where he ultimately became Governor in 1961.
Subjects
Weddings
Name Access
Rasminsky, Lyla
Rasminsky, Lou
Rasminsky, Michael
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-9
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w (tif)
Date
[193-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one digital photograph of a group of men inside Shaw Street Synagogue in the early 1930s. Identified in the image are: Avraham Calstein (far right) and Harry Weinstein (2nd from the left).
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
Shaw Street Synagogue
Calstein, Avraham
Weinstein, Harry
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-18
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-18
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
85 cm of textual records
184 photographs : b&w and col. (tif and jpg)
ca. 200 photographs : b&w and col.
14 moving images : mov and mp4
Date
[192-]-2015, predominant 1983-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the records related to the activities and operations of the First Narayever Congregation. Included are board and general meeting minutes (1984-1996); general correspondence, high holiday tickets and membership lists (1970s-1990s); membership and dues ledger (1929-1983); Ritual Committee meeting minutes (1984-1988); Implementation Committee records (1970s-1980s); constitutions (1980s); newsletters (1983-2004); a blank seat deed (1920s); a cemetery map (1950s?); records regarding burial rights for the Owen Sound Hebrew Congregation (1966-1980); records regarding a court case filed by members of the congregation surrounding the egalitarian changes being planned; an album documenting SHTICK! A Celebration of Jewish Playrights (2005-2006); an album documenting the congregation's participation in a UJA Mission to Israel (2003-2004); a binder of material containing photocopied and original records in support of the research for the congregation's 100th anniversary celebrations (1970s-2014); photographs and a video recording of the 100th Anniversary exhbition opening at the Miles Nadal JCC; photographs of events hosted by the congregation; and 9 video interviews with individuals connected to the shul conducted by Sharoni Siboney for the anniversary celebrations. Interviewees are: Peter Gold, Sharon Weintraub, Murray Teitel, Rosalyn Katz, Julia Gluck, Shaya Petroff, Stuart Schoenfeld, Sylvia Solomon and Ben Rothman. Also included are family photographs and written transcripts of oral interviews conducted with members of the Hersh Petersiel family, who lived in Hastings, Ontario and had early connections to the Narayever Congregation.
Custodial History
The records related to Hersh Petersiel were given to the First Narayever by Marsha Beck for their upcoming 100th anniversary. Marsha agreed to donate them to the OJA along with the Narayever records.
Subjects
Synagogues
Religion
Name Access
First Narayever Congregation (Toronto, Ont.)
Petersiel, Hersh
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Hastings, Ont.
Owen Sound, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-7
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 70 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1928-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the activities of Ben Zion Shapiro and his family. The bulk of the records document the Shapiro family's involvement in Young Judea. Young Judea material includes: yearbooks, photographs, correspondence, meeting minutes, event programmes, song books, newsletters, and two Camp Biluim flags made by Bunny Shapiro. One flag contains Camp Biluim's crest (1951) and the other one was created for Camp Biluim's colour war and contains the text "We will try and we will succeed Camp Biluim" (1954?). Also included is a VHS tape containing a copy of the Toronto Zionist Council's video about Camp Shalom (1991?). Of note are minute books maintained by Roy Shapiro for the Toronto Young Judea Administrative Board (1928-1934) and for the Leadership Club (1940-1948).
Accession also contains material relating to Roy and Ben Zion's involvement with the following organizations: the Coordinated Services to the Jewish Elderly (Circle of Care), B'nai Israel Beth David Congregation, Beth Tzedec's Mispacha Program, Beth Tzedec's Israel Action Program, Congregation Beth Haminyan, and Holy Blossom Temple's Department for Jewish Living. These records include, minutes, correspondence, newsletters and publications, evaluation reports and other reports. Also included is a demographic report entitied, "Rapid Growth and Transformation: Demographic Challenges Facing the Jewish Community of Greater Toronto" (1995), material from a conference at the University of Toronto on the university's partnership with Israel, CHAT alumni directories, and a CHAT book entitled, "Voices: Jewish Teens of the 90's". Of note are buttons, photographs, reports and correspondence documenting Bunny and Ben Zion's trip to the Soviet Union on behalf of the CJC's Committee for Soviet Jewry.
Finally accession includes material documenting family activities of the Shapiro and Sherman family. Included is a transcript of Bessie Sherman telling her life story (1978), haggadot, PowerPoint presentations created by Ben Zion for his grandchildren and for a family reunion outlining the family history of his family and Bunny's family. There is also a video of Ben Zion presenting his PowerPoint at the Michalski / Cohen family reunion. Also included are family films and videos containing footage of Bunny and Ben Zion's wedding and honeymoon, Camp Biluim, Young Judea events, Bunny on Machon, family wedding anniversaries and birthday parties, trips to Israel, the United States, and Europe as well as footage of the Cousin's Club. Also included is a VHS tape containing a recorded segment from CityPulse News featuring the family's Pesach festivities in 1995.
Photo identification: Back row, left to right: Ray Markus, Michelle Landsberg, Menachem ?, Frank Narrol. Front row, left to right: Gilda Mitchell, Bunny Shapiro, BenZion Shapiro, Malka Rabinowitz.
Administrative History
Ben Zion Shapiro was born in Toronto in 1931 to Roy and Beck (nee Cohen) Shapiro. He has a younger brother, Morden (Mort) Shapiro (b. 1940). His father worked as an office manager at Rotstein Furniture and Maple Leaf Cleaners and his mother worked as a legal secretary until marriage. Roy was active in a number of organizations including: Young Judea, Sons of Jacob Society, Toronto Camera Club, a founding member of Beth David Synagogue, Coordinated Services to the Jewish Elderly (Circle of Care) and President of the Association of Jewish Seniors. Beck was active in Young Judea and Pioneer Women (President of the Golda Meir Club).
Ben Zion received a Master of Social Work from the University of Toronto and attended the Jewish Agency Institute for Youth Leaders from Abroad in Jerusalem, Israel (1951-1952). He has worked for a number of organizations throughout his career, including: Young Judea (he was Director of both Camp Shalom (1962-1969) and Camp Biluim (1954-1956)), B'nai Brith Youth Organization, University Settlement, St. Christopher's House and Director of the Novomeysky Centre in Jerusalem (1957-1961). He was also Professor and Associate Dean of Social Work at the University of Toronto and three times Visiting Professor at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.
Ben married Bunny (Bernice) Shaprio in 1955. Bunny was born in 1934 in Noranda, Quebec to Irving and Bessie (nee Consky) Sherman. Bunny attended public school in Noranda, Noranda High School and Forest Hill Collegiate in Toronto, University of Toronto (BA), the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (M.Ed. in Special Education), and the Jewish Agency Institute for Jewish Leaders from Abroad (1952-1953).
