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Accession Number
2014-8-11
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-11
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
7 photographs : b&w
Date
1931-1935
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting the activities of Motel Bergstein and Borris Litman. Included are images documenting Hat Cap and Milinery workers banquets, conventions and Executive members, as well as images documenting Camp Yungvelt and the Workmen's Circle 35th anniversary. Motel Bergstein is identified in the photos.
Custodial History
The photographs were in the possession of Carrie Grossman, the daughter of Motel Bergstein and step-daughter of Borris Litman.
Administrative History
Motel Bergstein was born in 1898 in Buckawchevitz, Galicia. He came to Toronto in 1920 or 1921 and initially worked as an operator in a hat factory. He met and married Rita Katz in 1922. Motel was a member of the communist party and in the early 1930s he replaced JB Salsberg as the union organizer for the Hat, Cap and Millinery Workers Union. He was eventually excommunicated from the communist party for refusing to call a strike after the party's headquarters ordered him to. After his excommunication, he became an active member of the Workmen's Circle. Around 1937 or 1938, Motel began selling life insurance as a sub-agent for his uncle, Max Bergstein. Motel passed away on December 25, 1941.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
Labour and unions
Name Access
Bergstein, Motel, 1898-1941
Litman, Boris
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-15
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-15
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
ca. 20 cm textual records
3 photographs
Date
1948-2007
Scope and Content
Accession consists of documents and photographs related to Young Judaea programs. Photographs are group pictures from Camp Shalom and Camp Biluim. Among the documents are meeting minutes, newsletters, correspondence, songbooks, scripts, flyers, and guides for counsellors and group leaders. Also included are issues of Hebrew newsletters Daf Hat'Nua and Bat'Nua.
Subjects
Camps
Youth
Zionism
Name Access
Canadian Young Judaea
Camp Shalom
Camp Biluim
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-1
Material Format
textual record
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 folder of textual records (PDF, Word)
Date
9 Feb. 2001
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a eulogy for Michael Maister written by his son Jonathan Maister.
Name Access
Maister, Jonathan
Maister, Michael
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-12
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
7 photographs : b&w and col. (tiff)
Date
[1970?]-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of Ben and Carrie Grossman and their family at family gatherings. Identified in the photographs are: Carrie Grossman, Ben Grossman, Jack Grossman, Warren Grossman, Rita Bergstein, Borris Litman, Ruth Malka Grossman, Miriam (Mimi) Grossman, Lillian Rose, Martha Sud, Hilda Grossman, and David Sud.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Bergstein, Rita
Grossman, Ben
Grossman, Carrie
Grossman, Hilda
Grossman, Jack
Grossman, Miriam
Grossman, Ruth
Grossman, Warren
Litman, Borris
Rose, Lillian
Sud, David
Sud, Martha
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-10
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
5 cm of textual records
Date
1988-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting Cyrel Troster's Jewish communal involvement, particularly with cultural planning for UJA Federation. Included are event inviations, program books, brochures, a postcard, meeting minutes, reports, and flyers. Records relate to the following agencies and projects: UJA Federation of Greater Toronto, the Tomorrow Campaign, Anshei Minsk Synagogue, Holy Blossom Temple, Shareeh Haim Synagogue, the Jewish Museum in Toronto, reports on Jewish education in Toronto, the Toronto Jewish Film Festival, the Holocaust Centre of Toronto, and the Koffler Centre. Of note is a copy of a study commissioned by UJA Federation for Frank Gehry, who was originally approached to design the Koffler Gallery.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Troster, Cyrel
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-14
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-14
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1 scrapbook
1 folder of textual records
2 photographs : b&w ; 13 x 18 cm and 21 x 25 cm
Date
1941-1951, 1959-1961
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a scrapbook documenting the military career of Seymour Bernard. Included in the scrapbook are photographs, newspaper clippings, correspondence, the transcript for a CFRB radio segment featuring Bernard, invitations for dinners honouring Bernard, a booklet (possibly by the Canadian Jewish Congress) entitled "Jews Have Always Fought for Freedom", and a torn black ribbon that was likely worn by Bernard's parents during shiva after he died in 1951 (kriah). The scrapbook was likely assembled by Bernard's parents.
Accession also includes material documenting Joel Snitman's confirmation at Holy Blossom Temple and involvement in the BBYO. Included are photographs and programs documenting Holy Blossom Temple's confirmation class of 1959, the program book of the B'nai Brith Youth Organization (BBYO) Southern Ontario Region Fall Conclave (1960), a BBYO AZA Sweetheart Ball booklet (1961), and the Lorac Letter newsletter (1959) which was a chapter of the AZA BBYO. Identified in the photographs are: Joel Snitman, Susie Romm, Karen Smith (?), Don Smith, Rabbi Eisen, and Rabbi Feinberg.
Administrative History
Beatrice Bernard (1913-1998) was born to Louie Bernard (1895?-1956) and Esther Berger (1892-1983) in Toronto in 1913. She had two younger siblings: Seymour (was a tailgunner in the RAF during the Second World War) and Gertrude. The family lived at 410 Crawford Street and Louie owned his own dress store at St. Clair and Yonge Street. Beatrice helped her father in the dress store in the 1930s. Louie eventually owned a coat manufacturing business which was located in the Balfour Building. Beatrice married Michael Snitman in 1935. Michael Snitman (1910-1978) was born to Harry and Lottie in Russia in 1910. He immigrated to Canada with his parents in 1912 and had two younger siblings who were born in Toronto: Bill (1912-2013) and Judy (Judith). Michael attended Harbord Collegiate and ran his own business called Plastwood Products in the early 1940s. Around 1947 he entered the photographic business as a distributor. He ran the Toronto branch of Montreal-based Anglophoto, which was owned by his brother-in-law, Abe Feigelson. Michael and Beatrice had two children together: Joel (b. 1943) and Bernard (Bernie) (b. 1948). Joel received a Bachelor of Science from the University of Toronto and taught Biology for five years before entering the real estate and property management business. He met his wife Blossom (nee Houpt) in the B'nai Brith Youth Organization and they had their first date on April 9, 1960. They later married in Aug. 1964 and had three children together: Aryeh, Sheri, and Aviella.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
Scrapbooks
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Bernard, Seymour
Snitman, Beatrice, 1913-1998
Snitman, Michael, 1910-1978
Snitman, Joel, 1943-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
10 cm textual records
ca. 70 photographs: b&w and col. ; 10 cm x 15 cm or smaller
1 scrapbook
Date
1963-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the activities of "Council '63", a branch of the Toronto Section of the National Council of Jewish Women of Canada (NCJWC). Types of records include a photograph album, a scrapbook, correspondence, souvenirs, meeting minutes, membership lists, program materials and budgets.
Administrative History
The "Council '63" Branch of the Toronto Section of the National Council of Jewish Women of Canada (NCJWC) was formed in 1963. Currently consisting of 20 members, the group was initially spearheaded by Barbara Norwich (d. 2011), and they met regularly in homes in the Cedarvale area. The group primarily did volunteer work, although it later evolved into a study group and book club.
Subjects
Women
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
National Council of Jewish Women (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-4
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1.2 m of textual records and other material
Date
[ca. 1936]-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the activities of Eitz Chaim. Included are photographs, yearbooks, class lists and registers, teachers record books and student grade reports, curriculum materials, anniversary books and 2 DVDs from a gala dinner and fundraising event. Also included is the Beth Jacob High School dedication and founders dinner book.
Administrative History
Known then as the Poylishe Talmud Torah, Eitz Chaim began in 1915 with a few students in one classroom guided by one teacher. The school’s first premises were in the Elm Street Shul. Within a year, a second teacher, Reb Leibish Noble, was hired, and he remained actively involved in Eitz Chaim for 30 years. There were now 30 students in two classes. The four-hour nightly sessions were held at the end of the regular public school day with an additional six hours on Sunday. Classes continued throughout the summer as well.
The school’s first building on Chestnut Street was inaugurated in August 1916, with additional classes held at a branch on Simcoe Street. The second president of the school, Yosef Shidlowsky, in a move to be more inclusive of all Orthodox Jews, changed the name of the school to Talmud Torah Eitz Chaim.
In 1917, Mr. Shidlowsky, Itshe Meyer Korolnek, and Joseph Cooper managed not only to obtain a provincial charter to open a religious school, but were also instrumental in purchasing the Italian Club at 68 D’Arcy St. to accommodate the school’s growing enrollment.
In 1920, Rabbi Yehuda Leib Graubart arrived from Stashow, Poland, and assumed the post of spiritual leader of the Talmud Torah. He introduced more Hebrew instruction and a more intensive Torah curriculum.
In 1926, Rabbi Pinchas Ravad became the next principal, a position he retained for the next nine years. During that time, a separate girls’ class was formed and the first female teacher was hired. Although a fire in 1927 destroyed the wooden school building on D’Arcy St., a new, larger school was constructed on the same site and dedicated on December 30, 1927. After moving into the new building, student enrollment increased dramatically. Beginning with 300 students in 1929, the student body grew to 400 in 1931, 503 in 1933, and 600 in 1938.
