Search Results

New Search Photo Search Audiovisual Search
235 records – page 1 of 5.
Accession Number
2014-7-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-7-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of items gathered to comprise the time capsule commemorating the 60th anniversary of the Miles Nadal JCC. Documents include event programmes, ticket stubs, a timeline, a summary of the history of the Miles Nadal JCC, and several newspaper clippings.
Subjects
Anniversaries
Name Access
Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-4
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1 m textual records and other materials
Date
1915-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of personal and professional materials of Gerald Tulchinsky. Documents include agendas and journals written between 1958 and 2013, clippings, research notes, articles, correspondence and vacation souvenirs. Among the resarch materials are notes, oral histories and films on Joe Salsberg for Tulchinsky's book, Joe Salsberg: A Life of Commitment. Photographs pertain mainly to Tulchinsky's Salsberg research material but there are also personal photographs of Tulchinsky family gatherings. The audio cassettes include several oral histories used for Tulchinsky's research. The stamps appear on empty envelopes addressed to different recipients, including Tulchinsky's parents, Harry and Anne Tulchinsky, with return addresses from all over the world.
Administrative History
Dr. Gerald Tulchinsky is Professor Emeritus at Queen's University, Department of History, and author of several books on the history of Canadian Jewry and labour issues in Canada. His books include: Shtetl on the Grand (2015); Joe Salsberg: A Life of Commitment (2013); Canada's Jews: A People's Journey (2008); Branching Out: The Transformation of the Canadian Jewish Community (1998); Taking Root: The Origins of the Canadian Jewish Community (1992); and The River Barons: Montreal Businessmen and the Growth of Industry and Transportation, 1837-53 (1977).
Tulchinsky was born in Brantford, Ontario in 1933 to Harry and Anne Tulchinsky. He currently resides in Kingston, Ontario.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: Includes textual records, ca. 50 stamps, ca. 20 photographs, 2 video cassettes, 6 audio cassettes
Name Access
Tulchinsky, Gerald, 1933-
Salsberg, Joseph, 1902-1998
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-12
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
7 photographs : b&w and col. (tiff)
Date
[1970?]-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of Ben and Carrie Grossman and their family at family gatherings. Identified in the photographs are: Carrie Grossman, Ben Grossman, Jack Grossman, Warren Grossman, Rita Bergstein, Borris Litman, Ruth Malka Grossman, Miriam (Mimi) Grossman, Lillian Rose, Martha Sud, Hilda Grossman, and David Sud.
Subjects
Jewish families
Photography of families
Name Access
Grossman, Carrie
Grossman, Ben
Grossman, Jack
Grossman, Warren
Bergstein, Rita
Litman, Borris
Grossman, Ruth
Grossman, Miriam
Rose, Lillian
Sud, Martha
Grossman, Hilda
Sud, David
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-10
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
5 cm of textual records
Date
1988-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting Cyrel Troster's Jewish communal involvement, particularly with cultural planning for UJA Federation. Included are event inviations, program books, brochures, a postcard, meeting minutes, reports, and flyers. Records relate to the following agencies and projects: UJA Federation of Greater Toronto, the Tomorrow Campaign, Anshei Minsk Synagogue, Holy Blossom Temple, Shareeh Haim Synagogue, the Jewish Museum in Toronto, reports on Jewish education in Toronto, the Toronto Jewish Film Festival, the Holocaust Centre of Toronto, and the Koffler Centre. Of note is a copy of a study commissioned by UJA Federation for Frank Gehry, who was originally approached to design the Koffler Gallery.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Troster, Cyrel
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
10 cm textual records
ca. 70 photographs: b&w and col. ; 10 cm x 15 cm or smaller
1 scrapbook
Date
1963-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the activities of "Council '63", a branch of the Toronto Section of the National Council of Jewish Women of Canada (NCJWC). Types of records include a photograph album, a scrapbook, correspondence, souvenirs, meeting minutes, membership lists, program materials and budgets.
Administrative History
The "Council '63" Branch of the Toronto Section of the National Council of Jewish Women of Canada (NCJWC) was formed in 1963. Currently consisting of 20 members, the group was initially spearheaded by Barbara Norwich (d. 2011), and they met regularly in homes in the Cedarvale area. The group primarily did volunteer work, although it later evolved into a study group and book club.
Subjects
Women
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
National Council of Jewish Women (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-4
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1.2 m of textual records and other material
Date
[ca. 1936]-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the activities of Eitz Chaim. Included are photographs, yearbooks, class lists and registers, teachers record books and student grade reports, curriculum materials, anniversary books and 2 DVDs from a gala dinner and fundraising event. Also included is the Beth Jacob High School dedication and founders dinner book.
Administrative History
Known then as the Poylishe Talmud Torah, Eitz Chaim began in 1915 with a few students in one classroom guided by one teacher. The school’s first premises were in the Elm Street Shul. Within a year, a second teacher, Reb Leibish Noble, was hired, and he remained actively involved in Eitz Chaim for 30 years. There were now 30 students in two classes. The four-hour nightly sessions were held at the end of the regular public school day with an additional six hours on Sunday. Classes continued throughout the summer as well.
The school’s first building on Chestnut Street was inaugurated in August 1916, with additional classes held at a branch on Simcoe Street. The second president of the school, Yosef Shidlowsky, in a move to be more inclusive of all Orthodox Jews, changed the name of the school to Talmud Torah Eitz Chaim.
In 1917, Mr. Shidlowsky, Itshe Meyer Korolnek, and Joseph Cooper managed not only to obtain a provincial charter to open a religious school, but were also instrumental in purchasing the Italian Club at 68 D’Arcy St. to accommodate the school’s growing enrollment.
In 1920, Rabbi Yehuda Leib Graubart arrived from Stashow, Poland, and assumed the post of spiritual leader of the Talmud Torah. He introduced more Hebrew instruction and a more intensive Torah curriculum.
In 1926, Rabbi Pinchas Ravad became the next principal, a position he retained for the next nine years. During that time, a separate girls’ class was formed and the first female teacher was hired. Although a fire in 1927 destroyed the wooden school building on D’Arcy St., a new, larger school was constructed on the same site and dedicated on December 30, 1927. After moving into the new building, student enrollment increased dramatically. Beginning with 300 students in 1929, the student body grew to 400 in 1931, 503 in 1933, and 600 in 1938.
After the passing of Rabbi Graubart, an evening high school yeshiva, the Maharil Graubart Yeshiva, was founded in 1939 to serve boys 14 years of age and up with Rav Yaakov Kamenetsky acting as rosh yeshiva beginning in 1941. The building next door to the Talmud Torah, at 80 D’Arcy Street, was purchased to provide space for the yeshiva and was connected via a walkway to the Talmud Torah. As the students of Eitz Chaim Talmud Torah graduated from the elementary school, they would eventually attend the Maharil Graubart Yeshiva. That same year, Rabbi Jacob I. Wohlgelernter became principal of the Talmud Torah and a kindergarten was added in 1942.
Seven years later, Rabbi Chaim Nussbaum officially assumed the role of principal of Eitz Chaim Schools. Beginning with only a grade 1, new grades were added every year until grades 1 through 9 were in place. Eitz Chaim gradually broadened its scope, welcoming Jewish students from many diverse backgrounds and establishing afternoon and day classes beginning in 1950 at a branch on Burnside Ave. To meet the growing demand for classes, the Torath Emeth Jewish Centre was established at 1 Viewmount Avenue in 1956.
By 1958, in response to the geographical shift of the Jewish population northward, the Tanenbaum Building was added to the complex, followed by the Korolnek Building in 1961, both at 1 Viewmount Avenue. By this time, Eitz Chaim had two principals: Rabbi Nussbaum, who oversaw Hebrew studies, and Rabbi Shlomo Jakubovitz, who oversaw general studies.
The two buildings on D’Arcy St. were sold in 1966 and the proceeds were designated toward purchasing a new school building to the north of the city. Rabbi Shlomo Jakobovits, Avraham Bleeman, Joe Goldwasser and Sam Wortsman led the way in persuading the Board of Directors to purchase the land at Patricia and Bathurst Streets. Patricia and Bathurst Streets served as the temporary location for portable units until the large, permanent building was completed in 1970. This location evolved into the boys’ campus, servicing students from all areas of the city.
Rabbi Shneur Weinberg succeeded Rabbi Nussbaum in 1969 and served as the Hebrew principal until his retirement in 1995, when Rabbi Aaron Levine took over. The position of Hebrew studies principal for the girls’ school was created in 1974 and was held by Rabbi Leibish Adler for 26 years. Rabbi Mordechai Gewirts succeeded Rabbi Adler in 2002 and was principal of the girls’ school until 2012. Eitz Chaim Schools developed rapidly and acquired an excellent reputation among North American day schools.
The female graduates of Eitz Chaim, for the most part, attended public high school. To counter this trend, Beth Jacob High School, with the guidance of Eitz Chaim, was launched in 1963, with classes conducted near the Viewmount branch. In 1966, the Beth Jacob High School and Teacher’s Seminary was completed on Lawrence Avenue, culminating in the opening of a girls’ high school that became completely independent of Eitz Chaim. Today, many female graduates of Etiz Chaim continue their education at Beth Jacob High School.
The Spring Farm campus, named for the farm formerly on that site, opened its doors in 1988. Currently, Eitz Chaim serves primarily as an elementary educational institute under the guidance of Rabbi Isser Pliner.
History from http://www.eitzchaim.com/index.php?page=history (viewed Oct. 6, 2014)
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Physical Description note: Includes ca. 500 photographs, texts, 2 DVDs and 1 betacam cassette.
Use Conditions note: student grade reports are closed until 30 years after the death of the individual.
Subjects
Education
Children
Name Access
Eitz Chaim Schools (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
15 cm of textual records
Date
1974-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the involvement of Rolf Lederer in a variety of community organizations, including Congregation B'nai Torah, the Jewish Genealogical Society of Canada (Toronto), United Jewish Appeal, Jewish Immigrant Aid Society, the Chaplaincy Committees of the Toronto Jewish Congress and Jewish Family and Child Service. Included is general correspondence; newsletters; event, workshop and seminar materials; meeting minutes and agendas; and a SAJAC newsletter.
Name Access
Lederer, Rolf
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
40 cm of textual records and other material
Date
[192-]-[200-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the life and career of David Green and the Jaffey family. Records include sound and video recordings of events, Goodwill Sales accounting ledgers, meeting minutes from the Jewish Canadian Military Archives and Museum, David Green's military ephemera, manuals and reports of the Jewish Federation Board of Trustees and Bequest and Endowment Fund, and Jaffey family correspondence and photographs. Records also include certificates of appreciation awarded to David Green, mainly from UJA Federation.
Administrative History
David Green (1919-2014) was born in the Junction in west Toronto. He served as a private in the Canadian army as part of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. He was captured and designated MIA when he was held as a POW in Belgium. He became a member of General Wingate Branch 256 Jewish Canadian Legion. In the mid-1940s he married his wife, Sylvia (nee Jaffey) (d. 2010) and they had a daughter, Miriam. He was a longtime volunteer for the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto. In 1990, he was one of the first individuals to establish an Endowment Fund at the Jewish Foundation of Greater Toronto.
