Search Results

New Search Photo Search Audiovisual Search
50 records – page 1 of 1.
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Jewish Community Centre Archives Committee series
Photograph collection sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 61; Series 2-2; File 41
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Jewish Community Centre Archives Committee series
Photograph collection sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
61
Series
2-2
File
41
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Date
1983
Physical Description
5 photographs : b&w ; 13 x 18 cm
0.5 cm of textual records
Scope and Content
This file consists of several photographs of Louis Borsook and Albert White, two original members of the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. Executive Committee. The photographs were taken in the Bloor and Spadina branch gymnasium, probably at an event in celebration of the 30th anniversary of the Bloor and Spadina building. There is also a small program booklet from the event.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 51
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
51
Material Format
multiple media
Date
[192-]-1990
Physical Description
1.35 metres of textual records (20 vols.) and other material
Admin History/Bio
Philip Gerard Givens (1922-1995) was a municipal, provincial and federal politician, a judge, a police commissioner and an active Jewish communal leader. He is largely remembered as the 54th Mayor of Toronto.
Phil Givens was born in Toronto on April 24th, 1922, the only son of Hyman and Mary Gevertz (Gewercz). As a youth, he attended Harbord Collegiate and graduated from the University of Toronto in political science and economics in 1945 and from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1949. In 1947, he married Minnie "Min" Rubin (born February 7th, 1924) and together they had two children, Eleanor and Michael.
Givens graduated as a lawyer from Osgoode Hall; however, shortly thereafter he decided to enter politics, running as a municipal school board trustee in 1950. In 1951 he was elected as alderman for Ward 5, serving in this capacity until 1960, when he was subsequently elected as a city Controller.
Givens was appointed Queen’s Counsel in 1962.
Following the sudden death of Mayor David Summerville in 1963, Givens was appointed by City Council as the Mayor of Toronto and was officially elected to the position in 1964, winning a close race against the former mayor, Allan Lamport. As mayor, Givens was automatically a member of the Metropolitan Toronto Executive and Council, the Metropolitan Toronto Police Commission, the Consumer’s Gas Company Executive, the Toronto Hydro Commission and the governing boards of Toronto’s major hospitals.
Givens was publicly seen as an affable and populist mayor but his tenure was not without controversy. His support for the construction of the St. Lawrence Centre for the Arts and his decision to acquire Henry Moore’s bronze sculpture “the Archer” for the new Nathan Phillips Square were both highly controversial during his term in office. In particular, the Moore sculpture sparked intense controversy and public debate amongst council members and citizens alike. Although ultimately purchased with private solicited donations, the controversy surrounding the statue’s purchase was still partly to blame for Givens’ 1966 election defeat to William Dennison.
In 1967 Givens entered national politics for the second time, the first being a failed 1957 bid in Toronto’s Spadina riding, winning a seat as a Liberal in Toronto’s York West riding. In 1971 he stepped down before the end of his term to campaign for a seat in the Provincial Legislature. Again running under the Liberal banner, Givens won his seat in York-Forest Hill and after the elimination of this riding in 1975, was re-elected in the new riding of Armourdale. In 1977 he retired from politics. He also worked briefly as a current affairs commentator for local radio broadcaster CHUM 1050 AM.
In 1977, Givens was appointed as a provincial court judge and chairman of the Metropolitan Toronto Police Commission, serving in both capacities until 1985, when he left the Commission but continued in the judiciary as a civil trial judge until officially retiring from public life in 1988.
An ardent Zionist, Givens was also a prominent leader of several Jewish communal organizations. He was the founder and first president of the Upper Canada Lodge of B’nai Brith and sat on the executives of the Canadian Jewish Congress, the United Jewish Welfare Fund, the Talmud Torah Eitz Chaim, the Zionist Organization of Canada, the Toronto Zionist Council, Jewish National Fund, State of Israel Bonds and the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care. He was chairman of the United Israel Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund in 1967 and the United Jewish Appeal-Israel Special Fund in 1968. From 1973 to 1985 he was the national president of the Canadian Zionist Federation and in the 1990s was the national chairman of the Canadian Jewish Congress’ Committee for Yiddish.
Givens was honoured by Jewish community organizations, including the Jewish National Fund’s Negev Award in 1968 and the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews’ Human Relations Award in 1969. As well, in 1972, he received the Award of Honour from the Toronto Regional Council of B’nai Brith.
Givens was also known to be a passionate sailor and was a member of both the Royal Canadian and the Island Yacht Clubs in Toronto. He died on November 30th, 1995 at the age of 73.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Phil Givens until they were donated to the Archives in September 1990 by his wife.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the personal, professional and communal activities of Phil Givens. The bulk of the material is graphic and most of the photographs relate to his tenure as Mayor of Toronto and to his Jewish communal work. The records also include general correspondence, speeches, campaign material, scrapbooks, cartoons, certificates and awards, biographical writings, audio and visual materials and artifacts. The records have been arranged into nine series representing Givens’ various roles and activities and have been described to the file level and item level when necessary. These series are: 1. Personal life; 2. City of Toronto Alderman; 3. City of Toronto Controller; 4. City of Toronto Mayor; 5. Metropolitan Toronto Police Commissioner; 6. Provincial politics; 7. National politics; 8. Legal career; 9. Jewish communal service.
Notes
Physical Description Note: Includes ca. 915 photographs, 14 drawings, 1 print, 1 presentation piece, 27 objects, 4 DVD’s, 4 videocassettes and 1 audiocassette.
Physical Extent Note: Fonds was reduced from 5.5 m of records to 2.6 m of records. Please see accession record for further details regarding the records that were culled.
General Note: Previously cited as MG6 B
Associated material note: City of Toronto Archives: “Philip Givens fonds” (fonds 1301) and Series 363, Sub-series 2 “Mayor' Office journals” (fonds 200). Library and Archives Canada: “Correspondence and subjects” series (R4942-1-1-E) in the Stuart E. Rosenberg fonds (R4942-0-X-E); Henry S. Rosenberg fonds (R3946-0-9-E); Jewish National Fund of Canada fonds (R4347-0-1-E), “Subject series: Givens, Judge Philip G. – Toronto” (R4347-7-4-E); “Correspondence, memoranda, minutes, reports” series (MG31-H67), Zdzislaw Przygoda fonds (R6257-0-0-E) [Sir Casimir Gzowski monument committee records –chaired by Phil Givens]; B'nai Brith Canada fonds (R6348-0-9-E); Canadian Zionist Federation fonds (R9377-0-6-E).
Name Access
Givens, Phillip, 1922-1995
Givens (nee Rubin), Min
Subjects
Law
Politicians
Related Material
See Fonds 2: Benjamin Dunkelman fonds
See Fonds 18: Gordon Mendly fonds
See Fonds 28: Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
See Fonds 37: Gilbert Studios fonds (Negev dinners series, Zionist Building series, Portraits series).
Creator
Givens, Philip, 1922-1995
Accession Number
1990-9-7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Address
1335 Camp White Pine Ct.
Source
Landmarks

Camp White Pine, a children’s summer camp located in the Haliburton Highlands outside of Toronto was founded by Joe Kronick in 1956. Joe's son, Adam, took over as director of Camp White Pine in 1987. He has run the camp with his wife, Dana, as co-Director since 1990.
Address
1335 Camp White Pine Ct.
Time Period
1956-present
Scope Note
Camp White Pine, a children’s summer camp located in the Haliburton Highlands outside of Toronto was founded by Joe Kronick in 1956. Joe's son, Adam, took over as director of Camp White Pine in 1987. He has run the camp with his wife, Dana, as co-Director since 1990.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Part Of
Cowan family fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 102; File 60
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Cowan family fonds
Level
File
Fonds
102
File
60
Material Format
textual record
Date
1978-1995
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Admin History/Bio
Philip Cowan is the only child of Norman and Bertha Cowan. Both he and his wife Carolyn are clinical psychologists in California.
Scope and Content
File consists of a review of an academic book on an aspect of clinical psychology by Phillip, a newsletter with family updates, and wedding invitations for Philip and Carolyn's three children.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 2; File 91
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
2
File
91
Material Format
textual record
Date
1998
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Accession Number
2005-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2014-3-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-3-2
Material Format
sound recording (electronic)
Physical Description
1 audio recording : mp3
Date
[ca. 1982]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one audio recording of an oral history interview conducted by Mike Culiner with his father Harry Culiner. The interview was conducted in San Francisco in the early 1980s. In the interview Harry describes his early life in Russia and in the Russian army, his immigration to Canada and early life here.
Custodial History
The original cassette tapes are in the possession of Jill Culiner, the granddaughter of Harry and niece of Mike. Jill is the daughter of Jack Culiner. She digitized the cassette tape and brought the digitial file into us.
Administrative History
Harry was born around 1885 in Privitnoye (Russia). Around 1904 he went into the Russian army and soon after immigrated to Ontario. He initially worked on the railway in South Porcupine and Cochrane. Around 1918 he moved to St. Catharines and eventually moved from there to the Junction area of Toronto. He opened a menswear shop at 2996 Dundas Street West and lived above the shop. He married Milder Culiner and they had four children together: Alex (b. 1911), Jack (or John) (1913-2013), Norman (b. around 1915), and Mike (b. around 1917). Harry passed away in 1985 or 1986.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Culiner, Harry
Places
Russia
South Porcupine, Ont.
Cochrane, Ont.
