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16 records – page 1 of 1.
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
International Council of Jewish Women series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 38; Series 6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
International Council of Jewish Women series
Level
Series
Fonds
38
Series
6
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1940-1996
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
11 photographs
Admin History/Bio
The International Council of Jewish Women is made up of Jewish women's organizations from across the world. Founded in 1912 and revived in 1949, the ICJW's goals were to promote equal rights, women's rights, understanding, and peace throughout the world. It sought to spread knowledge about and strengthen Jewish cultural traditions, to help build Israel, and to encourage women to participate in community services. It cooperated actively as a non-governmental organization with UNESCO, and was an accredited observer at the United Nations. The National Council of Jewish Women has been a vital member of the ICJW, with a number of its members having served on the executive and as vice-presidents and presidents of the ICJW.
In a first attempt to form an international council of Jewish women, representatives from the National Council of Jewish Women in the United States, along with similar organizations in Great Britain and Germany, met in Rome in 1912. Their efforts were aborted with the onset of World War I, but in the 1920s, Jewish women's groups reconvened and ended up holding three meetings. After a long hiatus due to the devastation of World War II and the Holocaust, the International Council of Jewish Women was officially re-born in 1949 in Paris. The ICJW has held conventions every three years since 1954, and in countries around the world, including in Toronto in 1972, and in Vancouver in 1987.
The ICJW was organized in a committee system which communicated through a network of newsletters, mailings, and triennial meetings. Committees have included By-Laws, Community Services, Herczeg Israel Seminar, Newsletter, North American Committee, Public Relations, Resolutions, Soviet Jewry, Status of Women, and United Nations. The ICJW also held regional meetings, seminars such as the Rosa and Esteban Herczeg seminars in Jerusalem, and field trips.
Canadian presidents of the ICJW have included Antonia S. Robinson (1957-1960), and Helen Marr (1990-1993). While serving as president, Tony Robinson represented Jewish women of Canada at the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II.
Helen Marr served as president of National Council of Jewish Women of Canada, Toronto Section from 1973 to 1976, and as president of the NCJWC from 1981 to 1985. She married Gerald Marr, and has three children. Helen served as Canada's Vice-President to the ICJW from 1986-1989, and chaired the ICJW's triennial convention in Vancouver in 1987. She also held leadership positions with the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, Ben Gurion University, Canadian Jewish Congress, and the Skylight Theatre.
Scope and Content
Series contains records documenting the National Council of Jewish Women of Canada's involvement in the International Council of Jewish Women. It includes pamphlets and publicity material, newsletters, the 75th anniversary tribute book, by-laws and resolutions, material from conventions and other activities, correspondence, and photographs.
A portion of the records were generated during Helen Marr's presidency of the ICJW. These records include by-laws and guidelines, committee files, and mailings.
Notes
The International Council of Jewish Women was variously called the World Congress of Jewish Women, the World Conference of Jewish Women, and the World Organization of Jewish Women between 1912 and 1929.
Name Access
Helen Marr
World Congress of Jewish Women
World Conference of Jewish Women
World Organization of Jewish Women
Subjects
Human rights
Women
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 38
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
38
Material Format
multiple media
Date
[190-]-2002
Physical Description
2.6 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
The National Council of Jewish Women of Canada (NCJWC) was the first national Jewish women's organization in Canada. The council had its beginnings among the urban elite, and played a strong role over the years in influencing public policy in such areas as relations with Israel, national unity, and the plight of world Jewry. The NCJWC is dedicated, in the spirit of Judaism, to furthering human welfare in the Jewish and general communities -- locally, nationally and internationally. It operated around three main pillars: service, education, and social action.
The National Council of Jewish Women was founded in the United States in 1893 by activist Hannah G. Solomon. In 1897, its first Canadian chapter was established in Toronto. In 1925, with seven chapters in Canada, a Canadian liaison position to the National Council of Jewish Women was created. A full-fledged “Canadian Division” of the NCJW was formed in 1934, with rules drafted at the first conference in Winnipeg three years later. Irene Samuel served as the Canadian Division’s first national president. In 1943, the division was renamed the National Council of Jewish Women of Canada, and was officially incorporated in 1944, though it did not receive its letters patent until three years later. Even so, the NCJWC still retained some affiliation with the NCJW, whereby they paid per-capita dues to the Americans in return for program and administrative materials. In 1967 the NCJWC ceased these payments altogether, thereby separating from NCJW completely.