The Jaffey family consisted of Kaby Jaffey, his wife, Nellie, and their children Sylvia, Jess and Albert.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: Accession also consists of photographs and textiles.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
Charities
Jewish families
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Green, David, 1919-2014
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-3
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
40 cm textual records
ca. 50 photographs
Date
1940-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records of Canadian Young Judaea. Records include correspondence, camp committee meeting minutes, camp committee and staff lists, the CYJ constitution, organizational newsletters, donation lists, flyers and camp reunion ephemera. Records also include clippings and reproductions from the Zionist Archives, and Camp Solelim photographs, as well as publications from other Jewish organizations.
Administrative History
Canadian Young Judaea was founded in 1909 as a Zionist movement for Canadian youth by members of the Herzl Zion Club. As a Zionist organization, Young Judaea continues to be committed to fostering a sense of Jewish identity and values in today's Jewish youth and to encouraging a lifelong commitment to Israel. In order to foster a closer connection to Israel, Canadian Young Judaea employs educational Shlichim from Israel who are posted to various Jewish communities throughout Canada and to offices at the national level in Toronto Young Judaea also operates several Zionist summer camps located in each region of Canada, and a summer leadership institute called Camp Biluim in Quebec. In addition to the social programme of the organization, Young Judaea also offers educational seminars and conferences.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Access restriction note: Files contain personal information of donors, campers, committee members and applicants for subsidies.
Subjects
Jewish camps
Jewish youth
Zionism
Name Access
Canadian Young Judaea
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-1
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
45 cm of textual records
Date
2006-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of Executive Committee and Board of Director packages distributed to members prior to meetings. Included in the packages are previous meeting minutes, agendas, and ancillary reports. The Executive Committee packages are from 2006-2008 and 2010-2011 and the Board of Director packages are from 2006-2008.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
Date
1948-1949; 1997-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the literary career and personal life of Dr. Gerald Tulchinsky. Included are manuscripts for several short stories and a book, general correspondence and notes, thoughts and ponderings, article and book reviews and records related to his time at Yeshiva in New York.
Administrative History
Dr. Gerald Tulchinsky is Professor Emeritus at Queen's University, Department of History, and author of several books on the history of Canadian Jewry and labour issues in Canada. His books include: Shtetl on the Grand (2015); Joe Salsberg: A Life of Commitment (2013); Canada's Jews: A People's Journey (2008); Branching Out: The Transformation of the Canadian Jewish Community (1998); Taking Root: The Origins of the Canadian Jewish Community (1992); and The River Barons: Montreal Businessmen and the Growth of Industry and Transportation, 1837-53 (1977).
Tulchinsky was born in Brantford, Ontario in 1933 to Harry and Anne Tulchinsky. He currently resides in Kingston, Ontario.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Subjects
College teachers
Jewish authors
Name Access
Tulchinsky, Gerald, 1933-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
7 photographs : b&w ; 23 x 36 cm or smaller
Date
1928-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the life and cantorial career of Rev. Alexander Steinberg, and to a lesser extent his son, Ben Steinberg. Included are photographs of Cantor Steinberg, fellow cantors and the Shaarei Shomayim cheder class; Cantor Steinberg's scrapbook; hand-copied solo and choral music books; correspondence; and materials relaing to Ben Steinberg's cantata Echoes of Children memorializing the children who perished in the Holocaust.
Administrative History
Chazzan Alexander Steinberg was born Eliyahu Steinberg in Zhitomeir, Ukraine in 1893 to Chava and Chaim Steinberg. His father was the owner and operator of a lumber yard and, as a devout Jew, brought his son Eliyahu regularly to the synagogue where he developed a love of chazzanut and, in the then traditional apprenticeship method, studied the skills which would lead him eventually to a lifetime career in the music of the traditional synagogue.
At the age of 15 he emigrated to Winnipeg, Canada and worked in a men's clothing store until he could find employment as a cantor. He began his professional life as a visiting cantor in the 1920s, travelling to smaller communities in Alberta and Saskatchewan, officiating at services for Shabbat, High Holy Days and the Fesitvals, as well as presenting concerts of Hebrew and Yiddish song.
By the 1930s, he officiated regularly at the Atereth Yisrael Synagogue in Winnipeg and appeared as a concert cantor throughout the western Canadian provices (Lethbridge, Regina, Prince Albert, Edenbridge, Melville, Edmonton, Calgary, etc.) as well as Ontario (London, Hamilton, Kitchener, Sarnia, Ottawa, Fort William and Toronto) and as far away as St. Louis, Missouri and Detroit, Michigan.
He was appointed cantor of Atereth Yisrael Congregation of Winnipeg in 1930 and maintained a relationship with that Shul throughout his time in Toronto, visiting regularly to daven and present concerts.
After the death of his first wife, he married Polly Shapiro in 1928, and in 1933 he moved his family including four children (three, Sam, Ida and Laurie from his previous marriage) to Toronto, where for a time he served as cantor at Goel Tzedec Congregation.
In Toronto, Cantor Steinberg became renowned for his beautiful tenor voice and his knowledge of the liturgy. He was much sought after and officiated througout the Toronto area in synagogues such as the Hebrew Men of England, Ostrovtzer, Beth Jacob, Kiever, Goel Tzedec, Palmerston, Anshei Minsk and Lubavitcher. All this activity brought him to the attention of various synagogues in the United States as well and he travelled to Detroit and Rochester on several occasions.
In 1941, he was appointed Cantor at Shaarei Shomayim on St. Clair Ave., a congreation he served until 1950. He continued to serve outlying congregations in Hamilton, London and Sarnia until he was invited in 1953 to establish the King David Congregation in Toronto, to serve the unaffiliated during the High Holy Days. His cantorial career came to an end in April 1960 when he experienced a heart attach in London, Ontario while leading that community's Pesach service. He died at home in Toronto two days before Yom Kippur in 1960.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Benjamin Steinberg is a composer, conductor, organist, and teacher. He was born in Winnipeg on 22 January 1930 and received his Bachelor of Music from the University of Toronto in 1961. He and his wife Mildred have two children.
A soloist at age 8 in the synagogue choir conducted by his father, Cantor Alexander Steinberg, he began conducting choirs himself at age 12. At the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto from 1948-1951 and 1957-1960 he studied composition with John Weinzweig, piano with Samuel Dolin, and voice with Weldon Kilburn. After teaching from 1953-1958 in public schools in the Toronto area and studying music education at the University of Toronto, he served from 1961-1964 as head of the music department at Winston Churchill Collegiate Institute and from 1961-1964 and in the same capacity at Forest Hill Collegiate Institute from 1964-1986. He was director of school music (1950-1960) and music director (1960-1969) at Holy Blossom Temple, and in 1970 he became music director at Temple Sinai. His method for youth choirs, "Together Do They Sing" (New York 1961), was commissioned and published by the Union of American Hebrew Congregations.
Steinberg's music includes five sacred services (four published - 1963, 1969, 1969, and 1990 - by Transcontinental Music); works for choir and/or soloist and organ or orchestra (some published by Transcontinental Music and Israeli Music Publications); The Vision of Isaiah (1970) for tenor, choir, and organ or instrumental ensemble; Yerushalayim (1973) for soprano, choir, and orchestra; Echoes of Children (1979), a cantata for soloist, narrator, chorus, and orchestra (which won the International Gabriel Award and has twice been televised on PBS); and instrumental works including a suite for flute and string trio based on Israeli folksongs. Steinberg was invited by the city of Jerusalem to be an artist-in-residence in 1978 and 1980; he received the Kavod (Honour) Award of the Cantor's Assembly in 1983, and that same year received a composer's award from the American Harp Society for his Suite for Flute, Viola and Harp (1981, commissioned by Suzanne Shulman). A number of temples, synagogues, and congregations in the USA commissioned some 18 works from Steinberg between 1980 and 1991. He has also received commissions from Paul Brodie (Suite Sephardi 1980), the Chamber Players of Toronto (Suite for String Orchestra 1983), and Lawrence Cherney (Invocations 1990). Baritone Richard Allen recorded several of Steinberg's works on the cassette A Ben Steinberg Concert. (ca 1989, Transcontinental unnumbered).
Of Steinberg's music Michael Isaacson wrote, 'While conservative, pragmatic and always well-mannered, it is also gratefully mindful of its tradition in a deeply lyrical way' (Journal of Synagogue Music, June 1973). Steinberg has presented Jewish music on the CBC, has published articles on it, and has given many lecture-recitals on it in Australia, Canada, Japan, and the USA. He is a contributor to EMC, a member of the CLComp, and an associate of the Canadian Music Centre.
Descriptive Notes
Biographical Note: Further biographical information on Ben Steinberg is available with the accession record.
Subjects
Cantors (Judaism)
Heder
Religion
Name Access
Steinberg, Alexander, 1893-1960
Steinberg, Ben
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-4
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 8 cm of textual records
Date
1984-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records predominantly related to UJA Federation of Greater Toronto's Community Planning and Allocations Committee. Records include studies, meeting minutes, correspondence, budgets and reports, most related to the plans for redevelopment of the Bathurst JCC. Records also include Bar Mitzvah benchers and Ashkenaz Festival promotional materials.
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-10
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
moving images
Physical Description
ca. 20 cm of textual records
ca. 50 photographs
2 videocassettes : VHS
Date
1985-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of mixed media material documenting SAJAC Seniors and the SAJAC News. SAJAC Seniors material includes newsletters, certificates, videocassettes, and photographs of events, such as chanukah luncheons and a group trip to 1000 Islands in Gananoque. Also included is one composite photograph with images of all the members in 2002 and a minute book (2000-2010) which contains minutes of general and annual meetings, financial statements, and annual reports. Accession also includes issues of the SAJAC News publication (2010-2014).
Administrative History
Thea was born in Estonia (Liebau) in 1918. She lived with her family in Berlin until they moved to Johannesberg, South Africa in 1923. Thea married Abe Bernard Abramson in 1942 and they had two children: Michael Julian (b. 1964) and Colleen "Chips". Michael passed away at a young age. Thea was a concert pianist and also worked as a bookeeper. She was a first league tennis player in South Africa and also played field hockey. She knits and does needlepoint as a hobby.
Colleen married Paul Klein around 1970. Colleen and Paul immigrated to Guelph in 1975. Thea and Abe immigrated to North York in 1981 (after the passing of Thea's mother). Abe was retired, but Thea continued to work as a pianist and accountant. She became involved with SAJAC Seniors in 1985. She alternated with other members as Chairperson of SAJAC Seniors for a few years, but held the role for over 25 straight years starting around 1990. Abe passed away in 2006.
SAJAC Seniors is a social organization that was formed in 1978 by Nancy Rubenstein for older South Africans who immigrated to Toronto. Many members had immigrated to Canada later in life to join children who had already moved here. The organization raises funds for various causes in Israel, holds luncheons, dinners, lectures and other social occassions, and organizes trips to cities across Canada.
Subjects
Newsletters
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Southern African Jewish Association of Canada (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-7
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
moving images
Physical Description
7.2 m of textual records and other material
Date
1923-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the Alpha Omega Fraternity, Pi Chapter, the Ladies Auxiliary, the AO Alumni Association, the AO Foundation and the AO House Association. Records include meeting minutes and reports, convention programs, general correpondence, newsletters, membership rosters, legal records, programs, photographs, budgets and other financial records, scrapbooks, AORTA yearbooks and efficiency reports detailing the activities of the AO during the year. Of particular note are the meeting minutes of the Mount Sinai Dental Society (1939-1946) and the Toronto Jewish Dental Society (1934-1935). There are also early photographs of John Sherman, one of the original founders of the AO, which were collected for an event in his honour.