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-11-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-11-13
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
7 cm of textual records
Date
1993-1998
Scope and Content
Accession consists of meeting minutes of the Southern African Jewish Association of Canada (SAJAC). The earliest minutes are from 8 May 1993; the latest minutes are from 12 January 1998.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Southern African Jewish Association of Canada
Places
Ontario
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-5-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-5-2
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
object
Physical Description
ca. 78 cm of graphic material, textual records, and 1 stamp
Date
1919-1992
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting David Croll. Included are: forty photographs (military, political, and sport) of Croll; two scrapbooks (one a congratulatory scrapbook on Croll's appointment to the Ontario provincial cabinet, the other a scrapbook of the 1939 royal visit to Windsor, Ontario); several personal documents including Croll's marriage certificate and address book/phone book; and Croll's stamp.
Custodial History
Records were donated to the Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre by Croll's granddaughter.
Descriptive Notes
Related groups of records external to the unit being described: Other records relating to David Croll can be found in the Rebecca Kamarner fonds; the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds; the Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds; the Zionist Organization of Canada fonds; the Philip Givens fonds; the Dora Till fonds; Julius P. Katz fonds; the Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds; the United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds; and the Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds.
Subjects
Jewish veterans--Canada
Legislators--Canada
Royal visitors
Name Access
Croll, David, 1900-1991
Places
Windsor (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-3-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-3-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1980
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a report prepared by JIAS Canada detailing the situation of recent immigrant arrivals to various small communities in Ontario. The communities discussed are Cambridge, Hamilton, Kitchener, London, Ottawa, St. Catharines and Windsor.
Custodial History
The custodial history for this item is unknown. The accession number has been assigned by the assistant archivist.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Communities
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Cambridge (Ont.)
Hamilton (Ont.)
Kitchener (Ont.)
London (Ont.)
Ottawa (Ont.)
St. Catharines (Ont.)
Windsor (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-3-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-3-1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 55 photographs
1 folder of textual records
Date
1919-1939, [ca. 2005]
Scope and Content
Accession consists primarily of photographs documenting the early life of Bella (nee Goldbach) Wilder and her family in Poland. Included are images of Bella with her siblings and friends, group photos of Bella at her Jewish school in Poland, a group image of Victor in the Polish army, and other photographs of Bella's family and friends. Also included are two family histories documenting the story of Bella's mother, Shifra Frimeth Goldbach, and the story of Max and Bella Wilder, which was written by their granddaughter Sandee Sharpe. Of particular note is a 1925 school photograph of the Workers Evening School in Opatow (?), which has Yiddish writing suggesting that the school may have received aid from an organization referred to as "Gives Relief" in Toronto.
Custodial History
The records were originally donated to the Jewish Genealogical Society of Canada (Toronto section) by Bella's daughter Ann Sharpe. JGS Toronto donated the material to the OJA a few months later with her consent.
Administrative History
Bella (nee Goldbach) Wilder was born on May 12, 1910 in Opatow, Poland to Chaim Shlomo Goldbach and Shifra Frimeth Schatz Goldbach. Bella's older brothers, Victor, Jack and Hymie began immigrating to Toronto in the 1920s and had saved enough money by 1936 to bring Bella and her mother to Toronto. After arriving in Toronto Bella found work sewing in a factory.
Bella married Max Wilder on September 29, 1939. Max worked at Superior Men's Tailoring where he sewed zippers into men's pants. They had two children together: Ann (born 5 April 1940, married Norman Sharpe) and Stan (born 21 Jan. 1945, died June 1974). Max passed away in 1999 and Bella passed away in 2002.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Name Access
Goldbach, Shifra
Sharpe, Ann
Wilder, Bella, 1910-2002
Wilder, Max, ?-1999
Places
Poland
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-1-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-1-6
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
285 photographs : b&w and col. ; 10 x 12 cm of smaller
Date
1975-1985
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the activities of the Royal Canadian Legion, General Wingate Branch 256. Included are meeting minutes from 1975-1977; an album containing photographs, event materials, and newsclippings celebrating the 50th anniversary of the legion in 1984, remembrance day memorial and an event in tribute to Phil Givens; and one scrapbook containing newsclippings, photographs and other textual records related to various activities of the Branch and its membership, including a tribute to Ben Dunkelman and a 99th birthday celebration for Norman Creed.
Custodial History
The records were originally loaned by the donor to an OJA researcher who arranged to have the materials donated to the OJA.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
Name Access
Royal Canadian Legion, General Wingate Branch 256 (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Jewish Vocational Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 75
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Vocational Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
75
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
moving images
Date
1947-2006
Physical Description
5.1 m of textual records and graphic material
1 DVD
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Vocational Services (JVS) was established on 16 June, 1947. After the war, thousands of survivors arrived in Canada in search of homes, education for their children and jobs. The returning servicemen, in turn, were also in need of employment as well. The first two years of its existence, it catered to these two groups. By 1949, it expanded its mandate to become a community-wide agency.
Max Enkin, the founder of the famous post-war "tailor scheme," became its first president and chairman of the board. Under this scheme, he and other members of his delegation were able to bring over 6000 survivors to Canada. Other members of the board included Lipa Green, Sydney Harris, Dr. Albert Rose and Louis Locksin. The executive director was Norman Stack. He served for a few years and was replaced by Milton Freidman in 1949. Freidman was a social worker who relocated to Toronto from Buffalo and spent close to 40 years in this position, retiring in 1985.
Its early mandate was to serve as a placement service for applicants and employers and to provide individual counselling services to its clients. Its office was situated above the original Tip Top Tailor building at 455 Spadina Avenue. It later moved its office to 152 Beverley Street and then in the 1960s to Tycos Drive. By the 1960s, JVS began to expand its services to all segments of society including newcomers, people with disabilities and from all sectors of life. The staff included social workers, psychologists, job counsellors and clerical staff.
During the 1980s, Bernie Berger became the new executive director. He served in that capacity until 1991. He was replaced by Ed Segalowitz. During this period, JVS set up a seniors' program called ATLAZ on the grounds of the Baycrest Home for the Aged. It was funded by the Bick family and was intended to create programs to keep seniors occupied. Today, this program is called the Al Green Resource Centre and provides employment, placement, training and volunteer opportunities to adults of all ages and with developmental disabilities. JVS also launched a youth program called Youthinc and a women's program.
Karen Goldenberg became executive director in 1998 and was replaced by Frank Markel in 2011 after her retirement. JVS has expanded its clientele, helping people from all backgrounds with diverse needs to identify their strengths and goals, develop skills, and achieve success in school, work and life. By 2009 it offered an expansive range of over 40 employment-related support programs and services throughout the Greater Toronto Area to thousands of unemployed and underemployed individuals and served 23,000 people.They operated out of 12 locations and have approximately 200 professionals on staff.
Kim Coulter became President and CEO in 2013.
Custodial History
The case files were located in the vault with no accession number. They were likely transferred to the OJA during the 1970s or 1980s.They were assigned accession number 2002-10/34.
The remaining records were in the possession of Amanda Batchelor of JVS, who had acquired the material from various past board and committee members for the creation of the 60th anniversary book.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the activities, programs, finances, operation and history of the Jewish Vocational Services. Included are meeting minutes, photographs, correspondence, surveys, reports, financial statements, certificates, bulletins, newsletters, newsclippings, press releases, anniversary books, and one DVD.
Name Access
Jewish Vocational Services of Toronto
Subjects
Charities
Immigrants--Canada
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Creator
Jewish Vocational Services of Toronto (1947-)
Accession Number
2002-10/34
2008-9/6
2010-11/7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sadie Stren fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 78
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sadie Stren fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
78
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Date
[189-]-1997
Physical Description
15 cm of textual records
176 photographs : b&w ; 20 x 25 cm or smaller
2 photographs (jpg) : b&w
Admin History/Bio
Sadie Stren was born on April 19, 1915 in Detroit, Michigan. Her father and mother had come from a small town in Russia. Samuel Goldberg, her father, arrived to stay with family in Brantford, Ontario in 1910 and began working as a peddler. He moved to Detroit, Michigan in 1912 where he worked for the Ford Motor Company and later owned a confectionary store. Emma, Sadie’s mother, came from Russia to reunite with Samuel after he began living in Detroit and the couple married and started a family there.
Sadie grew up in a predominately Jewish neighbourhood in Detroit with her parents and her sister Sarah. She graduated from what is now Wayne State University and worked as a social studies teacher in Detroit for approximately 10 years, until she married at age 31. Sadie first met her husband, Maurice Strenkovsky (1910-1995), while visiting relatives in Brantford. By the time the two had met, "Maurie" was going by the last name Stren, although it is not certain when he began to do so. He served in the Second World War and corresponded with Sadie during their courtship. The two married in 1947, five years after meeting.The couple initially lived in Detroit, where their son David was born on August 28, 1948, but soon moved to Brantford, where Sadie gave birth to a daughter, Patti, on August 8, 1949. Maurie became a manufacturer of surgical dressing and continued in this profession until his retirement.
When Sadie first moved to Brantford, she joined several Jewish women’s organizations, including Hadassah. She has continued to be actively involved in both Jewish and non-Jewish community organizations since that time. She ran and taught the Beth David Sunday school in Brantford for many years, and in 1976, was honoured for her work as Sunday School Supervisor by the Beth David Sisterhood. During her time in Brantford, Sadie served on the Board of Directors for eight different organizations, and was the president of four. She was a member of the Board of Directors for the Family Service Bureau and was elected president in 1966. She is also a past president of the University Women’s Club and a former board member of the YM-YWCA. Her husband was quite active in the community as well. Maurie Stren’s commitments included serving as President of B’nai B’rith Brantford from 1965-1966 and as District Governor of the Lions Club from 1963-64, among other things.
Upon moving to Toronto, Sadie became a member of the Baycrest Women’s Auxiliary and volunteered at Mount Sinai Hospital and the Aphasia Institute.