Bunny graduated from the first Camp Biluim Institute for leadership training in 1951 and worked with Ben Zion at Camp Shalom as Camp Mother in 1962 and from 1964-1969. She also worked at Camp Biluim from 1955-1956. In 1983, Bunny and Ben Zion went to the Soviet Union to visit Refuseniks on behalf of the Soviet Jewry Committee of the Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region.
Bunny and Ben have two children: Ayala and Ilan. Since Ben Zion's retirement in 1996, he and Bunny have been living in Jerusalem for half of each year. In 2015, they moved full-time to Jerusalem.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes ca. 300 photographs (256 tiff), 2 PowerPoint presentations, 1 textual record (doc), 4 buttons, 2 flags, 5 VHS tapes, and 18 film reels (8 mm).
Subjects
Jewish camps
Jewish youth
Zionism
Name Access
Shapiro, Ben Zion, 1931-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-14
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-14
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 300 photographs
ca. 10 cm of textual records
1 ledger
Date
[ca. 1910]-[ca. 1969]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the activities of the Rotenberg family and Hertzel Rotenberg. The Rotenberg family material includes family photographs, documents pertaining to the will and estate of Rivka and Louis Rotenberg, income tax papers for Max and Sarah Rotenberg, and an invitation to a dance in honour of Leila Rotenberg. Also included are records relating to the family business, L. Rotenberg and Sons Ltd. This includes an indenture (1916) and a ledger relating to mortgage loans given out by the business.
The bulk of the Hertzel Rotenberg material are photographs. Included are family portraits, school photos, a hockey team photo, images of the Toronto Ski Club at Haileybury, portraits of Hertzel, summer camp photos from various camps (Camp Winnebago, Camp Hiawatha, and Camp Wabi-kon Timagami), Pi Lambda Phi fraternity group photos, images likely taken at the family cottage, military portraits of Hertzel and images of him at Grossingers and attendending other events with family and friends. Also included is correspondence, newspaper clippings, Hertzel's report cards and immigration papers for the United States, and certificates.
Identified in the photographs are: Louis Rotenberg, Rivka Rotenberg, Max Rotenberg, Sara Rotenberg, Marc Rotenberg, Cyril Rotenberg, Hertzel Rotenberg, Anne Rotenberg, Risa Rotenberg Sam Factor, and Murray Koffler.
Custodial History
Material was in the possession of Risa and Anne Rotenberg. Some of the material was inherited by Risa and Anne from their parents. The Hertzel Rotenberg material was inherited directly by Risa after Hertzel's death. She was the executor of his estate and found the material while cleaning out his home.
Administrative History
Louis (Elazar / Loozer) Rotenberg immigrated to Toronto in 1893. He was the first Jew to immigrate to Toronto from Ivansk, Poland. He had married Rivka (nee Cukier) in 1883. She followed him to Toronto with their four children in 1895. They had an additional five children in Toronto. Their children were: Harry, Max, Meta, Louis (Leibish), Meyer, Zechariah (died at age 4 in 1906), Charlie, and Hilda. Louis eventually opened a banking, steamship and insurance office in Toronto with three of his sons (Louis Jr., Harry and Max) in 1916. The business eventually became known as Rotenberg's Ltd. Louis passed away in 1936.
Hertzel Rotenberg was born in Toronto to Max and Sara (nee Lavine) Rotenberg on July 27, 1923. He had two brothers: Marcus (b. 30 May 1925) and Cyril (b. 9 Mar. 1920). Hertzel studied medicine at the University of Toronto and served in the Canadian army's medical corps during the Second World War. After the war, he practiced medicine in the United States and joined the US army. He eventually worked as an ear, nose and throat doctor in Buffalo. In the 1970s he married Cecylia. He passed away in Florida in 2011.
Name Access
Rotenberg, Louis
Rotenberg, Hertzel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-10
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1930-1989
Scope and Content
Accession consists of various lettters, one in Polish and others in Hebrew and Yiddish. One of the letters appears to have been addressed to Rabbi Shemen's mother (Gitl), although undated, it appears to be from the late 1920s or early 1930s. A letter in Yiddish is addressed to the Boimoil family of Chodel, Poland. Boimol was the original last name of Rabbi Shemen.
Custodial History
It appears that the documents came directly from Rabbi Nachman Shemen
Administrative History
Rabbi Shemen was a Rabbinic scholar, author and Jewish civil servant. He held the following positions: Executive secretary of the Canadian Federation of Polish jews (1940-1993), Director of Orthodox Division of CJC, Ontario (1950-1992). Rabbi Shemen died in 1993.
Subjects
Jewish families
Letters
Rabbis
Name Access
Shemen, Nachman
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 8 cm of textual records and other material
Date
[ca. 1938]-[ca. 2009]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Silberg family's immigration to Ontario, family life in South Africa and Ontario, education, communal involvement in Hamilton, and pharmacy businesses. Included are photographs, correspondence, ephemera from the pharmacy businesses (such as bags and a name tag), newspaper clippings, certificates, invitations, flyers, school transcripts, architectural drawings for Night-Day Pharmacy on Ryman Road East, cookbooks, and photo albums. Also included is a JNF book for a Negev dinner honouring Hilton and Shirley Silberg as well a copy of Beth Jacob Synagogue's 125th anniversary book (the Beth Jacob Family Album).
Administrative History
Hilton Silberg was born in Durban, South Africa in 1951 to Sam and Brina Silberg. Sam worked in the retail furniture business and Hilton has three siblings: Sheryl, Lynn and Brett. Hilton was very active in sports and played soccer, cricket and swimming. At age 11, he started competing in ballroom dancing with his sister Lynn. At age 16, he and Lynn were the South African Juvenile Ballroom Champions and runners up in the Latin American Championship. In highschool, Hilton started his own DJ business which he continued through his first years of pharmacy school.
Shirley (nee Gitlin) Silberg was born in Durban in 1951 to Max and Isabel Gitlin. Max was a physical medicine specialist and Isabel ran his practice. Shirley has two siblings: Brian and Barbara. Shirley was very active in her school's netball, field hockey and swimming teams.
Hilton and Shirley met at the Natal Pharmacy School in Durban and married in 1974. After marriage, Hilton completed his one-year mandatory service in the South African army as an officer. After his service, he and Shirley went on a ten month long backpacking trip which ended at the 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal. This trip was an eye-opener for them and they realized that they no longer wanted to live in a country with apartaid politics. They didn't want to raise children in South Africa. They chose Canada as their destination and applied three times for entry. Thier application was rejected all three times, but Hilton staged a "sit-in" at the Canadian embassy in Pretoria and an immigration officer eventually met with him and overturned thier rejection. They arrived in Canada in August 1977.
They went to the University of Toronto School of Pharmacy for two years to re-license in Canada. In the evenings they worked in a pharmacy owned by their Canadian sponsor. In 1981, Hilton and Shirley partnered with their Canadian sponsors and opened the Amhurst Pharmacy in Dundas. In 1982 the pharmacy's name was changed to Hilton's Pharmacy. In 1987 Shopper's Drug Mart purchased Hilton's Pharmacy. The Silberg's stayed on to operate two of the franchises in Dundas. In 1992, Hilton and Shirley left Shppers Drug Mart to open the DayNight Pharmacy on the east Hamilton Mountain. This was the first pharmacy in Hamilton to remain open until midnight. Their pharmacy eventually expanded to include five stores. In 2007, they sold their business to Rexall Pharma Plus.
