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10 records – page 1 of 1.
Part Of
George Morrison fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 99; Item 156
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
George Morrison fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
99
Item
156
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1978]
Physical Description
1 slide : col. ; 35 mm
Name Access
Shaar Shalom Synagogue
Markham Place
Subjects
Architecture
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Thornhill (Ont.)
Accession Number
1980-6-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
George Morrison fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 99; Item 157
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
George Morrison fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
99
Item
157
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1978]
Physical Description
1 slide : col. ; 35 mm
Name Access
Shaar Shalom Synagogue
Markham Place
Subjects
Architecture
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Thornhill (Ont.)
Accession Number
1980-6-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
George Morrison fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 99; Item 159
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
George Morrison fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
99
Item
159
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1979
Physical Description
1 slide : col. ; 35 mm
Name Access
Shaar Shalom Synagogue
Subjects
Building
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Don Mills Road (Toronto, Ont.)
Thornhill (Ont.)
Accession Number
1980-6-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
George Morrison fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 99; Item 160
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
George Morrison fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
99
Item
160
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1979
Physical Description
1 slide : col. ; 35 mm
Name Access
Shaar Shalom Synagogue
Subjects
Building
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Don Mills Road (Toronto, Ont.)
Thornhill (Ont.)
Accession Number
1980-6-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
George Morrison fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 99; Item 155
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
George Morrison fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
99
Item
155
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1978]
Physical Description
1 slide : col. ; 35 mm
Name Access
Shaar Shalom Synagogue
Markham Place
Subjects
Architecture
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Thornhill (Ont.)
Accession Number
1980-6-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
George Morrison fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 99; Item 158
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
George Morrison fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
99
Item
158
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1979
Physical Description
1 slide : col. ; 35 mm
Name Access
Shaar Shalom Synagogue
Subjects
Building
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Don Mills Road (Toronto, Ont.)
Thornhill (Ont.)
Accession Number
1980-6-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1868
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1868
Material Format
graphic material
Date
June 20, 1920
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Admin History/Bio
Stop 17 was a transport stop in Thornhill served by an electrically powered rail line, called the Radial. The Jewish Girls' Club was sponsored by the National Council of Jewish Women.
Scope and Content
This appears to be a Jewish Girls' Club outing.
Name Access
Yonge Street
Subjects
Girls
Picnics
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Thornhill (Ont.)
Yonge Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1980-1-11
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2015-11-11
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-11
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
14 photographs : col. (jpg)
Date
[1981?]-2009
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting various trips Nicole Cohen took to South Africa as a child and adult. Photographs predominatly document Nicole visiting sites around Johannesburg, particularly her family's old apartment building. Also included are photographs of Nicky visiting her grandparents as a child, reconnecting with her family's maid, and visiting the Nelson Mandela Square with her children. Also included is one photograph of Nicole's brother, Jeremy David Cohen, in front of the Cohen family home in Thornhill (1984?).
Administrative History
Nicole (Nicky) Cohen was born in Johannesburg, South Africa to John Cohen and Viviane (nee Lehwess) Cohen in 1972. She has two siblings: Steven (b. 1974), and Jeremy David (1979). Viviane worked as a physiotherapist and John as a textile sales agent. Due to the unstable political situation in South Africa, the family immigrated to North York in March 1977. For the first few weeks, they lived in a rental apartment in North York. They soon moved into a townhouse nearby. In 1980, they bought their first house in Thornhill. Both John and Viviane were able to continue in their professions after immigrating to Canada. The family regularly visited South Africa.
