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4 records – page 1 of 1.
Level
Item
ID
Item 3078
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3078
Material Format
graphic material
Date
31 May 1981
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 21 x 26 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of Ernst Zundel (pictured centre in a hard hat) with his supporters on the front lawn of his home in Cabbagetown. They are holding signs with various slogans denying the Holocaust.
Notes
Photo by Ben Lechtman.
Name Access
Zundel, Ernst, 1939-2017
Subjects
Demonstrations
Holocaust deniers
Portraits, Group
Places
Carlton Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Anti-Semitism Cases sub-series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 17; Series 5-3; File 295; Item 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Anti-Semitism Cases sub-series
Level
Item
Fonds
17
Series
5-3
File
295
Item
1
Material Format
textual record
Date
[198-?]
Physical Description
1 textual record
Scope and Content
Item is a printout soliciting donations for Ernst Zündel. A Carlton Street address and phone number are included.
Notes
Availability of other formats: Also available as a PDF file.
Places
Carlton Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Anti-Semitism Cases sub-series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 17; Series 5-3; File 295; Item 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Anti-Semitism Cases sub-series
Level
Item
Fonds
17
Series
5-3
File
295
Item
2
Material Format
textual record
Date
[198-?]
Physical Description
1 textual record
Scope and Content
Item is a printout soliciting donations for Ernst Zündel. A Carlton Street address and phone number are included. The printout contains a death threat directed at Alan Shefman of B'nai Brith.
Notes
Availability of other formats: Also available as a PDF file.
Name Access
Shefman, Alan
Places
Carlton Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Address
150 Beverley Street
Source
Landmarks

By 1919 the plight of post-war Eastern European Jewry and the need for a united community voice for Canadian Jewry led to the creation of the Canadian Jewish Congress. Its founding meeting was held on March 16, 1919 in Montreal. Though it briefly maintained a tiny regional office in Toronto, the CJC remained inactive until 1933, when it fully reconvened by opening offices in Winnipeg, Montreal, and Toronto. Egmont L. Frankel was the first President of the new Central Division in Toronto. While the National Office in Montreal focused on the overarching issues of the social and economic rights of European Jewry, assistance for Jewish immigrants, and combating prejudice in Canada, the Toronto office dealt with local violent anti-Jewish demonstrations as well as continuing discrimination both in employment and in access to public recreational facilities. The structure was based on regular national biennial plenary conferences at which policies were delineated and national and regional executives were elected. Between plenary sessions, National and Regional Councils were in charge.
Address
150 Beverley Street
Time Period
1919-2012
Scope Note
By 1919 the plight of post-war Eastern European Jewry and the need for a united community voice for Canadian Jewry led to the creation of the Canadian Jewish Congress. Its founding meeting was held on March 16, 1919 in Montreal. Though it briefly maintained a tiny regional office in Toronto, the CJC remained inactive until 1933, when it fully reconvened by opening offices in Winnipeg, Montreal, and Toronto. Egmont L. Frankel was the first President of the new Central Division in Toronto. While the National Office in Montreal focused on the overarching issues of the social and economic rights of European Jewry, assistance for Jewish immigrants, and combating prejudice in Canada, the Toronto office dealt with local violent anti-Jewish demonstrations as well as continuing discrimination both in employment and in access to public recreational facilities. The structure was based on regular national biennial plenary conferences at which policies were delineated and national and regional executives were elected. Between plenary sessions, National and Regional Councils were in charge.
History
During the 1930s the Central Division Office moved several times and occupied offices in the following locations; Yonge St., the Bond St. Synagogue, Scheuer House, the Zionist Building, and its long-term home at 150-152 Beverley Street where it remained until its July, 1983 move to the Lipa Green Building in North York. Its activities expanded to include taking responsibility for Jewish educational standards but, by 1941, its main efforts shifted to support for Canada’s war effort. Immediately after the end of the war, the focus again shifted to Jewish immigration projects and the maintenance of Jewish identity in small communities.By 1950, the CJC’s use of the title “division” was changed to “region” to accommodate internal operational “divisions” within each region. Also, by then, the Central Region was busy expanding its programs for all Ontario Jewish communities, creating a province-wide council of youth groups, and working with the newly-created Bureau of Jewish Education (later Board of Jewish Education).
Category
Organization
Source
Landmarks
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