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4 records – page 1 of 1.
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Al Gilbert portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 37; Series 4; Item 36
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Al Gilbert portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
37
Series
4
Item
36
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1987]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 11 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Edwin "Eddy" Alan Goodman was born to David Bertram and Dorothy Soble on October 11, 1918. He married Suzanne Dorothy Gross and they had two children named Joanne Ruth and Diane Selena.
He was a barrister and solicitor with Goodman and Goodman along with his father, who was also a prominent barrister. Eddy Goodman was an active leader within the Jewish community. His accomplishments include: Past President of the National Ballet Company; Vice-President of the Progressive Conservative Association of Canada; Past President of University College at the University of Toronto; honorary counsel for United Jewish Welfare Fund; Past President of Toronto Chapter, Canadian Friends of the Hebrew University; Director YM-YWHA; and Director, New Mount Sinai Hospital. In 1987, Edwin Goodman was the honourary guest at the Negev Dinner held at the Royal York Hotel in Toronto.
Scope and Content
Photograph of Edwin Alan Goodman posing in a photography studio. This photograph may have been taken for Edwin Goodman's Negev Dinner Tribute book in 1987.
Name Access
Goodman, Eddie
Subjects
Lawyers
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2018-1-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-1-6
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
20 photographs : col. ; 10 x 15 cm
1 plaque
Date
1978, 2016-2017
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two thank-you notes addressed to Morley Wolfe from Supreme Court Justice Rosalie Abella, as well as a plaque in appreciation presented to Wolfe for inspiring the genesis of CASTS (Canadians Against Slavery and Torture in Sudan), which led to a larger coalition in Canada against the genocide in Darfur. There is also an accompanying photo on printer paper of Wolfe receiving the plaque from Dr. Norman Epstein alongside C. Arthur Dowes. Finally, there is photo scrapbook compiled by Arnold Lipshitz documenting the Advocates Society's trip to Israel. The Advocates Society was made up of judges and lawyers in Ontario. Identified in the photographs are Franz Bowman; Barbara Bowman; Kathy Parkinson; Sandra Newman; Douglas Caruthers; Cecile Goldenberg and Morley Wolfe.
Administrative History
Morley S. Wolfe was born in Winnipeg in 1928 to Cecil (b. 1895) and Betty (nee Davidow) Wolfe. He spent his early childhood in various cities in Saskatchewan and Manitoba until moving to Toronto in 1940. Soon after graduating from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1955 he started his own practice as a senior member of the law firm Burt, Burt, Wolfe and Bowman. In 1971 he was appointed Queen’s Council, and from 1973 to 1977 he served as counsel for B’nai Brith Canada. After his retirement from practice in 1993, the Province of Ontario appointed him presiding Justice of the Peace for Ontario and Deputy Judge in Small Claims Court. His first marriage was to Sandra Newman in 1958 and they had three children together: Leslie, Lee, and Melanie. He later married Joan and became the step-father to her daughter, Erin. Throughout his life Morley was passionate about fighting prejudice and discrimination and became involved with organizations, such as the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews and the Urban Alliance on Race Relations. He was also a member of the Toronto Police Services Board Committee on Race Relations, served as Chair of the North York Committee on Community, Race and Ethnic Relations, and was appointed to the Canadian Multiculturalism Council. In addition, he was the founding president of Toronto Residents in Partnership (TRIP) from 2003 to 2006. His involvement extended to Jewish organizations. He served as National President of B’nai Brith Canada (BBC) from 1982 to 1983 and was a founding member of its League for Human Rights. He was also President of BBC’s Toronto Regional Council and Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998, and of the Jewish Camp Council of Toronto as well as many other organizations. Morley’s hard work and involvement in the community earned him many awards, including, City of Toronto’s William P. Hubbard Race Relations Award, the YMCA Canada Peace Medal, B’nai Brith Canada Service Award, and the Province of Ontario’s Senior Achievement Award. Around 2002, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 began filing a series of appeals with B’nai Brith International (BBI) over concerns that BBC’s national executive was governing undemocratically. Morley played a key role in filing these appeals and was the centre of one appeal filed after BBC censured him without advance notice or the opportunity for a hearing. These appeals were not all successful. Around 2006, Morley became involved in another appeal against BBC that was filed by a group of members who called themselves the Concerned Members of B’nai Brith Canada (CMOBBC). They alleged that BBC’s national executive had too much centralized power, was not governing transparently, failed to provide members with audited financial statements at multiple annual general meetings (AGMs), passed a constitution that members had defeated at the 2005 AGM, and was threatening and harassing some members. BBI’s appeal court rendered its verdict in 2007 in favour of BBC. Soon after this judgment was made BBC took steps to expel all the members of CMOBBC. In response, Morley resigned from the organization. Morley currently resides in Brampton.
Descriptive Notes
SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE: See accession record for page numbers of identified individuals.
Subjects
Lawyers
Name Access
Wolfe, Morley S., 1928-
Places
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-5-17
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-5-17
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
2.4 m of textual records
Date
[ca. 1998]-[ca. 2001]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the records or Keith Landy, created during his tenure as Chair of the Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region. Records include officers and executive meetings, general correspondence, clippings and reference material specifically related to antisemitism and the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, and records documenting interactions with other organizations such as Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, UJA Federation of Greater Toronto, Jewish Immigrant Aid Services and Canadian Council of Christians and Jews.
Custodial History
These records were being housed at Keith Landy's former law office. OJA archivists visited the space and retrieved the records of interest.
