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12 records – page 1 of 1.
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 103
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Fonds
Fonds
103
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
[192-?]-1993
Physical Description
45.9 m of textual records
35 photographs
Admin History/Bio
Nachman Shemen, a rabbinic scholar, author and Jewish civil servant, was born Nachman Boimoil in Chodel, Poland on March 15, 1912. His great-grandfather was a disciple of the founder of Hasidism in Poland, known as the “Seer of Lublin,” and both of his parents were descendants of Hasids and scholars. Shemen was ordained in Warsaw in 1929 at age seventeen by the chief rabbi of Warsaw, Rabbi Eliezer Ezra Kershenbaum of Lublin, and the famous scholar Rabbi Pinchas Eliezer Grosfershtand. In 1930, he settled in Toronto with his family, becoming a teacher at the Eitz Chaim Talmud Torah until 1965. He was also a disciple of Rabbi Yehuda Lieb Graubart, spiritual leader of the city’s Polish Jewish community and an internationally respected rabbinic authority and author. In 1936, he married Toby Rosenberg and they had a son and three daughters.
From 1940 until his death in 1993, Shemen was a secretary of the Canadian Federation of Polish Jews, later known as the Canadian Federation to Aid Polish Jews in Israel, serving as secretary of the Toronto branch and executive secretary of the national executive. From 1954 to 1993, he was Director of the Orthodox Division of the Canadian Jewish Congress, now known as the Kashruth Council of Canada.
Shemen was a prolific writer, contributing articles to periodicals not only in Canada, but also in the United States, Europe, South America, and Israel. Shortly after his arrival to Canada, Shemen began a journalistic career with the Toronto Hebrew Journal. Writing under seven pen names, his works appeared in numerous Yiddish dailies, weeklies, and periodicals around the world. From the mid-1950s, he served as the editor of Yidishe Nayes for a decade, a monthly bulletin published jointly by Canadian Jewish Congress and the United Jewish Welfare Fund of Toronto. He edited commemorative volumes for many Toronto Jewish organizations and wrote more than twenty books ranging from biographies of rabbis to fascism, from Chasidism to labour issues. He was also a founder and volunteer rabbi for the Torah V’Avodah Congregation.
Custodial History
The records of this fonds were housed in the basement study of Rabbi Shemen's home on Lonsmount Drive in Toronto until 1987, when a flood prompted an emergency effort by his family to rescue the collection. Material was not packed carefully, and was transferred to dry boxes without regard to size or subject. The flood also encouraged Shemen to offer the collection to the Archives.
It was Shemen's intention to donate the material piecemeal as he reordered it, and to assist in its processing at the Archives following his retirement, however illness prevented him from doing so. The collection was instead transferred to the Ontario Jewish Archives in a state of disarray in several accessions between 1987 and 1991. Processing began in May of 1996 when funds were made available from the Canadian Council of Archives and other sources.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records that provide insight into the career and thought of Rabbi Nachman Shemen, an influential figure in Canadian orthodox Jewry. It consists primarily of textual records, both in English and Yiddish, and includes minutes and correspondence related to Canadian Jewish Congress, the Kashruth Council of Toronto, the Canadian Federation to Aid Polish Jews in Israel and the Kehilla of Toronto, as well as Shemen's own articles and monographs together with research material for his writings. Also included are Shemen's private correspondence with scholars and literary figures throughout the Jewish world. Of special interest is the plethora of ephemera collected over a half-century.
Notes
Associated material: For related material, refer to records at the Archives of Religious Zionism at Bar Ilan University in Israel.
Name Access
Shemen, Nachman, Rabbi, 1912-1993
Torah V'Avodah Congregation (Toronto, Ont.)
Subjects
Orthodox Judaism
Rabbis
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
For related material at the OJA, refer to the Eitz Chaim Talmud Torah fonds, Canadian Jewish Congress fonds, United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds, United Jewish Refugee and War Relief series and the Rabbi David Kirshenbaum accession.