After the passing of Rabbi Graubart, an evening high school yeshiva, the Maharil Graubart Yeshiva, was founded in 1939 to serve boys 14 years of age and up with Rav Yaakov Kamenetsky acting as rosh yeshiva beginning in 1941. The building next door to the Talmud Torah, at 80 D’Arcy Street, was purchased to provide space for the yeshiva and was connected via a walkway to the Talmud Torah. As the students of Eitz Chaim Talmud Torah graduated from the elementary school, they would eventually attend the Maharil Graubart Yeshiva. That same year, Rabbi Jacob I. Wohlgelernter became principal of the Talmud Torah and a kindergarten was added in 1942.
Seven years later, Rabbi Chaim Nussbaum officially assumed the role of principal of Eitz Chaim Schools. Beginning with only a grade 1, new grades were added every year until grades 1 through 9 were in place. Eitz Chaim gradually broadened its scope, welcoming Jewish students from many diverse backgrounds and establishing afternoon and day classes beginning in 1950 at a branch on Burnside Ave. To meet the growing demand for classes, the Torath Emeth Jewish Centre was established at 1 Viewmount Avenue in 1956.
By 1958, in response to the geographical shift of the Jewish population northward, the Tanenbaum Building was added to the complex, followed by the Korolnek Building in 1961, both at 1 Viewmount Avenue. By this time, Eitz Chaim had two principals: Rabbi Nussbaum, who oversaw Hebrew studies, and Rabbi Shlomo Jakubovitz, who oversaw general studies.
The two buildings on D’Arcy St. were sold in 1966 and the proceeds were designated toward purchasing a new school building to the north of the city. Rabbi Shlomo Jakobovits, Avraham Bleeman, Joe Goldwasser and Sam Wortsman led the way in persuading the Board of Directors to purchase the land at Patricia and Bathurst Streets. Patricia and Bathurst Streets served as the temporary location for portable units until the large, permanent building was completed in 1970. This location evolved into the boys’ campus, servicing students from all areas of the city.
Rabbi Shneur Weinberg succeeded Rabbi Nussbaum in 1969 and served as the Hebrew principal until his retirement in 1995, when Rabbi Aaron Levine took over. The position of Hebrew studies principal for the girls’ school was created in 1974 and was held by Rabbi Leibish Adler for 26 years. Rabbi Mordechai Gewirts succeeded Rabbi Adler in 2002 and was principal of the girls’ school until 2012. Eitz Chaim Schools developed rapidly and acquired an excellent reputation among North American day schools.
The female graduates of Eitz Chaim, for the most part, attended public high school. To counter this trend, Beth Jacob High School, with the guidance of Eitz Chaim, was launched in 1963, with classes conducted near the Viewmount branch. In 1966, the Beth Jacob High School and Teacher’s Seminary was completed on Lawrence Avenue, culminating in the opening of a girls’ high school that became completely independent of Eitz Chaim. Today, many female graduates of Etiz Chaim continue their education at Beth Jacob High School.
The Spring Farm campus, named for the farm formerly on that site, opened its doors in 1988. Currently, Eitz Chaim serves primarily as an elementary educational institute under the guidance of Rabbi Isser Pliner.
History from http://www.eitzchaim.com/index.php?page=history (viewed Oct. 6, 2014)
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Physical Description note: Includes ca. 500 photographs, texts, 2 DVDs and 1 betacam cassette.
Use Conditions note: student grade reports are closed until 30 years after the death of the individual.
Subjects
Education
Children
Name Access
Eitz Chaim Schools (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
15 cm of textual records
Date
1974-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the involvement of Rolf Lederer in a variety of community organizations, including Congregation B'nai Torah, the Jewish Genealogical Society of Canada (Toronto), United Jewish Appeal, Jewish Immigrant Aid Society, the Chaplaincy Committees of the Toronto Jewish Congress and Jewish Family and Child Service. Included is general correspondence; newsletters; event, workshop and seminar materials; meeting minutes and agendas; and a SAJAC newsletter.
Name Access
Lederer, Rolf, 1934-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-5-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-5-8
Material Format
textual record
moving images
graphic material
Physical Description
2 m of textual records
10 film reels : 8mm
ca. 300 photographs
Date
[192-]-[200-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Steinberg family. The bulk of the material was collected and created by Elise Steinberg. Included are photographs and slides, family films, Israel and Miriam's wedding album and honeymoon scrapbook, correspondence and greeting cards, newsletters, Holy Blossom Temple bulletins, newsletters, certificates, Elise's school notebooks and assignments, and financial and legal records pertaining to the estate of Joseph Steinberg. Of particular note are Elise Steinberg's diaries which span the years from 1974 to 1984. Also of note is material documenting the family's resignation from Holy Blossom Temple.
Custodial History
The material came into the possession of Charles Levi and his parents after the death of Israel and Miriam Steinberg.
Administrative History
Irving (Israel) Steinberg was born to Joseph and Leah Steinberg (Schindermann) on January 16, 1919. Joseph and Leah had immigrated to Canada in 1914. They initially lived in Peterborough, but moved to Toronto by 1921. They lived in Toronto for a few years, but evetually settled in Sudbury and opened the Toronto Bargain Store.
Irving joined the Canadian army in 1942 and served in Canada. He married Miriam (from Philadelphia) and they lived in Toronto. They had one daughter, Elise, on September 25, 1955. Israel worked as an accountant and Miriam was a musician and patron of the arts. In her teen years, Elise developed an intellectual and physical disability (possibly scoliosis). Elise was an avid doll collector and volunteered for many years at Holy Blossom Temple's library. The family were members of Holy Blossom Temple for many years and tried advocating for better access to the synagogue for individuals with disabilities. They resigned their membership in the 1990s.
Elise passed away on April 5, 2005. Miriam passed away on February 28, 2011. Irving passed away the following day on March 1, 2011.
Subjects
Diaries
Families
Synagogues
Name Access
Holy Blossom Temple (Toronto, Ont.)
Steinberg, Elise, 1955-2005
Steinberg, Irving, 1919-2011
Steinberg, Miriam, ?-2011
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-11-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-11-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder textual records
Date
1944-1971
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a newsletter from Frontier Branch 513 of the Jewish National Workers' Alliance, and several documents from Shaarei Shomayim Congregation: a Sunday religious school report card and monthly bulletins.
Subjects
Newsletters
Societies
Synagogues
Name Access
Jewish National Workers' Alliance (Toronto, Ont.)
Shaarei Shomayim Congregation (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
40 cm of textual records and other material
Date
[192-]-[200-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the life and career of David Green and the Jaffey family. Records include sound and video recordings of events, Goodwill Sales accounting ledgers, meeting minutes from the Jewish Canadian Military Archives and Museum, David Green's military ephemera, manuals and reports of the Jewish Federation Board of Trustees and Bequest and Endowment Fund, and Jaffey family correspondence and photographs. Records also include certificates of appreciation awarded to David Green, mainly from UJA Federation.
Administrative History
David Green (1919-2014) was born in the Junction in west Toronto. He served as a private in the Canadian army as part of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. He was captured and designated MIA when he was held as a POW in Belgium. He became a member of General Wingate Branch 256 Jewish Canadian Legion. In the mid-1940s he married his wife, Sylvia (nee Jaffey) (d. 2010) and they had a daughter, Miriam. He was a longtime volunteer for the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto. In 1990, he was one of the first individuals to establish an Endowment Fund at the Jewish Foundation of Greater Toronto.
The Jaffey family consisted of Kaby Jaffey, his wife, Nellie, and their children Sylvia, Jess and Albert.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: Accession also consists of photographs and textiles.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
Charities
Families
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Green, David, 1919-2014
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-12-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-12-2
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
1 film reel (ca. 22 min.) : 16mm
1 videocassette
Date
[ca. 1980]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one film reel and one videocassette copy of the JIAS film entitled "We Are Our Brother's Keeper".
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-3
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
40 cm textual records
ca. 50 photographs
Date
1940-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records of Canadian Young Judaea. Records include correspondence, camp committee meeting minutes, camp committee and staff lists, the CYJ constitution, organizational newsletters, donation lists, flyers and camp reunion ephemera. Records also include clippings and reproductions from the Zionist Archives, and Camp Solelim photographs, as well as publications from other Jewish organizations.
Administrative History
Canadian Young Judaea was founded in 1909 as a Zionist movement for Canadian youth by members of the Herzl Zion Club. As a Zionist organization, Young Judaea continues to be committed to fostering a sense of Jewish identity and values in today's Jewish youth and to encouraging a lifelong commitment to Israel. In order to foster a closer connection to Israel, Canadian Young Judaea employs educational Shlichim from Israel who are posted to various Jewish communities throughout Canada and to offices at the national level in Toronto Young Judaea also operates several Zionist summer camps located in each region of Canada, and a summer leadership institute called Camp Biluim in Quebec. In addition to the social programme of the organization, Young Judaea also offers educational seminars and conferences.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Access restriction note: Files contain personal information of donors, campers, committee members and applicants for subsidies.