Administrative History
Keith M. Landy (ca. 1950-2017) was born in Coventry, England and moved with his family to South Africa, then immigrated to Canada. He was the senior and founding partner of the Toronto law firm Landy Marr Kats LLP and was certified as a specialist in civil litigation by the Law Society of Upper Canada.
Keith was a respected leader of the Jewish community in Toronto. He devoted much of his life to fighting antisemitism and racism and to advocating for the Jewish community and other minority groups both in Canada and abroad.
From 1998-2001, Landy was the Chair of the Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region (CJC). As Chair of CJC Ontario, Landy successfully lobbied for passage of the Holocaust Memorial Day – Yom Hashoah- Act by the Ontario Legislature. He served as the CJC's National Honorary Legal Counsel from 1995-1998 and was counsel for CJC at the Somalia Inquiry, and at the Supreme Court of Canada in Human Rights Commission v. Malcolm Ross and New Brunswick Teachers Federation. From 2001 to 2004, Landy acted as National President of CJC. In 2008, he served as chair of the CJC's War Crimes Committee.
In addition to the CJC, Landy was a Vice President of the World Jewish Congress, was a member of the Executive Committee of the Conference on Jewish Material Claims, and a Governor of the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews (CCCJ), a national, non-sectarian organization dedicated to promoting cultural, racial, and religious equality among the people of Canada, through education and research. Landy was also an active member of the Jewish Agency for Israel.
Landy has also served as a delegate to the United Nations' World Conference Against Racism, Racial Discrimination and Xenophobia in Durban, South Africa. In April 2004, he was a member of the official Canadian governmental delegation to the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) conference on antisemitism.
In 2002, Landy was awarded The Queen’s Golden Jubilee Medal for his significant contribution to Canada, to the community and to his fellow Canadians. In June, 2005, Keith was the recipient of The Lincoln Alexander Award by the Law Society of Upper Canada, recognizing his commitment to public and community service and to the people of Ontario. Keith was honoured for being a champion for human rights and religious tolerance throughout his longstanding career as a lawyer and community leader.
Landy died in February 2017.
Subjects
Lawyers
Name Access
Landy, Keith, ca. 1950-2017
Canadian Jewish Congress. Ontario Region
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
David Vanek fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
David Vanek fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1906-1999
Physical Description
12 cm of textual records
10 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
David Vanek (1915-2008) was born on a farm in Whitchurch Township, York County, Ontario in 1915. He was the sixth of seven children born to Jacob and Jesse Vanek, Jewish-Russian immigrants from the Ukraine who immigrated to Canada in 1913. The family lived in the Newmarket-Oak Ridges area, where they owned a farm and the Vanek Grocery and Confectionary Store in Oak Ridges. The family also owned Cedarholm Park in Lake Wilcox, which had a bandstand and cottages and sold refreshments. They opened the park specifically for Jews who were being excluded from other nearby social venues. The family also lived in Toronto.
Vanek completed his elementary school education at Annette Street Public School and attended Richmond Hill High School and Harbord Collegiate. He was admitted to the honour law course at the University of Toronto. In 1936, he graduated with a bachelor of arts in honour law and went on to law school at Osgoode Hall. While in law school he worked for Carswell’s Canadian Law Abridgement and was editor of the Obiter Dicta student publication at Osgoode Hall. He received his LLB in 1939.
During the Second World War Vanek served in the Canadian Intelligence Corps and Field Security in England from 1943 to 1945. Following his military service he returned to Toronto where he tried private practice briefly before beginning a new career as a lecturer in the newly created Faculty of Law at the University of Toronto. He taught a variety of subjects, including legal bibliography, real property, and public international law.
A community activist, Vanek was the founder of the Lawrence Manor Ratepayers Association. In 1963, he ran for the Ontario Provincial Legislature as a Conservative candidate, but failed to win the seat. He was the founder of the Credit Counselling Service of Metropolitan Toronto, which was established in 1965. Vanek was also actively involved in the new Reform congregation Temple Sinai and served as its third president.
In September 1968, Vanek was appointed to the magistrates' court. A few months later, the Provincial Courts Act came into being and he became a judge of the provincial court, criminal division. Vanek presided over and wrote judgements in many significant cases including Weightman and Cunningham, involving the residual power of a trial judge to stop unfair prosecution, and Squires, involving the lawful exclusion of cameras from the courtroom. His best known case was that of Susan Nelles, a nurse who was charged with the death of four babies at Toronto’s Hospital for Sick Children in the early 1980s. He also served as president of the Ontario Provincial Judges' Association. In 1989, after twenty-one years on the bench, David Vanek retired. A decade later he published his autobiography, Fulfilment : Memoirs of a Criminal Court Judge, which documents his life and career.
David Vanek married Joyce Lester in 1942 and the couple had three children. Vanek died in 2008.
Custodial History
The records were donated to the Ontario Jewish Archives by David Vanek in July 2000. The records were used to help with the researching of his autobiography.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of textual records and graphic material that document Vanek's family history and career as a prominent lawyer and provincial court judge in Ontario. The fonds includes family records from Russia, newspaper articles, correspondence and documentation relating to his military service during the Second World War, and press clippings and photographs of his family and community activities. The fonds has been arranged into the following series: Personal records, Military service records, Occupational records, and Community organizations.
Name Access
Vanek, David, 1915-2008
Subjects
Judges
Lawyers
Creator
Vanek, David, 1915-2008
Accession Number
2000-7-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
4 records – page 1 of 1.

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