Nicole is a clinical psychologist in Toronto. She married Jordan Kerpinsky on May 16, 1999. They have three children together: Hayley, Justin, and Ryan.
Descriptive Notes
Related Material Note: for an oral history interview with Nicole Cohen see AC 422, for other Cohen family material see accession #2015-3/8.
Subjects
Families
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Vacations
Name Access
Cohen, Nicole
Places
South Africa
Thornhill (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-11-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-11-4
Material Format
textual record (electronic)
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 flyer (pdf)
1 presentation (ppt)
Date
2018
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a flyer for the movie Villa Heimann: A Lost Memorial, which was shown at Temple Har Zion on 3 November 2018 as part of Holocaust Education Week, and a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation from the same event. Claude Heimann, the grandson of Albert and Frieda Heimann, the owners of the Villa Heimann, spoke at the event.
Administrative History
Claude Heimann was born on 21 March 1944 in Johannesburg, South Africa to Wilhelm "Bill" Otto Heimann and Lotte Heimann (née Rosenberg). He received a bachelor of science degree from the University of Witwatersrand in 1966. In 1969, he married Adele Masail at the Pine Street Synagogue in Johannesburg. They lived in Windsor Park, Johannesburg and had two children together: Nicole Heidi (now married to Marshall Starkman) and Marc Steven.
Claude initially worked for Market Research Africa interviewing farm workers across the country. In 1971 he joined Reader's Digest in South Africa as a research director. Believing there would not be a peaceful solution to apartheid, Claude had decided at a young age that he would evenutally leave South Africa. He hoped that Reader's Digest was a company that might be able to transfer him to work in another country. Ten years later, in 1981, an opportunity came up with the Canadian edition of Reader's Digest in a similar role. Claude accepted the position and immigrated with his family to Toronto in May 1981. For their first few months they lived at Glengrove Manor on Yonge Street between Lawrence and Eglinton. In July, they moved into their home in Thornhill. Adele initially stayed home with the family, but eventually worked as a bookkeeper for a variety of different businesses.
Claude left Reader's Digest in 1990 to become a partner in Totum Research. Throughout his career, Claude has served on the research committee of PMB and has been a member of the board of directors of CARF for whom he served as technical director. He has also served on a number of other media research related committees, including the technical committee of AMPS and the Magazines Canada Research Committee. Claude was also active on the board of Temple Har Zion, holding a variety of positions, including: regular board member, vice president for worship, vice president, treasurer, president and past President for two years on the executive. He also reported board decisions for the THZ monthly bulletin.
Subjects
Suburban homes
Name Access
Temple Har Zion (Thornhill, Ont.)
Places
Steinfurt (North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany)
Thornhill (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Colleen "Chips" Klein and Paul Klein
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
03/13/2017
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Colleen "Chips" Klein and Paul Klein
Number
AC 444
Subject
Canada--Emigration and immigration
Jews--South Africa
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Interview Date
03/13/2017
Interviewer
Lisa Newman
Total Running Time
AC 444 part 1: 7 min.
AC 444 part 2: 7 min.
AC 444 part 3: 37 min.
AC 444 part 4: 2 min.
Biography
Although they both grew up in Jewish neighbourhoods, Chips and Paul met for the first time at Margate, a decidedly non-Jewish seaside resort on South Africa’s southern coast. Chips’ grandmother, who was with Chips at the time, scouted the area for Jewish men, which is when she spotted Paul. Convinced the two were bashert, she indulged in a little matchmaking, with the result that Paul phoned Chips when he returned home. While they did break up at one point, Chips’ grandmother’s judgment was vindicated when the two married at Cyrildene Shul in Johannesburg a few years later.
When their children were three and five years old, the couple made the decision to immigrate to Canada. Paul, an engineer by training, was transferred to Guelph. There, the family joined the local synagogue and enrolled their children in public education. It was while living in Guelph that Chips and Paul became involved in work combating antisemitism. Growing up in Jewish communities, neither had encountered much antisemitism, but living in a small town they were forced to come to terms with being different.
