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6 records – page 1 of 1.
Accession Number
2013-3-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-3-1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 55 photographs
1 folder of textual records
Date
1919-1939, [ca. 2005]
Scope and Content
Accession consists primarily of photographs documenting the early life of Bella (nee Goldbach) Wilder and her family in Poland. Included are images of Bella with her siblings and friends, group photos of Bella at her Jewish school in Poland, a group image of Victor in the Polish army, and other photographs of Bella's family and friends. Also included are two family histories documenting the story of Bella's mother, Shifra Frimeth Goldbach, and the story of Max and Bella Wilder, which was written by their granddaughter Sandee Sharpe. Of particular note is a 1925 school photograph of the Workers Evening School in Opatow (?), which has Yiddish writing suggesting that the school may have received aid from an organization referred to as "Gives Relief" in Toronto.
Custodial History
The records were originally donated to the Jewish Genealogical Society of Canada (Toronto section) by Bella's daughter Ann Sharpe. JGS Toronto donated the material to the OJA a few months later with her consent.
Administrative History
Bella (nee Goldbach) Wilder was born on May 12, 1910 in Opatow, Poland to Chaim Shlomo Goldbach and Shifra Frimeth Schatz Goldbach. Bella's older brothers, Victor, Jack and Hymie began immigrating to Toronto in the 1920s and had saved enough money by 1936 to bring Bella and her mother to Toronto. After arriving in Toronto Bella found work sewing in a factory.
Bella married Max Wilder on September 29, 1939. Max worked at Superior Men's Tailoring where he sewed zippers into men's pants. They had two children together: Ann (born 5 April 1940, married Norman Sharpe) and Stan (born 21 Jan. 1945, died June 1974). Max passed away in 1999 and Bella passed away in 2002.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Name Access
Goldbach, Shifra
Sharpe, Ann
Wilder, Bella, 1910-2002
Wilder, Max, ?-1999
Places
Poland
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-2-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-2-13
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 150 photographs : b&w and col ; 21 x 27 cm or smaller
1 photograph : negative print on transparency
1 scrapbook
1 folder of textual records
Date
1925-1996
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting the family life of Henry and Bella Rosenbaum. Included are photos from Poland, Italy, Israel and Canada. In addition, there is a scrapbook of photos prepared by their daughter Brenda on Henry and Bella's thirtieth wedding anniversary in 1976. In addition, there is a more comprehensive biography written by Henry and Bella's son-in-law Eric Bornstein. Individuals identified in photographs include,
Administrative History
Henry "Hanoch" Rosenbaum (1925-2015) was born in Radom Poland. He was the seventh of eight children born to Rachel Rosenbaum (née Katz) and Moshe Rosenbaum. Henry learned the fate of his parents, two siblings and their families, after the war. All were innocent victims murdered during the Holocaust. Most of Radom's Jews were murdered in Treblinka following the August 1942 liquidation of its ghettos.
Henry Rosenbaum met his Bella Rotbard (1925-2012) in Italy in the aftermath of the Second World War. Although Bella was also from Radom, she did not know the Rosenbaum family. Bella's parents, her sixteen-year-old sister and four-year-old brother along with most of her parents' extended families were murdered in the Holocaust.
While in Italy, the Joint Distribution Committee funded 'mock' Kibbutzim, preparing holocaust survivors for immigration to Palestine and Kibbutz life. Bella, a one-time member of the secular Jewish youth movement Hashomer Hatzair in Poland, believed that she was destined to be a kibbutznik. Henry would follow.
Bella and Henry were part of the illegal immigration to Palestine in 1946 and spent their first few days in Atlit, a British Mandate detainee camp. Soon Bella settled on kibbutz, but soon after married Henry. In 1946, Bella and Henry married in their apartment in Ramat Gan. At the time, Henry was serving in the IDF’s motor pool. Finding the weather exasperating her migraine symptoms, Bella, Henry and their toddler daughter Brenda (b. 1949) immigrated to Toronto in 1952.