Custodial History
The records were housed at the Fraternity House on Willowdale Rd. until its sale and the Fraternity's move to 4600 Bathurst St.
Administrative History
Alpha Omega is an international dental fraternity. It is the oldest international dental organization and was founded in Baltimore, Maryland in 1907 by a group of dental students originally to fight discrimination in dental schools. Today, with headquarters relocated to Glen Rock, NJ, it is primarily an educational and philanthropic organization. There are chapters and members in cities and dental schools in the United States, Canada, South America, Europe, Israel, South Africa and Australia/New Zealand. Alpha Omega represents about 6,000 active dentists worldwide.
The Alpha Omega International Dental Fraternity is dedicated to the following: to be "The Voice of the Jew In Dentistry"; to be "The Voice of Dentistry in all problems concerned with the Jewish Fate"; to uphold "The Image of the Jew in Dentistry"; to fight discrimination in the graduation of dental students from their respective schools, in procedures of licensing boards, in organized dentistry and in the private practice of dentistry.
The objectives of the Fraternity are to promote the profession of dentistry; to establish, foster and develop high standards of Scholarship, Leadership and Character; to inculcate a spirit of fellowship amongst all its members; to create and bind together a body of professional people, who, by scholarly attainments, faithful service and the maintenance of ethical ideals and principles, have achieved distinction; to honour achievement in others; to strive for breadth of vision, unity in action and accomplishment of ideals; to commend all worthy deeds, and if fraternal welfare demands, to call and counsel with its members; to accept, sponsor and develop the cultural and traditional achievements of our faith; to build within our fraternity a triangle, the base of which is Judaism, the supporting sides, professionalism and fraternalism.
The Toronto undergraduate chapter was founded in 1921 at the University of Toronto and the alumni chapter in 1924. The alumni continue to meet regularly and organize a variety of educational, networking, fundraising and social events for its membership.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Physical Description Note: Accession inclucdes scrapbooks, graphic material and a film reel.
Use Conditions Note: Financial materials and executive meeting minutes are closed for 15 years from date of creation. Membership rosters are closed for 50 years from date of creation.
Subjects
Greek letter societies
Occupations
Name Access
Alpha Omega Dental Society (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-5
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
2 folders of textual records
10 photographs
21 photographs (tiff)
Date
1957-2015, predominant 1987-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the activities of Colin and Brenda Baskind. Included are family photographs, such as a wedding portrait of Colin and Brenda, images of family events, graduation portraits of Colin's children, family holiday celebrations, Colin and Brenda running marathons, and the family at a baby naming ceremony for Colin's granddaughter at Darchei Noam Synanagoue. Textual records include thank you letters Colin received from individuals he assisted as President of SAJAC and in other capacities, the CV that Colin used to look for work in Toronto while preparing to immigrate from South Africa, a speech Brenda delivered to a cancer support group regarding her fight with breast cancer and marathon running, newsclippings, certificates, and letters of reference for both Colin and Brenda.
Identified in the photographs are: Colin Baskind, Brenda Baskind, Alan Sandler, Ian Sandler, Lorraine Sandler, Cliff Baskind, Stacey Baskind, Audrey Weinberg, Gerald Weinberg, Solly Simmons, Renee Simmons, Lily Shaie Baskind, Alana Baskind, and Refton Blair.
Administrative History
Colin Baskind was born in Johannesburg, South Africa, on April 20, 1943. As a child, he attended an all boys' school and played a wide variety of sports including, soccer, cricket and rugby. He studied commerce at the University of South Africa and completed a business course through a school in England. While in school he met his future wife, Brenda, on a blind date and they married in 1967. Together they had three children: Stacey, Alana and Cliff.
Colin worked in an import business and Brenda was a nursery school teacher. For a short period of time they cared for the grandson of their maid, whose daughter gave birth at a young age and was still in school. They raised him with their children until his mother was finished school.
Around 1976, Colin and Brenda started to think about leaving South Africa due to the worsening violence and political situation. After first considering Australia, they eventually immigrated to Toronto in 1987. Colin found work in the importing business and Brenda found work at Holy Blossom Temple school. Soon after arriving in Toronto, Colin became involved in the Southern African Jewish Association of Canada. He attended a meeting that had been called to resuscitate SAJAC (the organization, which was formed in 1977, had ceased functioning and there was a need to bring it back to help a new large wave of immigrants). At the meeting Colin was nominated as President and he has held this role ever since. Colin also volunteered with a variety of organizations including, JIAS and JVS. He continued with his athletic pursuits in Canada and jogged, hiked, and cycled in all weather. Around 1998, Brenda started to join Colin and his running group on jogs. Around 2000 they both began running in marathons. By 2015, they had participated in 11 marathons. In 2010, their granddaughter Lily Shaie was born to their daughter Stacey.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Baskind, Colin
Places
Johannesburg
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-8
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
18 photographs : tiff
Date
1969, 1974-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the Cohen family, their immigration to Canada from South Africa and life in Toronto. Textual records include photocopies of correspondence and paperwork relating to the Cohen's immigration, certificates, and a typed document containing humorous stories their South African friends shared at a "10 Years Out Of Africa" party relating to their adjustment to Canadian life. Also included are family portraits and photographs documenting family celebrations such as, weddings and bar mitzvahs. Of note is an image of Vivien and John at the "10 Years Out of Africa" party.
Administrative History
John Cohen was born in Johannesburg, South Africa in 1944 to Phil and Flora Cohen. Viviane (nee Lehwess) Cohen was born in Johannesburg, South Africa in 1947 to Henry and Isla Lehwess. John's cousin was in physiotherapy school with Viviane and they were introduced to each other. They married on Dec. 3, 1969 and had three children together: Nicole (b. 1972), Steven (b. 1974), and Jeremy David (1979). Viviane was a physiotherapist and John was a textile sales agent. Due to the unstable political situation in South Africa, they immigrated to North York in March 1977. For the first few weeks, they lived in a rental apartment in North York. They soon moved into a townhouse nearby. In 1980, they bought their first house in Thornhill. They were both able to continue in thier professions after immigrating to Canada. Both of their mothers and many of thier friends also moved to Toronto. John and Viviane were members of Shaarei Shalom synagogue for 25 years and are now members of Darchei Noam.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Cohen, John
Places
Johannesburg, South Africa
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-5-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-5-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of signed pages for the 2014 inductees into the Jewish Foundation's Book of Life. Names include: Cecil and Elaine Brauer; Congregation Bina; Senator David Croll; Joel Cuperfain; Judy Feld Carr; Mike and Sue Feldman; Marvin and Lillian Goldman; Judi Gottlieb; Daniel Hornik; William Lipsey; Mintz Family; Nathan Peck; Lori Rosenthal; Michael & Lom Schelew; David M. Sherman; Harold and Joan Somer; Didi Urbach; Saul Wagman; and Ernest (Ernie) Weiss. Also included is a program book from the Book of Life ceremonies.
Subjects
Philanthropy and fundraising
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Jewish Foundation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-5
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
4 cookbooks (pdf)
1 folder of textual records (pdf and tiff)
1 folder of textual records
ca. 1000 photographs (jpg)
Date
[ca. 1950]-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of scanned and photocopied material documenting the Hotz family's activities in South Africa and Canada. Included are family photographs, correspondence, invitations, programmes, school report cards, passports, newsclippings, a wedding speech, and certificates. Also included are copies of four South African Jewish cookbooks: Passover "Palatables", International Goodwill Recipe Book (1951 and 1969), and K.D.S. Recipe Book (1964).
Custodial History
Barbara Weisberg is the wife of Darrel Hotz. The material was either inherited by them after Darrel's parents passed away or created by Barbara and Darrel.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Language Note: English and Afrikaans.
Subjects
Cookbooks
Jewish families
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Hotz, Darrel
Wiseberg, Barbara
Places
South Africa
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 25 cm of textual records
Date
2012-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records of the Gittin performed by the Reform Rabbis of Greater Toronto.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director and Rabbi in charge of gittin (or the Chair of the Reform Rabbis of Greater Toronto) prior to accessing the records.
Descriptive Notes
Gittin are in sealed envelopes and identified by the surname(s) of parties involved. The start date assigned to this accession may not be accurate as the gittin are sealed and not all are marked with a date on the envelope.
Subjects
Religion
Name Access
Reform Rabbis of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-8
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 20 cm of textual records
Date
1984-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting the activities of SAJAC Seniors. The bulk of the material is newsletters and thank you letters that were sent to the organization. Other material includes, general correspondence, meeting agendas, an annual general meeting agenda, a draft constitution, membership lists and directories, financial statements, and newspaper clippings. Also included is a small ledger book which records all the letters sent out members between 2001 and 2014. Information included in the ledger book is the date, name of recipient, and the reason for sending the letter.
Custodial History
Rita Witkin is the Social Secretary for SAJAC Seniors. She created and/or maintained the records. She inherited a small amount of the documents from the previous Social Secretary, Gerald Berley.
Administrative History
SAJAC Seniors is a social organization that was formed in 1978 by Nancy Rubenstein for older South Africans who immigrated to Toronto. Many members had immigrated to Canada later in life to join children who had already moved here. The organization raises funds for various causes in Israel, holds luncheons, dinners, lectures and other social occassions, and organizes trips to cities across Canada.
Subjects
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
South African Jewish Association of Canada (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-5-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-5-2
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
98 photographs (tiff)
1 folder of textual records
Date
1932-2014, predominant 1947-1978
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the personal and professional activities of Percy Skuy. Photographs include: family portraits, school photographs, images of Percy as an apprentice pharmacist, images of Habonim camp in Vryheid, images of Frances as a child in Sudbury, images of Percy and Frances's honeymoon, images of Percy with his family in Toronto, images of trips back to South Africa, photos from the cottage, images of Percy receiving awards, and street scenes of Kensington Market (1978).
Also included is Percy's memoir entitled "My Story Unfolds", articles written by Percy for the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada, and a book wrtiien by Percy entitled "Tales of Contraception."
Administrative History
Percy Skuy was born in Vryheid, South Africa on February 17, 1932 to Benjamin and Chana (nee Cilevitz) Skuy. Percy is the middle of three children. His siblings are Max (b. 1929) and Rita (b. 1942). At seventeen, Percy began his apprenticeship and education to be a pharmacist. After qualifying as a pharmacist in 1954, he worked for a year at a pharmacy near Johannesburg before starting his travels through Europe, Australia and the United States. He had planned to return to South Africa, however, he did not have enough money for the fare back. Although he did not originally intend to visit Canada, he headed to Toronto to find a job so he could earn money for the passage home. He eventually secured a job with Glaxo Pharmaceuticals as a Medical Sales Representative and decided to stay. In 1959 he completed his requirements to become a liscenced pharmacist in Ontario and was the first South African pharmacist registered in Ontario.
Percy met Frances Goodman in 1960 on a blind date and they married that same year. Frances was a nurse from Sudbury. They had two children together: Beth (b. 1961) and David (b. 1963).
In 1961, Percy began his 34-year long career with the Johnson and Johnson Corporation. He had a variety of roles within the company and was President for 22-years with two Johnson & Johnson affiliate companies, namely Ortho Pharmaceutical (Canada) Ltd and Ortho-McNeil Inc. Percy is also the founder of the only museum devoted exclusively to the history of contraception located at the Dittrick Medical History Centre in Cleveland, Ohio.