Once their children were grown up, Chips and Paul moved to Toronto, purchasing a house in Thornhill in order to be close to the South African community. Both Chips and Paul are involved in Jewish education through their local synagogue and remain active in a variety of sports. In addition to their faith, sport is one of the ways they stay in touch with their grandchildren, which is why Chips says, “As long as we’re able, we’re going to keep doing it.”
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Klein, Colleen
Klein, Paul
Geographic Access
Guelph (Ont.)
Johannesburg (South Africa)
Thornhill (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Original Format
Digital file
Transcript
Part 1:
00:00 Chips discusses the areas in Johannesburg where she was born and raised.
01:30 Chips discusses her education. She attended King David School. She notes that her parents may have been founding members of King David.
02:37 Chips discusses her career in dance as a dancer and as a teacher in her own dance school.
05:22 Chips describes growing up in South Africa. She discusses her family's warm relationship with their servants.
06:20 Chips mentions her own political involvement as a teenager in the late 1960s and early 1970s. She explains why and her husband decided to leave South Africa.
Part 2:
00:00 Paul discusses his parents' arrival to South Africa. His father fled from Berlin in 1937. His mother fled from Frankfurt, Germany in 1936. His father served in the British army during the war.
01:34 Paul explains why his father did not join a synagogue. Paul did not have a bar mitzvah. He recounts an incident that he attributes to his connection to Judaism.
02:55 Paul explains that having Jewish friends only became an issue for him when he started dating.
03:20 Paul explains that his father's fellow workers were secular German Jews.
03:40 Paul discusses his limited Jew upbringing. He discusses how and why he started to learn about and practice Judaism.
05:02 Paul has one sister living in Montreal. He discusses other relatives, some of whom survived the Holocaust.
06:30 Paul discusses how he met Chips.
Part 3:
00:00 Chips discusses how she met Paul.
00:48 Chips and Paul describe how they reconnected with Chips when Paul graduated from engineering.
03:49 Paul discusses their early marriage. He explains the factors that contributed to his decision to leave South Africa and immigrate to Canada. He expresses satisfaction with their decision to come to Canada.
05:25 Chips notes their children's positive comments about growing up and living in Canada.
05:56 Paul discusses his professional career.
07:30 Chips discusses their friends' and relatives' reactions to their decision to leave South Africa. They left in 1975. Chips' and Paul's parents immigrated to Canada around 1981.
09:18 Paul describes his parents' reaction to their decision to emigrate.
10:14 Chips discusses her parents' comments about leaving South Africa.
10:49 Chips and Paul discuss their return visits to South Africa. Chips describes her children's impressions of South Africa.
12:45 Chips discusses their early time in Canada. They first came to Guelph. She discusses establishing a Jewish home/environment for their children.
13:42 Paul recounts antisemitic incidents while living in Guelph.
15:20 Paul discusses their involvement with a program out of Lipa Green focused on assisting small Jewish communities. He comments on the program's success. Paul served as vice-chair.
16:50 Paul discusses the impact of the program on his children. He describes their strong connection to Israel.
17:37 Chips and Paul explain the program and how it was implemented.
18:46 Paul discusses his involvement with the synagogue in Guelph and in Toronto.
20:39 Paul explains why they decided to move to Thornhill in 1991. They belong to a synagogue on Green Lane.
21:33 Paul explains that the company he worked for in South Africa transferred him to Canada.
22:32 Chips discusses her community involvement including participation in Hadassah-WIZO and participation in the synagogue.
23:26 Chips discusses the creation of a business. She discusses her involvement in a women's inventors project. Chips mentions that she and Paul run a business together.
25:47 Chips describes her involvement in the development of a book to assist women with the patenting and marketing of products. She describes a federal government initiative that she was involved in to develop a book for the government to help women entrepreneurs. She also assisted with the development of a books for teachers and Girl Guides geared toward female inventions.
27:52 Paul discusses an acclaimed dance program that Chips was involved with South Africa.
30:22 Chips and Paul discuss their involvement in Jewish education. Chips spearheaded an adult education program for women and men. Paul discusses his involvement teaching Parshat HaShavuah.
35:45 Chips discusses her family's involvement in sport, including marathons and skiing.
36:47 Paul ponders the question of feeling Canadian.
Part 4:
00:34 Chips comments on when she first considered herself Canadian.
02:02 Paul mentions a National Film Board documentary about Jews in small communities and their inclusion in the film.
Source
Oral Histories

An Entrepreneurial Spirit

Always a Stranger

Anti-Semitism in Canada

Small Town Life

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