Subjects
Camps
Youth
Zionism
Name Access
Canadian Young Judaea
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-11-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-11-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 30 cm textual records
ca. 100 photographs
ca. 150 slides
Date
[198-]-2005
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records of Hillel Toronto. Records include a photograph album documenting the construction of the Wolfond Centre for Campus Jewish Life, slides from various Hillel programs, auditor reports, job postings and correspondence.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-17
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-17
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1930-1965
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting the immigration and settlement of Max Smith (Szmidt, Szmit, Szmita) and Pearl (nee Apelbaum?) Smith and their family. Included are Polish identification papers and correspondence with Canadian immigration officials. Also included is correspondence relating to Alexander Najmanowicz.
Custodial History
The records were found by UJA Federation employee Leanne Campbell while she was cleaning out her office for a move. She believes the records belonged to someone who had her office before her. The original owner/source of the records is unknown.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: Polish and English.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Smith, Max
Smith, Pearl
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-12-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-12-1
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Date
1957-1958
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two photographs of Bernie Shiner's class at Associated Hebrew Schools on Neptune Avenue, Toronto.
Identified individuals from 1957 are: David Zweig; Mitchell (?); Phillip Granovsky; Ian Eckler; Mark Greenspan; Hillel Eisen; Mark Gottlieb; Heidi (?); Mark Shapiro; Bernie Shiner; Gordon Lindsay; Carol Ogden; Vernon Kurtz; Milton Davis; Allan Greenspan; Leonard Feldman; Bobby Posen; Avram Steinman; and Sima Godfrey. The teacher was Mr. Clodman.
Identified individuals from 1958 are: Avram Steinman; David Zweig; Evelyn Klein; Bobby Posen; Emma Applebaum; Vernon Kurtz; Gordon Lindsay; Leonard Feldman; Allan Greenspan; Alan Frankel; Henry Metkiewitz; Bernie Shiner; Ronnie Rosenberg; Phil Granovsky; Deena Mandel; Mitchell (?).
Descriptive Notes
See accession form for location of individuals.
Subjects
Education
Children
Name Access
Zweig, David
Granovsky, Phillip
Eckler, Ian
Greenspan, Mark
Eisen, Hillel
Gottlieb, Mark
Shapiro, Mark
Shiner, Bernie
Lindsay, Gordon
Ogden, Carol
Kurtz, Vernon
Davis, Milton
Greenspan, Allan
Feldman, Leonard
Posen, Bobby
Steinman, Avram
Godfrey, Sima
Shapiro, Mark
Davis, Milton
Klein, Evelyn
Applebaum, Emma
Frankel, Alan
Metkiewitz, Henry
Rosenberg, Ronnie
Mandel, Deena
Associated Hebrew Schools
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-1
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1917-1964
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting Samuel Berger and his family. Included is Sam's marriage certificate, wedding invitation, naturalization certificates, and pay book and discharge papers from the First World War. Also included is a copy of the birth certificate for Sam's wife, Rebecca (nee Rotenberg) and a newsclipping of the obituary for Rebecca's father, Lazar Rotenberg.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Goldie Berger, the daughter-in-law of Samuel Berger and wife of Leonard Berger.
Administrative History
Samuel Berger enlisted in the Canadian army in Oct. 1918. He was discharged in Dec. 1918. He married Rebecca Rotenberg in 1917.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
World War, 1914-1918
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
[ca. 1970], 1979
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one Associated Hebrew Schools of Toronto certificate for Jeff Springer and one Israel Day at Ontario Place souvenir book (sponsored by the Canadian Zionist Federation).
Descriptive Notes
Language note: English and Hebrew
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
architectural drawing (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
ca. 30 photographs (tiff)
ca. 15 architectural drawings (tiff)
3 textual records (pdf)
Date
[1945?]-[ca. 1990]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs and architectural drawings documenting Jaime Levy-Bencheton's architectural career in Ontario and Morocco. The bulk of the material relates to projects Levy-Bencheton designed while working for the Government of Ontario including: a greenhouse for the Ontario Science Centre, OPP Headquarters building in London, ON, Rideau Correctional Centre, and Chestnut Hill (Southwestern Ontario regional archaeological office). Also included are architectutal drawings and photographs related to Levy-Bencheton's private practices in Morocco and Toronto and work for architect Martin Mendelow.
Administrative History
Jaime Levy-Bencheton was born on July 6, 1918 in Casablanca, Morocco. Jaime started a private architectural practice in Morocco in 1945. He immigrated to Canada in 1963 and initially found work with the architect Martin Mendelow. In 1965, he started working for the Government of Ontario's Department of Public Works as a draftsman. Starting in 1969, he worked for the Ministry of Government Services as an architectural job captain until his retirement in 1985. During his career Levy-Bencheton specialized in designing facilities for the handicapped and worked on a variety of buildings across Ontario including, industrial, institutional, and office use buildings. In his retirement, Levy-Bencheton became devoted to the study of the Bible and creating Jewish religious art.
Subjects
Architects
Occupations
Name Access
Levy-Bencheton, Jaime, 1918-
Places
Casablanca, Morocco
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-4
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder textual records
1 photograph: b&w ; 35 x 25 cm
Date
1899-[ca. 1903]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of Dr. Samuel Lavine's certification from the State Board of Medical Colleges of New Jersey and and the Board of Medical Registration and Examination, State of Ohio. Also included is one photograph believed to be of Samuel and Ida Lavine.
Custodial History
Donor found items among her mother's papers, donor was Samuel Lavine's great-granddaughter.
Administrative History
Dr. Samuel Lavine (1874-1959) was the first Jewish doctor to practice in Toronto. He graduated from Trinity University Medical School in 1899. Understanding that Jewish practitioners had little future in Toronto, he moved to the United States and received his medical certification in New Jersey and Ohio. However, he returned to Toronto one year later and opened an office at John and Adelaide Streets. He was known for making house calls on his bicycle. Dr. Lavine was also part of the Pride of Israel Sick Benefit Society, and became the first Jewish Lodge doctor in 1907. In 1909, he helped found, and later remained active in, the Free Jewish Dispensary. As of 1911 he lived at 159 Beverly Street. After 1922 he lived and practiced at 30 Dunvegan Road. The building was designed by Benjamin Brown. By 1931, Lavine's practice was located at 2 Wells Hill. Around 1903 he married Ida (nee Levy? Levi?) (1880-1958), and they had two daughters, Ruth (Levinson) and Helen (Sterling), and a son Bernard. Helen's husband, Theodore "Ted" Sterling, is said to be the first Jewish stockbroker.
Subjects
Physicians
Name Access
Lavine, Samuel, 1874-1959
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-5
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 30 x 53 cm
Date
28 Oct. 1925
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one photograph taken at the wedding reception of Egmont and Ruth Frankel, which was held at the Blackstone Hotel in Chicago. Identified in the photograph are: Ruth Frankel, Egmont Frankel, Dorothy Frankel and Carl Frankel.
Custodial History
Photograph was in the possession of Cherie Friend. She believes it originally belonged to her grandparents who had a music shop in Chicago. Her grandfather was born in Quebec.
Subjects
Weddings
Name Access
Frankel, Egmont
Frankel, Ruth
Places
Chicago
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
20 cm of textual records
Date
1934-1966
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the records created or accumulated by Suzann (Cohen) Hutner related to the operations of the Canadian Jewish Review. Included are circulation reports, financial records, correspondence related to advertisers and the sale of the publication, issue summaries prepared by Suzann and a history of the paper written by Suzann. There also a few issues of the CJR from the 1930s.
Custodial History
The records were in the custody of Harold Hutner, the stepson of Suzann Hutner.
Administrative History
The Canadian Jewish Review was established in 1921 by George and Florence Cohen. The couple had founded the short-lived Buffalo Jewish Review prior to them immigrating to Canada. The CJR was not bound by any particular religion or organization. Their offices were located in teh Hermant Building at Dundas Square. The paper was sold to the Canadian Jewish Chronicle in 1966.
Subjects
Newspapers
Name Access
Hutner, Suzann
Cohen, Florence
Cohen, George
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-7
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
ca. 20 photographs
Date
1929-1982
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the Heaps family. Included are general letters and postcards, wartime correspondence, political materials, photographs, and newsclippings. Of note is a 1948 letter written (but perhaps not sent) to David Ben-Gurion describing various issues he was finding with the Israeli army. There is also a great deal of correspondence between Leo, David and A. A. during the war, including some letters describing his escape from Arnhem and a letter describing the Bergen-Belsen Concentration Camp in 1945.