Sadie was an amateur historian who served as the Brantford Jewish community's archivist and historian for a number of years. She had been collecting sources of Brantford Jewish history in her home since at least the 1970s in order to assemble the history of Brantford's community. Sadie was also an author who wrote about the history of the Brantford community, spoke at conferences, and was a contributor to the Canadian Jewish Historical Society Journal in 1981. She passed away on December 9, 2014. She was one hundred.
Custodial History
The records were donated by Sadie Stren in five different transfers from 1976-2006. The first accession was received as a part of the small communities project in 1976 and included only photographs. Subsequent accessions included photographs and textual documents relating to both Sadie’s family and the Brantford community. Sadie is an author and she acquired some of the materials when researching the history of the Brantford community.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of material created and collected by Sadie Stren related to the Brantford Jewish community, as both a member of the community and an author researching its history. Among the records are newspaper and article clippings, correspondence, research notes, records of the Brantford Hebrew Association, miscellaneous printed and published material, Hadassah minutes, records related to Congregation Beth David and its Hebrew School and photographs.
The Brantford Hebrew Association records include 3 ledger books which span the years between 1909 to 1952, legal documents for the Association including the original letters patent incorporating the Brantford Hebrew Association in 1911.
Notes
Some of the photographs are modern copies of older photographs.
Some early accessions contained photocopies of orginal documents that were eventually donated in later transfers. These photocopies were culled.
Many photographs were described at the item level at the time they were accessioned, but there are quite a few photographs in the fonds which have not yet been described in detail.
Name Access
Stren, Sadie, 1915-2014
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Volunteers
Related Material
For additional material related to the Brantford Jewish community see also accession #1978-11-4, accession #2009-2-5, oral history #AC91, and accession #2004-5-71.
Creator
Stren, Sadie, 1915-
Places
Brantford (Ont.)
Accession Number
1976-6-9
1977-5-6
1978-11-3
2005-11-10
2006-12-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Metropolitan Toronto Police Commission series
Official engagements sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 51; Series 5-3; File 8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Metropolitan Toronto Police Commission series
Official engagements sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
51
Series
5-3
File
8
Material Format
graphic material
Date
11 Nov. 1981
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w. ; 12 x 18 cm
Scope and Content
File consists of one photograph of Phil and Min Givens attending a Remembrance Day ceremony held at the Yorkminster Baptist Church..
Name Access
Givens, Min
Yorkminster Park Baptist Church (Toronto, Ont.)
Subjects
Remembrance Day (Canada)
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
National politics series
Phil Givens with Brian Mulroney (Breakfast event) file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 51; Series 7; File 12
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
National politics series
Phil Givens with Brian Mulroney (Breakfast event) file
Level
Item
Fonds
51
Series
7
File
12
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1985
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 20 x 25 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of Phil Givens meeting with Brian Mulroney at a breakfast event. Identified in the photograph are (foreground, left to right): Brian Mulroney, Paul Godfrey, and Phil Givens.
Notes
Photograph is by Mike Peake (The Toronto Sun)
Name Access
Canada. Prime Minister (1984-1993 : Mulroney)
Subjects
Prime ministers--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Jewish communal series
Canadian Zionist Federation sub-series
Canadian Zionist Federation - Tribute album file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 51; Series 9-2; File 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Jewish communal series
Canadian Zionist Federation sub-series
Canadian Zionist Federation - Tribute album file
Level
Item
Fonds
51
Series
9-2
File
1
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1968
Physical Description
1 photograph: b&w ; 21 x 25 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of Phil Givens (left) conversing with Prime Minister Pierre Elliot Trudeau (centre) and Mayor William Dennison during a visit to Toronto's New City Hall during the 1968 federal election.
Name Access
Canada. Prime Minister (1968-1979 : Trudeau)
Subjects
Prime ministers--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 2; File 80
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
2
File
80
Material Format
textual record
Date
1997
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Name Access
Isabel Silverman Canada International Scientific Exchange Program
Palestinian National Authority
Subjects
Canada--Foreign relations
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Accession Number
2005-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2011-4-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-4-3
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
1 DVD
Date
July 1985
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one DVD copy of a July 1985 interview of Dr. Stephen Speisman by the donor, recorded at the TJC Archives. Dr. Speisman discusses his family's connections with the Gold family because of their common background in Ostrow, Poland. He also talks about the socialist views of many Jewish immigrants, the factors influencing their desire to emigrate in the First World War era, their early experiences learning English, the reasons for Anglicizing their names, and the cultural values that Polish Jews brought to Canadian life.
Custodial History
DVD copy created from original videocassette created by the donor.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Use Conditions: Any re-use requires written permission of the donor.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Socialism
Name Access
Speisman, Stephen A., 1943-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-5-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-5-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
15 cm of textual records
8 architectural drawings
2 CDs
Date
1960-2011, predominant 2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of architectural drawings for the construction of the Northern YM-YWHA at 4600 Bathurst Street (1960) as well as floor plans for the proposed re-development of the site in 1999. Also included are submissions for the competition to design and build the Jewish War Veterans of Canada memorial at the Sherman Campus (2011).
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Subjects
Architecture
Charities
Veterans--Canada
Name Access
Young Men's Hebrew Association (Toronto, Ont.)
Bathurst Jewish Community Centre
Jewish War Veterans of Canada
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-12-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-12-2
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
1 film reel (ca. 22 min.) : 16mm
1 videocassette
Date
[ca. 1980]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one film reel and one videocassette copy of the JIAS film entitled "We Are Our Brother's Keeper".
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-10-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-10-13
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
63 cm of textual records
Date
1997-2007
Scope and Content
Accession consists of paper issues of the Afterword, a national Jewish student newspaper in Canada.
Descriptive Notes
Associated material: Issues of the Afterword are also held by the Jewish Public Library Archives in Montreal.
Subjects
Jewish students--Canada--Periodicals
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Jewish community involvement series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 92; Series 4; Item 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Jewish community involvement series
Level
Item
Fonds
92
Series
4
Item
4
Material Format
object
Date
[198-?]
Physical Description
1 pin : 2 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a pin of the Canadian flag and Israel flag crossing over one another.
Notes
Artifact number 155.
Subjects
Flags--Canada
Flags--Israel
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
9
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1925-1989
Physical Description
31.8 m of textual records
319 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Immigrant Aid Society of Canada was established in 1920 by the newly-formed Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC). A Toronto branch was established in Toronto in a storefront office on Spadina Avenue, but the organization was rudimentary, and as the enthusiasm that spurred the founding of CJC died out, JIAS soon faltered. Then in 1922 it was taken over and reactivated under the cooperative support of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto, B'nai B'rith and the Council of Jewish Women. JIAS was legally incorporated on 30 August 1922. It also operated under the moniker of the Emergency Jewish Immigrant Aid Committee, and it changed its name to Jewish Immigrant Aid Services in 1954.
Charged with organizing emergency relief for European Jews in distress, JIAS became the central agency of the Jewish community to facilitate the lawful entry of Jewish immigrants into Canada, and provided them with welfare services, transportation, and assistance with accommodation and employment after their arrival. In addition, JIAS offered consultation services for sponsors of potential immigrants, ran a competitive foreign remittance service, and campaigned to counter the activities of unscrupulous steamboat agents, lawyers and influence peddlers, or “shtadlanim,” who often victimized immigrants and sponsors alike.
In conjunction with similar efforts by the CJC, JIAS was also actively engaged in negotiating for the increased admission of Jewish immigrants to Canada. In 1923, the federal government instituted a permit-based immigration program and JIAS competed with travel agents and solicitors in the private sector for these limited quota permits. After combating the anti-immigration policies of the Depression era, the outbreak of war in 1939 virtually closed the already limited avenues for immigration.
JIAS Canada was organized into a National Office in Montreal and regional offices in Winnipeg (Western Region), Toronto (Central Region) and Halifax (Eastern Region). The Central Region covered Ontario, and established a full-time head office in 1935 at 399 Spadina Avenue in Toronto (hence the Central Region was sometimes called simply the Toronto Office). The office later moved to 265 Spadina Avenue. JIAS Toronto’s board of directors met on a regular basis at different locations in Toronto, including 206 Beverley Street and in the Talmud Torah building at 9 Brunswick Avenue. The first JIAS Toronto board included notable Toronto residents such as Henry Dworkin, Mrs. Draiman, Mr. Kronick, Dr. Brodey and Mrs. Willinsky. The role of the board was to oversee the operations of the Central Region. It rendered decisions on issues relating to finances, procedures and policies, negotiations with the federal Immigration Branch, as well as individual cases that required their attention.
General meetings of the Central Region membership were held annually. The 1943 JIAS constitution states that regional annual meetings were to be held for “receiving and considering reports,” holding nominations and elections for the executive, and discussing JIAS’s program and policies.
In the post-war era, JIAS shifted its focus to renewed efforts on behalf of individual claimants and community support, while the focus for lobbying for a reversal of Canada's immigration policy fell increasingly under the jurisdiction of the CJC. A boom in immigration between 1947 and 1952 saw the arrival of large numbers of Jewish immigrants to all parts of Canada and the Toronto Office of JIAS renewed its efforts to meet the needs of this new influx. Major world events also sparked other waves of immigration from Hungary, Czechoslovakia, North Africa and Russia, to which JIAS responded in turn. JIAS worked in conjunction with other immigrant aid societies such as HIAS, the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, in the United States, to facilitate immigration to the United States, and later to Israel, where many of the immigrants and refugees coming to Canada had family and ultimately settled.
Custodial History
Custody of these records was transferred to the Ontario Jewish Archives by JIAS in 1983, as preparations were under way for the move to a new facility in North York. Much of the material was in four-cubic-foot boxes and in file cabinets.