Arrangement
Attempts were made to restore the collection as much as possible to its original order, which required educated guesswork. Duplicate and irrelevant material were culled, and the remainder cleaned as required. Records were arranged into a preliminary series. Further rearrangement of the series and rehousing of material have been carried out by archivists to improve accessibility and address conservation needs.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 6064
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
6064
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1945
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 13 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Admin History/Bio
Rev. Goldbloom was a respected Zionist leader in the United Kingdom, who was sent to Canada for protection during the Second World War.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Rev. J. K. Goldbloom giving a speech at the head of a table at Camp Hagshama. The camp was located on Otty Lake near Perth, Ontario, and was run by Young Judaea. Behind him is a sign which reads: welcome delegates, in both Yiddish and English.
Name Access
Goldbloom, Rev. J. K.
Subjects
Camps
Speeches, addresses, etc
Zionists
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Perth (Ont.)
Accession Number
1992-9-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 6065
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
6065
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1945
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 13 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Admin History/Bio
Rev. J. K. Goldbloom was a respected Zionist from the United Kingdom, who was sent to Canada for protection during the Second World War.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of a group of people at Camp Hagshama on Otty Lake near Perth, Ontario. The camp was a Zionist youth camp run by Young Judaea. Pictured left to right are:
Chaim Kirshenbaum (later Dr. Hyman Kirshenbaum, the son of Rabbi David Kirshenbaum), Anne Brown, Max Bookman (from Ottawa), Mrs. J. K. Goldbloom (from England), Nathan Sheister (national president of Canadian Young Judaea), Rev. J. K. Goldbloom (Zionist from England), Martin Stoler, Harry Geffen (camp director and national executive director of Young Judaea). Hanging on the wall behind the group is a sign which reads: welcome delegates, in both Yiddish and English.
Name Access
Bookman, Max
Brown, Anne
Camp Hagshama
Geffen, Harry
Goldbloom, Jacob Koppel, 1872-1961
Goldbloom, Mrs. J. K.
Kirshenbaum, Chaim
Kirshenbaum, Dr. Hyman
Sheister, Nathan
Stoler, Martin
Subjects
Camps
Portraits, Group
Zionists
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Perth (Ont.)
Accession Number
1992-9-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Jewish communal series
Jewish National Fund Sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 51; Series 9-3; File 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Jewish communal series
Jewish National Fund Sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
51
Series
9-3
File
1
Material Format
textual record
Date
1965-1968
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of two 35 x 46 cm certificates presented to Phil Givens by the Jewish National Fund commemorating the planting of trees in the B’nai B’rith Martyrs Forest and the establishment of a Nachla in Israel.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 51; File 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Level
File
Fonds
51
File
3
Material Format
textual record
Date
1950
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of one blotter produced by Phil Givens in support of his candidacy for School Trustee in Ward 5 (Toronto Board of Education).
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 51; File 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Level
File
Fonds
51
File
2
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1949-1953
Physical Description
4 cm of textual records (1 vol.) and other material
Scope and Content
File consists of one scrapbook documenting Phil Givens’ tenure as a City of Toronto Alderman and his ongoing work with Jewish organizations. The scrapbook contains newspaper clippings, photographs, pins, and flyers.
Notes
Includes photographs, pins, and flyers.
Subjects
Scrapbooks
Physical Condition
The clippings have been glued or taped onto highly acidic paper. The paper pages are browning and brittle, as are the clippings themselves. Some of the adhesive tape is failing.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 51; File 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Level
File
Fonds
51
File
4
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1954-1956
Physical Description
4 cm of textual records (1 vol.) and other material
Scope and Content
File consists of one scrapbook documenting Phil Givens’ tenure as a City of Toronto Alderman and his ongoing work with Jewish organizations. The scrapbook contains newspaper clippings, photographs, and ephemera such as balloons, flyers, and matchbook covers.
Notes
Includes photographs and ephemera.
Subjects
Scrapbooks
Physical Condition
The clippings have been glued or taped onto highly acidic paper. The paper pages are browning and brittle, as are the clippings themselves. Some of the adhesive tape is failing.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 51; File 6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Level
File
Fonds
51
File
6
Material Format
textual record
Date
1959
Physical Description
4 cm of textual records (1 vol.)
Scope and Content
File consists of one scrapbook documenting Phil Givens’ tenure as a City of Toronto Alderman, his work with the Liberal Riding Association, and his ongoing work with Jewish organizations. The scrapbook contains newspaper clippings and political cartoons.