Administrative History
Leo Heaps (1923-1995) was born in Winnipeg in 1923, the son of A. A. Heaps and Bessie Morris. His father A. A. was a founder of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, the forerunner of the New Democratic Party. Leo Heaps was raised in Winnipeg and received an education at Queen's University, the University of California, and McGill University. During the Second World War, at the age of 21, Heaps was seconded to the British Army and found himself commanding the 1st Battalion's Transport. He participated in the Battle of Arnhem as a paratrooper.
Leo Heaps was awarded the Royal Military Cross for his work with the Dutch Resistance. His brother, David, had also achieved the same distinction, thereby making them the only Jewish brothers during the Second World War to win the decoration. After the war, Heaps went to Israel and aided their army in the establishment of mobile striking units. Whilst there, he met his wife-to-be, Tamar (1927-). Together they had one son, Adrian, and three daughters, Karen, Gillian, and Wendy.
During the Hungarian Revolution he led a special rescue team to bring refugees out and across the border. In the mid-1960s he returned to Britain where he dabbled in various entrepreneurial projects as well as writing several books, notably "The Grey Goose of Arnhem", telling his own story of Arnhem, the aftermath of the battle, and also the stories of other Arnhem evaders and their dealings with the Resistance.
Leo Heaps spent most of his life in Toronto, Canada, and was amongst the forty Canadian veterans who returned to Arnhem in 1994 to mark the 50th anniversary. He died in 1995.
Subjects
Concentration camps
World War, 1939-1945
Zionism
Name Access
Heaps, Leo, 1923-1995
Heaps, David
Heaps, A. A.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-1
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
45 cm of textual records
Date
2006-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of Executive Committee and Board of Director packages distributed to members prior to meetings. Included in the packages are previous meeting minutes, agendas, and ancillary reports. The Executive Committee packages are from 2006-2008 and 2010-2011 and the Board of Director packages are from 2006-2008.
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
Date
1948-1949; 1997-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the literary career and personal life of Dr. Gerald Tulchinsky. Included are manuscripts for several short stories and a book, general correspondence and notes, thoughts and ponderings, article and book reviews and records related to his time at Yeshiva in New York.
Administrative History
Dr. Gerald Tulchinsky was Professor Emeritus at Queen's University, Department of History, and author of several books on the history of Canadian Jewry and labour issues in Canada. His books include: Shtetl on the Grand (2015); Joe Salsberg: A Life of Commitment (2013); Canada's Jews: A People's Journey (2008); Branching Out: The Transformation of the Canadian Jewish Community (1998); Taking Root: The Origins of the Canadian Jewish Community (1992); and The River Barons: Montreal Businessmen and the Growth of Industry and Transportation, 1837-53 (1977).
Tulchinsky was born in Brantford, Ontario in 1933 to Harry and Anne Tulchinsky. He resided in Kingston, Ontario until his death on 13 Dec. 2017.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Subjects
Authors
Teachers
Name Access
Tulchinsky, Gerald, 1933-2017
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-3
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
15 cm of textual records
ca. 100 photographs
Date
1938-2006
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the Max and Anne Tanenbaum and Wolf families. Included are photographs of family, trips and missions to Israel, the establishment of the John Bassett Sports Centre in Israel and other events; certificates; documents related to Anne and Max's philanthropic work and giving to the Baycrest Centre, the University of Toronto, CHAT and the United Jewish Appeal; newsclippings; and photographs and an invitation documenting the honourary doctorate degree bestowed on Anne Tanenebaum by the Ben Gurion University of the Negev.
Administrative History
Max (1909-1983) and Anne (1909-2009) Tanenbaum were notable philanthropists in Toronto, best known for their support of the Jewish community in the areas of medicine and education.
Max Tanenbaum was born in Poland to Abraham and Chippa Sura Tanenbaum in 1909. He immigrated to Canada with his mother and brother, Joseph, in 1914, three years after his father's arrival in 1911. Max began work in the family steel business at the age of 13 and later went on to found his own steel company; York Steel. Max had two additional siblings, sisters Sarah (m. Sam Kates) and Esther (m. Simon Gottlieb).
Anne Tanenbaum was born in New York in 1909 to Herman and Minnie Wolf. Anne had three siblings: Molly (m. ? Raphael), Dorothy (m. Max Roher) and Jack (m. Ann Korolnek). At the age of 10, Anne's mother passed away and her father remarried. Her father and step-mother had three additional children: Bill (m. Sylvia), Noah (m. Marilyn), and Esther (m. Carmen). The family moved from New York to Montreal and then to Toronto.
Max and Anne met in Toronto and married in 1930. Together they had seven children: Harold, Joey (m. Toby), Howard (m. Carol), Larry (m. Judy), Tauba (m. Sol Spiro), Minda (m. Les Feldman), and Carol.
Descriptive Notes
Anne's stepmother was affectionately referred to by the Tanenbaum grandchildren as "Bubbie from Palestine."
Subjects
Families
Philanthropists
Name Access
Tanenbaum, Anne, 1909-2009
Tanenbaum, Max, 1909-1983
Wolf family
Places
Israel
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-2
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 100 photographs
1 folder of textual records
Date
1920-1980
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of the Hersch family, a screenplay by Phillip Hersch, school certificates from Landsdowne School, Canadian naturalization certificates, thank you notes, a New Year's greeting card, and a Polish passport. Included are photographs of weddings, Europe vacations, class photos, houses in Toronto, bar mitzvah, Niagara falls, Channukah, Farms, studio sets, the beach, and snow scenes
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Norman Hersch until his death in the mid-1980s, at which point the donor took possession of the records and stored them until donating them to the OJA in March 2015.
Administrative History
Norman Hersch was a special effects technician for the CBC from the early 1950s until his retirement in the mid-1980s. He was married to a French woman from Western Canada named Margaret. He is buried in the Mount Albert area with his wife. He served in the Canadian military during the Second World War and graduated from Central Technical School upon his return. In later years, he started P & M Display in Yorkville. Norman's older brother Phillip was a screenwriter in Toronto. He wrote the CBC series Wojek. Their mother Lily (Polish) volunteered at Mount Sinai Hospital. Their father Alexander (Romanian) worked in stainless steel manufacturing. They lived around Cecil Street. Doug Wardle was a friend and colleague of Hersch's at CBC in the Special Effects Department.
Subjects
Bar mitzvah
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Name Access
Hersch, Norman
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-4
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
[ca. 1960]-1999
Scope and Content
Accession consists of Jewish cookbooks from South Africa and Zimbabwe that were collected and used by Denise Rootenberg and her mother Celia. Included are the following cookbooks: "The Traditional Sephardi recipe book" (cookbook by the Sephardic community in Zimbabwe), "Cooking With Confidence" (South African), "Cavalcade Golden Jubilee" (Zimbabwe), and "The Ambuya Nompi Smith Cookbook". Accession also includes two letters written to Denise from her mother-in-law shortly after her immigration to Canada in 1989. One letter includes a recipe.
Administrative History
Denise Rootenberg was born in 1958 in Zimbabwe (Rhodesia) to Celia (nee Hofstein) and Harold Sydney Abrahamson. Her parents had both grown up in South Africa but moved to Rhodesia soon after they married. Harold was a pharmacist and Celia taught commercial subjects at a technical college. Denise moved to Cape Town to go the University of Cape Town. She married Lanny Rootenberg in 1981 and they had one son, Mark, born in 1988. Denise and Lanny moved to Toronto in 1989. Lanny's brother was already living here. They struggled initially, but Lanny eventually found work in customer relations management at Price Waterhouse and Denise initially found secretarial work. Denise eventually became an editorial assistant for the Financial Post. She currently does freelance writing for the web.
Subjects
Community cookbooks
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Rootenberg, Denise
Places
Zimbabwe
Cape Town
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
7 photographs : b&w ; 23 x 36 cm or smaller
Date
1928-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the life and cantorial career of Rev. Alexander Steinberg, and to a lesser extent his son, Ben Steinberg. Included are photographs of Cantor Steinberg, fellow cantors and the Shaarei Shomayim cheder class; Cantor Steinberg's scrapbook; hand-copied solo and choral music books; correspondence; and materials relaing to Ben Steinberg's cantata Echoes of Children memorializing the children who perished in the Holocaust.
Administrative History
Chazzan Alexander Steinberg was born Eliyahu Steinberg in Zhitomeir, Ukraine in 1893 to Chava and Chaim Steinberg. His father was the owner and operator of a lumber yard and, as a devout Jew, brought his son Eliyahu regularly to the synagogue where he developed a love of chazzanut and, in the then traditional apprenticeship method, studied the skills which would lead him eventually to a lifetime career in the music of the traditional synagogue.
At the age of 15 he emigrated to Winnipeg, Canada and worked in a men's clothing store until he could find employment as a cantor. He began his professional life as a visiting cantor in the 1920s, travelling to smaller communities in Alberta and Saskatchewan, officiating at services for Shabbat, High Holy Days and the Fesitvals, as well as presenting concerts of Hebrew and Yiddish song.