The accession was divided into three sections: files which were at the JIAS office and had been retained in their original order; files which had been retrieved from a flood in the basement of 152 Beverley St. and consequently had been thrown into dry boxes without regard to order; files discovered in the furnace rooms at 150 and 152 Beverley St., intact but covered in coal dust. The bulk of the records were stored off-site, with dirty files being isolated from the rest.
The dust-covered materials were cleaned at an off-site location, placed in temporary boxes and transferred to the Archives and restored, as far as was possible, to their original order.
Clips were removed and replaced as appropriate with archivally acceptable ones. All materials were transferred to acid-free folders and boxes.
Scope and Content
Fonds contains the records of the Toronto Office (Central region) of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Canada. The fonds consists primarily of textual records: minutes, correspondence, financial records, reports, immigration files, naturalization case files, social service case files and the records of attempts to trace missing individuals. There are also photographs of special events, speakers and arriving immigrants.
The fonds represents an important resource for the study of Canadian Jewry, especially when taken in conjunction with the JIAS National Office records at the Canadian Jewish Congress National Archives in Montreal, and those of the Western Office at the Library and Archives of Canada. It documents the means by which a particular Canadian ethnic community has dealt with the problems of rescue, settlement and government relations. These records also offer insight into the relationship between the Toronto Office and the other branches of JIAS, and invite comparison with similar agencies in the United States, as well as those of other ethnic groups in Canada.
The material collected includes information about the countries of origin, transportation routes, settlement and employment patterns of Jewish immigrants to Canada in the twentieth century. The documents also touch upon important related issues such as advocacy, sponsorship, admission processes, health and social problems.
These records cover several waves of immigration following the Second World War: Holocaust survivors in the late 1940s, Sephardic (North African) and Hungarian Jews in the 1950s, Russian and Czechoslovakian Jews in the 1960s, and additional Russians in the 1970s.
The records also contain significant information for those researchers looking to conduct genealogical research into Jewish immigrants and their descendents.
The fonds has been arranged with one sous-fonds, which contains the records of the National JIAS office in Montreal. In total there are 17 series. The Toronto office (main fonds) series are: 1. Board of Directors and Executive Committee Minutes; 2. Annual meeting proceedings; 3. Reports; 4. Legal ; 5. Administration; 6. JIAS Committees; 7. External committees; 8. Financial ; 9. Arrivals; 10. Immigration case files; 11. Social service assistance case files; 12. Photographs; 13. Miscellaneous. The National Office sous-fonds is divided into the following series: 1. National executive meeting minutes; 2. National annual meeting proceedings; 3. National annual reports; 4. Publications; and Photographs.
Notes
Physical description note: Physical extent is based on fully processed records. Additional accessions are not included (see Related Material note below).
Associated material note: The CJC National Archive, in Montreal, has additional JIAS records from 1920-1989 including 275 m of textual records and graphic materials (3250 photos): collection number I0037; alpha-numeric designation MA 4. The National Archives of Canada, Manitoba branch, in Winnipeg, has Jewish Historical Society of Western Canada JIAS textual records from 1923-1950 on 18 microfilm reels: Former archival reference number MG28-V114 (no replacement listed). The originals of these records are maintained by the Jewish Historical Society of Western Canada.
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
Other OJA records relating to JIAS may be found in the following accessions: 1979-9-5; 1988-5-2; 1991-10-5; 2006-3-11.
Creator
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto
Accession Number
1983-8-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Sous-fonds
ID
Fonds 9-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Sous-fonds
Fonds
9-1
Material Format
textual record
Date
1926-1982
Physical Description
51 cm of textual records
14 photographs : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Immigrant Aid Society of Canada was organized into a national office in Montreal and regional offices in Winnipeg (Western Region), Toronto (Central Region) and Halifax (Eastern Region). The national office was responsible for directing and managing all the affairs of the organization, including defining national and international policy; administration of regional offices; national budget; fundraising; external relations with other organizations, such as the United Jewish Relief Agencies (UJRA) and Jewish Family & Child Services (JF&CS); and publicity. It also organized the annual meeting, special events and conventions.
Membership in JIAS was open to individuals, organizations or companies who paid an annual fee. General meetings of the membership were held at least once every two years, where reports were presented and considered, nominations and elections held for national officers and the national executive committee, policies, programs and problems discussed, and decisions taken.
The National Executive Committee of JIAS was composed of the following members: national president; three vice-presidents (the presidents of the Western, Central and Eastern regions), with the addition in the 1950s of a vice-president at large; three regional treasurers, eventually reduced to one national treasurer; secretary; and twelve members comprising four representatives from each region. In 1929 the ‘executive secretary’ position was renamed ‘executive director.’ According to the 1943 constitution, the executive was required to hold meetings at least three times a year, in alternate cities. In 1954 this was amended to twice a year.
During the early stages of JIAS's operations, it had to face the difficulty of being overstretched financially, as it sought to respond to and to change the often oppressive living conditions of new immigrants and the situation of those held in federal detention centres. The organization’s principled approach to immigrant welfare won JIAS much of its early success, as it became the preferred contact for government officials who had formerly dealt with numerous independent agencies, many of which had profited from the exploitation of desperate immigrants. This situation also profited the government, however, as the responsibility for establishing the priority of applications reverted increasingly to JIAS as it had to limit its appeals by the quotas imposed by the federal government.
JIAS was one of the founding organizations responsible for the establishment of the Canadian Council for Refugees (CCR) in 1978, which has since operated as a non-profit umbrella organization to coordinate the efforts of immigrant and refugee advocacy groups. JIAS continues to operate offices across Canada in Calgary, Edmonton, Halifax, Hamilton, London, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Vancouver, Windsor and Winnipeg. The JIAS National Office moved from Montreal to Toronto in 1989, with the appointment of Susan Davis to National Director, and is now located at 4580 Dufferin St., Suite 306, Toronto, Ontario.
Scope and Content
Sous-fonds consists of National Office records retained by the Toronto JIAS office as reference copies. Records include meeting minutes, speeches and reports from annual meetings, and the published annual reports produced from the annual meetings. The sous-fonds covers the years 1926 to 1982 and is divided into the following series: 1. National Executive meeting minutes; 2. National annual meeting proceedings; 3. National annual reports; 4. Publications; and 5. Photographs.
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Canada (creator)
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
General Wingate Branch 256, Royal Canadian Legion fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 74; Item 28
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
General Wingate Branch 256, Royal Canadian Legion fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
74
Item
28
Material Format
graphic material
Date
7 Sept. 1980
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 13 x 9 cm
Notes
Credit: Royal Canadian Legion / Sacks.
Name Access
Royal Canadian Legion
Mount sinai Cemetery
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
Cemeteries
Accession Number
1987-12-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
General Wingate Branch 256, Royal Canadian Legion fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 74; Item 30
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
General Wingate Branch 256, Royal Canadian Legion fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
74
Item
30
Material Format
graphic material
Date
22 Sept. 1985
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 25 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of the General Wingate Branch, Royal Canadian Legion and Jewish war veterans memorial service held at Mount Sinai Cemetery. Identified in the photograph are Barry Goldman (5 yrs.) and Randy Goldman (6yrs.). Their father Israel Goldman is buried in the cemetery. On the far left is Ernie Stein, a Jewish war veteran and member of the colour party.
Notes
Photograph is by Graphic Artists, Toronto
Name Access
Goldman, Barry
Goldman, Randy
Stein, Ernie
Royal Canadian Legion
Mount sinai Cemetery
Goldman, Israel
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
Cemeteries
Physical Condition
Good
Accession Number
1986-12-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
General Wingate Branch 256, Royal Canadian Legion fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 74; Item 31
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
General Wingate Branch 256, Royal Canadian Legion fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
74
Item
31
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1986
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 25 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of the annual remembrance parade of Wingate Branch Royal Canadian Legion, held at Mount Sinai cemetery. Identified in the photograph are Jack Arons (left, with glasses) and Lee Pritzker (centre right).
Notes
Photograph is by Graphic Artists, Toronto
Name Access
Pritzker, Lee
Arons, Jack
Royal Canadian Legion
Mount sinai Cemetery
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
Cemeteries
Accession Number
1986-12-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Simon fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 23
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Simon fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
23
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1931-[198-]
Physical Description
25 cm of textual records
17 photographs (6 negatives)
Admin History/Bio
Harry Simon (1909-1993) was born in Russia on 15 July 1909 and immigrated to Canada with his parents and two younger brothers in 1923. In 1930, he married Eva Millman and together they had two sons, Morris and Norman. Simon was involved in a number of labour unions and organizations during his lifetime, namely the Fur Workers' Union, the AFL-CIO, the Canadian Labour Congress and the Labour Zionist Movement.
In 1926, at the age of 17, Simon left his schooling in Toronto and went to work in a fur factory. He joined the International Fur Workers' Union and at the age of 20, Simon held the distinction of being the youngest business agent elected to a union in Canada. He joined the Canadian Commonwealth Federation (CCF) in 1933 and ran as a political candidate in the 1937 provincial election for the St. Andrew riding in Toronto.
Simon also served as the Canadian representative for the American Federation of Labour from 1944 to 1956. In 1956, he was appointed to the Canadian Labour Congress, becoming the CLC's Ontario regional director of organization until his retirement in 1974. Simon also held the position of national chairman of the Jewish Labour Committee of Canada and as president of the Labour Zionist Movement of Canada. He was also a member of the national executive of the Canadian Jewish Congress.
After his retirement Simon often spoke about labour issues at various functions and events when requested. He died on 22 December 1993 at the age of 84.