The early NCJWC focused on providing service to young girls and immigrants. They also involved themselves in contemporary politics through support for the war effort; the council donated vehicles to the Red Cross, turned Council House into a servicemen's centre, and even built several libraries at Canadian army camps. A national office opened ca. 1950 in Toronto, but until 1966 it moved to the national president's home city with every election. That year the office was permanently anchored in Toronto. In the 1950s and 1960s the council established Good Age clubs, the Irene Samuel Scholarship Fund, and developed the national Higher Horizons child-care and Newer Horizons elder-care programs. It expanded its overseas programs with support for the Israel Family Counseling Association and Ship-a-Box. The Soviet Jewry projects in the 1970s and 1980s reflected the council’s increasing emphasis on social action. Since the late 1990s, the council has focused on women's issues with efforts such as the Breast Self-Examination (BSE) program.
The NCJWC was governed by an executive council, led by a president. Vice-presidents were each responsible for one portfolio, such as membership, public affairs, etc., which were in turn made up of a number of national committees. The national executive was responsible for producing by-laws, guidelines, policies and procedures, as well as developing national service and social action programs. National also provided support and program materials to the sections, and held biennial meetings every other year from 1937 in cities across Canada. Its decentralized structure meant that while the national office remained in Toronto, officers of the executive have resided right across the country.
As of 1997, the National Council of Jewish Women of Canada was an affiliate member of the International Council of Jewish Women, a member of UNESCO Canadian Subcommission of the Status of Women, and a member of the Coalition of Jewish Women Against Domestic Violence and the Coalition for Agunot Rights. Prominent past presidents include Mrs. Harry (Irene) Samuel, Mrs. Lucille Lorie, Dr. Reva Gerstein, Mozah Zemans, Mina Hollenberg, Sophie Drache, Thelma Rolingher, Helen Marr, Bunny Gurvey, Sheila Freeman, Penny Yellen, and Gloria Strom. The council’s national office moved to Winnipeg in November, 1993. As of 2006, the council still had 5 active sections in Canada: Vancouver, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Toronto and Montreal.
Custodial History
NCJWC donated these records to the OJA after they had finished a historical exhibit and catalogue in 1997 called "Faith and Humanity," celebrating 100 years of NCJWC.
Scope and Content
The fonds documents NCJWC’s fundraising, social service and social action work in Toronto, in other cities across the country, and overseas. Records include conference and meeting programs, minutes, hand-written correspondence, speeches and reports, national newsletters, published histories, by-laws and policies, photographs, publicity material, historical subject files and artifacts. The records have been arranged into nine series: National biennial conventions and annual meetings; National Executive Council; National portfolios and committees; National program and event materials; National history research and subject files; International Council of Jewish Women; Toronto Section; Photos and audio-visual material; and National Council of Jewish Juniors, Toronto Section.
Notes
Physical description note: includes ca. 2470 photographs, 13 architectural drawings, 2 artistic drawings, 3 badges, 3 medals, 1 pin, 28 audio cassettes, and 1 videocassette.
Name Access
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada
Subjects
Women
Related Material
See also: photographs 3207, 3192, 4140, 4067, 4066, 4434; Accession 1977-8-7 for National Council of Jewish Women of Welland; National Council of Jewish Juniors, photographs 458, 459, 460, 463, 464, 465, 466, 468; MG2 B-1K
Arrangement
Records have been arranged by function, in accordance with information gleaned from NCJWC's organizational charts and annual reports
Creator
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada
Accession Number
2001-8-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2013-8-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-8-3
Material Format
text
Physical Description
1 book : 166 p.
Date
[198-?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one cookbook published by the Sisterhood of the Shaar Hashomayim Synagogue and the Dorothy Rothschild Chapter of Hadassah (Sudbury).
Subjects
Food
Women
Name Access
Shaar Hashomayim Synagogue
Hadassah-Wizo
Places
Subury, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-6-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-6-1
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1970-2008
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting the activities of the Masada Chapter of Lithuanian Jews. Included are invitations, newspaper clippings, program books, membership lists, certificates and song lyrics.
Custodial History
Records were in the possession of Anna Kremer, Masada Chapter President. Brought to the archives by Mara Finkelstein, her granddaughter.