Hilton and Shirley have three children: Mark, Maxine and Brad. Hilton and Shirley were very active in Hamilton's community. Hilton was involved in a variety of organizations including, Beth Jacob synagogue, Shalom Village, and Jewish National Fund Hamilton. Shirley has volunteered with various Hamilton JCC programs, the Hamilton North End Breakfast Program, the 'Out of the Cold' Program, Goldie's Place day program for adults at Shalom Village, and the Jewish National Fund Hamilton.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes ca. 80 photographs, 4 cookbooks, 1 architectural drawing, 3 bags, and 1 name tag.
Related material note: oral history #419.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Jewish families
Occupations
Societies
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Silberg, Hilton
Silberg, Shirley
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-4
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 250 photographs (3 albums) : b&w and col. ; 53 x 43 cm and smaller
9 cm of textual records
Date
(191-)-(197-), 1992
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the Title, Samuels and Fishman families. Included are family photographs, and photos related to involvement with philanathropy and industry, materials related to Reliable Toy Company, Forest Hill Collegiate "Forester" year books, a land deed for the Ansheir Yoisher Misrachi Synagogue in Welland, news clippings relating to Alex Samuels death, a Holy Blossom "Tempelite" year book, a Crown Bakery Bread promotional item, a wedding menu from the marriage of Molly Fishman and Harry Title, Molly Fishman's high school diplomas and JNF certificates. There are a number of photos of the Fishman and Title families in Welland and the United States, photos of the Crowland Volunteer Fire Department with Sam and Frank Fishman, Turk family albums with Moishe Turk and Yeva Fishman, an album of a sefer torah dedication to Baycrest Hospital in memory of Leah Fishman, photos of the Samuels family, their trip to Israel, promotional photos from the Reliable Toy Company, Beth Tzedec founding board photos, and B'nai Brith Women photos.
Administrative History
Samuel (ca. 1882-1929, Russia) and Gussie (nee Moscovitz) (b. ca.1884, Romania) Fishman, immigrated to Welland Ontario from Romania. Both arrived to the USA as teenagers sometime around the turn of the century. Samuel and Gussie were married in the USA and by 1920 immigrated with their young family to the historic township of Crowland in Welland County. Here they opened and operated a men's clothing store. Together they had six children, Molly (b. 1909, USA), Abe (b. 1911, USA), Morris (b. 1916, USA), Ruth (b. 1915, USA), Ann (b. 1920, Ontario) and Ethel. Morris married Pauline and lived in St. Catherines, Ruth married Nate Oelbaum and lived in Tucson Arizona, Anne married Alec Rothman and lived in Port Colborne, Ethel married Eddie Matchtinger and lived in Toronto and Abe never married. Yeva Fishman, the niece of Samuel Fishman married Morris Turk. Her father was (Frank Fishman?) and her mother was Sara Leah Fishman. Molly Fishman married Harry Title (Teitelebaum) (b. ca. 1903). They had three children, Greta (nee Title) Greisman, Sandra (nee Title) Samuels and Stephen (m. Carole Hillman, niece of Ben Hillman). Harry Teitelbaum is the son of Israel and Frumeth Teitelbaum. He was born in Gdansk Poland (b. ca., 1903). Harry Title had four younger siblings Lloyd, Birdie (m. Witlin), Arthur and Lorelle (Lieba) the youngest who was born in Toronto. Harry arrived to Canada shortly after the first world war and worked in the garment industry. He and his brother Arthur founded the Title Dress Company in the late 1920s and operated the business out of 355 Adelaide St. West. In the late 1980s, the business moved from this location to Adelaide and Bathurst. Sandra Title (b. Oct 27, 1936, Toronto), the middle daughter of Molly Fishman and Harry Title, married Lawrence Samuels. Together they had five children Joanna, John, Noah, Tom and Caroline. Lawrence was the eldest son of Alex Samuels (d. 1966) and Kate (nee Goldberg) Samuels. He had two younger siblings Herbie and Florence (m. Bill Goodman). Lawrence's father Alex Samuels immigrated to Canada from Dubrovna, White Russia (present day Dubrouna, Belarus). He immigrated to Canada with his parents Samuel and Chana Samuels and his younger siblings Sol, Ben, Riva and Polly. Alex and his brothers Sol and Ben established Reliable Toy Company in (ca. 1929) on Carlaw Ave. They sold the company in 1990.
Subjects
Art and popular culture
Business
Charities
Jewish families
Places
Welland, Ont.
Toronto, Ont.
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-6
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
2 photos (jpgs)
Date
1922, 1955
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 2 electronic copy photographs. One is of a group of 4 men, sitting at a desk smoking cigars. Behind them stands a manikin of a woman wearing a dress. Identified from left to right: Bill Rosenberg (son of Morris), Morris Rosenberg, Hyman Rossman, and Sam Gross. All men owned garment businesses in the Balfour building including Klever Klad, Queen City Dress, and Normandie Frocks. These were the brothers-in-law of Penny's father David Rubinoff.
The second photograph is a class photo from Orde Street School (ca. 1922), Toronto. Penny's mother Rachel Rosenberg is on the far left, second row from the bottom.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Occupations
Fashion and clothing
Education
Name Access
Rubinoff, Penny
Places
Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-7
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
6 photographs : b&w and col. ; 13 x 18 cm or smaller
Date
[ca.1930]-[ca.1945], [197-]-[2015]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records pertaining to the military service of twin brothers Julius (Jack) Spiegel and Louis (Lou/Syd) S. J. Spiegel. Included are photographs of the young Spiegel brothers with their cousins in front of Central High School of Commerce, Dewson St., ca. 1930, original snapshots and portraits of Lou Spiegel in uniform during the 1940s, a hand drawn Easter greeting card signed by Lou Spiegel, and newspaper clippings concerning Lou's role as an aerial photographer for the U.S. Marine Corps unit and his return home to Toronto. There are wartime photocopies of photos including a portrait of Jack Spiegel in uniform, an image of Jack with his crew in front of military aircraft, and a modern day photo of Lou visiting Jack's grave in Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery in Holland. Textual copies include, an annotated photocopy of Veteran Affairs Canada website listing of Jack Spiegel, including information on his burial location and his listing in the Second World War Book of Remembrance. There is a photocopy of Jack's obituary from the Canadian Jewish Congress Book Canadian Jews in World War II, Part II: Casualties, p. 75, and a copy of a letter from the Royal Canadian Air Force addressed to Jack's mother Mrs. Israel Spiegel, notifying her of her son's death. In addition, there is one colour photograph (197?) of promotional municipal campaign street signs for North York City Councillor and Controller, Irving Paisley.