Scope and Content
This fonds consists of the records related to the professional career of Harry Simon. This includes meeting minutes, general correspondence, speeches, posters, flyers, booklets, programmes and photographs. The bulk of the material is in the form of correspondence sent to or from Harry Simon. There is also a small amount of biographical material and a number of photographs, which have been described at the item level.
Name Access
Simon, Harry, 1909-1993
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Labor leaders
Physical Condition
Some photographs require conservation work.
Arrangement
The files were originally arranged by Harry Simon according to organization. This original order has been maintained by the archivist.
Creator
Simon, Harry, 1909-1993
Accession Number
1988-5-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2008-2-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-2-4
Material Format
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
5 photographs : b&w and col. (jpg)
1 photograph : col.
2 documents : col. (jpg)
Date
[1910?]-2008
Scope and Content
Accession consists of six photographs of the Greenspoon family of Sudbury, Ontario. There are also two scanned documents: Moe Greenspoon's 1918 birth certificate and his statement of service in the Canadian Armed Forces, issued in 1990.
Photographs include the following:
01. Benjamin and Fanny Greenspoon ca. 1910. (photograph was a reprint of a scanned original)
02. Paul Allan Greenspoon with grandfather Benjamin and his second wife at bar mitzvah, ca. 1966.
03. Greenspoon family gathering ca. 1942. L to R (back): Nathan, Doris, Moses (Moe), Max, Sydney, Irving, Bill, Ruth, Louis. L to R (front): Dave, wife Ann, Ben, Fanny, Harry, wife Millie.
04. Greenspoons at the Nahala dedication plaque in Israel, Oct. 1972. L to R: Rose (married to Max), daughter Elaine, Max, son Ira, Ira's wife Merle, and Ben in front.
05. Zady's Boyz - basketball team of all the grandsons with Moe, 2008.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
Communities
Families
Name Access
Greenspoon, Moe
Places
Sudbury, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-2
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 100 photographs
1 folder of textual records
Date
1920-1980
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of the Hersch family, a screenplay by Phillip Hersch, school certificates from Landsdowne School, Canadian naturalization certificates, thank you notes, a New Year's greeting card, and a Polish passport. Included are photographs of weddings, Europe vacations, class photos, houses in Toronto, bar mitzvah, Niagara falls, Channukah, Farms, studio sets, the beach, and snow scenes
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Norman Hersch until his death in the mid-1980s, at which point the donor took possession of the records and stored them until donating them to the OJA in March 2015.
Administrative History
Norman Hersch was a special effects technician for the CBC from the early 1950s until his retirement in the mid-1980s. He was married to a French woman from Western Canada named Margaret. He is buried in the Mount Albert area with his wife. He served in the Canadian military during the Second World War and graduated from Central Technical School upon his return. In later years, he started P & M Display in Yorkville. Norman's older brother Phillip was a screenwriter in Toronto. He wrote the CBC series Wojek. Their mother Lily (Polish) volunteered at Mount Sinai Hospital. Their father Alexander (Romanian) worked in stainless steel manufacturing. They lived around Cecil Street. Doug Wardle was a friend and colleague of Hersch's at CBC in the Special Effects Department.
Subjects
Bar mitzvah
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Name Access
Hersch, Norman
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-6
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
62 photographs : b&w and col. ; 10 x 15 cm or smaller
4 cm of textual records
Date
1920-2018
Scope and Content
Accession contains material documenting Gabriella Szanto and her family. Included are family photographs, vital records, correspondence, and a 2018 Baycrest calendar that features a portrait and short biography of Gabriella.
Custodial History
Shirley Worth served as the executor of Gabriella Szanto's estate. Following Gabriella's death, Shirley donated the records that make up the accession to the Ontario Jewish Archives.
Administrative History
Gabriella "Gabi" Szanto (née Lazlo) was born in Budapest, Hungary on 26 January 1916. Gabriella's parents, Arnold and Ilonka Lazlo (née Diamenstein), were women's clothing manufacturers who employed twenty-five people. Their skills complemented each other: Arnold had studied design in Berlin for two years while Ilonka was a dressmaker. On 18 May 1919, Arnold and Ilonka had their second child, George.
During the Second World War, Gabi and her mother moved to the outskirts of Budapest where they passed as Catholics, rarely leaving their house. Miklos Szanto—the man Gabriella married after the war—was sent to the Mauthausen concentration camp. Gabriella's brother, George, was sent to a camp in Siberia and did not survive. It is not known where or how Gabriella's father survived the war.
After the war, Gabriella, her mother and father, and her husband Miklos reunited in Budapest. The four lived in the family apartment near the city opera house.
During the period of Communist rule, Gabriella and Miklos bribed their way out of Hungary and travelled to Vienna. From Vienna, they travelled to Australia, where they lived for five or six years, working as a short order cook and a seamstress respectively.
At some point, Gabriella and Miklos made the decision to immigrate to Canada. Their first stop—most likely in the 1950s—was Montreal. There, Gabriella worked for a high-end retailer before moving with her husband to Toronto one year later. In Toronto, Miklos worked again as a short order cook at the Noshery Restaurant on Eglinton, holding this job until he retried. Gabriella, meanwhile, worked as a seamstress until she was in her mid-80s.
In their retirement, Gabriella and Miklos spent two months each winter in Florida. Gabriella died in 2018.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
LANGUAGE NOTE: English, Hungarian, German.
Subjects
Families
Holocaust survivors
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Szanto, Gabriella, 1916-2018
Places
Australia
Austria
Canada
Hungary
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-24
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-24
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
3 photographs : b&w and col. ; 25 x 20 cm or smaller
Date
1988-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Gerald "Jerry" Rosenberg and his involvement with the Royal Canadian Legion's General Wingate Branch 256. Included are General Wingate Branch 256 meeting agendas (2013-2015), Royal Canadian Legion correspondence (2014), two General Wingate Branch newsletters (October 2015 and March 2016), an annual branch inspection report form (27 September 2015), a branch regulations and clubhouse rules submission form (2012), financial statements and receipts (2013-2015), certificates of merit and appreciation from the Royal Canadian Legion (2002-2009), and a document in Hebrew commemo
In addition to the above documents, there are three photographs for which identification is missing: one of a funeral, one of a demonstrators carrying signs urging recognition of China, and a portrait of an unknown veteran.
Finally, the accession contains an undated letter to the editor of an unspecified newspaper that outline Jerry's views of the Arab-Israeli conflict.
Custodial History
At the time of his death, Jerry Rosenberg was living with his partner Frances Cohen. Frances' daughter Ronda "Rhonnie" Cohen took possession of the records following Jerry's death. Rhonnie subsequently gave the records to author Ellin Bessner who donated them to the Ontario Jewish Archives.
Administrative History
Jerry Rosenberg grew up in Hamilton, Ontario along with his twin sister, two brothers, and older sister. When he was seventeen years old, Rosenberg lied about his age in order to fight in the Second World War. He joined the Royal Canadian Navy and served for the duration of the war.
After the war, Rosenberg approached the Canadian Zionist Organization about volunteering in Palestine. After a circuitous journey that first took him from Montreal to New York to France, he arrived in Haifa in February or March 1948. Rosenberg was part of Machal, a group of overseas volunteers who fought alongside Israeli forces during the 1948 Arab-Israeli War. Rosenberg joined the Haganah and fought in the 52nd Givati Regiment. As part of this unit, he participated in battle in the Arab village of Bashshit.
After the war, Rosenberg made preparations to leave Israel. Upon arriving in Canada, he worked with Jewish organizations and started a family. He became president of the Royal Canadian Legion's Wingate Branch 256. He died on 23 August 2017.
Descriptive Notes
Language: English, French
Subjects
Arab-Israeli conflict
Veterans--Canada
Name Access
Bessner, Ellin, 1961-
Rosenberg, Jerry
Royal Canadian Legion
Places
Canada
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-10-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-10-10
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
7 cm of graphic material and textual records
Date
1925-1980
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Kirschner family, in particular Maurice and Gertrude Kirschner. Included are family photographs, wedding telegrams, marriage certificates, certificates of naturalization, and passports. Individuals identified in the photographs include: Ann Kirschner, Chaim Kirschner, Gertrude Kirschner (née Taylor), Hannah Kirschner, Helen Kirschner, Joseph Kirschner, Maurice Kirschner, Shlomo Kirschner, Ruth Lowe, Bernice Taylor, Leah Taylor, and Saul Taylor.
Administrative History
Gertrude Kirschner (née Taylor) was born on 29 November 1907 in Toronto, Ontario. She lived with her parents at 770 Markham Street and finished high school. On 3 July 1932, she married Maurice Kirschner, with whom she had two daughters: Helen (b. 1934) and Elaine (b. 1942). The couple lived at 770 Markham Street until they bought their first home at 46 Gloucester Grove. They became founding members of Beth Sholom Synagogue on Englinton Avenue. Gertrude died 7 June 1982.
Maurice Kirschner was born on 13 August 1904 in Lyck, Germany. He was trained as a watchmaker and opened a watch repair shop on Bay Street, just north of Queen. The shop was demolished to make way for the new city hall. Maurice subsequently went to work for Sayvette, where he remained for the rest of his career. He died on 15 February 1980.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Availability of other formats: Digital copies (jpg, tif) have been created for thirty-one documents.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
Married people
Name Access
Kirschner (family)
Kirschner, Gertrude
Kirschner, Maurice
Places
Germany
Ontario
Soviet Union
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 2; File 672
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
2
File
672
Material Format
textual record
Date
1997
Physical Description
1 folder of textual material
Subjects
Arab Canadians
Communities
Muslims--Canada
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Accession Number
2005-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
General Wingate Branch 256, Royal Canadian Legion fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 74; Item 29
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
General Wingate Branch 256, Royal Canadian Legion fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
74
Item
29
Material Format
graphic material
Date
27 Sept. 1981
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 13 x13 cm
Notes
Credit: Royal Canadian Legion.