With the assistance of a relative, Henry gained employment in a print shop sweeping floors. Shortly thereafter he advanced to machine operator and in 1961 he opened his own print shop. Bella found employment in the garment industry sewing collars onto shirts and earning her wages by piece work. Bella stopped working when their son Murray (b. 1961) was born. Henry served as editor for the quarterly Yiddish and English journal the Voice of Radom and was an active life-long member of the Radom Society.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Expo 67 (Montréal, Québec)
Rosenbaum, Henry, 1925-2015
Places
Canada
Israel
Italy
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-6-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-6-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
95 cm of textual records
42 photographs : b&w and col. ; 9 x 13 cm and 10 x 15 cm
5 audiocassettes
Date
1974-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the records documenting Nathan Leipciger's role as the Chairman of the Holocaust Remembrace Committee, as well as his affiliation with other Holocaust commemoration organizations in Poland and Toronto. Organizations documented in this collection include: the Canadian Jewish Congress Holocaust Remembrance Committee and its Education Sub-Committee, the March of the Living, Yad Vashem, the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., the State Museum of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the International Council to the Museum of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the Christian-Jewish Dialogue of Toronto, the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews, the Board of Education of North York, and the Holocaust Memorial and Education Centre (now Neuberger). Events documented include Yom HaShoah programs, the Canadian Gathering of Holocaust Survivors and Their Children, and Holocaust Education Week. Records include Holocaust Remembrance Committee meeting minutes, correspondence (including correspondence between Mr. Leipciger and the director of the museum at Auschwitz), programming material, curriculum development material, event flyers, newsclippings, synagogue newsletters featuring published memoirs by Mr. Leipciger. Also included are architectural drawings of the Holocaust Memorial and Education Centre (now Neuberger), one copy of a small book entitled, "60 Days for 6 Million," published by Tribe UK, and five audiocasettes of recordings from the 22nd International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies conference on the topic of the shared history of Poles and Jews (August 2002, Toronto, Ont.).
Administrative History
Nathan Leipciger was born in Chorzów, Poland, in 1928. He survived the Sosnowiec Ghetto and the camps of Auschwitz-Birkenau, Funfteichen, GrossRosen, Flossenberg, Leonberg, and Dachau. Nate and his father were liberated in May 1945, and immigrated to Canada in 1948. In Toronto Nate attended high school and eventually obtained a university degree in engineering. He later established an engineering firm with several partners. In 1982, Nate chaired the Toronto Holocaust Remembrance Committee, later becoming an executive member of the Canadian Jewish Congress National Holocaust Remembrance Committee. Nate was a member of the International Council to the Museum of Auschwitz-Birkenau for fifteen years and has been an educator on March of the Living trips to Poland and Israel for fifteen years. In 2015, The Azrieli Foundation published Nate's 280-page memoir "The Weight of Freedom" as part of their series of Holocaust memoirs by survivors in Canada. In 2016, Mr. Leipciger guided Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on a tour of Auschwitz-Birkenau.
Subjects
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Name Access
Leipciger, Nathan, 1928-
Places
Poland
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-9-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-9-1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
moving images
Physical Description
ca. 14 cm of textual records
ca. 275 photographs : b&w and col. ; 26 x 21 cm or smaller
1 DVD
Date
[191-?]-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the life of Abe Zukerman and several family members including Abe's father-in-law Elia Rubin and brother-in-law Jack Rubin. Included are: certificates of various sorts, correspondence, a DVD of the dedication of the restored Jewish cemetery in Wachock, eulogies, a family calender, financial documents, identity documents for Abe and Margot Zukerman, memorial books/records for Abe Zukerman and Elia Rubin, photographs, and a small number of administrative and financial records from the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society.
Custodial History
The material that makes up accession 2017-9-1 belonged to Abe Zukerman. Mr. Zukerman's stepson, Mel Perlmutter, gathered the material and donated it to the Archives
Administrative History
Abram "Abe" Zukerman (1914-2009) was born in Wierzbnik, Poland in 1914. He was the only member of his family to survive the Holocaust. In 1948, he came to Canada, where he became involved in the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society and married. His first wife, Esther, predeceased him. In 1975, he married his second wife, Margot, who had two children from a previous marriage. In addition to serving as a senior executive member of the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society for over 50 years, Abe volunteered with United Jewish Appeal and State of Israel Bonds. He passed away 8 Feb. 2009. Photo Caption (001): Abe Zukerman at his store on Queen St. W., Toronto, Ontario, Canada, [196-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (002): Lansdowne Cut Rate Store on Queen St. W., Toronto, Ontario, Canada, [196-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (011): Abe Zukerman at the Western Wall, [199-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (017): Abe Zukerman with others, possibly in Israel, [196-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (018): Abe Zukerman, [193-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Captions (032) - (087): Unidentified individuals, [192-?]-[195-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
A number of photographs have writing in Polish and Yiddish on their opposite side, which might prove useful in their identification.