Subjects
Societies
Women
Name Access
Masada Chapter of Lithuanian Jews (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
10 cm textual records
ca. 70 photographs: b&w and col. ; 10 cm x 15 cm or smaller
1 scrapbook
Date
1963-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the activities of "Council '63", a branch of the Toronto Section of the National Council of Jewish Women of Canada (NCJWC). Types of records include a photograph album, a scrapbook, correspondence, souvenirs, meeting minutes, membership lists, program materials and budgets.
Administrative History
The "Council '63" Branch of the Toronto Section of the National Council of Jewish Women of Canada (NCJWC) was formed in 1963. Currently consisting of 20 members, the group was initially spearheaded by Barbara Norwich (d. 2011), and they met regularly in homes in the Cedarvale area. The group primarily did volunteer work, although it later evolved into a study group and book club.
Subjects
Women
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
National Council of Jewish Women (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-11
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-11
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
6 cm textual records
1 photograph
Date
1982-1983
Scope and Content
This accession consists of a scrapbook with materials documenting Morley Wolfe's presidency of B'Nai Brith Canada in 1982. Materials include congratulatory letters, tribute items, badges, pins, invitations, banquet programs, annual convention programs, speeches, awards, and certificates. There is also a photograph from a Harbord Collegiate reunion from the early 1990s. People identified in the photo: A. Kashen, I Cass, M. Barrett, G. Rumak, M. Silverberg, S. Rabinowitz, B. Federman, L. Novitsky, S. Friedberg, F. Gross, E. Robbins, B. Kleiman, B. Nightingale, S. Siegelman, G. Saunders, H. Freeman, M. Yasny, E. Fisher, L. Rosen, E. Smith, S. Landsberg, and M. Wolfe.
Administrative History
Morley S. Wolfe was born in Winnipeg in 1928 to Cecil (b. 1895) and Betty (nee Davidow) Wolfe. He spent his early childhood in various cities in Saskatchewan and Manitoba until moving to Toronto in 1940. Soon after graduating from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1955 he started his own practice as a senior member of the law firm Burt, Burt, Wolfe and Bowman. In 1971 he was appointed Queen’s Council, and from 1973 to 1977 he served as counsel for B’nai Brith Canada. After his retirement from practice in 1993, the Province of Ontario appointed him presiding Justice of the Peace for Ontario and Deputy Judge in Small Claims Court. His first marriage was to Sandra Newman in 1958 and they had three children together: Leslie, Lee, and Melanie. He later married Joan and became the step-father to her daughter, Erin. Throughout his life Morley was passionate about fighting prejudice and discrimination and became involved with organizations, such as the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews and the Urban Alliance on Race Relations. He was also a member of the Toronto Police Services Board Committee on Race Relations, served as Chair of the North York Committee on Community, Race and Ethnic Relations, and was appointed to the Canadian Multiculturalism Council. In addition, he was the founding president of Toronto Residents in Partnership (TRIP) from 2003 to 2006. His involvement extended to Jewish organizations. He served as National President of B’nai Brith Canada (BBC) from 1982 to 1983 and was a founding member of its League for Human Rights. He was also President of BBC’s Toronto Regional Council and Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998, and of the Jewish Camp Council of Toronto as well as many other organizations. Morley’s hard work and involvement in the community earned him many awards, including, City of Toronto’s William P. Hubbard Race Relations Award, the YMCA Canada Peace Medal, B’Nai Brith Canada Service Award, and the Province of Ontario’s Senior Achievement Award. Around 2002, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 began filing a series of appeals with B’nai Brith International (BBI) over concerns that BBC’s national executive was governing undemocratically. Morley played a key role in filing these appeals and was the centre of one appeal filed after BBC censured him without advance notice or the opportunity for a hearing. These appeals were not all successful. Around 2006, Morley became involved in another appeal against BBC that was filed by a group of members who called themselves the Concerned Members of B’nai Brith Canada (CMOBBC). They alleged that BBC’s national executive had too much centralized power, was not governing transparently, failed to provide members with audited financial statements at multiple annual general meetings (AGMs), passed a constitution that members had defeated at the 2005 AGM, and was threatening and harassing some members. BBI’s appeal court rendered its verdict in 2007 in favour of BBC. Soon after this judgment was made BBC took steps to expel all the members of CMOBBC. In response, Morley resigned from the organization. Morley currently resides in Brampton.