Subjects
Scrapbooks
Physical Condition
The clippings have been glued or taped onto highly acidic paper. The paper pages are browning and brittle, as are the clippings themselves. Some of the adhesive tape is failing.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Reports series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 9; Series 3; File 41
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Reports series
Level
File
Fonds
9
Series
3
File
41
Material Format
textual record
Date
[between 1940 and 1956]
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of an Executive Secretary's report, an unidentified report following the reorganization of UJRA and an unidentified report in Yiddish.
Notes
Title based on contents of the file.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Henry Cassel fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 93
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Henry Cassel fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
93
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1900]-2000, predominant 1929-1947
Physical Description
8 cm of textual records
3 albums (ca. 210 photographs)
2 photographs
Admin History/Bio
Heinz Kassel (1912-2009) (later changed to Henry Cassel) was a German refugee during the Second World War who was classified as an enemy alien by the British government. He spent two years in an internment camp for prisoners of war (POWs) in Quebec. He later became a naturalized Canadian citizen and enlisted in the Canadian military.
Heinz was born on October 25, 1912 in Aschaffenburg, Germany to Adolf and Olga Kassel. Adolf owned a successful banking business which he had inherited from his father. The family resided above the bank and lived a comfortable life during these early years. They moved to Frankfurt around 1920 after Adolf sold his business to buy a partnership in a bank there.
Heinz’s parents had hoped that he would one day become a corporate lawyer. In 1931, in preparation for his future career, he began studying law and economics at Frankfurt University. He enjoyed his initial university years. However, after Hitler’s rise to power in 1933 he became alarmed when his non-Jewish university friends began ignoring him and when the German government passed laws forbidding Jews from practicing law in court. Determined to leave Germany and seek out a better life elsewhere, he begged his parents to immigrate with him to the United States. They refused to go, unwilling to leave behind the life they had worked so hard to build. In accordance with his parents’ wishes, Heinz relocated to nearby Italy instead of the US in 1934. He learned Italian and eventually secured a job with an engineering firm.
Sensing that the political climate in Italy was becoming dangerous for Jewish people, Heinz applied for immigration to the US in early 1939. Eager to leave Italy, he relocated to London to await the approval of his US visa. He left just in time – Britain declared war on Germany less than a week after his arrival. His parents, in turn, managed to escape to Holland. Soon after Britain’s declaration, all immigrants from enemy countries were considered enemy aliens and suspected of being spies.
On May 12, 1940, the British military arrested Heinz and interned him with other German immigrants and POWs. He believed his detainment was only a precautionary measure and that he would be cleared within a few days. However, the British shipped him to the Isle of Man where he remained for several months. Fearing an invasion, the British shipped 3,000 of the POWs, including Kassel, to Quebec, where he was briefly interned at a POW camp set up at the Plains of Abraham. In October 1940, he was moved with 736 other refugees to an abandoned railway yard (later known as “Camp N”) in Newington, near Sherbrooke, Quebec. While there, he confronted a great deal of antisemitism from the guards.
While he was interned in Quebec, the Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC) interviewed him and other Jewish prisoners in order to lobby for their release. Realizing that the internees were not POWs, the Canadian government declared the camp a refugee camp in 1941. By October 1942, the CJC was successful in helping Heinz secure employment with Benjamin Pape & Company in Toronto.
Heinz met Reta Freeman in Toronto and they were married in November 1944. Reta was born and raised in Toronto. After their nuptials, they were both briefly classified as enemy aliens and had to report to the RCMP on a regular basis. Shortly thereafter, Heinz enlisted in the Royal Canadian Army and was sent to basic training in Manitoba. On January 21, 1946 he was granted landed immigrant status, and in April of that year, he became a citizen.
After the war, Heinz learned that his parents as well as other relatives had been transported to concentration camps and had not survived. He was certainly one of the few fortunate ones to leave the country, despite the circumstances of his removal. He resented being interned for so long, but did not blame the British for rounding him up with other Germans based on their initial fears regarding enemy aliens. His feelings about Canada's treatment of him during that time, however, were not as sympathetic.