Administrative History
Julius (Jack) Spiegel (1921-1944, Toronto), and Louis (Lou) Spiegel (1921-1999), are twin brothers born in Toronto on March 26, 1921. Their parents Israel Spiegel (b. 1878) and Eva (née Gelbwachs) Spiegel (b. 1880) of 430 Euclid St. Toronto, immigrated from Austria to Canada in 1894 and 1906 respectively.
According to the 1921 Canada census, Israel and Eva had 8 children; Nat Spiegel (b. 1903, U.S.A.), Morse Spiegel (b. 1906), Gertrude Spiegel (b. 1909), Beatrice Spiegel (b. 1911), Sydney Spiegel (b. 1915), Mildred Spiegel (b. 1917), and twin brothers Julius and Louis S. Spiegel (b. 1921).
Both Jack and his twin brother Lou, attended Central High School of Commerce. Jack enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1941 and trained as a wireless air gunner. He went overseas in May 1944 and successfully completed 10 military missions with his unit. Eyewitnesses reported to Lou that Jack parachuted out of his Lancaster Bomber that was shot down over the Rhineland battlefields in Germany . Originally buried by the Dutch Resistance, Jack was later moved to Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery, Holland. His date of death was confirmed as October 28, 1944. According to his death certificate, the location of his death was Belgium, that he was married at the time of death and resided at 238 Beatrice St. Jack's brothers Sydney and Murray Spiegel, also served in the military during the Second World War. Sydney with the Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps (administrative corps) and Murray with the U.S. Army Medical Department in Kansas.
Louis (Lou) Spiegel (1921-1999, Toronto) served during the Second World War for the Royal Canadian Air Force and the U.S. Marine Corps as an aerial photographer. He later studied at U of T earning a bachelor's degree and transferred to USC (California) earning a master's degree in English and communications. He served as campaign director for the United Welfare Fund in 1954 and worked various jobs throughout his career as an educator in American Community Colleges. He was director of Unarius after Ruth Norman died and was awarded by the same institution with a doctor of psychic therapeutic science degree.
Irving Paisley (1919-2006) married to Adele Paisley, had a 30 year long career in municipal politics in the city of North York holding positions as Councillor, Controller, and Deputy Mayor. He spearheaded the building of York Finch Hospital and served as its founding Chairman. He was also a founding member of Temple Sinai, and founded Paisley Manor Insurance. Paisley’s accomplishments were recognized by the Federal Government and he earned the Centennial Medal for Service to the Nation in 1967.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Spiegel, Jack, 1921-1944
Spiegel, Lou, 1921-1999
Paisley, Adele
Paisley, Irving 1919-2006
Places
Toronto
Holland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-10
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
19 photographs : b&w and col. ; 31 x 41 cm and smaller
Date
1916-2007
Scope and Content
Accession consists of family photographs from Penny Rubinoff's mother Rachel (née Rosenberg) Rubinoff and her Aunt Anne (née Rosenberg) Glickman. Textual records include a promotional poster and flyer from Hadassah's 1967 membership campain in which Penny Rubinoff appeared as a model. In addition, there is a 2007 issue of Orah magazine, Hadassah's annual magazine showcasing the oriingal promotional poster form the 1967 campaign on page 17.
Custodial History
Penny's mother Rachel, received 12 photographs in this accession from her sister Anne.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Jewish families
Photography of families
Name Access
Rubinoff, Penny
B'nai Israel Synagogue (London, Ont.)
Places
London, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-13
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
8 photographs : b&w ; 41 x 51 cm and smaller
1 object
1 book
Date
[193-]-1976
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of Sandra (née Title) Samuels; a hanger from Shiffer-Hillman and a published book "The Prominent Jews of Canada" that belonged to Sandra's in-laws, Kate and Alex Samuels.
Administrative History
Samuel (ca. 1882-1929, Russia) and Gussie (nee Moscovitz) (b. ca.1884, Romania) Fishman, immigrated to Welland, Ontario from Romania. Both arrived in the United States as teenagers sometime around the turn of the century. Samuel and Gussie were married in the United States and by 1920 had immigrated with their young family to the historic township of Crowland in Welland County. Here they opened and operated a men's clothing store. Together they had six children; Molly (b. 1909, USA), Abe (b. 1911, USA), Morris (b. 1916, USA), Ruth (b. 1915, USA), Ann (b. 1920, Ontario) and Ethel. Morris married Pauline and lived in St. Catherines, Ruth married Nate Oelbaum and lived in Tucson, Arizona, Anne married Alec Rothman and lived in Port Colborne, Ethel married Eddie Matchtinger and lived in Toronto and Abe never married. Yeva Fishman, the niece of Samuel Fishman married Morris Turk. Her father was (Frank Fishman?) and her mother was Sara Leah Fishman. Molly Fishman married Harry Title (Teitelebaum) (b. ca. 1903). They had three children, Greta (nee Title) Greisman, Sandra (nee Title) Samuels and Stephen (m. Carole Hillman, niece of Ben Hillman). Harry Teitelbaum was the son of Israel and Frumeth Teitelbaum. He was born in Gdansk, Poland (b. ca., 1903). Harry Title had four younger siblings; Lloyd, Birdie (m. Witlin), Arthur and Lorelle (Lieba) the youngest who was born in Toronto. Harry arrived to Canada shortly after the First World War and worked in the garment industry. He and his brother Arthur founded the Title Dress Company in the late 1920s and operated the business out of 355 Adelaide St. West. In the late 1980s, the business moved from this location to Adelaide and Bathurst. Sandra Title (b. Oct 27, 1936, Toronto), the middle daughter of Molly Fishman and Harry Title, married Lawrence Samuels. Together they had five children Joanna, John, Noah, Tom and Caroline. Lawrence was the eldest son of Alex Samuels (d. 1966) and Kate (nee Goldberg) Samuels. He had two younger siblings Herbie and Florence (m. Bill Goodman). Lawrence's father Alex Samuels immigrated to Canada from Dubrovna, White Russia (present day Dubrouna, Belarus). He immigrated to Canada with his parents Samuel and Chana Samuels and his younger siblings Sol, Ben, Riva and Polly. Alex and his brothers Sol and Ben established Reliable Toy Company around 1929 on Carlaw Ave. They sold the company in 1990.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Jewish families
Name Access
Samuels, Sandra, 1936-
Shiffer-Hillman (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-6
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
2 photographs (tiff) : b&w
Date
1897-1960, 1993
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the activities of Eli Bloch. Included are photocopies of correspondence, newsclippings, Eli's Canadian certificate of naturalization, travel documents, South African licenses, and a genealogical family tree for the Bloch family. Also included are two photographs of Eli in his later years.
Custodial History
The original records are in the possession of Gerry Bloch, the grandson of Eli Bloch. Gerry is the son of Eli's son Norman.