Throughout his career, Percy has been appointed to a number of government and research councils including: the Premier's Council of Ontario, the Federal National Advisory Council on Pharmaceutical Research, and the Board of Governors of the Riverdale Hospital. In September 1995, Percy was inducted as a Candian Pioneer in Family Planning. He has also been an active member of the Rokeah Chapter of the Rho Pi Phi fraternity.
in 1977, Frances passed away. Percy eventually re-married to Elsa Ruth Snider on December 16, 1979.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Skuy, Percy, 1932-
Places
Vryheid, South Africa
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
8 cm of textual records
140 photographs : tiff
Date
[194-?]-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the activities of Ivor Simmons. Included is personal correspondence and photographs of Ivor's early life in South Africa and his family life and activities in Toronto. Of note are family portraits, Bialik Hebrew Day School class photos, Holy Blossom Temple Religious school images, images of the Toronto Island Yacht Club, images of Camp New Moon, Camp Ahmek, and Camp Walden, an image at Crystal Beach, and images of Ivor and his family visiting South Africa. Identified in the photographs are: Ivor Simmons, Milly Simmons, Jack Simmons, Renee Simmons, Gail Simmons, Alan Simmons, Eric Simmons, Anthony Giffard, Theo Wardaugh, Ruth Gold, Marlene Goldbach, Vicki Feraris, and Kim Bresge.
Administrative History
Ivor Simmons was born in Bloemfontein, South Africa in 1937 to Milly and Jack Simmons. He has two younger brothers: Michael (B. 1941) and David (b. 1945). Ivor's father owned a printing business. Ivor studied chemical engineering at the University of Capetown and found work at a petroleum refinery near Johannesburg soon after graduating. Around 1961, Ivor moved to London, England where he worked for the Lummus Company. He moved to Canada in 1963 and settled in Toronto. He worked for Union Carbide for a few years conducting industrial market research and then took a job performing the same work for Falconbridge Nickelmines. Around 1970, he opened his own business called A&A Liquid Waste Removal Company.
Ivor married Renee Rothman in 1966. Together they had three children: Alan, Eric, and Gail. Ivor sold his business in 1997. In his retirement, Ivor has volunteered with a variety of organizations including, animal and bird rehabilitations centres, Friends of Cedarvale, the Escarpment Biosphere Conservancy, and Trinity College (assisting with its annual book fair). Ivor is a member of Adath Israel Synagogue and was a member of B'nai Brith for many years.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Simmons, Ivor, 1937-
Places
Bloemfontein, South Africa
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-2
Material Format
textual record
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
14 photographs : tiff
Date
1961-[2014?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the activities of Max Skuy. Included are photocopies of short stories and poems written by Max and photographs of Max and Glenda's wedding, portraits of Max and his family, Max at the closing of the synagogue in Vryheid, and the window displays at Max's pharmacy in South Africa.
Administrative History
Max Skuy was born in Karsava, Latvia in 1929 to Benjamin and Chana (nee Cilevitz) Skuy. In 1930, Max and his mother immigrated to Vryheid, South Africa. They joined Max's father who was already living there. Max is the oldest of three children. His siblings are Percy (b. 1932) and Rita (b. 1942). Max married Glenda Silverstone in 1961. They had three children together. Max owned his own pharmacy in Durban called Check Pharmacy.
Max and Glenda immigrated to Toronto soon after Max's mother passed away in 1985. Max's children and brother Percy had already immigrated here. Max found work managing a furniture store in Richmond Hill. He is a member of a short story club and regularly submits stories and poems to the SAJAC News for publication.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Skuy, Max, 1929-
Places
Vryheid, South Africa
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records and other materials
Date
[197-]-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting personal and professional achievements of Morley S. Wolfe. It includes a photograph of Morley being introduced as B'Nai Brith Toronto Regional Council President, and a photograph of Morley addressing a group at B'Nai Brith Canada. Also includes two medals, one from Harbord Collegiate and a Peace Medal from the YMCA. There is a paper copy of a family tree created on the internet, a letter to the Toronto Star editor written by Wolfe, an article he wrote about jobs, a speech from his daughters for his 75th birthday, B'Nai Brith Central region mailing lists, material related to a donation to the Osgoode collections library from Morley Wolfe and the Osgoode class of 1955, two of Morley Wolfe's passports, a "Harbord Romeos" members list, a form nominating Karen Mock for the William Hubbard Award, and the text for a League for Human Rights of B'Nai Brith Canada brochure.
Administrative History
Morley S. Wolfe was born in Winnipeg in 1928 to Cecil (b. 1895) and Betty (nee Davidow) Wolfe. He spent his early childhood in various cities in Saskatchewan and Manitoba until moving to Toronto in 1940. Soon after graduating from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1955 he started his own practice as a senior member of the law firm Burt, Burt, Wolfe and Bowman. In 1971 he was appointed Queen’s Council, and from 1973 to 1977 he served as counsel for B’nai Brith Canada. After his retirement from practice in 1993, the Province of Ontario appointed him presiding Justice of the Peace for Ontario and Deputy Judge in Small Claims Court. His first marriage was to Sandra Newman in 1958 and they had three children together: Leslie, Lee, and Melanie. He later married Joan and became the step-father to her daughter, Erin. Throughout his life Morley was passionate about fighting prejudice and discrimination and became involved with organizations, such as the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews and the Urban Alliance on Race Relations. He was also a member of the Toronto Police Services Board Committee on Race Relations, served as Chair of the North York Committee on Community, Race and Ethnic Relations, and was appointed to the Canadian Multiculturalism Council. In addition, he was the founding president of Toronto Residents in Partnership (TRIP) from 2003 to 2006. His involvement extended to Jewish organizations. He served as National President of B’nai Brith Canada (BBC) from 1982 to 1983 and was a founding member of its League for Human Rights. He was also President of BBC’s Toronto Regional Council and Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998, and of the Jewish Camp Council of Toronto as well as many other organizations. Morley’s hard work and involvement in the community earned him many awards, including, City of Toronto’s William P. Hubbard Race Relations Award, the YMCA Canada Peace Medal, B’Nai Brith Canada Service Award, and the Province of Ontario’s Senior Achievement Award. Around 2002, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 began filing a series of appeals with B’nai Brith International (BBI) over concerns that BBC’s national executive was governing undemocratically. Morley played a key role in filing these appeals and was the centre of one appeal filed after BBC censured him without advance notice or the opportunity for a hearing. These appeals were not all successful. Around 2006, Morley became involved in another appeal against BBC that was filed by a group of members who called themselves the Concerned Members of B’nai Brith Canada (CMOBBC). They alleged that BBC’s national executive had too much centralized power, was not governing transparently, failed to provide members with audited financial statements at multiple annual general meetings (AGMs), passed a constitution that members had defeated at the 2005 AGM, and was threatening and harassing some members. BBI’s appeal court rendered its verdict in 2007 in favour of BBC. Soon after this judgment was made BBC took steps to expel all the members of CMOBBC. In response, Morley resigned from the organization. Morley currently resides in Brampton.
Subjects
Human rights
Name Access
Wolfe, Morley, 1928-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-6
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
11 m of textual records
Date
[195-]-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of United Restitution Organization (URO), Toronto Office case files for the following funds: Hardship Fund; Hardship Fund, Pre-1965 Austrian; German Social Security (EB); German Social Security (DE); Article 2 Fund; Ghetto Lodz; and the immidiate post-Second World War Wiedergutmachung reparations. There is also a small amount of general operational files.
Custodial History
These records were left in the URO office following the departure of the URO staff person. They were boxed and moved by archives staff.
Administrative History
In Canada, the United Restitution Organization (URO) was founded in 1953 under the aegis of the Canadian Jewish Congress. The funds advanced by the Claims Conference were administered by the CJC which also gave support by providing the URO with office space and clerical staff. Offices were set up in Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg and Vancouver. The Winnipeg and Vancouver offices closed in the 1970s and the Montreal office remained open until 2002, after which time the active cases were sent to the Toronto office. The Toronto office officially closed on April 1, 2007. There was one case worker, however, who contintued to tend to any active claims that were left. Her position was transfered to Jewish Family and Child in 2013. The URO dealt with a variety of different types of claims. The first and largest were the BEG cases (Bundesentschaedigungsgesetz), which translates as Federal Indemnification Law for the Compensation of Victims of National Socialist Persecution. This program provided compensation for individuals persecuted for political, racial, religious, or ideological reasons who suffered long-term damage to their health, imprisonment, death of family members, loss of property, reduced income, or reduced professional advancement. The other two major programs or cases covered by the URO were the Hardship Fund and Article 2. The Hardship Fund was established during the 1960s and was open to Jews who emigrated from the former Soviet Union who were not eligible for compensation under the BEG program. The Article 2 program, in turn, arose during the 1990s, after the unification of the German government. It is still operating today and is open to Jewish victims of Nazi persecution who met a certain critiera, and those who are eligible, are provided with a pension paid out in installments every three months each year.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Subjects
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
United Restitution Organization (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-2
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
39 photographs (tiff)
Date
1923, [1950?]-[2011?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting Martin Charney and his family. Included are portraits of Martin as a child and young man, wedding photographs of Martin's grandparents in Johannesburg (1923), images of Martin's bar mitzvah and weddings, photographs of Matin's family in London en route to Montreal, images of Martin and his family in Montreal, images of Camp Timberlands (New York), images of the Anglo-African Glass Company, images of Martin with his family in South Africa and images of Martin's family at weddings and bar mitzvah's in Toronto. Of note is an image from the dedication of Chabad Lubavitch in Thornill (2011). Identified in the images are: Martin Charney, Jack Frenkel, Doris Levinstein, Max Charney, Leah Charney, Candy Charney, Rabbi Gansberg, and Norman Charney.
Administrative History
Martin was born in Johannesburg in 1947 to Max and Joan Lena (nee Frenkel) Charney. He has a younger brother, Norman. Max owned a glass manufacturing business called Anglo-African Glass. In 1963, the family left South Africa and immigrated to Montreal, Canada. They left South Africa because Max anticipated a future of political uncertainty. The family remained in Montreal for 7 years, before returning to South Africa in 1970. During this time, Martin graduated from high school and attended Sir George Williams University (now Concordia) where he studied for a 4 year Bachelor of Commerce Degree. Max built three office buildings in Sherbrooke, Kingston and Valleyfield and had six One Hour Martinizing laudromats. Joan was a Home Maker - never having done domestic work before.
Soon after returning to South Africa in 1970, Martin married Yaffa (nee Franco). They had one daughter, Candyce Jasmine. They divorced in 1980. In 1982 Martin married his second wife, Basia (nee Sztrom). They had four children together: Candy, Leah, Avi Jack and Mirelle Feiga. All 5 children were born in Johannesburg. Martin worked as a real estate broker in South Africa and as a finance resource consultant concentrating on factoring accounts receivable in Toronto.