Subjects
Cemeteries
Families
Societies
Name Access
Rubin, Elia
Rubin, Jack
Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society
Zukerman, Abe, 1914-2009
Zukerman, Margot
Places
Canada
Israel
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-6-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-6-5
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
ca. 30 cm of textual records
89 photographs : b&w and col. (7 negatives) ; 18 x 13 cm or smaller
1 CD-ROM (textual record)
19 videocassettes (ca. 22 hr.)
Date
[19--?]-2008
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Abe and Margot Zukerman, their family, and the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society. Included are: awards, identity documents, legal documents, letters, photographs, publications, videocassettes, and vital records.
Photo Caption (015): Abe Zukerman's father, [19--?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-6-5.
Custodial History
Mel Perlmutter, stepson of Abe Zukerman and son of Margot Zukerman, donated the records to the Archives.
Administrative History
Abe Zukerman (1914-2009) was born in Wierzbnik, Poland in 1914. He was the only member of his family to survive the Holocaust. In 1948, he came to Canada, where he became involved in the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society and married. His first wife, Esther, predeceased him. In 1975, he married his second wife, Margot, who had two children from a previous marriage. In addition to serving as a senior executive member of the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society for over 50 years, Abe volunteered with United Jewish Appeal and State of Israel Bonds. He passed away 8 Feb. 2009. Margot Zukerman (née Rubin) was born in Berlin, Germany on 31 December 1922. Still a child when the National Socialists came to power, she was denied schooling. She arrived in Toronto in 1939 never having received a formal education. Despite this, she was able to learn English and operate her father's small ladies' wear store in Hamilton for at least a dozen years. In 1944, she married her first husband Alexander Perlmutter, with whom she had two children: one in 1945 and another in 1948. In 1970, she moved to Toronto, where she acted as caregiver to her father. In 1974, she met Abe, whom she married on 14 February 1975. Like her husband, Margot was an active member of Toronto's Jewish community.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIALS: Other records relating to Abe Zukerman can be found in Accession 2017-9-1.
Subjects
Families
Societies
Name Access
Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society
Zukerman, Abe, 1914-2009
Zukerman, Esther, 1912-1972
Zukerman, Margot, 1922-
Zukerman family
Places
Canada
Israel
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-8-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-8-8
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
2 videocassettes (180 min.)
Date
1986-1997
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two videocassettes.
The first videocassette is titled Anguish to Hope: May 1-19, 1997 and records the travels of forty Canadian university students to Hungary, Poland, and Israel. During their travels, the students visited the birthplace of Theodor Herzl in Budapest, took part in the March of the Living from Auschwitz to Birkenau on Holocaust Remembrance Day, and celebrated Yom Ha'atsmaut in Jerusalem. Anguish to Hope was sponsored by the United Israel Appeal of Canada and local UJA/CJA Federations. Participants included: Gary Abenaim, Lesley Arbus, Andrew Bloom, Jessica Blumberger, Aaron Bockner, Shelly Brenner, Jason Brookman, Neshama Carlebach, Jennifer Cohen, Judy Cohen, Shoshana Cohen, Aliza Dwoskin, Alison Engel, Elissa Flagg, Cindy Goldbenberg, Henry Goldstein, Sarah Gonshor, Itai Hammer, Judy Heilik, Jocelyn Heisel, Daniel Hertzman, Gideon Hess, Naomi Hirshberg, Chaim Indig, Muki Jankelowitz, Andy Koltai, Yonina Machlis, Deborah Mervitz, Marla Munk, Oren Ognigwicz, Marla Pinsky, Bryan Rappaport, Eli Rubenstein, Lauren Schwartz, Ilana Sernick, Tammy Sitcoff, Elan Sloim, Noah Solomon, Julie Stevens, Rachel Stys, Nicole Sussman, Andrea Syrtash, Simone Vigod, and Laura Weinrib. The recording, which ends abruptly, is two hours in length.
The second videocassette is a recording of a Rogers Cable 10 special presentation: The Official Opening of the Baycrest Hospital Ben & Hilda Katz Building. The opening took place on 4 May 1986, where it was broadcast live from the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care in North York. The recording is one hour in length.
Custodial History
The videocassettes were donated to the Ontario Jewish Archives by Elissa Flagg, one of the participants in the Anguish to Hope trip. She is also the great-niece of Ben and Hilda Katz, the couple honoured in the Baycrest opening.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Availability of other formats note: Available as DVD reference copies.
Subjects
Hospitals
Jewish youth--Travel
Name Access
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care
Flagg, Elissa
Jewish Federations of Canada – UIA
Rogers TV
Places
Canada
Hungary
Israel
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
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