Administrative History
Eli (Elias) Bloch was born in 1872 to Nokhum Tevel Rabinovitch in Kishinev Moldava. He had four siblings: Golda, Joseph, Samuel and Bertha. In the 1890s Eli and his siblings (with the exception of Golda) immigrated to South Africa. Bertha married Theodore Dissler (an importer/exporter). During the Boer War, Eli and his brother Joseph fought with the Dutch. After the war, Dissler employed Eli in his business. In 1907, Dissler sent Eli to sell ostrich feathers in various cities around the world, including: London (England), Montreal and Toronto. While in Toronto, Eli attended the First Roumanian Hebrew Congregation Adath Israel where he met his future wife Leah Madnok and chose to remain in Ontario, without completing his task of selling ostrich feathers in the remaining cities on his itinerary. He married Leah in 1909. From about 1911 until 1922, Eli and Leah lived in Gravenhurst and ran a general store on the main street. They had four children together: Harry (1912-1945), Rose (1914-1994), Rachel (Rae) (1916-2000), and Norman (1916-1989). Rachel and Norman were twins.
In 1922, Elias and Leah moved to Mactier and opened a general store. By 1926, Leah and the children were living in London, ON and Elias continued to operate the general store. He saw the family regularly. Around 1935, Elias left Mactier. He remained in London until he moved to Toronto in 1942. Elias passed away in Toronto in 1960.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: English, Yiddish, and Russian
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Jewish families
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-2
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
19 photographs (tiff)
Date
[1909?]-[196-?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of scanned images of the Fromstein family, particularly relating to Harry and his wife Pearl. Included are family portraits, images of Harry while he was interning at Hashmall's Drugstore and working in his own pharmacy called Central Drugs, an image from a Rokeah Chapter dinner, and other images of the family at a cottage (possibly Tent City or Belle Ewart), in the backyard of their home (likely on Palmerston) and at Sunnyside Beach.
Custodial History
Carol is the daughter is Harry and Pearl Fromstein.
Administrative History
Harry was born in London, England in 1907 to Getzl (from Obodovka, Podolia, Russia) and Yetta (nee Kramer; from Kosow, Stanislawow, Galicia) Fromstein. Harry had six siblings: Max (Mendel, b. 1902 in Kosow), Anne (Chava Yita, b. 23 Sept. 1905 in London), Shep (b. 1911 in London), Minnie (b. 1916? in Toronto), Joe (b. 1918 in Toronto) and Sam (Shimmy, b. 1919 in Toronto). The family immigrated to Toronto in 1912. Getzl arrived first and then paid for the passage for his wife and children. Getzl was a cantor who also wrote music. He also worked as a presser.
Harry attended the College of Pharmacy at the University of Toronto. As part of his training, he did an internship at Hashmall's Drug Store. Harry graduated in 1932. He married Pearl Shimmerman soon after graduation in 1932. They had met at Pearl's sweet 16 birthday party and had been engaged for 5 years.
Pearl was born in 1911 to Aaron and Malka Shimmerman in Pomorzany, Austria (now in the Ukraine). Pearl was the youngest of seven children. Her siblings were: Tzivia (married name Toben), Max, Toby (married name Rockfeld), Sam, Joe, and Anne (married name Kerbel). She immigrated to Toronto with her family when she was 3 months old. Her family lived at 102 Huron Street and Aaron worked as a labourer (collecting and selling scraps of fabric).
Pearl and Harry had two children together: Jerry (Gerald ; b. 1934) and Carol (b. 1937). By 1935, Harry had opened his own drugstore called Central Drugs, located at Church and Queen. The family initially lived above the store. The store moved a few times, but always remained in one of the corner units at the intersection of Church and Queen. Harry eventually moved his store north to Davenport and Dupont. After many years, his store was finally moved to Dufferin Street at Castlefield and re-named Castlefield Drugs. During the summer, the family regularly rented cottages at Tent City and Belle Ewart.
Carol married Harold Tanenbaum in 1956. They had three children together: Mark, Cheryl, and Michelle.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Occupations
Pharmacists
Photography of families
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1.2 m of textual records
ca. 250 photographs : b&w and col.
Date
1776, [191-]-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the records related to the life and career of Dr. Fred Wienberg. Included are textual and photographic records documenting his personal and family life, his medial career, scholarly activities, involvement with the Jewish community, his collecting of Judaica, medical antiques and art, and his synagogue involvement. Other items include the Ostrovtzer Mutual Benefit Society minute book and a 1776 letter from Jonas Phillips, a veteran of the American Revolutionary War and an American merchant in New York City and Philadelphia.
Administrative History
Fred Weinberg (1919-2003) was born in Ostrawiec, Poland on July 6, 1919 to Rose and Israel Weinberg. Israel immigrated to Canada in 1920 and his wife and children joined him several years later in March of 1924. The family settled in Toronto where Israel worked in the fur manufacturing business. Israel was a supporter and aficionado of cantorial music as well as a founder of the Associated Hebrew Schools of Toronto and the Ostrovtzer Synagogue on Cecil Street.
Fred completed his primary and secondary education at Clinton Street Public School and Harbord Collegiate. He also attended the Brunswick Talmud Torah, celebrating his bar mitzvah in 1932. Fred decided to pursue a medical career, graduating from the University of Toronto’s medical school in 1944. During his studies he enlisted in the army and completed officers’ training in April 1945, attaining the rank of Captain. During his military career he served in the RCAMC at Camp Borden, Christie St. Hospital and at the Stanley Barracks in Toronto. Towards the end of the war he served as Officer in charge of repatriation of the POWs.
After the war Fred pursued his post-graduate work at Seaview and Bellevue hospitals in New York City from 1946 to 1947 and then moved on to the Children’s and Washington University hospitals in St. Louis, Missouri the following year. He was subsequently accepted as a resident at Sick Kids Hospital in Toronto and was ultimately appointed Chief Resident under the supervision of the internationally renowned paediatrician, Dr. Alan Brown. In 1950, Dr. Weinberg was hired as a physician in paediatrics at Sick Kids Hospital, making him the first Jewish doctor on staff. In addition to his staff responsibilities, he also lectured and was a faculty member at the University of Toronto’s Medical School for many years.
By the mid-point of his career, Dr. Weinberg went on to specialise in Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), delivering lectures and publishing articles in medical journals. He also ran his own practice, which operated from 1950 to 1976, and later become Associate Medical Director of the Child Development Clinic, Neurology Division of Sick Kids until his retirement in 1984. He later continued his service at Sick Kids as a senior staff consultant and ran a specialized practice in Developmental Pediatrics for close to twenty years, which was later situated at 208 Bloor Street West.