Subjects
Law
Women
Name Access
Wolfe, Morley, 1928-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-7
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 10 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1986, 1991-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the personal and professional activities of Janice Benatar. Personal records include a family tree, speeches Janice delivered at the Lipa Lippers Toastmaster's Group meetings, a Sephardic cookbook, immigration papers, and a Sharon School Reunion invitation for alumni living in Toronto. Also included are photographs of Janice with her family, performing in a ballet production with the Academy of Ballet and Jazz, with her newborn son, at her son's bar mitzvah at Chabad Flamingo, and with the keys to her first home in Thornhill. Also identified in photographs are: Elan Levitan, Viviane Benatar, Michael Benatar, Claudia Benatar, Rachel Pasternak, and Samuel Pasternak.
Also included are speeches, invitations, event programs, and video recordings of Book Of Life events as well as a bookmark that was designed by artist Enya Keshet for Book of Life honourees. Finally, accession also includes Professional Advisory Committee meeting minutes (2009-2015) and breakfast seminar presentations (2014-2015).
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes 7 photographs, 4 DVDs, 200 KB of textual records, and 1 bookmark.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Philanthropy and fundraising
Women
Name Access
Jewish Foundation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-14
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-14
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1.8 m of textual records and graphic material
Date
1989-2000
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records created by UJA Federation's Women's Campaign and Advocacy. The records consist of general subject files that document the breadth of work of the WC&A, including the operation of its executive board and committees, fundraising campaigns and the various giving levels, missions, volunteer management, outreach efforts, programming, as well as the WC&A's relationship with the Jewish Women's Federation.
Custodial History
These records appear to have originated with Frances Goldstein.
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Subjects
Philanthropy and fundraising
Women
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Jewish Women's Federation (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-6-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-6-8
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1.4 m of textual records and graphic material
Date
1959-2001
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to Esther Matlow's involvement as both a member and as a former President of Hadassah-WIZO of Canada. By extension, the records also reflect the activities of World WIZO and Hadassah International. Included are meeting minutes and associated board reports; speeches and greetings; general correspondence; Hadassah publicity and informational materials including Orah Magazine; bulletins and president's newsletters; seminar materials; conference materials; and honours and certificates. There is also material related to Matlow's personal affairs, including letters written to news media outlets with her husband Irving, personal correspondence, and several cookbooks including one compiled of Esther's recipes created in 2001 in her honour. Also included is a personal memoir written by Irving Matlow for his children.
Administrative History
Esther (née Climans) Matlow (1930-2012) served as national president of the Hadassah-WIZO Organization of Canada from Nov. 1990 to Nov. 1993, presiding over the organizations 75th anniversary celebrations. Her term of office spanned an historic period from the events leading up to and including the Persian Gulf War to the signing of the Middle East peace accords. A forty-year member of the organization, she served it in a variety of executive capacities before her election as president. She was married to Irving Matlow for 60 years and had four children, Anne, Ruth, Elaine, and David. Esther passed away on 1 Dec. 2012.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIAL NOTE: Library and Archives Canada hold the Esther Matlow fonds, MG31 H187.
Subjects
Women
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Matlow, Esther, 1930-2012
Hadassah-WIZO Organization of Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-3-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-3-2
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
10 cm of textual and graphic material (2 vol.)
Date
1976-1993
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a scrapbook documenting the Yedidot Chapter of the National Council of Jewish Women and a photo album documenting programming of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Canada (Toronto). The Scrapbook includes photographs, invitations and notes, programmes and other related ephemera. The album includes photographs documenting the Summer Seminar on Jewish Genealogy held in Toronto on June 27-30, 1993 at the Park Plaza Hotel.
Administrative History
The Yedidot Chapter was formed in 1977. Chairpersons included Marsh Cohen (1976-1977); Cheryl Sonenberg (1977-1978); Noreen Horowitz (1978-1979); Adena Glasner (1979-1980); Elaine Safer (1980-1981); Blanca Abramson (1981-1982); Pauline Gold (1982-1983); Isabel Schnapp (1983-1984); Paula Frisch (1984-1985): Ellen Lewkowicz (1985-1986).