By the 1930s, he officiated regularly at the Atereth Yisrael Synagogue in Winnipeg and appeared as a concert cantor throughout the western Canadian provices (Lethbridge, Regina, Prince Albert, Edenbridge, Melville, Edmonton, Calgary, etc.) as well as Ontario (London, Hamilton, Kitchener, Sarnia, Ottawa, Fort William and Toronto) and as far away as St. Louis, Missouri and Detroit, Michigan.
He was appointed cantor of Atereth Yisrael Congregation of Winnipeg in 1930 and maintained a relationship with that Shul throughout his time in Toronto, visiting regularly to daven and present concerts.
After the death of his first wife, he married Polly Shapiro in 1928, and in 1933 he moved his family including four children (three, Sam, Ida and Laurie from his previous marriage) to Toronto, where for a time he served as cantor at Goel Tzedec Congregation.
In Toronto, Cantor Steinberg became renowned for his beautiful tenor voice and his knowledge of the liturgy. He was much sought after and officiated througout the Toronto area in synagogues such as the Hebrew Men of England, Ostrovtzer, Beth Jacob, Kiever, Goel Tzedec, Palmerston, Anshei Minsk and Lubavitcher. All this activity brought him to the attention of various synagogues in the United States as well and he travelled to Detroit and Rochester on several occasions.
In 1941, he was appointed Cantor at Shaarei Shomayim on St. Clair Ave., a congreation he served until 1950. He continued to serve outlying congregations in Hamilton, London and Sarnia until he was invited in 1953 to establish the King David Congregation in Toronto, to serve the unaffiliated during the High Holy Days. His cantorial career came to an end in April 1960 when he experienced a heart attach in London, Ontario while leading that community's Pesach service. He died at home in Toronto two days before Yom Kippur in 1960.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Benjamin Steinberg is a composer, conductor, organist, and teacher. He was born in Winnipeg on 22 January 1930 and received his Bachelor of Music from the University of Toronto in 1961. He and his wife Mildred have two children.
A soloist at age 8 in the synagogue choir conducted by his father, Cantor Alexander Steinberg, he began conducting choirs himself at age 12. At the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto from 1948-1951 and 1957-1960 he studied composition with John Weinzweig, piano with Samuel Dolin, and voice with Weldon Kilburn. After teaching from 1953-1958 in public schools in the Toronto area and studying music education at the University of Toronto, he served from 1961-1964 as head of the music department at Winston Churchill Collegiate Institute and from 1961-1964 and in the same capacity at Forest Hill Collegiate Institute from 1964-1986. He was director of school music (1950-1960) and music director (1960-1969) at Holy Blossom Temple, and in 1970 he became music director at Temple Sinai. His method for youth choirs, "Together Do They Sing" (New York 1961), was commissioned and published by the Union of American Hebrew Congregations.
Steinberg's music includes five sacred services (four published - 1963, 1969, 1969, and 1990 - by Transcontinental Music); works for choir and/or soloist and organ or orchestra (some published by Transcontinental Music and Israeli Music Publications); The Vision of Isaiah (1970) for tenor, choir, and organ or instrumental ensemble; Yerushalayim (1973) for soprano, choir, and orchestra; Echoes of Children (1979), a cantata for soloist, narrator, chorus, and orchestra (which won the International Gabriel Award and has twice been televised on PBS); and instrumental works including a suite for flute and string trio based on Israeli folksongs. Steinberg was invited by the city of Jerusalem to be an artist-in-residence in 1978 and 1980; he received the Kavod (Honour) Award of the Cantor's Assembly in 1983, and that same year received a composer's award from the American Harp Society for his Suite for Flute, Viola and Harp (1981, commissioned by Suzanne Shulman). A number of temples, synagogues, and congregations in the USA commissioned some 18 works from Steinberg between 1980 and 1991. He has also received commissions from Paul Brodie (Suite Sephardi 1980), the Chamber Players of Toronto (Suite for String Orchestra 1983), and Lawrence Cherney (Invocations 1990). Baritone Richard Allen recorded several of Steinberg's works on the cassette A Ben Steinberg Concert. (ca 1989, Transcontinental unnumbered).
Of Steinberg's music Michael Isaacson wrote, 'While conservative, pragmatic and always well-mannered, it is also gratefully mindful of its tradition in a deeply lyrical way' (Journal of Synagogue Music, June 1973). Steinberg has presented Jewish music on the CBC, has published articles on it, and has given many lecture-recitals on it in Australia, Canada, Japan, and the USA. He is a contributor to EMC, a member of the CLComp, and an associate of the Canadian Music Centre.
Descriptive Notes
Biographical Note: Further biographical information on Ben Steinberg is available with the accession record.
Subjects
Cantors (Judaism)
Families
Heder
Name Access
Steinberg, Alexander, 1893-1960
Steinberg, Ben
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-6
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
5 cm textual records and other material
Date
[ca.1890]-[ca. 1940]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of personal records of Hyman (Ben) Benjamin, and records documenting Arthur Benjamin's miltiary service. Records include ca. 30 photographs of three generations of the Benjamin family, Rosh Hashanah greeting cards, Hyman Benjamin's birth certificate and first aid certificate. Records also include corespondence between several branches of the Canadian government and Arthur's mother, Annie, regarding the circumstances of Arthur's death; his grave site and his army pension.
Custodial History
The records were donated to the Archives by Nancy Rose, daughter of the great-nephew of Hyman (Ben) Benjamin.
Administrative History
Hyman "Ben" Benjamin (ca. 1884-1969) was born in Leeds, England to Lazuras and Annie Benjamin. He married Hilda (Holds) Benjamin, and they immigrated to Canada in 1911. He worked as a car mechanic. They had two daugthers, Laura (b.1911) and Florence (b.1912).
Arthur "Abraham" Benjamin (ca.1882-1917) was Hyman Benjamin's brother. He immigrated to Toronto from Leeds some time after 1911 and worked with Hyman as a car cleaner. He joined the 198th Battalion of the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force in 1916, and was killed in the First World War.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
World War, 1914-1918
Name Access
Benjamin, Arthur, 1882-1917
Benjamin, Hyman, 1884-1969
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-4
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 8 cm of textual records
Date
1984-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records predominantly related to UJA Federation of Greater Toronto's Community Planning and Allocations Committee. Records include studies, meeting minutes, correspondence, budgets and reports, most related to the plans for redevelopment of the Bathurst JCC. Records also include Bar Mitzvah benchers and Ashkenaz Festival promotional materials.
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
34 photographs (tiff)
Date
[between 1914 and 1916?], 1986-1998
Scope and Content
Accssion consists of photographs documenting the Levine family's immigration to Canada and activities in Saskatchewan and Ontario. Included are images of Mark and Bev during their first few years in Melford, Saskatchewan, family holiday celebrations (Chanukah and Pesach dinners), shabbat dinners, the Edenbridge synagogue, trips to Niagara Falls, and images taken during trips Elfreda and Alec made to Canada from South Africa to visit Mark. Of note are images taken of Mark and Bev with other South African immigrants at a ski hill in Saskatchewan and at shabbat dinners in Melford. Also included is a Sweiden family portrait taken in South Africa in the early 1900s.
Administrative History
Leible and Esther Sweiden moved from Lithuania to Capetown in 1890. Leible's brother, Jacob followed him to Capetown around 1902. In 1906, Jacob and his wife Fanny (nee Vickers) immigrated with a small group of other Jewish South Africans to Edenbridge, Saskatchewan. Leible remained in South Africa. Leible's son Israel married Edith (Eadie) in 1934. Israel and Edith's daughter Elfreda (b. 1936) married Alec Levine in 1958. Elfreda was a bookkeeper for various companies and Alec worked for his family's plumbing business. They had three children together: Mark (b. 1959), Carol (b. 1962), and Adrian ( b. 1966).
Mark Levine married Beverley in 1983. They immigrated to Melford, Saskatchewan in 1986. Mark did not know at the time that his great grandfather's brother had immigrated to a nearby area decades earlier and only learned of his story and the Edenbridge Jewish community soon after arriving there. Mark worked as a physician at a local hospital. Beverley had been a pharmacist in South Africa, however, her qualifications were not recognized in Canada and she focused on raising her family. Mark and Bev's daughter, Romi, was born in August 1987. After 18 months in Melford, they moved to Toronto after Mark found work as a pediatric anesiologist at Sick Kids Hospital. In 1998, thier second daughter, Jade, was born. Mark's parents, Elfreda and Alec, immigrated to Toronto in 1999. Mark and other relatives encouraged them to immigrate due to the increasingly dangerous political situation in South Africa. Mark is also an assoicate professor at the University of Toronto. Alec and Elfreda's daughter Carol lives in England and their son Adrian remains in South Africa.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Levine, Mark
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-10
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
moving images
Physical Description
ca. 20 cm of textual records
ca. 50 photographs
2 videocassettes : VHS
Date
1985-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of mixed media material documenting SAJAC Seniors and the SAJAC News. SAJAC Seniors material includes newsletters, certificates, videocassettes, and photographs of events, such as chanukah luncheons and a group trip to 1000 Islands in Gananoque. Also included is one composite photograph with images of all the members in 2002 and a minute book (2000-2010) which contains minutes of general and annual meetings, financial statements, and annual reports. Accession also includes issues of the SAJAC News publication (2010-2014).