Fred married Joy Cherry on December 16, 1952 at Goel Tzedec Synagogue. The couple had four children: Joel (b. 1953), Barry (b. 1955), Sari (b. 1956) and Deena (b. 1961). Throughout his life, Fred was actively engaged in Jewish communal work in a variety of capacities: assisting with the establishment of the United Synagogue Day School during the 1950s; as a fundraiser for the United Jewish Appeal (UJA); and as a participant in two of UJA’s early study missions to Israel in 1960 and 1961. He was also an influential figure within his synagogue, joining the Board of Directors of Beth Tzedec Synagogue during the late 1960s and serving as President from 1972 to 1975.
Fred and his wife Joy also collected Judaica, antiques and artwork. As a physician, Fred developed a passion and expertise in the area of medical antiques. He published articles in both the mainstream and Jewish press on subjects related to Jewish rituals, Judaica and art. He also had a regular column in the Canadian Journal of Diagnosis from 1998 to 2002 entitled “Antique instruments”. Over time, the Weinberg’s assembled a world-class collection of Judaica and became increasingly active in the museum world. Fred assisted in the establishment of Beth Tzedec’s Helene and Rubin Dennis Jewish Museum, contributing items from the couple’s Judaica collection and securing the acquisition of the renowned Cecil Roth collection for the Museum during the early to mid-1960s. As a result of his significant contributions, he was bestowed the title of honourary curator to the Museum. Dr. Weinberg later branched out and assisted with the Koffler Gallery’s Lifecycle exhibition in 1984 as guest curator. The following year, he served as a special presenter and instructor to the docents at the “Precious Legacy” Czech Judaica exhibition at the ROM. The Weinberg’s most significant contribution to the museum world, however, was marked in September of 2000, when they were honoured at the opening of the Dr. Fred and Joy Cherry Weinberg Gallery of Judaica at the ROM, featuring some of their most valuable and treasured pieces.
Dr. Fred Weinberg passed away on October 30, 2003 at 84 years of age. The Weinberg Endowment Fund was established by the family at the University of Toronto’s Jewish Studies Program to honour Fred’s passion for Jewish history, rituals and artefacts. That year the Weinberg family also set up a fund in Fred’s name in support of the Therapeutic Clown Program, a highly visible and successful program within Sick Kids’ Pediatric Division.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Use Conditions Note: Records contain patient names and medical information.
Subjects
Art and popular culture
Fraternal organizations
Jewish families
Jewish physicians
Occupations
Name Access
Weinberg, Fred, 1919-2003
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-1-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-1-2
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 36 x 34 cm
Date
1935
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one black and white photograph of the B'nai Brith Toronto Lodge, no. 836 installation dinner and dance, which took place at the Royal York Hotel, on January 14, 1935. Individuals identified in the photo include: Carl Kayfetz, Mel Bochner, Dr. Joseph Gollom, Sam Sable, Moe Palmer, Sam Bregman, Sam Staiman and Sol Staiman.
Subjects
Clubs
Name Access
B'nai Brith Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1903-1939
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two marriage certificates documenting the marriage of Israel Cohen and Bessie (nee Cohen) Cohen from 1903. It also includes early Jewish National Fund (Karen Hayesod) tree planting donation certificates from both the Cohen family and the family of Mr. Saul Greenwood. There are JNF certificates honouring the Daughters of Zion Chapter of Hadassah. There is also a Youth Aliyah Certificate of Honour.
Custodial History
Sheila Smolkin from the Holy Blossom Archives found this in their collection and identified it as not appropriate so she has transferred it to the OJA
Subjects
Clubs
Marriage records
Zionism
Name Access
Greenwood, Saul
Cohen, Israel
Cohen, Bessie
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 300 photographs : b&w, sepia and col. (1 negative) ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
40 cm of textual records
Date
[189-]-2007
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records created and accumulated by Bill Gladstone in the course of researching his book on the genealogical lineage of the Naftolin and Rubinoff families. Included are photographs of the Shmuel Chaim and Rachel Rubinoff branch, the Aaron Rubinowitz branch, the Benjamin Rubinoff branch, the Arnoff branch and the Naftolin branch. The photographs are in the form of family and individual portraits, candid snapshots, event photographs, Rubinoff store exteriors, and photographs of various life event celebrations. The textual records consist of research notes and copied material from various sources detailing the lives of individual family members.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
FINDING AID NOTE: It is recommended that researchers consult the book "One Hundred Years in Canada: the Rubinoff-Naftolin Family Tree" for more context when viewing the material.
USE CONDITIONS NOTE: Donor retains copyright for all original research and writing. Donor wishes to be notified prior to publication. Publication requests must receive permission from donor, if possible.
Subjects
Jewish families
Photography of families
Name Access
Gladstone, Bill
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-10
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1932
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the wedding invitation for the marriage of Sylvia Mehr and Arthur Warshavsky, as well as photocopies of original announcments of the marriage in the Jewish Standard and another unknown publication, and a copy of M. Mehr & Co. Limited letterhead. The company dealt in iron, steel and metals and was located at the foot of Bathurst St.
Administrative History
Sylvia Mehr was the daughter of Mandel Mehr. She married Arthur Warshavsky in 1932 at her parent's home at 126 Lauder Ave.
Subjects
Invitation cards
Weddings
Name Access
Mehr, Mandel
Mehr, Sylvia
Warshavsky, Arthur
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-15
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-15
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 m of textual records
ca. 200 photographs
Date
[189-]-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records created and collected by Bill Gladstone during the course of his research into the family history and genealogy of the Naftolin and Rubinoff families and their various branches. Included are Gladstone's extensive research files on each member of the family, which consist of hand-written research notes, correspondence with family members and government officials, newsclippings, copies of vital statistics, immigration and citizenship records, certificates, bereavement and sympathy cards, telegrams and congratulatory anniversary cards, invitations, and photographs.
Accession also consists of records related to the Agudas Hamishpocha, the family mutual benefit society and social club that was formed in 1928 by the Naftolin and Rubinoff families. These records include meeting invitations and flyers, anniversary and jubilee books, membership lists, photographs, loan society materials, newsclippings and articles, research notes, and a copy of the letters of incorporation.
Administrative History
Bill Gladstone is a direct decendent of the Naftolin-Rubinoff family. The five branches of the family as researched by Gladstone are the Rachel Rubinowitz and Shmuel Chaim Rubinowitz branch; Riva Rishe Rubinowitz and Itsha Maisha Naftolin branch; Binyamin (Benjamin) Rubinoff and Esther Dobin branch; Minya Rubinowitz and Elimelech Arnoff branch; and Aaron Rubinowtiz and Esther Cahansky branch. Rachel, Riva Rishe, Binyamin, Minya and Aaron were all siblings. Other family names include Cohen, Slovin, Rosensweig, Patlik and Alter.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
FINDING AID NOTE: It is recommended that researchers consult the book "One Hundred Years in Canada: the Rubinoff-Naftolin Family Tree" for more context when viewing the material.
USE CONDITION NOTE: Donor retains copyright for all original research and writing. Donor wishes to be notified prior to publication. Publication requests must receive permission from donor, if possible.