The couple lived their lives in Toronto. They first resided at 2346 Yonge Street. Heinz legally changed his name to Henry Cassel. He worked as an accountant and later was a controller for the United Jewish Welfare Fund. The couple had two children: Andrew (b. 1947) and Richard (b. 1951). Reta passed away in August 1962 and Henry later remarried Esther Cassel. He passed away at the age of 96 on February 15, 2009.
Custodial History
Records were created and accumulated by Henry Cassel. His sons donated them to the OJA after his death.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the life of Henry Cassel, particularly his attempt to emigrate from Europe prior to the Second World War and his internment in Canada as a German prisoner of war (POW). Included is personal correspondence between Cassel and his parents; correspondence written by Cassel to potential employers and Canadian Jewish agencies; legal documents and certificates, such as Cassel's birth certificate and passport; family photo albums documenting the family and lives of Henry Cassel and his wife Reta; Cassel's autobiography; a journal and notebook written by Cassel during his internment; and, other internment records, such as government forms and poems and songs written by internees. Also included are newspaper clippings, articles, financial statements, genealogical research, and antisemitic ephemera collected by Cassel. Of particular note are newsletters that were produced during the 1990s by ex-internees who had kept in touch over the years. Records are arranged into 16 files.
Notes
Textual records in the fonds were reduced from ca. 20 cm to 8 cm. Please see accession record for further details about the culled material.
Associated material notes: for related records at other archives, please see: the UJRA case files at the National CJC Archive in Montreal and the holdings at Library and Archives Canada (such as, the Directorate of Internment Operations series in the Department of National Defense fonds R112-0-2-E)
Name Access
Cassel, Henry, 1912-2009
Subjects
Europe--Emigration and immigration
Prisoners of war
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
See: Canadian Jewish Congress case files in RG 282 and accession #2005-10-1.
Creator
Cassel, Henry, 1912-2009
Accession Number
2010-4-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Henry Cassel fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 93; File 5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Henry Cassel fonds
Level
File
Fonds
93
File
5
Material Format
textual record
Date
1921-2000, predominant 1935-1939
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of correspondence and legal records documenting Henry Cassel's emigration from Germany and attempt to immigrate to the United States of America. Included is Henry's passport, nationality identification card, birth certificates, driving certificates, USA immigration sponsorship application, correspondence regarding his application to enter the USA, criminal background checks, a citizenship visa for Italy, and a registration card indicating Henry's place of employment. Also included are newspaper clippings that were collected by Henry regarding the Jewish community of Ferrara, Italy (a region that Henry had travelled through).
Notes
Photocopies of some Italian and German records with translated titles are attached to the accession record.
Access Restriction
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Accession Number
2010-4-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
Shomrai Shabbos Synagogue series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 4; Series 7; File 28
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
Shomrai Shabbos Synagogue series
Level
File
Fonds
4
Series
7
File
28
Material Format
textual record
Date
1923-1935
Physical Description
4 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
Shomrai Shabbos was an orthodox congregation that was founded by Galician Jews in 1896. They originally met in a room on Richmond Street in Toronto. They purchased a building in 1899 on Chestnut Street which was once a mission church. The first rabbi was Rabbi Yosef Weinreb, who was hired in 1899 when the synagogue opened. He was the grandfather of Sol Edell. The synagogue was in several downtown locations until it moved to Glengrove Avenue in North York in 1966. The congregation has its own cemetery located on Jones Avenue in the east end of Toronto.
Scope and Content
File consists of a Shomrai Shabbos ledger listing membership dues and donations for the years 1923 to 1935. The ledger begins with a list of members whose names are written in Englsh and Yiddish. Each member is assigned a number. The ledger includes entries for close to 400 individuals. Each page is assigned a number which corresponds to the names listed in the front of the ledger. Each entry includes the name of the individual, address, as well as the dates of each payment made by the individual to the synagogue.
Physical Condition
Ledger is in very poor condition and requires conservation attention. The spine cover is missing and thread binding is disintegrating, there is some mould damage to the cover and likely some of the pages, the leather corners on the cover are rotting, and there is considerable water damage to the cover and interior pages.
Source
Archival Descriptions
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