Due to the worsening violence in South Africa, Martin immigrated to Thornhill with his family in 1999. Martin and Basia divorced soon after immigrating here and Martin eventually re-married to a Canadian Judy Rosenberg. Martin continued in the same line of work once he arrived in Canada, however, he had to build his business back up again from scratch. Martin volunteers with a variety of organizations, including: Circle of Care, Tomchei Shabbos, HOD (Hebrew Order of David - Lodge Ramon) and Benjamin's Park memorial Chapel. He is a member of Chabad Lubavitch at 770 Chabad Gate in Thornhill.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Charney, Martin, 1947-
Places
Johannesburg, South Africa
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-12
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
2.1 m of textual records and graphic material
Date
1904-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the precursor synagogues of Congregation Or Shalom: B'nai Israel and B'nai Moses ben Judah. Records include committee records, board meeting minutes, flyers and invitations, newsletters and bulletins, by-laws, sisterhood records, men's club records, photographs, Board of Education minutes, records related to the London Talmud Torah, minute books of the Daughters of Israel, correspondence, financial records and scrapbooks. There is also a small amount of material related to the National Council of Jewish Women, London Chapter and the London Jewish Community Council and Federation.
Custodial History
Records were donated to the OJA by Congregation Or Shalom, who has an archival repository at the synagogue under the guidance of Dr. Jack Rosen.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
B'nai Israel Synagogue, (London, Ont.)
B'nai Moses ben Judah (London, Ont.)
Congregation Or Shalom (London, Ont.)
Rosen, Jack
Places
London, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-8
Material Format
textual record
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 document (docx)
Date
Nov. 2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one memoir written by Muriel Comay regarding her life in South Africa and immigration to Toronto.
Administrative History
Muriel was born to Ellie Goldblatt and Malcah (nee Friedlander) Goldblatt in 1945 in Cape Town, South Africa. She married Stephen Comay. In June 1975, she immigrated to Toronto with Stephen and their three young children.
Subjects
Immigrants' writings, South African (English)
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Comay, Muriel
Places
Cape Town, South Africa
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-10
Material Format
textual record
graphic material (electronic)
moving images (electronic)
Physical Description
10 cm of textual records
2240 photographs (jpg and gif)
8 moving images
Date
1944-2015 (predominent 2008-2015)
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the activities of Alex Levin, a Jewish war veteran and Holocaust survivor. Records include letters written to Levin from school children following various speaking engagements; interviews with Crestwood School, CHAT, and Netivot Hatorah; a recording of the Saluting Our Italian Heroes commemorative event; recordings of Remembrance Day ceremonies hosted by the Canadian Jewish War Veterans (Toronto Post); and photographs documenting events attended by Levin including Holocaust remembrance events, Yom Hashoah, Remembrance Day ceremonies, March of the Living, Miracle Dinners and Proms, Azrieli Foundation events including the launch of Levin's book "Under the Yellow and Red Stars", school visits, JWV programs with Sunnybrook veterans, portraits of Levin through the years and various scanned images of Levin's family.
Administrative History
Alex Levin (1932-2016) was born in 1932 in Rokitno, Poland. In 1941, the Germans invaded Rokitno and established a ghetto and formed a Judenrat to carry out their orders. In 1942, the Ghetto was evacuated and the Jews were brought to the town's marketplace to be transported by train to be killed. Levin was ten years old when he escaped into the nearby forest with his brother Samuel where he lived for 18 months in a hole in the ground. He was twelve when he emerged from hiding to find that his parents and youngest brother Moishe had been murdered. In 1944, he joined the Soviet forces as a messenger boy. After the war, he was sent to the USSR and enrolled in cadet school, remaining in the Soviet army until forced out for being Jewish in the 1970s. An engineer by training, Alex came to Canada in 1975 via Austria and Italy, and now lives in Toronto where he regularly speaks about his experiences in the Holocaust.
Subjects
Education
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Levin, Alex, 1932-2016
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-6
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
[2010?]-[2015?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of thank you cards from schools where Alex was a speaker, sharing his story of Holocaust survival.
Administrative History
Alex Levin (1932-2016) was born Joshua Levin in 1932 in Rokitno, Poland. (He was also known as Yehoshua and Shike.) Rokitno was occupied in 1941 by Nazi Germany and Alex escaped the Rokitno ghetto with his brother in 1942, hiding in the woods for eighteen months. Soviet troops found him in January of 1944 and invited him to join the 13th Army as a field hospital unit helper. Because his Yiddish nickname was unfamiliar (Shike, from his Hebrew name, Yehoshua), they called him Shura or Shurik, diminutive forms of Alexander, which became his formal name. He became an officer in the USSR and an engineer. He immigrated to Canada in 1975 and brought his family to join him in 1980.
Subjects
Education
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
World War, 1939-1945
Antisemitism
Name Access
Levin, Alex, 1932-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-18
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-18
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
85 cm of textual records
184 photographs : b&w and col. (tif and jpg)
ca. 200 photographs : b&w and col.
14 moving images : mov and mp4
Date
[192-]-2015, predominant 1983-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the records related to the activities and operations of the First Narayever Congregation. Included are board and general meeting minutes (1984-1996); general correspondence, high holiday tickets and membership lists (1970s-1990s); membership and dues ledger (1929-1983); Ritual Committee meeting minutes (1984-1988); Implementation Committee records (1970s-1980s); constitutions (1980s); newsletters (1983-2004); a blank seat deed (1920s); a cemetery map (1950s?); records regarding burial rights for the Owen Sound Hebrew Congregation (1966-1980); records regarding a court case filed by members of the congregation surrounding the egalitarian changes being planned; an album documenting SHTICK! A Celebration of Jewish Playrights (2005-2006); an album documenting the congregation's participation in a UJA Mission to Israel (2003-2004); a binder of material containing photocopied and original records in support of the research for the congregation's 100th anniversary celebrations (1970s-2014); photographs and a video recording of the 100th Anniversary exhbition opening at the Miles Nadal JCC; photographs of events hosted by the congregation; and 9 video interviews with individuals connected to the shul conducted by Sharoni Siboney for the anniversary celebrations. Interviewees are: Peter Gold, Sharon Weintraub, Murray Teitel, Rosalyn Katz, Julia Gluck, Shaya Petroff, Stuart Schoenfeld, Sylvia Solomon and Ben Rothman. Also included are family photographs and written transcripts of oral interviews conducted with members of the Hersh Petersiel family, who lived in Hastings, Ontario and had early connections to the Narayever Congregation.
Custodial History
The records related to Hersh Petersiel were given to the First Narayever by Marsha Beck for their upcoming 100th anniversary. Marsha agreed to donate them to the OJA along with the Narayever records.
Subjects
Synagogues
Religion
Name Access
First Narayever Congregation (Toronto, Ont.)
Petersiel, Hersh
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Hastings, Ont.
Owen Sound, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-7
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 70 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1928-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the activities of Ben Zion Shapiro and his family. The bulk of the records document the Shapiro family's involvement in Young Judea. Young Judea material includes: yearbooks, photographs, correspondence, meeting minutes, event programmes, song books, newsletters, and two Camp Biluim flags made by Bunny Shapiro. One flag contains Camp Biluim's crest (1951) and the other one was created for Camp Biluim's colour war and contains the text "We will try and we will succeed Camp Biluim" (1954?). Also included is a VHS tape containing a copy of the Toronto Zionist Council's video about Camp Shalom (1991?). Of note are minute books maintained by Roy Shapiro for the Toronto Young Judea Administrative Board (1928-1934) and for the Leadership Club (1940-1948).
Accession also contains material relating to Roy and Ben Zion's involvement with the following organizations: the Coordinated Services to the Jewish Elderly (Circle of Care), B'nai Israel Beth David Congregation, Beth Tzedec's Mispacha Program, Beth Tzedec's Israel Action Program, Congregation Beth Haminyan, and Holy Blossom Temple's Department for Jewish Living. These records include, minutes, correspondence, newsletters and publications, evaluation reports and other reports. Also included is a demographic report entitied, "Rapid Growth and Transformation: Demographic Challenges Facing the Jewish Community of Greater Toronto" (1995), material from a conference at the University of Toronto on the university's partnership with Israel, CHAT alumni directories, and a CHAT book entitled, "Voices: Jewish Teens of the 90's". Of note are buttons, photographs, reports and correspondence documenting Bunny and Ben Zion's trip to the Soviet Union on behalf of the CJC's Committee for Soviet Jewry.
Finally accession includes material documenting family activities of the Shapiro and Sherman family. Included is a transcript of Bessie Sherman telling her life story (1978), haggadot, PowerPoint presentations created by Ben Zion for his grandchildren and for a family reunion outlining the family history of his family and Bunny's family. There is also a video of Ben Zion presenting his PowerPoint at the Michalski / Cohen family reunion. Also included are family films and videos containing footage of Bunny and Ben Zion's wedding and honeymoon, Camp Biluim, Young Judea events, Bunny on Machon, family wedding anniversaries and birthday parties, trips to Israel, the United States, and Europe as well as footage of the Cousin's Club. Also included is a VHS tape containing a recorded segment from CityPulse News featuring the family's Pesach festivities in 1995.
Photo identification: Back row, left to right: Ray Markus, Michelle Landsberg, Menachem ?, Frank Narrol. Front row, left to right: Gilda Mitchell, Bunny Shapiro, BenZion Shapiro, Malka Rabinowitz.
Administrative History
Ben Zion Shapiro was born in Toronto in 1931 to Roy and Beck (nee Cohen) Shapiro. He has a younger brother, Morden (Mort) Shapiro (b. 1940). His father worked as an office manager at Rotstein Furniture and Maple Leaf Cleaners and his mother worked as a legal secretary until marriage. Roy was active in a number of organizations including: Young Judea, Sons of Jacob Society, Toronto Camera Club, a founding member of Beth David Synagogue, Coordinated Services to the Jewish Elderly (Circle of Care) and President of the Association of Jewish Seniors. Beck was active in Young Judea and Pioneer Women (President of the Golda Meir Club).
Ben Zion received a Master of Social Work from the University of Toronto and attended the Jewish Agency Institute for Youth Leaders from Abroad in Jerusalem, Israel (1951-1952). He has worked for a number of organizations throughout his career, including: Young Judea (he was Director of both Camp Shalom (1962-1969) and Camp Biluim (1954-1956)), B'nai Brith Youth Organization, University Settlement, St. Christopher's House and Director of the Novomeysky Centre in Jerusalem (1957-1961). He was also Professor and Associate Dean of Social Work at the University of Toronto and three times Visiting Professor at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.
Ben married Bunny (Bernice) Shaprio in 1955. Bunny was born in 1934 in Noranda, Quebec to Irving and Bessie (nee Consky) Sherman. Bunny attended public school in Noranda, Noranda High School and Forest Hill Collegiate in Toronto, University of Toronto (BA), the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (M.Ed. in Special Education), and the Jewish Agency Institute for Jewish Leaders from Abroad (1952-1953).
Bunny graduated from the first Camp Biluim Institute for leadership training in 1951 and worked with Ben Zion at Camp Shalom as Camp Mother in 1962 and from 1964-1969. She also worked at Camp Biluim from 1955-1956. In 1983, Bunny and Ben Zion went to the Soviet Union to visit Refuseniks on behalf of the Soviet Jewry Committee of the Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region.
Bunny and Ben have two children: Ayala and Ilan. Since Ben Zion's retirement in 1996, he and Bunny have been living in Jerusalem for half of each year. In 2015, they moved full-time to Jerusalem.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes ca. 300 photographs (256 tiff), 2 PowerPoint presentations, 1 textual record (doc), 4 buttons, 2 flags, 5 VHS tapes, and 18 film reels (8 mm).