Subjects
Jewish families
Name Access
Gladstone, Bill
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-5
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
4 folders of textual records
ca. 94 photographs : b&w and col. (44 tiff.) ; 20 x 25 cm or smaller
1 plaque
Date
1936-1990, predominant 1951-1990
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the activities of Ronnie Roth. Included are textual and graphic materials relating to Ronnie's personal life and career such as, photographs of family milestones and events; Ronnie's youth and early adulthood in South Africa, his involvement with Betar; and time as a paratrooper with the Israeli Army; Ronnie and Sandra's wedding; travel; Ronnie's insurance broker license graduation; and condolence letters sent to the Roth family after his passing. Also included are records documenting Ronnie's communal involvement, particularly his involvement with B'nai Brith Raoul Wallenberg - Yorkdale Circle Lodge, Antibes-Torresdale Ratepayers Association, and Forest Hill Ratepayers Association . B'nai Brith material includes photographs of Ronnie's participation in B'nai Brith Canada's 1986 Mission to Israel; photographs of events honouring Ronnie and his work; and an issue of The Orbit that eulogizes Ronnie. Finally, the accession consists of a business card for Ronnie's film and video entertainment company in South Africa and a Prime Minister's Certificate of Appreciation from the Conservative Party of Canada.
Identified in the photographs are: Ronnie Roth, Sandra Roth, Chantal [Roth], Gavin Roth, Elana [Roth], Morris Flicht, Frank Dimant, Ralph Snow, Prime Minister Yitzchak Shamir, Harry Bick, Sam Pacht, Merv Rosenstein, Ralph Cohen, [?] Steinmetz, Colin Baskind, Dr. Meister, Esther Shiner, Peter Roth, Paul Roth, and Annie Guttman.
Custodial History
Material was in possession of Sandra Roth, Ronnie's wife. Sandra donated it to the OJA.
Administrative History
Ronnie Roth was born on December 24, 1938 to Mr. Dezso (Desmond) and Mrs. Erzsi (Elizabeth) Abraham of Johannesburg, South Africa. Throughout his youth, Ronnie was active in a variety of Zionist groups including: the Zionist Youth Movement of South Africa, Betar, the Zionist Revisionist Organization and the South African Zionist Federation. In his late teens, Ronnie went on Na[c]hal Tzonei-ach and joined the Tzanchanim, the elite paratrooper corps of the Israeli Army. Ronnie served in the military for three years. His time in Israel also included work on a kibbutz.
By the age of 25, Ronnie had returned to South Africa and was a director of the Tollman Group of hotels and manager of the famous Johannesburg restaurant, The Colony. Ronnie married Sandra Benn from Port Elizabeth, SA, in August 1964. Sandra was a singer, dancer and entertainer. After their marriage, they settled in Johannesburg where Ronnie continued to work as an hotelier. Their first daughter, Chantal, was born in 1966 followed by Gavin in 1969 and Elana in 1973. During this period, Ronnie’s community involvement grew as he became Executive Director of Tel Hai in 1968 and served in this role until 1970. He then joined the Jewish United Communal Fund and ran their fundraising campaign.
The Roth’s were unhappy with South Africa’s apartheid politics and were eager to emigrate. Ronnie sought employment opportunity abroad and was offered employment as a fundraiser for UJA Federation in Toronto in 1975. Ronnie accepted the position and immigrated to Toronto in 1976. Sandra followed him with their children a few months later. When he completed his UJA assignment, he became an insurance broker. After a year, he founded KRG Insurance Brokers with two partners in 1980.
Upon arriving in Canada, Ronnie became interested in immigration issues and co-founded the South African Jewish Association in Canada (SAJAC) to help other South Africans with immigration and adjustment to Canadian life. He was the organization’s first president from 1976 to 1981 and again from 1986 to 1987. Ronnie’s involvement in assisting newcomers extended to his roles as Member of the Board of Directors and Member of the Integration Committee of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society as well as Chairman of the Sherut Shalom Employment & Integration Assistance to African Jews.
Ronnie was also active in B’nai Brith Canada. He joined the Yorkdale Lodge in 1983 and went on to serve as both Vice-President and President. During his tenure as President, he played a critical role in the integration of the Yorkdale and Circle Lodges into the unified Raoul Wallenberg Lodge. He also served in various positions at the National level with B’nai Brith Canada, including as National Chairman of the Israel Cabinet, Co-Chairman of the Fundraising Committee and a member of the National Executive and Board of Governors. In 1986, the National Leadership awarded him with the B’nai Brith Canada Achievement Award. In the same year, he and his wife and fellow lodge member Sandra (the lodge’s first female full member) were honoured recipients of the Israel Bonds Negev Award.
Ronnie also held important roles in the community at-large as President of the Antibes-Torresdale Ratepayers Association and Forest Hill Ratepayers Association; President and Founder of the Rockford Community Summer Day Camp; Member of the City of North York Condominium Committee; Member of the Board of Directors of Baycrest’s Men’s Service Group; and Member of the Board of Directors of Bank Leumi (Canada).
Ronnie passed away on October 14, 1989 at the age of 50 years.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Societies
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-4-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-4-2
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
ca. 100 photographs : b&w and col. ; 61 x 27 or smaller
3 cm of textual records
Date
[ca. 1900]-1994, predominent 1920-1960
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a scrapbook compiled by Edward J. Levy documenting the personal lives and musical careers of Sidney Levy and Philip and Elie Spivak. The scrapbook primarily consists of photographs of the Spivak and Levy families but also includes the musical score for Dirge for Orchestra composed by Oskar Morawetz in memory of Elie Spivak, naturalization papers for Philip Spivak and Bella Spivak, bulletins of the Royal Conservatory of Music and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, photographs of other musicians including Zara Nelsova, newsclippings, Ed Levy's bar mitzvah certificate, postcards and invitations. There is also an oversized photograph of the 19th Season of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, featuring Elie Spivak, Philip Spivak and Sidney Levy.
Administrative History
Sidney (Solomon) Levy (1898-1971) was born in London, England in 1898, the son of Elizabeth (nee Goldstein) Levy. He was the oldest brother to six younger sisters. Sidney was a violist who first played in movie houses in East London, where he met Phillip and Elie Spivak. During the 1920s, he played on touring ocean liners. He immigrated to Toronto in 1929 where he again played movie theatres and then built a career with the CBC radio orchestra and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. He also played the O'Keefe Centre's opening night performance of Camelot.