Name Access
Monson, Rabbi David
Royal Canadian Legion
Mount sinai Cemetery
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
Cemeteries
Rabbis
Accession Number
1987-12-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 2; File 347
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
2
File
347
Material Format
textual record
Date
1994
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Subjects
Arab Canadians
Communities
Muslims--Canada
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Accession Number
2005-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2010-11-16
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-16
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
45 cm of textual records
Date
1970-1997
Scope and Content
This accession consists of records related to Rolf Lederer's role with the Canadian Jewish Congress' Chaplaincy Services Committee, JIAS, and Congregation B'nai Torah. The records include meeting minutes and agendas, correspondence, reports, financial records, bulletins, invitations, and pamphlets, In addition, there is one document that lists the founders of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Toronto.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Rolf Lederer until they were donated to the Archives on 22 November 2010.
Administrative History
Dr. Rolf Lederer was born in Hamburg, Germany in 1934. His family immigrated to South Africa in 1936 and Rolf remained there until 1961, earning his medical degree from Cape Town University. After completing his psychiatric training in Edinburgh and Boston, Rolf settled in Toronto in 1968. There he set up private practice as a General Psychiatrist.
After moving to Toronto, Rolf became actively involved in the Jewish community and served on a number of committees. He was on both the local and national board of directors of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society (JIAS) as well as a number of JIAS sub-committees, including the South African Jewish Association of Canada (SAJAC), the Local Case File Committee and the Management Committee.
From 1985 to 1988 Rolf was chairman of the Canadian Jewish Congress’s (CJC) Chaplaincy Services Committee. He was also a member of other CJC committees; including, the Jewish Cultural Council and the Joint Adult Education Committee. In addition, Rolf co-founded the Jewish Genealogical Society (JGS) in 1985 and served as the society’s president from 1987 to 1991. Finally, he was an active member of B’nai Torah Congregation, serving as secretary and first vice-president in the early 1980s
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Lederer, Rolf, 1934-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-5-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-5-2
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
98 photographs (tiff)
1 folder of textual records
Date
1932-2014, predominant 1947-1978
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the personal and professional activities of Percy Skuy. Photographs include: family portraits, school photographs, images of Percy as an apprentice pharmacist, images of Habonim camp in Vryheid, images of Frances as a child in Sudbury, images of Percy and Frances's honeymoon, images of Percy with his family in Toronto, images of trips back to South Africa, photos from the cottage, images of Percy receiving awards, and street scenes of Kensington Market (1978).
Also included is Percy's memoir entitled "My Story Unfolds", articles written by Percy for the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada, and a book written by Percy entitled "Tales of Contraception."
Administrative History
Percy Skuy was born in Vryheid, South Africa on February 17, 1932 to Benjamin and Chana (nee Cilevitz) Skuy. Percy is the middle of three children. His siblings are Max (b. 1929) and Rita (b. 1942). At seventeen, Percy began his apprenticeship and education to be a pharmacist. After qualifying as a pharmacist in 1954, he worked for a year at a pharmacy near Johannesburg before starting his travels through Europe, Australia and the United States. He had planned to return to South Africa, however, he did not have enough money for the fare back. Although he did not originally intend to visit Canada, he headed to Toronto to find a job so he could earn money for the passage home. He eventually secured a job with Glaxo Pharmaceuticals as a Medical Sales Representative and decided to stay. In 1959 he completed his requirements to become a liscenced pharmacist in Ontario and was the first South African pharmacist registered in Ontario.
Percy met Frances Goodman in 1960 on a blind date and they married that same year. Frances was a nurse from Sudbury. They had two children together: Beth (b. 1961) and David (b. 1963).
In 1961, Percy began his 34-year long career with the Johnson and Johnson Corporation. He had a variety of roles within the company and was President for 22-years with two Johnson & Johnson affiliate companies, namely Ortho Pharmaceutical (Canada) Ltd and Ortho-McNeil Inc. Percy is also the founder of the only museum devoted exclusively to the history of contraception located at the Dittrick Medical History Centre in Cleveland, Ohio.
Throughout his career, Percy has been appointed to a number of government and research councils including: the Premier's Council of Ontario, the Federal National Advisory Council on Pharmaceutical Research, and the Board of Governors of the Riverdale Hospital. In September 1995, Percy was inducted as a Candian Pioneer in Family Planning. He has also been an active member of the Rokeah Chapter of the Rho Pi Phi fraternity.
in 1977, Frances passed away. Percy eventually re-married to Elsa Ruth Snider on December 16, 1979.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Skuy, Percy, 1932-
Places
Vryheid, South Africa
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
8 cm of textual records
140 photographs : tiff
Date
[194-?]-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the activities of Ivor Simmons. Included is personal correspondence and photographs of Ivor's early life in South Africa and his family life and activities in Toronto. Of note are family portraits, Bialik Hebrew Day School class photos, Holy Blossom Temple Religious school images, images of the Toronto Island Yacht Club, images of Camp New Moon, Camp Ahmek, and Camp Walden, an image at Crystal Beach, and images of Ivor and his family visiting South Africa. Identified in the photographs are: Ivor Simmons, Milly Simmons, Jack Simmons, Renee Simmons, Gail Simmons, Alan Simmons, Eric Simmons, Anthony Giffard, Theo Wardaugh, Ruth Gold, Marlene Goldbach, Vicki Feraris, and Kim Bresge.
Administrative History
Ivor Simmons was born in Bloemfontein, South Africa in 1937 to Milly and Jack Simmons. He has two younger brothers: Michael (B. 1941) and David (b. 1945). Ivor's father owned a printing business. Ivor studied chemical engineering at the University of Capetown and found work at a petroleum refinery near Johannesburg soon after graduating. Around 1961, Ivor moved to London, England where he worked for the Lummus Company. He moved to Canada in 1963 and settled in Toronto. He worked for Union Carbide for a few years conducting industrial market research and then took a job performing the same work for Falconbridge Nickelmines. Around 1970, he opened his own business called A&A Liquid Waste Removal Company.
Ivor married Renee Rothman in 1966. Together they had three children: Alan, Eric, and Gail. Ivor sold his business in 1997. In his retirement, Ivor has volunteered with a variety of organizations including, animal and bird rehabilitations centres, Friends of Cedarvale, the Escarpment Biosphere Conservancy, and Trinity College (assisting with its annual book fair). Ivor is a member of Adath Israel Synagogue and was a member of B'nai Brith for many years.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Simmons, Ivor, 1937-
Places
Bloemfontein, South Africa
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-2
Material Format
textual record
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
14 photographs : tiff
Date
1961-[2014?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the activities of Max Skuy. Included are photocopies of short stories and poems written by Max and photographs of Max and Glenda's wedding, portraits of Max and his family, Max at the closing of the synagogue in Vryheid, and the window displays at Max's pharmacy in South Africa.
Administrative History
Max Skuy was born in Karsava, Latvia in 1929 to Benjamin and Chana (nee Cilevitz) Skuy. In 1930, Max and his mother immigrated to Vryheid, South Africa. They joined Max's father who was already living there. Max is the oldest of three children. His siblings are Percy (b. 1932) and Rita (b. 1942). Max married Glenda Silverstone in 1961. They had three children together. Max owned his own pharmacy in Durban called Check Pharmacy.
Max and Glenda immigrated to Toronto soon after Max's mother passed away in 1985. Max's children and brother Percy had already immigrated here. Max found work managing a furniture store in Richmond Hill. He is a member of a short story club and regularly submits stories and poems to the SAJAC News for publication.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Skuy, Max, 1929-
Places
Vryheid, South Africa
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-2
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
39 photographs (tiff)
Date
1923, [1950?]-[2011?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting Martin Charney and his family. Included are portraits of Martin as a child and young man, wedding photographs of Martin's grandparents in Johannesburg (1923), images of Martin's bar mitzvah and weddings, photographs of Matin's family in London en route to Montreal, images of Martin and his family in Montreal, images of Camp Timberlands (New York), images of the Anglo-African Glass Company, images of Martin with his family in South Africa and images of Martin's family at weddings and bar mitzvah's in Toronto. Of note is an image from the dedication of Chabad Lubavitch in Thornill (2011). Identified in the images are: Martin Charney, Jack Frenkel, Doris Levinstein, Max Charney, Leah Charney, Candy Charney, Rabbi Gansberg, and Norman Charney.
Administrative History
Martin was born in Johannesburg in 1947 to Max and Joan Lena (née Frenkel) Charney. He has a younger brother, Norman. Max owned a glass manufacturing business called Anglo-African Glass. In 1963, the family left South Africa and immigrated to Montreal, Canada. They left South Africa because Max anticipated a future of political uncertainty. The family remained in Montreal for 7 years, before returning to South Africa in 1970. During this time, Martin graduated from high school and attended Sir George Williams University (now Concordia) where he studied for a 4 year Bachelor of Commerce Degree. Max built three office buildings in Sherbrooke, Kingston and Valleyfield and had six One Hour Martinizing laudromats. Joan was a Home Maker - never having done domestic work before.
Soon after returning to South Africa in 1970, Martin married Yaffa (née Franco). They had one daughter, Candyce Jasmine. They divorced in 1980. In 1982 Martin married his second wife, Basia (nee Sztrom). They had four children together: Candy, Leah, Avi Jack and Mirelle Feiga. All 5 children were born in Johannesburg. Martin worked as a real estate broker in South Africa and as a finance resource consultant concentrating on factoring accounts receivable in Toronto.