Subjects
Genealogy
Women
Name Access
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada
Jewish Genealogical Society of Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-21
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-21
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
multiple media
Physical Description
113 cm of textual and other records
1 scrapbook
Date
1938-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Act to End Violence Against Women organization. Included are: meeting minutes of the executive board; a ledger containing executive board waivers of notice; meeting minutes and resolutions from the yearly conventions; photographs of Act to End Violence Against Women members; correspondence with other organizations; correspondence, research material, public reactions, and ephemera from various campaigns; a commemorative booklet for a B'nai Brith cantorial concert; a scrapbook on the formation of the B'nai Brith Women Claire Morry Chapter; constitutions, constitutional amendments, reports, budgets, resolutions and other records of Act to End Violence Against Women; member lists and honour roll of past chapters; material and correspondence with B'nai Brith Washington; UJA material concerning assimilation and intermarriage and 2001 Jewish census data results.
Administrative History
The first Canadian chapter of B'nai Brith Women International was formed in Windsor, Ontario in 1923. Other chapters were soon formed throughout Eastern Canada and additional chapters were established in Winnipeg and British Columbia after 1949. The organization was initially administered by the American B'nai Brith Women. In 1976, it finally became autonomous (although still affiliated with the American agency) and changed its name to B'nai Brith Women of Eastern Canada. In 1981, its name was changed again to B'nai Brith Women of Canada. In 1995, the organization became known as Jewish Women International of Canada (JWIC). In November 2011, the organization underwent a final name change to Act to End Violence Against Women.
JWIC is committed to social change, with a particular focus on improving the lives of women and their families. In the 1980s, the agency initiated programs to counter domestic violence and began operating safe housing for Jewish women and children known as ASTEH (Alternative Safe Temporary Emergency Housing). JWIC also runs the JWI Residential Treatment Centre for emotionally disturbed youth.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: Material in English, Russian and French.
Subjects
Charities
Family violence
Women
Name Access
Act to End Violence Against Women
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 2; File 368
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
2
File
368
Material Format
textual record
Date
1994
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Subjects
Church and state
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Accession Number
2005-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 2; File 536
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
2
File
536
Material Format
textual record
Date
1997
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Subjects
Church and state
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Accession Number
2005-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 2; File 1089
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
2
File
1089
Material Format
textual record
Date
1996
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Subjects
Church and state
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Accession Number
2005-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Morris Norman collection
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 22; Item 46
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Morris Norman collection
Level
Item
Fonds
22
Item
46
Material Format
textual record
Date
1987
Physical Description
1 item
Name Access
Congregation Shaarei Tzedec (Toronto, Ont.)
Subjects
High Holidays
Synagogues
Women
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2009-1-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-1-2
Material Format
textual record
moving images
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
2 videocassettes (each 44 min, 39 sec.)
Date
1969, 1997
Scope and Content
This accession consists of a 1969 letter from Senator A[rthur] W. Roebuck, responding to a thank-you letter sent by Mrs. Sydney Cooper and Mrs. Minden, co-chairs of Crown Gifts division, and Mrs. Allen A. Small, chair of the Women's Division of UJA. The letter refers to the recent visit of a group of women who visited the Parliament buildings in Ottawa and were received by Senator Roebuck. The other items in the accession are a video and guidebook set entitled 'Untying the Bonds... Jewish Divorce: a GET Education Video & Guidebook, Fall 1997."
Custodial History
The records were in the office of Frances Goldstein, Associate Director for Top Gifts at UJA's Centre for Philanthropy, before being transferred to the OJA. Goldstein was formerly the head of Women's Campaign.
Administrative History
The Canadian Coalition of Jewish Women for the GET was composed of all the major Jewish women's organizations, which joined forces in the late 1980s to have the federal Divorce Act amended. The Jewish Women's Federation was one of these organizations; the others were Jewish Women International of Canada, Emunah Women of Canada, Hadassah-WIZO Organization of Canada, Na’amat Canada, Canadian ORT, Women’s Federation CJA, National Council of Jewish Women of Canada, Status of Women Committee of Canadian Jewish Congress and Women’s League of Conservative Judaism. In 1990, as part of a lobbying group that included B'nai Brith, Canadian Jewish Congress, and religious groups of all faiths, the Coalition succeeded in having a protective clause added to the Divorce Act, ensuring that no spouse should retain barriers to the religious remarriage of their ex-spouse in a divorce in Canada. The Coalition went on after its successful legislative reform campaign to produce an educational video on Jewish divorce and continue with its activism and public awareness building.
Subjects
Women
Get (Jewish law)
Source
Archival Accessions
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