Administrative History
Thea was born in Estonia (Liebau) in 1918. She lived with her family in Berlin until they moved to Johannesberg, South Africa in 1923. Thea married Abe Bernard Abramson in 1942 and they had two children: Michael Julian (b. 1964) and Colleen "Chips". Michael passed away at a young age. Thea was a concert pianist and also worked as a bookeeper. She was a first league tennis player in South Africa and also played field hockey. She knits and does needlepoint as a hobby.
Colleen married Paul Klein around 1970. Colleen and Paul immigrated to Guelph in 1975. Thea and Abe immigrated to North York in 1981 (after the passing of Thea's mother). Abe was retired, but Thea continued to work as a pianist and accountant. She became involved with SAJAC Seniors in 1985. She alternated with other members as Chairperson of SAJAC Seniors for a few years, but held the role for over 25 straight years starting around 1990. Abe passed away in 2006.
SAJAC Seniors is a social organization that was formed in 1978 by Nancy Rubenstein for older South Africans who immigrated to Toronto. Many members had immigrated to Canada later in life to join children who had already moved here. The organization raises funds for various causes in Israel, holds luncheons, dinners, lectures and other social occassions, and organizes trips to cities across Canada.
Subjects
Newsletters
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Southern African Jewish Association of Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-1
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
6 yearbooks
Date
1988-1993
Scope and Content
Accession consists of six yearbooks from Solomon's school years.
Administrative History
Dara Solomon was born in Toronto in 1975 to Joseph and Maureen (Kokotow) Solomon. Her sister is Alida Solomon. In 2004, she married Jay Rosenthal of Natick, MA in San Francisco, CA. Solomon attended Bialik Hebrew Day School (1980-89), Arlington Senior Public School (1989), CHAT (1990), and Forest Hill Collegiate Institute (1991-93). She went on to the University of Toronto where she received her BA and to the School of the Art Institute of Chicago where she received her Masters in Arts Administration. She worked in museums in the San Francisco Bay Area for 11 years before returning to Toronto with her family in 2012. Since 2012, she has been the director of the Ontario Jewish Archives. She has a daughter named Stella Rosenthal and a son named Cy Rosenthal.
Subjects
Children
Education
Name Access
Solomon, Dara, 1975-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-4
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
2 photograhs : tif
Date
[1955 or 1956]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two electronic copies of original photographs. The first depicts Abe Blankenstein with his wife Freda. The second is Abe Blankenstein with his business partner, Joe Fialkov. Both photographs feature Falco Electric trucks.
Subjects
Occupations
Name Access
Blankenstein, Abe
Falco Electric Co.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-7
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
moving images
Physical Description
7.2 m of textual records and other material
Date
1923-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the Alpha Omega Fraternity, Pi Chapter, the Ladies Auxiliary, the AO Alumni Association, the AO Foundation and the AO House Association. Records include meeting minutes and reports, convention programs, general correpondence, newsletters, membership rosters, legal records, programs, photographs, budgets and other financial records, scrapbooks, AORTA yearbooks and efficiency reports detailing the activities of the AO during the year. Of particular note are the meeting minutes of the Mount Sinai Dental Society (1939-1946) and the Toronto Jewish Dental Society (1934-1935). There are also early photographs of John Sherman, one of the original founders of the AO, which were collected for an event in his honour.
Custodial History
The records were housed at the Fraternity House on Willowdale Rd. until its sale and the Fraternity's move to 4600 Bathurst St.
Administrative History
Alpha Omega is an international dental fraternity. It is the oldest international dental organization and was founded in Baltimore, Maryland in 1907 by a group of dental students originally to fight discrimination in dental schools. Today, with headquarters relocated to Glen Rock, NJ, it is primarily an educational and philanthropic organization. There are chapters and members in cities and dental schools in the United States, Canada, South America, Europe, Israel, South Africa and Australia/New Zealand. Alpha Omega represents about 6,000 active dentists worldwide.
The Alpha Omega International Dental Fraternity is dedicated to the following: to be "The Voice of the Jew In Dentistry"; to be "The Voice of Dentistry in all problems concerned with the Jewish Fate"; to uphold "The Image of the Jew in Dentistry"; to fight discrimination in the graduation of dental students from their respective schools, in procedures of licensing boards, in organized dentistry and in the private practice of dentistry.
The objectives of the Fraternity are to promote the profession of dentistry; to establish, foster and develop high standards of Scholarship, Leadership and Character; to inculcate a spirit of fellowship amongst all its members; to create and bind together a body of professional people, who, by scholarly attainments, faithful service and the maintenance of ethical ideals and principles, have achieved distinction; to honour achievement in others; to strive for breadth of vision, unity in action and accomplishment of ideals; to commend all worthy deeds, and if fraternal welfare demands, to call and counsel with its members; to accept, sponsor and develop the cultural and traditional achievements of our faith; to build within our fraternity a triangle, the base of which is Judaism, the supporting sides, professionalism and fraternalism.
The Toronto undergraduate chapter was founded in 1921 at the University of Toronto and the alumni chapter in 1924. The alumni continue to meet regularly and organize a variety of educational, networking, fundraising and social events for its membership.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Physical Description Note: Accession inclucdes scrapbooks, graphic material and a film reel.
Use Conditions Note: Financial materials and executive meeting minutes are closed for 15 years from date of creation. Membership rosters are closed for 50 years from date of creation.
Subjects
Greek letter societies
Occupations
Name Access
Alpha Omega Dental Society (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-8
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
3 photographs: col., ; 12 x 18 cm and smaller
Date
2008
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting several professional achievements of Morley S. Wolfe. It includes: one programme from the Morley S. Wolfe Youth Book Competition, one programme from the Law Society of Upper Canada Awards Ceremony (with Morley S. Wolfe as the Lincoln Alexander Award Recipient), a clipping about the Youth Book Competition, and three photographs. Identified in the photographs: Morley S. Wolfe and Gavin Mackenzie (treasurer of LSUC).
Administrative History
Morley S. Wolfe was born in Winnipeg in 1928 to Cecil (b. 1895) and Betty (nee Davidow) Wolfe. He spent his early childhood in various cities in Saskatchewan and Manitoba until moving to Toronto in 1940. Soon after graduating from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1955 he started his own practice as a senior member of the law firm Burt, Burt, Wolfe and Bowman. In 1971 he was appointed Queen’s Council, and from 1973 to 1977 he served as counsel for B’nai Brith Canada. After his retirement from practice in 1993, the Province of Ontario appointed him presiding Justice of the Peace for Ontario and Deputy Judge in Small Claims Court. His first marriage was to Sandra Newman in 1958 and they had three children together: Leslie, Lee, and Melanie. He later married Joan and became the step-father to her daughter, Erin. Throughout his life Morley was passionate about fighting prejudice and discrimination and became involved with organizations, such as the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews and the Urban Alliance on Race Relations. He was also a member of the Toronto Police Services Board Committee on Race Relations, served as Chair of the North York Committee on Community, Race and Ethnic Relations, and was appointed to the Canadian Multiculturalism Council. In addition, he was the founding president of Toronto Residents in Partnership (TRIP) from 2003 to 2006. His involvement extended to Jewish organizations. He served as National President of B’nai Brith Canada (BBC) from 1982 to 1983 and was a founding member of its League for Human Rights. He was also President of BBC’s Toronto Regional Council and Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998, and of the Jewish Camp Council of Toronto as well as many other organizations. Morley’s hard work and involvement in the community earned him many awards, including, City of Toronto’s William P. Hubbard Race Relations Award, the YMCA Canada Peace Medal, B’Nai Brith Canada Service Award, and the Province of Ontario’s Senior Achievement Award. Around 2002, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 began filing a series of appeals with B’nai Brith International (BBI) over concerns that BBC’s national executive was governing undemocratically. Morley played a key role in filing these appeals and was the centre of one appeal filed after BBC censured him without advance notice or the opportunity for a hearing. These appeals were not all successful. Around 2006, Morley became involved in another appeal against BBC that was filed by a group of members who called themselves the Concerned Members of B’nai Brith Canada (CMOBBC). They alleged that BBC’s national executive had too much centralized power, was not governing transparently, failed to provide members with audited financial statements at multiple annual general meetings (AGMs), passed a constitution that members had defeated at the 2005 AGM, and was threatening and harassing some members. BBI’s appeal court rendered its verdict in 2007 in favour of BBC. Soon after this judgment was made BBC took steps to expel all the members of CMOBBC. In response, Morley resigned from the organization. Morley currently resides in Brampton.