Due to the worsening violence in South Africa, Martin immigrated to Thornhill with his family in 1999. Martin and Basia divorced soon after immigrating here and Martin eventually re-married to a Canadian Judy Rosenberg. Martin continued in the same line of work once he arrived in Canada; however, he had to build his business back up again from scratch. Martin volunteers with a variety of organizations, including: Circle of Care, Tomchei Shabbos, HOD (Hebrew Order of David - Lodge Ramon) and Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel. He is a member of Chabad Lubavitch at 770 Chabad Gate in Thornhill.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Charney, Martin, 1947-
Places
Johannesburg, South Africa
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-12
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
60 cm of textual records
ca. 30 photographs
Date
1963-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the career of Peter Held. Included is correspondence, letters of congratulations, event dinner menus, event programs, articles and writings by Held, annual reports, newsletters, reports, newspaper clippings and photographs. The material was originally organized into a series of binders. Original order of the material has been maintained.
Administrative History
Peter E. Held was born in Cape Town, South Africa in Dec. 1937 to Herbert and Hilde Held, Jewish immigrants from Germany. Following Hilde’s death, Herbert moved in with his own mother and stepfather who had also immigrated to South Africa. Speaking only German, Peter grew up trilingual, acquiring German fluency at home and speaking English and Afrikaans at school.
In 1960, after completing his education at the University of Witwatersrand, and five years of clerkship, in Johannesburg, S.A., Held passed the S.A. Public Accountants and Auditors Board Examination. As a newly minted Chartered Accountant, he worked for six months in London, England before arriving in Canada in 1961 as a tourist, intending to stay six months, work his way across North America then head for Australia.
With $24 in his pocket, Held arrived in Quebec and made his way to Toronto where he found work with Dunwoody & Company (now BDO Canada). He quickly proved himself, becoming a partner at the age of 26 years, one of the youngest ever at the firm. He became Toronto Region Managing Partner from 1981 to 1996, and Chief Executive Officer of BDO Dunwoody, where he was responsible for the overall management and leadership of the firm from 1997 to 2001. An employee at BDO Dunwoody for forty years, Held is recognized for his exemplary leadership as he guided it through a period of unprecedented growth and prosperity.
Held was Chairman of the Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants from 1991-2. He was First Vice-Chairman, Second Vice-President, a member of the Board of Governors, and a participant on various committees for the Canadian Institute. He was also President of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Ontario in 1986-87, First and Second Vice-Presidents, and served on various committees for the Ontario Institute. The Institute of Chartered Accountants of Ontario awarded Held a Fellowship (F.C.A.) in 1976, Life Membership in 1987, and the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Ontario Award of Outstanding Merit in 1993, usually awarded to only one individual per year. Held travelled in Canada and abroad on behalf of the Canadian Institute and profession, speaking at various conferences.
Held was also Canada's representative of the International Federation of Accountants from 1995-7 and President of the Toronto Chartered Accountants Association in 1974. He was a Board or Committee member at several other organizations, some are: Ontario Chamber of Commerce, North York General Hospital, University of Waterloo, Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Club, Y.M.C.A., Donalda Club, the Royal Canadian Military Institute, and United Way.
Following training in mediation and conflict resolution, Held worked as a mediator and arbitrator at ADR Chambers, conducting mediations dealing with a variety of commercial disputes. He also mediated on professional negligence issues.
Held is married to Gyneth (nee Gordon) from South Africa, a Speech-Language Pathologist in private practice. They have two adult children, Heather (married to Gill) and Michael (married to Krista), and several grandchildren.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: English and German.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
5 photographs (jpg)
Date
1953, 2010-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs taken by Jessica Parker documenting the following individuals: Ivan Zarenda, Lucille and Aubrey Groll, and Lynne and David Ginsburg. Jessica took these images after interviewing these individuals for an oral history project related to Jewish immigrants from South Africa living in Kingston, ON.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Related Material note: AC 431, AC 432, AC 433.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-8-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-8-8
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
18 photographs : b&w and col ; 14 x 22 cm or smaller
1 folder of textual records
Date
1937-2007
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the personal history of Cyril Shenker and family. The records include Cyril's birth certificate, marriage certificate, South African passports for Cyril, his wife Denise and his 3 daughters. Each passport has a Canadian landed immigrant status report attached, dated 1975. Also included are Certificates of Canadian Citizenship for each. In addition, there are family photographs including 4 photos of Cyril as a young child in South Africa and his children and grandchildren in Canada. Finally, accession includes a short personal history written by Cyril about his life.
Administrative History
Cyril Bernard Shenker was born in 1936 in Sea Port Cape Town to Sonia (nee Feldman) and Harry Shenker. He had two older siblings: Doreen and Lionel. Harry ran a kosher deli in Sea Port called Spotless Foods. Cyril moved to Johannesburg in 1954 and found work as an order picker at Stanley Electrical Wholesales. In 1962 he bought company shares and by 1967 he owned a controlling interest in the company. After the company was sold in 1968, Cyril started two additional businesses before leaving South Africa in 1975: SA Lighting (1969-1971) and Viceroy Hardware (1971-1974).
Cyril married Denise Weinberg in 1960. They had three daughters together: Michelle Hilary (b. 1961), Lauren Ruth (b. 1963), and Gayle Anne (b. 1968). Cyril and Denise decided to move the family to Toronto in 1975 since they did not see a future for their daughters in South Africa because of the political situation.
After working initially as a manager at a screw manufacturing plant in Milton, Cyril embarked on a series of additional business ventures in Canada. In 1977 he bought Irwin Hardware Store with two partners. In 1979, he sold his shares in the business and started Allied Agencies (an import and distribution business of household and kitchen wares) with his business partner Eric Gilbert. In 1988, they sold this business and started Port Style Enterprises in 1991 with Jackie Milner and Harvey Rachman. In 2014, Cyril sold his shares and retired.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Shenker, Cyril, 1936-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-6-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-6-13
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
3 DVDs
112 photographs : col. (tif)
Date
[ca. 1955]-2005, predominant [ca. 1982]-2005
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic records documenting the history of the Lurie family. Included are a wide variety of photographs documenting family activities such as Lynne and David's wedding; Jewish holiday celebrations; outdoor activities (such as skating and tobogganing); vacations; the Bat Mitzvahs of Danielle, Lisa and Shira and Asher's Bar Mitzvah at Shaar Shalom Synagogue. Also included are speeches and certificates from the children's Bar and Bat Mitzvahs.
Custodial History
Material was in the possession of Lynne and David Lurie. Lynne donated it to the OJA.
Administrative History
David Lurie was born in Klerksdorp, North West Province, South Africa (b. 1955). He was born to Rose (b. 1924-) and Victor (b. 1920–d. 1997). Victor was born in Capetown, South Africa (Grandfather’s family immigrated to South Africa from Latvia after the First World War. Grandmother’s family is of British origin, immigrated in the pre-1880s). Rose was born in Poland and joined her father in Klerksdorp in 1936. Victor and Rose retired to Capetown in 1980 and then Rose moved to Israel after Victor passed away. David attended dental school at Witz University in Johannesburg. He was subsequently conscripted to the army for two years and practiced dentistry. He then had a private practice in Johannesburg.
Lynne was born in Harare, Zimbabwe (b. 1958). Her parents Patricia (b. 1927) and Harry (b. 1923–d. 2012) were both born in South Africa. Pat was a speech pathologist and Harry was in the milling business for 30 years in Australia before retiring to South Africa in 1980-1. Also, Harry had been detained as a POW during the Second World War. Lynne studied drama. She did freelance directing and stage managing for children’s theatre.
Lynne and David were introduced through mutual friends at Witz University and shared a mutual interest in musical theatre and had both been involved in Habonim. They were married in December 1979 and now have four children: Danielle (b. 1982 in South Africa, is married with two children); Lisa (b. 1984 in South Africa); Asher (b. 1987 in South Africa), and Shira (b. 1990 in Canada).
The Luries considered leaving South Africa for many years and eventually emigrated in 1989 because it was becoming increasingly dangerous in the area where David’s practice was located. After completing the National Board Examinations of Canada in 1989 he joined the partnership at Uptowne Dental Centre and Amberwood Dental Centre. David immigrated in May 1989 and then Lynne followed in July 1989. They settled in Thornhill and Lynne now teaches at a drama school for children.
Lynne and David were members at Shaar Shalom Synagogue. Lynne was on the board as VP and secretary. They are Block Parents. David has been involved as a coach, coaching children’s teams, with the Thornhill Soccer Club.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Lurie, David, 1955-
Lurie, Lynn, 1958-
Places
South Africa
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-4-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-4-4
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w (tif)
5 documents (tif)
1 folder of textual records
1 DVD
1 videocassette
Date
1941-2004
Scope and Content
Accession consists of copies of electronic copies of photographs, postcards and telegrams as well as newsclippings, a video and a DVD documenting the career of Sam Shapiro in the RCAF and his time as a Prisoner of War at Stalag Luft 3 in Poland.
Administrative History
Sam Shapiro enlisted as a pilot in the Royal Canadian Air Force in September 1940. He received his wings in Brantford and was sent overseas in April 1941 as a sergeant pilot. He was in Squadron ten and flew eight successful missions before his plane was shot down over Holland in August 1941, killing two of the crew.
Shapiro was captured by German forces on 17 August 1941 and was taken to Stalag Luft 3 camp in Poland, where the "Great Escape" took place. Shapiro was not part of the breakout, but did help dig the tunnel that allowed seventy-six of his fellow prisoners to escape.