Subjects
Jewish camps
Jewish youth
Zionism
Name Access
Shapiro, Ben Zion, 1931-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-7
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
6 photographs : b&w and col. ; 13 x 18 cm or smaller
Date
[ca.1930]-[ca.1945], [197-]-[2015]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records pertaining to the military service of twin brothers Julius (Jack) Spiegel and Louis (Lou/Syd) S. J. Spiegel. Included are photographs of the young Spiegel brothers with their cousins in front of Central High School of Commerce, Dewson St., ca. 1930, original snapshots and portraits of Lou Spiegel in uniform during the 1940s, a hand drawn Easter greeting card signed by Lou Spiegel, and newspaper clippings concerning Lou's role as an aerial photographer for the U.S. Marine Corps unit and his return home to Toronto. There are wartime photocopies of photos including a portrait of Jack Spiegel in uniform, an image of Jack with his crew in front of military aircraft, and a modern day photo of Lou visiting Jack's grave in Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery in Holland. Textual copies include, an annotated photocopy of Veteran Affairs Canada website listing of Jack Spiegel, including information on his burial location and his listing in the Second World War Book of Remembrance. There is a photocopy of Jack's obituary from the Canadian Jewish Congress Book Canadian Jews in World War II, Part II: Casualties, p. 75, and a copy of a letter from the Royal Canadian Air Force addressed to Jack's mother Mrs. Israel Spiegel, notifying her of her son's death. In addition, there is one colour photograph (197?) of promotional municipal campaign street signs for North York City Councillor and Controller, Irving Paisley.
Administrative History
Julius (Jack) Spiegel (1921-1944, Toronto), and Louis (Lou) Spiegel (1921-1999), are twin brothers born in Toronto on March 26, 1921. Their parents Israel Spiegel (b. 1878) and Eva (née Gelbwachs) Spiegel (b. 1880) of 430 Euclid St. Toronto, immigrated from Austria to Canada in 1894 and 1906 respectively.
According to the 1921 Canada census, Israel and Eva had 8 children; Nat Spiegel (b. 1903, U.S.A.), Morse Spiegel (b. 1906), Gertrude Spiegel (b. 1909), Beatrice Spiegel (b. 1911), Sydney Spiegel (b. 1915), Mildred Spiegel (b. 1917), and twin brothers Julius and Louis S. Spiegel (b. 1921).
Both Jack and his twin brother Lou, attended Central High School of Commerce. Jack enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1941 and trained as a wireless air gunner. He went overseas in May 1944 and successfully completed 10 military missions with his unit. Eyewitnesses reported to Lou that Jack parachuted out of his Lancaster Bomber that was shot down over the Rhineland battlefields in Germany . Originally buried by the Dutch Resistance, Jack was later moved to Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery, Holland. His date of death was confirmed as October 28, 1944. According to his death certificate, the location of his death was Belgium, that he was married at the time of death and resided at 238 Beatrice St. Jack's brothers Sydney and Murray Spiegel, also served in the military during the Second World War. Sydney with the Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps (administrative corps) and Murray with the U.S. Army Medical Department in Kansas.
Louis (Lou) Spiegel (1921-1999, Toronto) served during the Second World War for the Royal Canadian Air Force and the U.S. Marine Corps as an aerial photographer. He later studied at U of T earning a bachelor's degree and transferred to USC (California) earning a master's degree in English and communications. He served as campaign director for the United Welfare Fund in 1954 and worked various jobs throughout his career as an educator in American Community Colleges. He was director of Unarius after Ruth Norman died and was awarded by the same institution with a doctor of psychic therapeutic science degree.
Irving Paisley (1919-2006) married to Adele Paisley, had a 30 year long career in municipal politics in the city of North York holding positions as Councillor, Controller, and Deputy Mayor. He spearheaded the building of York Finch Hospital and served as its founding Chairman. He was also a founding member of Temple Sinai, and founded Paisley Manor Insurance. Paisley’s accomplishments were recognized by the Federal Government and he earned the Centennial Medal for Service to the Nation in 1967.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Spiegel, Jack, 1921-1944
Spiegel, Lou, 1921-1999
Paisley, Adele
Paisley, Irving 1919-2006
Places
Toronto
Holland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-4
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
19 photographs : b&w and col. ; 20 x 26 cm and smaller
1 folder of textual records
1 poster ; 35 x 51 cm
Date
[194-]-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs and textual records related to the personal and professional life of Morley S. Wolfe. Photographs include a snapshot of Morely dressed in a Harbord Collegiate sweater; his first year law class at Osgoode Hall (1951); attendance at B'nai Brith Wilson Height Heights Lodge events and publicity stills from Branson Hospital. Textual records include a Branson Hospital promotional flyer; correspondence with Sir Martin Gilbert, the official biographer of Winston Churchill; email print outs of a series of letter to the editor correspondnece from Morely to the Toronto Star con cerning human rights,immigration and Israel's right to exist.
In addition, there is a photocopy of a Toronto Star photo of Mayor Art Eggleton, awarding Morley S. Wolfe with the William P. Hubbard race relations award; a print out from Harbordite (page 21) of Morely's entry into the Harbord club; a print out of his review of the book Walking with Giants by Saoul Feldberg; and a poster presented to Morely by the Children's Breakfast Club's presdient Rick Gosling, on the occasion of his 75th birthday (2003), in hounour of Morely's volunteer work with the club.
Administrative History
Morley S. Wolfe was born in Winnipeg in 1928 to Cecil (b. 1895) and Betty (nee Davidow) Wolfe. He spent his early childhood in various cities in Saskatchewan and Manitoba until moving to Toronto in 1940. Soon after graduating from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1955 he started his own practice as a senior member of the law firm Burt, Burt, Wolfe and Bowman. In 1971, he was appointed Queen’s Council, and from 1973 to 1977 he served as counsel for B’nai Brith Canada. After his retirement from practice in 1993, the Province of Ontario appointed him presiding Justice of the Peace for Ontario and Deputy Judge in Small Claims Court. His first marriage was to Sandra Newman in 1958 and they had three children together: Leslie, Lee, and Melanie. He later married Joan and became the step-father to her daughter, Erin. Throughout his life Morley was passionate about fighting prejudice and discrimination and became involved with organizations, such as the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews and the Urban Alliance on Race Relations. He was also a member of the Toronto Police Services Board Committee on Race Relations, served as Chair of the North York Committee on Community, Race and Ethnic Relations, and was appointed to the Canadian Multiculturalism Council. In addition, he was the founding president of Toronto Residents in Partnership (TRIP) from 2003 to 2006. His involvement extended to Jewish organizations. He served as National President of B’nai Brith Canada (BBC) from 1982 to 1983 and was a founding member of its League for Human Rights. He was also President of BBC’s Toronto Regional Council and Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998, and of the Jewish Camp Council of Toronto as well as many other organizations. Morley’s hard work and involvement in the community earned him many awards, including, City of Toronto’s William P. Hubbard Race Relations Award, the YMCA Canada Peace Medal, B’Nai Brith Canada Service Award, and the Province of Ontario’s Senior Achievement Award. Around 2002, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 began filing a series of appeals with B’nai Brith International (BBI) over concerns that BBC’s national executive was governing undemocratically. Morley played a key role in filing these appeals and was the centre of one appeal filed after BBC censured him without advance notice or the opportunity for a hearing. These appeals were not all successful. Around 2006, Morley became involved in another appeal against BBC that was filed by a group of members who called themselves the Concerned Members of B’nai Brith Canada (CMOBBC). They alleged that BBC’s national executive had too much centralized power, was not governing transparently, failed to provide members with audited financial statements at multiple annual general meetings (AGMs), passed a constitution that members had defeated at the 2005 AGM, and was threatening and harassing some members. BBI’s appeal court rendered its verdict in 2007 in favour of BBC. Soon after this judgment was made BBC took steps to expel all the members of CMOBBC. In response, Morley resigned from the organization. Morley currently resides in Brampton.
Subjects
Law
Human rights
Name Access
Wolfe, Morley, 1928-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-9
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 5 cm of textual records
Date
1989-1996, 2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of issues of the SAJAC News (publication of the South African Jewish Association of Canada).
Subjects
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-11
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-11
Material Format
textual record
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
ca. 2.5 metres of textual records
10 CDs
Date
1974-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting the governance and activities of the Jewish Family and Child (formerly Jewish Family and Child Services). Included are program reports and meeting materials from 1995 to 2011. Meeting materials document the following committees: Child and Youth Services, Family and Community Services, Budget and Finance, Management, Board of Directors, Executive Committee, Supervisors/Management, and Staff meetings.
Also included are CDs with scanned copies of JF&CS's Board of Director's and Executive Committee meeting minutes for the time period from 1974 to 2000.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Charities
Jewish children
Jewish families
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Jewish Family and Child (Toronto, Ont.)
Jewish Family and Child Services (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
2 folders of textual records
Date
2014-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a Jewish Foundation Report to Community for 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 as well as Book of Life stories for 2015. Individuals entered into the Book of Life for that year include: Harvey Atkin and Celia Tessler Atkin; Leonard Borer; Beverley D. Burdeyney; Arnold Buxbaum; Miriam Fish Coven; Paul Engel; Cynthia Gasner; Anette Goldstein; Al and Margaret Goodman; Irving and Barbara Green; Shirley Jackson; Lagover Mutual Benefit Society; Eleanor Nadler; Rochelle Reichert; Michael and Lili Shain; Hush and Sally Sherman; Michael B. Soberman; Frieda Torkin; Goldie and Sol Wassermuhl; Lynda Weinrib.
Custodial History
The records were transferred to the Archives by Janice Benatar, Director, Donor Development for the Jewish Foundation of Greater Toronto.
Administrative History
The Book of Life is a collection of family stories from those who have left a financial legacy with the Jewish Foundation. The book is both hardcopy and online. A complete list of Book of Life signatories can be found on their website at: http://www.jewishfoundationtoronto.com/Our-Activities/Book-of-Life
Subjects
Philanthropy and fundraising
Name Access
Jewish Foundation of Greater Toronto
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-12
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
60 cm of textual records
ca. 30 photographs
Date
1963-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the career of Peter Held. Included is correspondence, letters of congratulations, event dinner menus, event programs, articles and writings by Held, annual reports, newsletters, reports, newspaper clippings and photographs. The material was originally organized into a series of binders. Original order of the material has been maintained.
Administrative History
Peter E. Held was born in Cape Town, South Africa in Dec. 1937 to Herbert and Hilde Held, Jewish immigrants from Germany. Following Hilde’s death, Herbert moved in with his own mother and stepfather who had also immigrated to South Africa. Speaking only German, Peter grew up trilingual, acquiring German fluency at home and speaking English and Afrikaans at school.
In 1960, after completing his education at the University of Witwatersrand, and five years of clerkship, in Johannesburg, S.A., Held passed the S.A. Public Accountants and Auditors Board Examination. As a newly minted Chartered Accountant, he worked for six months in London, England before arriving in Canada in 1961 as a tourist, intending to stay six months, work his way across North America then head for Australia.
With $24 in his pocket, Held arrived in Quebec and made his way to Toronto where he found work with Dunwoody & Company (now BDO Canada). He quickly proved himself, becoming a partner at the age of 26 years, one of the youngest ever at the firm. He became Toronto Region Managing Partner from 1981 to 1996, and Chief Executive Officer of BDO Dunwoody, where he was responsible for the overall management and leadership of the firm from 1997 to 2001. An employee at BDO Dunwoody for forty years, Held is recognized for his exemplary leadership as he guided it through a period of unprecedented growth and prosperity.