Name Access
Wolfe, Morley, 1928-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-3
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
41 photographs : b&w ; 26 x 21 cm and smaller
1 folder of textual records
Date
1964-1976
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of Hon. Sydney Harris' activities with the Canadian Jewish Congress and as part of a Canadian delegation to the World Jewish Congress events. Among the events being photographed: World Jewish Congress Sixth Plenary Assembly in Jerusalem in 1975, World Jewish Congress Executive Meetings in Geneva in 1968 and Jerusalem in 1970, CJC Representatives Conference in Hamilton, a Central Region Meeting in 1964 and the International Conference on Soviet Jewry in Brussels in 1976. Also included is a programme from a Tribute Dinner presenting the Canada Israel Friendship Award to Honourable R. Roy McMurtry. Identified in the photographs: Sydney Harris, Enid Harris, Monroe Abbey, Minnie Abbey, Max Melamet, Evie Melamet, [?] Becher, Marcus Einfeld, Sol Kanee, Sam Sable, David Satok, Leon Kronitz, Saul Hayes, Beatrice Hays, Daniel Lewis, [?] Fidler, Leon Teitelbaum, [?] Rowe, [?] Daniels, Gerhard Riegner, Lord Sieff, Lady Reading, Stephen Roth, Harry Steiner, Meyer Sarner, Goldie Sarner, Julie Hayman, Leah Seller, [?] Finkleman, Sam Bronfman, Dave Peters, Shelly Kent, Sally Kent, Joachim Schneeweiss, Aryeh Tartakower, Zalman Shazar, Joachim Prinz, Nahum Goldman, John Roberts, Serge Joyal, Ruth [?], William Wexler, and Hugo Gryn.
Administrative History
Sydney Harris (1917-2009) was born on June 23, 1917, to Samuel Aaron and Rose Harris (nee: Geldzaeler). Samuel worked as a salesman. Sydney's maternal grandparents, Mark and Yetta Geldzaeler (nee: Shumer) immigrated to Toronto in the 1880s. Mark Geldzaeler was the Chazan at Holy Blossom Temple. Sydney's paternal grandparents, Samuel and Sarah Harris (nee: Buker), and their children, also immigrated to Canada in the 1890s. Samuel Harris (senior) owned the Harris Delicatessen (later a tobacco store) and was one of the founders of the Hebrew Free Loan Society. Sydney Harris received degrees from the University of Toronto and Osgoode Hall Law School, and then worked as a lawyer in Ottawa. He, along with Harold Rubenstein, founded the law firm of Harris and Rubenstein. Appointed as a judge of the Ontario Provincial Court in 1976, he rendered decisions on very noteworthy cases. In 1978 he acquitted officers of the Pink Triangle Press and gay magazine Body Politic of charges of possession and distribution of obscene materials. He also dismissed the charges against Magder Furs for doing business on a Sunday. In 1988, he convicted NHL player Dino Ciccarelli for his on-ice attack on a player from the opposing team. He became a small claims court judge when he retired in 1982, and was also a part-time member of the Ontario Assessment Review Board, a referee for the Law Society of Upper Canada and a lay appointee of the Council for the Association of Ontario Land Surveyors. Sydney Harris was a human rights advocate, fighting for stronger laws in the Criminal Code to combat neo-Nazism. He was also a fervent supporter of the civil rights movement, even meeting with Martin Luther King Junior in 1963. He was active in the Jewish community, serving as president of the Canadian Council of Reform Congregations national president of Toronto Jewish Vocational Services, and president Canadian Friends of Boys Town Jerusalem. He was also a founding member of Upper Canada Lodge, B'nai Brith. Most notably, he served as president of Canadian Jewish Congress, after serving on CJC's National Executive Committee, Foreign Affairs Committee and Religious Welfare Committee. He was secretary of Holy Blossom Temple's board, and then active at Temple Sinai. He was also known for his opposition to religious education in public schools. Sydney married Enid Pearlman, a Registered Nurse, in 1950 and they had two children, Mark and David. Sydney Harris died on January 17, 2009.
Name Access
Harris, Sydney, 1917-2009
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-5
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
2 folders of textual records
10 photographs
21 photographs (tiff)
Date
1957-2015, predominant 1987-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the activities of Colin and Brenda Baskind. Included are family photographs, such as a wedding portrait of Colin and Brenda, images of family events, graduation portraits of Colin's children, family holiday celebrations, Colin and Brenda running marathons, and the family at a baby naming ceremony for Colin's granddaughter at Darchei Noam Synanagoue. Textual records include thank you letters Colin received from individuals he assisted as President of SAJAC and in other capacities, the CV that Colin used to look for work in Toronto while preparing to immigrate from South Africa, a speech Brenda delivered to a cancer support group regarding her fight with breast cancer and marathon running, newsclippings, certificates, and letters of reference for both Colin and Brenda.
Identified in the photographs are: Colin Baskind, Brenda Baskind, Alan Sandler, Ian Sandler, Lorraine Sandler, Cliff Baskind, Stacey Baskind, Audrey Weinberg, Gerald Weinberg, Solly Simmons, Renee Simmons, Lily Shaie Baskind, Alana Baskind, and Refton Blair.
Administrative History
Colin Baskind was born in Johannesburg, South Africa, on April 20, 1943. As a child, he attended an all boys' school and played a wide variety of sports including, soccer, cricket and rugby. He studied commerce at the University of South Africa and completed a business course through a school in England. While in school he met his future wife, Brenda, on a blind date and they married in 1967. Together they had three children: Stacey, Alana and Cliff.
Colin worked in an import business and Brenda was a nursery school teacher. For a short period of time they cared for the nephew of their maid, whose daughter gave birth at a young age and was still in school. They raised him with their children until his mother was finished school.
Around 1976, Colin and Brenda started to think about leaving South Africa due to the worsening violence and political situation. After first considering Australia, they eventually immigrated to Toronto in 1987. Colin found work in the importing business and Brenda found work at Holy Blossom Temple school. Soon after arriving in Toronto, Colin became involved in the Southern African Jewish Association of Canada. He attended a meeting that had been called to resuscitate SAJAC (the organization, which was formed in 1977, had ceased functioning and there was a need to bring it back to help a new large wave of immigrants). At the meeting Colin was nominated as President and he has held this role ever since. Colin also volunteered with a variety of organizations including, JIAS and JVS. He continued with his athletic pursuits in Canada and jogged, hiked, and cycled in all weather. Around 1998, Brenda started to join Colin and his running group on jogs. Around 2000 they both began running in marathons. By 2015, they had participated in 11 marathons. In 2010, their granddaughter Lily Shaie was born to their daughter Stacey.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Baskind, Colin
Places
Johannesburg
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-6
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1957-1960
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a Congregation B'Nai Israel (St. Catharines) mailing list, the constitution and by-laws of the Niagara Peninsula Jewish Youth Commission, and a founding day program of the Niagara Peninsula Jewish Youth Commission and Council at B'Nai Brith Synagogue, May 26, 1957.
Administrative History
Stanley Feldman was born in Hamilton, Ontario. He is the son of David Feldman (born c. 1912) and Lillian (Waxman) Feldman (born c. 1914) of Hamilton, Ontario. David Feldman was born in Europe and came to Canada with his parents. David’s father, Morris Feldman, was a tailor. David and Lillian met and married in Hamilton in the late 1930s. Soon after, they moved to St. Catharine’s from Hamilton because David became the manager of a jewelry store, part of a chain of stores owned by the Minden family, based in Hamilton. After ten years, he opened his own jewelry store called Feldman Jewelry. David and Lillian had three children. Stan was the oldest, born in 1940; a daughter, Beverly was born in 1943; and Fred was the youngest, born in 1949. Stan Feldman attended Glen Ridge Elementary School and cheder during the week, part of B’Nai Israel Synagogue. He loved to play sports, especially hockey. Lillian was involved with Hadassah. Stan attended St. Catharines Collegiate and Vocational Institute where he was quarterback on the football team. In high school, he played on multiple sports teams and was involved in school politics including serving a term as Student Council President. He was also involved with the Niagara Peninsula Jewish Youth Council.
In 1959, Stan attended McMaster University for 3 years, where he lived with his grandparents in Hamilton. He worked at the Dofasco Steelmill during these years. In 1962, he attended Osgoode Law School. He married Susan Rosenberg of Toronto (Harbord Collegiate) on June 26, 1966. After graduation from Osgoode, he and Susan moved to New York in 1967. Stan worked for the United Nations for 2 years in an international development program. In the evenings, he attended NYU and received his MBA. He later worked for Columbia Pictures and MGM studios as an assistant to a number of important leaders in the film industry. He moved to Los Angeles in the late 1960s to continue working in the film industry. In 1971, Susan and Stan moved back to Toronto and had a baby boy named Jonathan. Back in Toronto, Stan got involved with provincial politics through friends from Hamilton who worked in advertising. Together, they strategized re-structuring the provincial system and helping Pierre Trudeau to win a majority election.