While a Prisoner of War, Shapiro was promoted to Warrant Officer. He was liberated on 16 April 1945 and arrived in England five days later. Shortly after arriving home in 1945, Shapiro received the YMCA sports badge for his conduct in the POW camp and the Canadian Volunteer Service medal. He married his fiance Geraldine Perlman in 1945.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Shapiro, Sam.
Stalag Luft 3
Perlman, Geraldine
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-16
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-16
Material Format
moving images
textual record
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 document (electronic)
4 DVDs
1 scrapbook
Date
1988-2001
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material relating to the Maccabees Royal Canadian Legion branch 343, including a 1998 membership register, poppy sale information, correspondence and notes regarding Ben Sussman's application for a lifetime membership, information about the ticket sales and a copy of the certificate from 1997 JNF tribute dinner that honoured Albert and Pearl Cohen, and planning notes for the 50th anniversary banquet of the Maccabees in 1995. The accession also contains the draft of Albert Cohen's speech that he presented at the 50th anniversary dinner, as well as newspaper clippings from the Hamilton Jewish News and the Canadian Jewish News relating to the Maccabees, two certificates from the Grand Order of Israel Benefit Society recognizing Albert Cohen's 40 years of membership and an award of merit, and a eulogy in Yiddish, with some translation, written by a father about the son he lost, Balinson, in the line of duty. The DVDs contain footage from the 1997 JNF dinner honouring the Cohens, including Pearl Cohen speaking about early Hamilton, one clip from 1994 of Albert Cohen telling the history of the Maccabees, and video from the 50th anniversary dinner of the Maccabees where there were various speakers including an address by the guest speaker, Commander Sam Pasternack, who spoke about the contribution of Jewish soldiers in WWII (DVD, Maccabees dinner part 3).
Custodial History
Michael Cohen is the son of Albert and Pearl Cohen, and was in possession of the records prior to donating them.
Administrative History
Albert Cohen (1918-2006) who also went by the nickname "Boomie," was born on November 12, 1918 in Hamilton, Ontario. Pearl Cohen (nee Chaunce) (1919-2008) was born in Hamilton on September 2, 1919. Albert and Pearl married in 1941. In the same year, Albert volunteered to serve in the army as a staff sargeant stationed in Hamilton. He was later discharged in May 1946 after the war. Albert then joined Hamilton's Maccabees, Branch 343 of the Royal Canadian Legion. The branch was founded in 1947 and had a membership of 150 people. The Maccabees' membership was made up of Jewish veterans of WWII, and some veterans of WWI. The branch held meetings in Hamilton's Jewish centre. Albert served as president of the branch for almost 20 years, from 1975 to around 2000. The Maccabees were quite active, and helped raise money by selling poppies for Remembrance Day. The money raised would be sent to general hospitals, veterans hospitals, and families of needy veterans. Albert passed away on August 7, 2006, and Pearl passed away April 18, 2008.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Cohen, Albert, 1918-2006
Cohen, Pearl, 1919-2008
Places
Hamilton, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
34 photographs (tiff)
Date
[between 1914 and 1916?], 1986-1998
Scope and Content
Accssion consists of photographs documenting the Levine family's immigration to Canada and activities in Saskatchewan and Ontario. Included are images of Mark and Bev during their first few years in Melford, Saskatchewan, family holiday celebrations (Chanukah and Pesach dinners), shabbat dinners, the Edenbridge synagogue, trips to Niagara Falls, and images taken during trips Elfreda and Alec made to Canada from South Africa to visit Mark. Of note are images taken of Mark and Bev with other South African immigrants at a ski hill in Saskatchewan and at shabbat dinners in Melford. Also included is a Sweiden family portrait taken in South Africa in the early 1900s.
Administrative History
Leible and Esther Sweiden moved from Lithuania to Capetown in 1890. Leible's brother, Jacob followed him to Capetown around 1902. In 1906, Jacob and his wife Fanny (nee Vickers) immigrated with a small group of other Jewish South Africans to Edenbridge, Saskatchewan. Leible remained in South Africa. Leible's son Israel married Edith (Eadie) in 1934. Israel and Edith's daughter Elfreda (b. 1936) married Alec Levine in 1958. Elfreda was a bookkeeper for various companies and Alec worked for his family's plumbing business. They had three children together: Mark (b. 1959), Carol (b. 1962), and Adrian ( b. 1966).
Mark Levine married Beverley in 1983. They immigrated to Melford, Saskatchewan in 1986. Mark did not know at the time that his great grandfather's brother had immigrated to a nearby area decades earlier and only learned of his story and the Edenbridge Jewish community soon after arriving there. Mark worked as a physician at a local hospital. Beverley had been a pharmacist in South Africa, however, her qualifications were not recognized in Canada and she focused on raising her family. Mark and Bev's daughter, Romi, was born in August 1987. After 18 months in Melford, they moved to Toronto after Mark found work as a pediatric anesiologist at Sick Kids Hospital. In 1998, thier second daughter, Jade, was born. Mark's parents, Elfreda and Alec, immigrated to Toronto in 1999. Mark and other relatives encouraged them to immigrate due to the increasingly dangerous political situation in South Africa. Mark is also an assoicate professor at the University of Toronto. Alec and Elfreda's daughter Carol lives in England and their son Adrian remains in South Africa.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Levine, Mark
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-5
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
2 folders of textual records
10 photographs
21 photographs (tiff)
Date
1957-2015, predominant 1987-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the activities of Colin and Brenda Baskind. Included are family photographs, such as a wedding portrait of Colin and Brenda, images of family events, graduation portraits of Colin's children, family holiday celebrations, Colin and Brenda running marathons, and the family at a baby naming ceremony for Colin's granddaughter at Darchei Noam Synanagoue. Textual records include thank you letters Colin received from individuals he assisted as President of SAJAC and in other capacities, the CV that Colin used to look for work in Toronto while preparing to immigrate from South Africa, a speech Brenda delivered to a cancer support group regarding her fight with breast cancer and marathon running, newsclippings, certificates, and letters of reference for both Colin and Brenda.
Identified in the photographs are: Colin Baskind, Brenda Baskind, Alan Sandler, Ian Sandler, Lorraine Sandler, Cliff Baskind, Stacey Baskind, Audrey Weinberg, Gerald Weinberg, Solly Simmons, Renee Simmons, Lily Shaie Baskind, Alana Baskind, and Refton Blair.
Administrative History
Colin Baskind was born in Johannesburg, South Africa, on April 20, 1943. As a child, he attended an all boys' school and played a wide variety of sports including, soccer, cricket and rugby. He studied commerce at the University of South Africa and completed a business course through a school in England. While in school he met his future wife, Brenda, on a blind date and they married in 1967. Together they had three children: Stacey, Alana and Cliff.
Colin worked in an import business and Brenda was a nursery school teacher. For a short period of time they cared for the nephew of their maid, whose daughter gave birth at a young age and was still in school. They raised him with their children until his mother was finished school.
Around 1976, Colin and Brenda started to think about leaving South Africa due to the worsening violence and political situation. After first considering Australia, they eventually immigrated to Toronto in 1987. Colin found work in the importing business and Brenda found work at Holy Blossom Temple school. Soon after arriving in Toronto, Colin became involved in the Southern African Jewish Association of Canada. He attended a meeting that had been called to resuscitate SAJAC (the organization, which was formed in 1977, had ceased functioning and there was a need to bring it back to help a new large wave of immigrants). At the meeting Colin was nominated as President and he has held this role ever since. Colin also volunteered with a variety of organizations including, JIAS and JVS. He continued with his athletic pursuits in Canada and jogged, hiked, and cycled in all weather. Around 1998, Brenda started to join Colin and his running group on jogs. Around 2000 they both began running in marathons. By 2015, they had participated in 11 marathons. In 2010, their granddaughter Lily Shaie was born to their daughter Stacey.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Baskind, Colin
Places
Johannesburg
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-8
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
18 photographs : tiff
Date
1969, 1974-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the Cohen family, their immigration to Canada from South Africa and life in Toronto. Textual records include photocopies of correspondence and paperwork relating to the Cohen's immigration, certificates, and a typed document containing humorous stories their South African friends shared at a "10 Years Out Of Africa" party relating to their adjustment to Canadian life. Also included are family portraits and photographs documenting family celebrations such as, weddings and bar mitzvahs. Of note is an image of Vivien and John at the "10 Years Out of Africa" party.
Administrative History
John Cohen was born in Johannesburg, South Africa in 1944 to Phil and Flora Cohen. Vivien (nee Lehwess) Cohen was born in Johannesburg, South Africa in 1947 to Henry and Isle (nee Wronsky) Lehwess. John's cousin was in physiotherapy school with Vivien and they were introduced to each other. They married on Dec. 3, 1969 and had three children together: Nicole (b. 1972), Steven (b. 1974), and Jeremy David (1979). Vivien was a physiotherapist and John was a textile sales agent. Due to the unstable political situation in South Africa, they immigrated to North York in March 1977. For the first few weeks, they lived in a rental apartment in North York. They soon moved into a townhouse nearby. In 1980, they bought their first house in Thornhill. They were both able to continue in their professions after immigrating to Canada. Both of their mothers and many of their friends also moved to Toronto. John and Vivien were members of Shaarei Shalom synagogue for twenty-five years and are now members of Darchei Noam.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Cohen, John
Places
Johannesburg, South Africa
Source
Archival Accessions
50 records – page 1 of 1.

Narrow By

Collection Name

Source

Format

Date

Description Level

Subject

Name

Place

Language

Restrictions

Available Digital Content