Held was Chairman of the Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants from 1991-2. He was First Vice-Chairman, Second Vice-President, a member of the Board of Governors, and a participant on various committees for the Canadian Institute. He was also President of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Ontario in 1986-87, First and Second Vice-Presidents, and served on various committees for the Ontario Institute. The Institute of Chartered Accountants of Ontario awarded Held a Fellowship (F.C.A.) in 1976, Life Membership in 1987, and the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Ontario Award of Outstanding Merit in 1993, usually awarded to only one individual per year. Held travelled in Canada and abroad on behalf of the Canadian Institute and profession, speaking at various conferences.
Held was also Canada's representative of the International Federation of Accountants from 1995-7 and President of the Toronto Chartered Accountants Association in 1974. He was a Board or Committee member at several other organizations, some are: Ontario Chamber of Commerce, North York General Hospital, University of Waterloo, Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Club, Y.M.C.A., Donalda Club, the Royal Canadian Military Institute, and United Way.
Following training in mediation and conflict resolution, Held worked as a mediator and arbitrator at ADR Chambers, conducting mediations dealing with a variety of commercial disputes. He also mediated on professional negligence issues.
Held is married to Gyneth (nee Gordon) from South Africa, a Speech-Language Pathologist in private practice. They have two adult children, Heather (married to Gill) and Michael (married to Krista), and several grandchildren.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: English and German.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1.2 m of textual records
ca. 250 photographs : b&w and col.
Date
1776, [191-]-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the records related to the life and career of Dr. Fred Wienberg. Included are textual and photographic records documenting his personal and family life, his medial career, scholarly activities, involvement with the Jewish community, his collecting of Judaica, medical antiques and art, and his synagogue involvement. Other items include the Ostrovtzer Mutual Benefit Society minute book and a 1776 letter from Jonas Phillips, a veteran of the American Revolutionary War and an American merchant in New York City and Philadelphia.
Administrative History
Fred Weinberg (1919-2003) was born in Ostrawiec, Poland on July 6, 1919 to Rose and Israel Weinberg. Israel immigrated to Canada in 1920 and his wife and children joined him several years later in March of 1924. The family settled in Toronto where Israel worked in the fur manufacturing business. Israel was a supporter and aficionado of cantorial music as well as a founder of the Associated Hebrew Schools of Toronto and the Ostrovtzer Synagogue on Cecil Street.
Fred completed his primary and secondary education at Clinton Street Public School and Harbord Collegiate. He also attended the Brunswick Talmud Torah, celebrating his bar mitzvah in 1932. Fred decided to pursue a medical career, graduating from the University of Toronto’s medical school in 1944. During his studies he enlisted in the army and completed officers’ training in April 1945, attaining the rank of Captain. During his military career he served in the RCAMC at Camp Borden, Christie St. Hospital and at the Stanley Barracks in Toronto. Towards the end of the war he served as Officer in charge of repatriation of the POWs.
After the war Fred pursued his post-graduate work at Seaview and Bellevue hospitals in New York City from 1946 to 1947 and then moved on to the Children’s and Washington University hospitals in St. Louis, Missouri the following year. He was subsequently accepted as a resident at Sick Kids Hospital in Toronto and was ultimately appointed Chief Resident under the supervision of the internationally renowned paediatrician, Dr. Alan Brown. In 1950, Dr. Weinberg was hired as a physician in paediatrics at Sick Kids Hospital, making him the first Jewish doctor on staff. In addition to his staff responsibilities, he also lectured and was a faculty member at the University of Toronto’s Medical School for many years.
By the mid-point of his career, Dr. Weinberg went on to specialise in Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), delivering lectures and publishing articles in medical journals. He also ran his own practice, which operated from 1950 to 1976, and later become Associate Medical Director of the Child Development Clinic, Neurology Division of Sick Kids until his retirement in 1984. He later continued his service at Sick Kids as a senior staff consultant and ran a specialized practice in Developmental Pediatrics for close to twenty years, which was later situated at 208 Bloor Street West.
Fred married Joy Cherry on December 16, 1952 at Goel Tzedec Synagogue. The couple had four children: Joel (b. 1953), Barry (b. 1955), Sari (b. 1956) and Deena (b. 1961). Throughout his life, Fred was actively engaged in Jewish communal work in a variety of capacities: assisting with the establishment of the United Synagogue Day School during the 1950s; as a fundraiser for the United Jewish Appeal (UJA); and as a participant in two of UJA’s early study missions to Israel in 1960 and 1961. He was also an influential figure within his synagogue, joining the Board of Directors of Beth Tzedec Synagogue during the late 1960s and serving as President from 1972 to 1975.
Fred and his wife Joy also collected Judaica, antiques and artwork. As a physician, Fred developed a passion and expertise in the area of medical antiques. He published articles in both the mainstream and Jewish press on subjects related to Jewish rituals, Judaica and art. He also had a regular column in the Canadian Journal of Diagnosis from 1998 to 2002 entitled “Antique instruments”. Over time, the Weinberg’s assembled a world-class collection of Judaica and became increasingly active in the museum world. Fred assisted in the establishment of Beth Tzedec’s Helene and Rubin Dennis Jewish Museum, contributing items from the couple’s Judaica collection and securing the acquisition of the renowned Cecil Roth collection for the Museum during the early to mid-1960s. As a result of his significant contributions, he was bestowed the title of honourary curator to the Museum. Dr. Weinberg later branched out and assisted with the Koffler Gallery’s Lifecycle exhibition in 1984 as guest curator. The following year, he served as a special presenter and instructor to the docents at the “Precious Legacy” Czech Judaica exhibition at the ROM. The Weinberg’s most significant contribution to the museum world, however, was marked in September of 2000, when they were honoured at the opening of the Dr. Fred and Joy Cherry Weinberg Gallery of Judaica at the ROM, featuring some of their most valuable and treasured pieces.
Dr. Fred Weinberg passed away on October 30, 2003 at 84 years of age. The Weinberg Endowment Fund was established by the family at the University of Toronto’s Jewish Studies Program to honour Fred’s passion for Jewish history, rituals and artefacts. That year the Weinberg family also set up a fund in Fred’s name in support of the Therapeutic Clown Program, a highly visible and successful program within Sick Kids’ Pediatric Division.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Use Conditions Note: Records contain patient names and medical information.
Subjects
Art and popular culture
Fraternal organizations
Jewish families
Jewish physicians
Occupations
Name Access
Weinberg, Fred, 1919-2003
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
2015-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records relating to Holy Blossom Temple and includes an Adult Education Guide (2015), L’Shanah Tovah Bulletin (2015) and Family & Youth Education Centre Programs 2015/2016 – 5776.
Administrative History
Nancy Draper is an active member of the Jewish community and has been a volunteer at the Ontario Jewish Archives for many years.
Subjects
Education
Synagogues
Name Access
Draper, Nancy
Holy Blossom Temple (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Bathurst St. (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-16
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-16
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 60 cm of textual records
Date
1970-2014, predominant 1993-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting the literary career and communal involvement of Shirley Kumove. The bulk of the accession includes correspondence, contracts, newspaper clippings and flyers relating to the publishing, marketing and promotion of Kumove’s various books. Also included is working content for Shirley’s unpublished book, Yet More Words, an unannotated manuscript for Kumove’s published book, Drunk From the Bitter Truth, and various book reviews written by Shirley. Of note are rejection letters Shirley received from publishers while trying to publish, Words Like Arrows, as well as correspondence with author Roger Greenwald in which he attached an original short story manuscript entitled, Conversations With Scott.
Accession also includes, ALTA conference material, issues of Paken Trager, and brochures for the National Yiddish Book Centre, the Canadian Jewish Book Awards, and Yiddish Studies at the University of Toronto. Finally accession also includes minutes, flyers, and planning material for the Habonim Reunion Organizing Committee (1983). Of note is a document containing personal memories of Habonim activities and its history (author unknown).
Custodial History
Joel is the son of Shirley Kumove. He provided the OJA with the material while he was cleaning out Shirley's house to put it up for sale.
Administrative History
Shirley Kumove is a Toronto-based writer and translator of Yiddish literature and folklore who has published articles and books relating to folklore, literature and the art of Yiddish translation. She was born in 1931, the first of two children of Harry (Hersh Meyer) Recht and Rifka Lessman. Kumove received her education at Toronto's Borochov School and, less formally, in her parents' home where Yiddish was the language spoken. She then attended New York University and the University of Toronto. During her career she has worked as a teacher of Judaic Studies and a public relations and special projects consultant; then in the 1980s, she served as Executive Director of The United Synagogue of America, Ontario Region, and Executive Director of JIAS. From 1997 to 2003, she was also a columnist for Paken Trager (The Book Peddler), the journal of the National Yiddish Book Centre in Massachusetts. Through the years she also undertook short-term translating projects on contract.
Kumove is the author of two books on Yiddish folksayings, Words Like Arrows: A Collection of Yiddish Folk Sayings (1984) and More Words, More Arrows (1999). A third volume is yet unpublished. She was a contributing editor of Found Treasures: Stories by Yiddish Women Writers (1994), and her most recent books are Drunk From the Bitter Truth: The Poems of Anna Margolin (2005), and a translated novel, Ordinary Jews (2009). She also worked for a time on a translation of the memoirs of Puah Rakovsky, "a Jewish revolutionary," but this work was not completed or published. In addition to her writing, Kumove has travelled extensively throughout North America giving lectures to Jewish Studies students, community groups and at conferences.
Kumove is a member of the American Literary Translators Association (ATLA) and has served on the boards of several organizations including chairing the Jewish Affairs committee of the National Council of Jewish Women. Shirley is married to Leon Kumove and they have three sons, Martin (Moishe), Aaron and Joel, as well as many grandchildren.
Shirley Kumove is the recipient of awards from the federal Multicultural Department and the Ontario Arts Council, and she won the 2007 Helen and Stan Vine Canadian Jewish Book Award for Yiddish Translation for Drunk from the Bitter Truth.
Descriptive Notes
Related material note: accession #2009-7/11
Subjects
Art and popular culture
Jewish authors
Women
Societies
Name Access
Kumove, Shirley
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-2
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
4 DVD's (ca. 4 hours)
Date
2005-2010
Scope and Content
Accession consists of video recordings of Transnistria Survivors' Association's annual commemmoration ceremonies. Included are six DVD recordings of the annual Transnistria Survivors Association Shoa commemoration ceremonies from 2005, 2008, 2009 and 2010.
Administrative History
Founded in 1994, the Transnistria Survivors’ Association works to provide a voice for and raise awareness of a lesser known group of Holocaust survivors. Transnistria was the Romanian authorities’ name for the former Ukrainian region located between the Rivers Dniester and Bug. It was placed under Romanian administration following the German and Romanian conquest of Ukraine in the summer of 1941. Prior to the Second World War, Romania was home to the third largest Jewish population in Europe; but beginning with the Citizenship Revision Laws of 1938, the Jews of Romania were deprived their citizenship rights and became the targets of repressive antisemitic policies and laws. Neighbours turned on neighbours. Thousands of Jews were murdered in pogroms, either by Romanian or German troops, Nazi Einsatzgruppen, or the local population. In 1941, the Jews who remained alive in the Provinces of Bucovina and Bessarabia were deported to camps and ghettos in Transnistria. Thousands were jammed into freight trains while others were marched by foot. Many died along the way. Between 1941 and 1944, it is estimated that German and Romanian authorities, along with Ukrainian collaborators, murdered or caused the deaths of hundreds of thousands of Romanian and Ukrainian Jews in Transnistria. Some of those who survived these tragic circumstances, especially from Bucovina and Bessarabia, and made a new home in Toronto gathered together to lend each other support and to tell their largely unknown story of oppression and survival. The Transnistria Survivor’s Association organized yearly Hazkarah (memorial) services and its dedicated members continue to share their extraordinary stories of survival through speaking engagements at schools, colleges and synagogues. Past presidents include:
1. Felicia (Steigman) Carmelly
2.Osias Nadel
3.Etti Ziegler
4.Lou (Leizer) Hoffer
As of 2017, the current President is Joe Leinburd.