Elie (2 Feb. 1902-23 July 1960) and Phillip (1906-ca. 1962) Spivak were born in Uman, Ukraine, the sons of Reverend Joseph (d. 1965) and Bella (nee Finkler) (d. 1962) Spivak. They were two of five children: Elie, Clara (1904-1984), Philip, Siam (d. ca. 1964, New York) and Thelma (m. Heller) (1917-2008).Their paternal grandfather, Yankel Spivak, was a famous chazzan. Their maternal grandfather, Ezra Finkler, was a successful wheat merchant in Ukraine, who was killed during the pogroms. Joseph and Bella Spivak, who were living with their children on the Finkler's large estate at the time, managed to escape through Poland and Germany, eventually arriving in Paris in 1910. At this time, Elie entered the Paris Conservatoire at the age of seven and studied violin with Henri Berthelier from 1910-1915. Around 1915, the Spivak family immigrated to England, where Clara later met Sidney Levy through her brothers, who at the time was a theatre musician. Elie continued his studies at the Royal College of Manchester with Adolphe Brodsky in 1916. In 1923, he founded the Elie Spivak String Quartet in Manchester, the first ensemble to give chamber music concerts over the new BBC network.
The Spivak family left London for Canada in the late 1920s. Elie was the first of the siblings to immigrate and after resideing for one year in New York City, he moved to Toronto in 1926. Philip and Clara followed in 1929, as did Sidney Levy. Joseph and Bella Spivak, along with their children Siam and Thelma, ended up settling in New York City. Sidney married Clara Spivak in a ceremony in New York in the year they immigrated. They had one son, Edward (b. 1934). Clara was active in the TSO's Women's Committee.
In Toronto, Elie Spivak was first violin (1929-1942) of the Conservatory String Quartet and concertmaster (1931-1948) of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. In 1945, he gave the North American premiere of the Khachaturian Violin Concerto with the Boston Pops Orchestra. He was the first Canadian musician invited to Israel, touring the country for five months in 1950 as guest of the Jerusalem String Quartet. He led the Spivak String Quartet (1951-1956) and was heard frequently over CBC radio. He examined for the Royal Conservatory of Music (RCM) in Toronto and adjudicated for Kiwanis Festivals and the Canadian National Exhibition. He taught violin at the RCM from 1922 until his death. He also taught in the University Settlement Music School. Elie was a member of Goel Tzedec Synagogue and was married to Hilda (nee Narrol) Spivak. He had two sons, David and Michael.
Philip Spivak played the cello and was first stand with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. He also played in a chamber orchestra. He married the famous cellist Zara Nelsova, later divorced and remarried Iris Cooper. Philip was a member of Holy Blossom Temple.
Subjects
Jews--Music
Name Access
Spivak, Elie, 1902-1960
Spivak, Phillip, 1906-ca. 1962
Levy, Sidney, 1898-1971
Levy, Edward, 1934-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-4-17
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-4-17
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w (tif) ; 377 MB
Date
[1938 or 1939]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a photograph of Lucille Mehr and Arthur Warren, taken at Balfour Beach at Bessie Mehr's cottage. Lucille Mehr was the daughter of Bessie and Mandel Mehr and the mother of the donor.
Custodial History
This photograph was loaned for scanning.
Name Access
Mehr, Lucille
Warren, Arthur
Places
Balfour Beach (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-5-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-5-2
Material Format
object
Physical Description
1 artifact
Date
[193-?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one artifact, a wooden hanger, from B. Feldman Clothing company.
Administrative History
Ben Feldman had a boys and mens clothing and tailoring store [B. Feldman Clothing] on 519 Queen St. W as early as 1931. He and his wife Mary lived in the same building.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-5-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-5-6
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
7 photographs : b&w, col. and sepia ; 16 x 22 cm or smaller
1 folder of textual records
Date
1910-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the Frankel and Draper families of Toronto. Included are photographs of various members of the Frankel family, a Frankel family tree, a bound book documenting the Draper family, a letter from Sue Levy to Nancy Draper discussing Nancy's grandparent's 50th anniversary celebration in Biblis in 1913, an obituary and euology for Helen Joyce Frankel Kofman, as well as a flyer for an exhibition on the Jews in Shanghai that was mounted at the Chinese Cultural Centre of Greater Toronto.
Photographs are identified as: Gottschall Frankel in Biblis, Germany (191-); a copy photograph of Gottschall Frankel and Mina Meyer in Biblis, Germany, printed on printer paper (191-); two photographs of Leo Frankel with his second wife Gertrude Wise (1920s-1930s); Nancy Ddraper with her cousin Helene Joyce Frankel (ca. 1931); Nancy with her sister Carol and cousins Helene and Allan (193-); and one photograph of the staff and volunteers of the Ontario Jewish Archives on an outing to the AGO.
Name Access
Draper, Nancy
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-5-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-5-10
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1.4 m of textual records and graphic material
Date
1851-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records reflecting the academic, personal and literary life of Dr. Gerald Tulchinsky. The bulk of the material relates to Canada's garment industry, including photocopied reference material from various sources, reports and statistics, research notes, articles and graduate thesis on the topic, reminiscences by those in the industry and original records from specific firms and associations situated in Ontario and Quebec. Also included are manuscripts and accompanying material for Shtetl on the Grand and a book on the Canadian Clothing Industry, lecture notes, family correspondence and photographs, and the last will and testament of Anne Tulchinsky. All of the material from 1851-1935 are photocopies of original records.
Administrative History
Dr. Gerald Tulchinsky is Professor Emeritus at Queen's University, Department of History, and author of several books on the history of Canadian Jewry and labour issues in Canada. His books include: Shtetl on the Grand (2015); Joe Salsberg: A Life of Commitment (2013); Canada's Jews: A People's Journey (2008); Branching Out: The Transformation of the Canadian Jewish Community (1998); Taking Root: The Origins of the Canadian Jewish Community (1992); and The River Barons: Montreal Businessmen and the Growth of Industry and Transportation, 1837-53 (1977). Tulchinsky was born in Brantford, Ontario in 1933 to Harry and Anne Tulchinsky. He currently resides in Kingston, Ontario.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Descriptive Notes
SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE: This accession also includes numerous books, some of wihch don't relate to our mandate and others which are duplicates of our current holdings. The books that we have retained have been integrated into the OJA's library holdings. USE CONDITION NOTE: Access restricted until ten years after the donor's death, at the donor's request.
LANGUAGE NOTE: Some of the material is in French.
Subjects
Business
Labour and unions
Name Access
Tulchinsky, Gerald, 1933-
Places
Montreal, Que.
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-56
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-56
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1930-1976
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a covering letter to Steve (presumably Speisman) from Sidney Harris dated September 14, 1976. The letter refers to two documents (a letter) one of which is in Hebrew and the other being its translation into English. The translation was performed by BGK (likely Ben Kayfetz). The covering letter refers to the Geldzaeler and Scheuer families and also refers to other documents being given to Steve. However, there were no other documents in the folder. The letter was from Mark Geldzaeler to Edmund Scheuer in thanks for a gift of a box of cigars.
Custodial History
There is no information on the acquisition of this material. However, it does appear to come from a family album of Sydney M. Harris.
Subjects
Jewish families
Name Access
Harris, Sydney M.
Scheuer, Edmund
Geldzaeler, Mark
Places
Toronto, Ontario
Source
Archival Accessions
2847 records – page 1 of 57.

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