With the same group, they opened a Direct Marketing business and eventually created a successful long-running Home Shopping Network. In 1975, Susan and Stan’s daughter Amy was born. During this time (1979-1980), Stan received his LLM at University of Toronto. He also began working for Morris Perlis, then president of American Express. Stan became a VP, working in the Marketing and Strategy Department. In 1988, when Sam Ruth was retiring as head of Baycrest, Stan was recruited to be the President of the Foundation. He worked there for 10 years and raised major funds for newly developed programs in Alzheimers, day programs, outreach, and the Rotman Research Institute. He also raised money for the Kunin-Lunenfeld Applied and Evaluative Research Unit (KLAERU), which provides resources and expertise to support clinical, evaluative and translational research at Baycrest. Stan also created a consortium for other ethnically specific geriatric groups. In 1997-1998, Stan spent a sabbatical year at Harvard University in Boston, receiving a Masters in Education that was an individualized Masters, allowing him to study with professors throughout the university, specifically looking at the brain and aging. In the 2000s, Stan returned full time to Baycrest and started a number of fundraising initiatives including a cycling project called Barrie to Baycrest, raising more than $10 million over its 20 year history. He has also developed a number of other fundraising initiatives including the Scotiabank Baycrest Hockey Pro Am Tournament and the Rally for Kids with Cancer. Stan was involved as a volunteer for over 25 years at the Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital.
Name Access
Feldman, Stanley, 1940-
Places
St. Catharines, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-8
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
18 photographs : tiff
Date
1969, 1974-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the Cohen family, their immigration to Canada from South Africa and life in Toronto. Textual records include photocopies of correspondence and paperwork relating to the Cohen's immigration, certificates, and a typed document containing humorous stories their South African friends shared at a "10 Years Out Of Africa" party relating to their adjustment to Canadian life. Also included are family portraits and photographs documenting family celebrations such as, weddings and bar mitzvahs. Of note is an image of Vivien and John at the "10 Years Out of Africa" party.
Administrative History
John Cohen was born in Johannesburg, South Africa in 1944 to Phil and Flora Cohen. Viviane (nee Lehwess) Cohen was born in Johannesburg, South Africa in 1947 to Henry and Isla Lehwess. John's cousin was in physiotherapy school with Viviane and they were introduced to each other. They married on Dec. 3, 1969 and had three children together: Nicole (b. 1972), Steven (b. 1974), and Jeremy David (1979). Viviane was a physiotherapist and John was a textile sales agent. Due to the unstable political situation in South Africa, they immigrated to North York in March 1977. For the first few weeks, they lived in a rental apartment in North York. They soon moved into a townhouse nearby. In 1980, they bought their first house in Thornhill. They were both able to continue in thier professions after immigrating to Canada. Both of their mothers and many of thier friends also moved to Toronto. John and Viviane were members of Shaarei Shalom synagogue for 25 years and are now members of Darchei Noam.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Cohen, John
Places
Johannesburg, South Africa
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-5
Material Format
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
6 photographs : b&w and col. ; 9 x 13 cm or smaller
1 photograph (electronic) : b&w
Date
[193-]-[197-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of six photographs and one scanned photograph of architect Benjamin Brown with various members of his extended family. The scanned photograph pictures Meyer Brown, Benjamin's father, with his brother.
Administrative History
Benjamin Brown was one of the first Jewish architects in Toronto. Alice Waldman is the daughter of Brown's sister, Sophie Blackstone.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Architects
Families
Name Access
Brown, Benjamin
Lewis, Alice Waldman
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-5-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-5-1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
6 cm of textual records
1 photograph : b&w ; 9 x 9 cm
Date
1947-1991
Scope and Content
Accession primarily consists of records related to the immigration of Victor and Bayla Lejzerson from a DP camp in US-controlled West Germany. This includes a large block of correspondence between Victor and his cousins in Toronto, Deborah (Lejzersohn) and David Breslove who helped facilitate their immigration and work placement on a farm in Stouffville and in the garment trade. Also included are materials related to Max and Ethel Siegerman's community involvement including a Toronto Joint Board Cloakmakers Union Golden Jubilee book (1961), a Shaarei Shomayim graduation program (1958), two Adath Sholom Synagogue anniversary books (1986, 1991) and a photograph of Norman and Hinda (Richards) Tobias.
Administrative History
Celia Denov is the dauther of Max (1898-1995) and Ethel (Breslove) Siegerman (1891-1966). Max was a union leader and one of the founders of the Minsker Farband. The Minsker Farband was originally located on Cecil Street until it became the Adath Sholom Synagogue and moved north to Sheppard Ave, eventually merging with Beth Tikvah. Ethel's brother was David Breslove, a teacher, author and founder of the Toronto Jewish Historical Society. He was married to Deborah Lejzersohn and had one son. Hinda Richards was a member of the Breslove family and married her music teacher, Norman Tobias. Both were killed in a car accident in 1973. Victor and Bayla Lejerson were married in the DP camp. Both were successful in immigrating to Canada with the help of David and Deborah Breslove.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Refugees
Name Access
Breslove, David
Breslove, Deborah
Siegerman, Max, 1898-1995
Siegerman, Ethel, 1891-1966
Lejerson, Victor
Lejerson, Bayla
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-5-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-5-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of signed pages for the 2014 inductees into the Jewish Foundation's Book of Life. Names include: Cecil and Elaine Brauer; Congregation Bina; Senator David Croll; Joel Cuperfain; Judy Feld Carr; Mike and Sue Feldman; Marvin and Lillian Goldman; Judi Gottlieb; Daniel Hornik; William Lipsey; Mintz Family; Nathan Peck; Lori Rosenthal; Michael & Lom Schelew; David M. Sherman; Harold and Joan Somer; Didi Urbach; Saul Wagman; and Ernest (Ernie) Weiss. Also included is a program book from the Book of Life ceremonies.
Subjects
Philanthropy and fundraising
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Jewish Foundation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-7
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
4 photographs : b&w and col. ; 77 x 57 cm or smaller
1 VHS cassette
1 object
Date
1939-1998
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to David and Anna Lang. Included are calendars from their pharmacy, two wedding portraits and VHS transfer of their wedding film from 1946, a photograph of Anna and her daughter Karen, a graduation ring and program book for Anna's graduation from the Ontario College of Pharmacy, and a photograph of the Ontario College of Pharmacy in Detroit, Michigan.
Custodial History
The records were donated by Don Perrier, a family friend. They were entrusted to him by Karen Lang upon her death.
Administrative History
David Lang (9 Jan. 1912-11 Dec. 1984) was the son of Abraham Leon Layefsky and Molly Forman. He had three siblings: Fay, Hyem and Sarah. He married Anna Shaw (ca. 1916-17 Nov. 2002) on 16 June 1946 at the Beth Medrosh Hagodol Chevra Tehillim (McCaul Street Synagogue) in Toronto. David and Anna were both practicing pharmacists and jointly owned Lang's Pharmacy on 745 Pharmacy Ave. Anna gradutated from the Ontario College of Pharmacy in 1939. The couple had one child, Karen Lang.
Subjects
Families
Pharmacists
Weddings
Name Access
Beth Medrosh Hagodol Chevra Tehillim (Toronto, Ont.)
Lang, Anna
Lang, David
Lang, Karen
Layefsky, Anna
Layefsky, David
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-5
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
4 cookbooks (pdf)
1 folder of textual records (pdf and tiff)
1 folder of textual records
ca. 1000 photographs (jpg)
Date
[ca. 1950]-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of scanned and photocopied material documenting the Hotz family's activities in South Africa and Canada. Included are family photographs, correspondence, invitations, programmes, school report cards, passports, newsclippings, a wedding speech, and certificates. Also included are copies of four South African Jewish cookbooks: Passover "Palatables", International Goodwill Recipe Book (1951 and 1969), and K.D.S. Recipe Book (1964).
Custodial History
Barbara Weisberg is the wife of Darrel Hotz. The material was either inherited by them after Darrel's parents passed away or created by Barbara and Darrel.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Language Note: English and Afrikaans.
Subjects
Cookbooks
Families
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Hotz, Darrel
Wiseberg, Barbara
Places
South Africa
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-1
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1959, 1965
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a 1959 UJA report to community leaders providing an update on Women's Division Diamon Luncheon, two issues of the UJA Picture News, and a clipping from the Toronto Jewish Reporter with images of leaders of the 1965 UJA Women's Division.
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-4
Material Format
object
Physical Description
1 book, 8 x 12 cm
Date
1989-1990
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a day planner produced by the Shaare Zedek Medical Center.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 25 cm of textual records
Date
2012-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records of the Gittin performed by the Reform Rabbis of Greater Toronto.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director and Rabbi in charge of gittin (or the Chair of the Reform Rabbis of Greater Toronto) prior to accessing the records.
Descriptive Notes
Gittin are in sealed envelopes and identified by the surname(s) of parties involved. The start date assigned to this accession may not be accurate as the gittin are sealed and not all are marked with a date on the envelope.
Subjects
Get (Jewish law)
Name Access
Reform Rabbis of Greater Toronto
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
28100 records – page 1 of 562.

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