Subjects
Anniversaries
Societies
Name Access
Transnistria Survivors' Association (Toronto, Ont.)
Hoffer, Lou
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-1-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-1-5
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 10 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1957-2015, predominant 1974-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting Claude Heimann's immigration to Canada, career, involvement with Temple Har Zion and family life. Included are photographs, correspondence, newsletters and journals, writings and presentations by Heimann, certificates, newspaper clippings, event and conference programs, and business cards. Also included are documents with the text used for Totum Research's website.
Administrative History
Claude Heimann was born on 21 March 1944 in Johannesburg, South Africa to Wilhelm (Bill) Otto Heimann and Lotte Heimann (nee Rosenberg). He received a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Witwatersrand in 1966. In 1969, he married Adele Masail at the Pine Street Synagogue in Johannesburg. They lived in Windsor Park, Johannesburg and had two children together: Nicole Heidi (now married to Marshall Starkman) and Marc Steven.
Claude initially worked for Market Research Africa interviewing farm workers across the country. In 1971 he joined Reader's Digest in South Africa as a Research Director. Believing there would not be a peaceful solution to apartheid, Claude had decided at a young age that he would evenutally leave South Africa. He hoped that Reader's Digest was a company that might be able to transfer him to work in another country. Ten years later, in 1981, an opportunity came up with the Canadian edition of Reader's Digest in a similar role. Claude accepted the position and immigrated with his family to Toronto in May 1981. For their first few months they lived at Glengrove Manor on Yonge Street between Lawrence and Eglinton. In July, they moved into their home in Thornhill. Adele initially stayed home with the family, but eventually worked as a bookkeeper for a variety of different businesses.
Claude left Reader's Digest in 1990 to become a partner in Totum Research. Throughout his career, Claude has served on the Research Committee of PMB and has been a member of the Board of Directors of CARF for whom he served as Technical Director. He has also served on a number of other media research related committees, including the Technical Committee of AMPS and the Magazines Canada Research Committee. Claude was also active on the Board of Temple Har Zion, holding a variety of positions, including: regular Board member, Vice President for Worship, Vice President, Treasurer, President and Past President for two years on the Executive. He also reported Board decisions for the THZ monthly bulletin.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes 2.3 MB of textual records, 6 photographs, 17 slides, and 26.3 MB of photographs.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Occupations
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Synagogues
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-7
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 10 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1986, 1991-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the personal and professional activities of Janice Benatar. Personal records include a family tree, speeches Janice delivered at the Lipa Lippers Toastmaster's Group meetings, a sephardic cookbook, and immigration papers, and a Sharon School Reunion invitation for alumni living in Toronto. Also included are photographs of Janice with her family, performing in a ballet production with the Academy of Ballet and Jazz, with her newborn son, at her son's Bar Mitzvah at Chabad Flamingo, and with the keys to her first home in Thornhill. Also identified in photographs are: Elan Levitan, Viviane Benatar, Michael Benatar, Claudia Benatar, Rachel Pasternak, and Samuel Pasternak.
Also included are speeches, invitations, event programs and video recordings of Book Of Life events as well as a bookmark that was designed by artist Enya Keshet for Book of Life honourees. Finally, accession also includes Professional Advisory Committee meeting minutes (2009-2015) and breakfast seminar presentations (2014-2015).
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes 7 photographs, 4 DVDs, 200 KB of textual records, and 1 bookmark.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Philanthropy and fundraising
Women
Name Access
Jewish Foundation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-2
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
92 photographs (jpgs) : col. and b&w
1.55 MB of textual records
Date
1965, 1990-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the activities and history of Dr. Mark Friedlander and his family. Included is a family history written by Mark's father, Bertie Friedlander and a personal CV written by Mark. Also included are photographs documenting a wide variety of Mark's activities, including his work as an anesthesiologist, Jewish holiday celebrations, his cottage life in Buckhorn, his outdoor activities (such as skiing, canoeing, hiking, cycling, fishing, and ice hockey), Danny's Bar Mitzvah at Kehillat Shareei Torah, Mark's marriage to Lila, the university graduations of family members, Mark's involvement with March of the Living, his participation in Walk With Israel, and his various trips to Zimbabwe, South Africa and other parts of the world. Of note is a photograph of Mark and his son Danny on Mount Kilimanjaro and images of the Sharon School Reunion which took place at Mark's house in Thornhill. Individuals identified in the photographs include: Dr. Mark Friedlander, Lila Speigel, Alec Amato, Lauren Amato, Eli Friedlander, Bert Amato, Danny Amato, Paul Ciapparelli, Sergio Ciapparelli, Lou Silver, Dennis Scolnik, Bertie Friedlander, Jarred Goldberg, Mike Green, Warren Liebowitz, Sue Holmes, Hilda Cohen, Florence Weinberger, Vickie Campbell, Joe Feldman, and Martha Shemtov.
Custodial History
The material was in the possession of Dr. Mark Friedlander. All the images he has are digital. He does not have the original prints in his possession.
Administrative History
Dr. Mark Friedlander was born in Salisbury, Rhodesia (now Harare, Zimbabwe) in May 1958 to Bertie and Selma Friedlander. Bertie was a pharmacist whose career went from retail manufacturing to regulations, and later an academic in learning and teaching.
Mark attended the University of Cape Town Medical School from 1976 to 1981. Between 1982 and 1987, he lived and worked in : Cape Town, South Africa; London, England; Saskatchewan, Canada and New York City, USA. In 1987 he married Lesley Kane (from London) in London, England and moved to Toronto for Specialty Residency in Anesthesia at the University of Toronto, Faculty of Medicine. During his four year residency, he and Lesley had two sons: Danny (1989) and Eli (1991).
Since 1992 Mark has worked as a staff anesthesiologist at North York General Hospital, Toronto. He is also a part time consultant at the Chronic Pain Management Allevio and Pinnacle Pain Clinics.
Mark and Lesley divorced In 2011. In 2015, Mark married Lila Speigel. Lila had immigrated to Toronto in about 1986 after living in Israel and before that from Caracas, Venezuela. Mark’s community involvement includes acting as a chaperone and physician on the March of the Living in 1994, as a UJA supporter since 1991 and as host of a Sharon Jewish Day School Zimbabwe reunion. He has also volunteered on numerous surgical missions to various countries including, Ecuador, Peru, Russia and Vietnam. He has been a member of Kehillat Shaarei Torah synagogue since 1996.
Mark has an older sister, Wendy (born in 1956), and a younger brother, Gary (born in 1960). Gary is married to a South African and Wendy is married to Dennis Scolnik also from Zimbabwe and they all live in the Toronto area. Mark’s parents, who moved to Israel with Gary in 1977, immigrated to Toronto in 1992 to be closer to their children and grandchildren. Mark's father passed away in 2012.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Occupations
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Travel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
1 photograph (jpg) : col.
44.5 KB of textual records
Date
2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one family history and photograph documenting Les Krawitz and his family. Identified in the photograph (taken in Muskoka) are:
Back row: Son-in-law Shaun Levy, daughter Delia Krawitz Levy, Daughter-in-law Randi Katz Krawitz, son Evan Krawitz (Delia's twin), wife Joan Krawitz, Les Krawitz, son Stan Krawitz, Stan's partner Laura Vasic, grandchildren Chloe and Max (Stan's kids)
Front row: grandchildren Jordana (Delia & Shaun's child), Adriana and Jake (Evan & Randi's children)
Administrative History
Les Krawitz was born in 1940 in Brakpan, South Africa to Abraham and Ella Krawitz. In 1964, he married Joan Marks. They had three children together: Stan (b. 1968) and twins Evan and Delia (b. 1971). The Krawitz family immigrated to Toronto in October 1987. Les initially worked with Tandem International (a marketing and sales consulting firm). In 1994, he joined the Sales Development Group (a human resources firm). After four years, he branched out with his own human resources company, Just Solutions Inc. In 2003 he joined his son, Stan's, real estate brokerage, Real Facilities, as a sales manager and realtor. He retired in 2011.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-7
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
60 cm of textual records
Date
1966-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records reflecting the academic, personal and literary life of Dr. Gerald Tulchinsky. Included are the final manuscript, research notes, edits and anciliary materials related to Tulchinsky's book on J. B. Salsberg; a large amount of general research and many unpublished articles on Canada's clothing industry and the Jewish involvment, particularly in Montreal and Toronto; correspondence to various granting bodies; folders of story ideas; genalogical research notes and an unpublished family history; research into a 1950 fatal fire at a garment factory at 447 Richmond St. W in Toronto; a unpublished poem; lecture notes; and personal records related to the lease of his home and the purchase of a Heinzman piano, which was dropped off the truck during delivery.
Of note is a memoir written by Ruth Talesnick documenting her parent's early involvment in the needle trade and a memoir by Anne Tulchinsky, Jerry's mother.
Administrative History
Dr. Gerald Tulchinsky is Professor Emeritus at Queen's University, Department of History, and author of several books on the history of Canadian Jewry and labour issues in Canada. His books include: Shtetl on the Grand (2015); Joe Salsberg: A Life of Commitment (2013); Canada's Jews: A People's Journey (2008); Branching Out: The Transformation of the Canadian Jewish Community (1998); Taking Root: The Origins of the Canadian Jewish Community (1992); and The River Barons: Montreal Businessmen and the Growth of Industry and Transportation, 1837-53 (1977).
Tulchinsky was born in Brantford, Ontario in 1933 to Harry and Anne Tulchinsky. He currently resides in Kingston, Ontario.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Descriptive Notes
SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE: This accession also includes numerous books, some of wihch don't relate to our mandate and others which are duplicates of our current holdings. The books that we have retained have been integrated into the OJA's library holdings.
USE CONDITION NOTE: Access restricted until ten years after the donor's death, at the donor's request.
Subjects
Jewish families
Name Access
Tulchinsky, Gerald, 1933-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-29
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-29
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one document created by the Adath Israel Congregaion honouring the synagogue's past and present members who are veterans of the Second World War. The document lists approximately 180 names, most of whom are deceased.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
Synagogues
Veterans--Canada
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Adath Israel Congregation (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-13
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a typed account of Lou Hoffer's experience as a Holocaust survivor in Transnistria. The account was written on the occassion of the establishment by Lou and Magda Hoffer of the Transnistria Forest Grove in Jerusalem through the Jewish National Fund (JNF). Also included is a printout of a photo of Lou and Magda alongside a brief description of the JNF gift and the original certificate presented to the Hoffers from JNF.
Subjects
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Name Access
Hoffer, Lou
Hoffer, Magda
Source
Archival Accessions
235 records – page 1 of 5.

Narrow By

Collection Name

Source

Format

Date

Description Level

Subject

Name

Place

Language

Restrictions

Available Digital Content