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50 records – page 1 of 1.
Level
Item
ID
Item 3575
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3575
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1980
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Scope and Content
Item is an interior photograph of the offices of Jewish Community Services buildings located at 150 Beverley Street, Toronto.
Notes
Graphic Artists.
Acquired 1983.
Subjects
Architecture
Charities
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3576
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3576
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1980
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Scope and Content
Item is an interior photograph of the offices of Jewish Community Services buildings located at 150 Beverley Street, Toronto.
Notes
Graphic Artists.
Acquired 1983.
Subjects
Architecture
Charities
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3577
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3577
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1980
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Scope and Content
Item is an interior photograph of the boardroom at 150 Beverley St.
Notes
Graphic Artists
Acquired 1983
Subjects
Architecture
Charities
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3578
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3578
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1980
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of the boardroom at 150 Beverley St.
Notes
Graphic Artists
Acquired 1983
Subjects
Architecture
Charities
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
1985-11-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1985-11-2
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 slide : col.
Date
1983
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a coloured slide of the former UJA Federation Building at 152 Beverley St.
Subjects
Architecture
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Jewish Vocational Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 75
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Vocational Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
75
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
moving images
Date
1947-2006
Physical Description
5.1 m of textual records and graphic material
1 DVD
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Vocational Services (JVS) was established on 16 June, 1947. After the war, thousands of survivors arrived in Canada in search of homes, education for their children and jobs. The returning servicemen, in turn, were also in need of employment as well. The first two years of its existence, it catered to these two groups. By 1949, it expanded its mandate to become a community-wide agency.
Max Enkin, the founder of the famous post-war "tailor scheme," became its first president and chairman of the board. Under this scheme, he and other members of his delegation were able to bring over 6000 survivors to Canada. Other members of the board included Lipa Green, Sydney Harris, Dr. Albert Rose and Louis Lockshin. The executive director was Norman Stack. He served for a few years and was replaced by Milton Freidman in 1949. Freidman was a social worker who relocated to Toronto from Buffalo and spent close to 40 years in this position, retiring in 1985.
Its early mandate was to serve as a placement service for applicants and employers and to provide individual counselling services to its clients. Its office was situated above the original Tip Top Tailor building at 455 Spadina Avenue. It later moved its office to 152 Beverley Street and then in the 1960s to Tycos Drive. By the 1960s, JVS began to expand its services to all segments of society including newcomers, people with disabilities and from all sectors of life. The staff included social workers, psychologists, job counsellors and clerical staff.
During the 1980s, Bernie Berger became the new executive director. He served in that capacity until 1991. He was replaced by Ed Segalowitz. During this period, JVS set up a seniors' program called ATLAZ on the grounds of the Baycrest Home for the Aged. It was funded by the Bick family and was intended to create programs to keep seniors occupied. Today, this program is called the Al Green Resource Centre and provides employment, placement, training and volunteer opportunities to adults of all ages and with developmental disabilities. JVS also launched a youth program called Youthinc and a women's program.
Karen Goldenberg became executive director in 1998 and was replaced by Frank Markel in 2011 after her retirement. JVS has expanded its clientele, helping people from all backgrounds with diverse needs to identify their strengths and goals, develop skills, and achieve success in school, work and life. By 2009 it offered an expansive range of over 40 employment-related support programs and services throughout the Greater Toronto Area to thousands of unemployed and underemployed individuals and served 23,000 people. They operated out of 12 locations and have approximately 200 professionals on staff.
Kim Coulter became president and CEO in 2013.
Custodial History
The case files were located in the vault with no accession number. They were likely transferred to the OJA during the 1970s or 1980s. They were assigned accession number 2002-10/34.
The remaining records were in the possession of Amanda Batchelor of JVS, who had acquired the material from various past board and committee members for the creation of the 60th anniversary book.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the activities, programs, finances, operation and history of the Jewish Vocational Services. Included are meeting minutes, photographs, correspondence, surveys, reports, financial statements, certificates, bulletins, newsletters, newsclippings, press releases, anniversary books, and one DVD. The fonds is arranged into the following series: 1) Formation and history; 2) Board of Directors; 3) Executive board; 4) Annual general meetings; 5) Special and general meetings; 6) Committees; 7) Career, employment and training services; 8) Disability services; 9) Immigrant and newcomer services; 10) Women in New Roles (WINR); 11) Youth services; 12) Volunteer program; 13) Studies and reports; 14) Finance; 15) Personnel; 16) Planning and operations; 17) Publications and publicity; 18) Fundraising; 19) United Way; 20) Events; 21) Conferences and workshops.
Name Access
Jewish Vocational Services of Toronto
Subjects
Charities
Immigrants--Canada
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Creator
Jewish Vocational Services of Toronto (1947-)
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
2002-10/34
2008-9/6
2010-11/7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2014-1-14
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-14
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
100 photographs : col. slides ; 35 mm
Date
[ca. 1980]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 100 slides documenting UJA Federation employees and the work space at the 150 Beverley Street location and a couple slides showing the construction of the Lipa Green building.
Custodial History
Negatives were found stored in tribute card work space cabinets.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Architecture
Charities
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2004-5-47
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2004-5-47
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 10 photographs : b&w
1 folder of textual records
Date
1983
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of the UJA Federation on moving day from the J. Irving Oelbaum Centre, 150 Beverley St., to the Lipa Green Building at 4600 Bathurst St. Also included is a program for the dedication ceremonies of the Lipa Green building.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Charities
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Jewish communal service series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 51; Series 9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Philip Givens fonds
Jewish communal service series
Level
Series
Fonds
51
Series
9
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Date
[194-]-1988
Physical Description
323 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller and other material
Scope and Content
Series consists of textual records and graphic material documenting Phil Givens' involvement with the Jewish community. In particular, the textual records include general correspondence, speeches and convention materials documenting his role as national president of the Canadian Zionist Federation and his involvement with many other Jewish organizations. The records also consist of certificates, scrapbooks, objects, photographs of various events within the community as well as photographic albums presented to Givens on the occasion of his 1968 Jewish National Fund Negev dinner and his 1985 Canadian Zionist Federation testimonial dinner.
The majority of the records has been arranged into nine sub-series: 9-1. B’nai Brith; 9-2. Canadian Zionist Federation; 9-3. Jewish National Fund; 9-4. Keren Hayesod; 9-5. Rho Pi Phi fraternity; 9-6. State of Israel Bonds; 9-7. United Jewish Welfare Fund / United Jewish Appeal; and 9-8. Other Jewish organizations.
Notes
Includes 12.15 cm of textual records, 2 objects and 1 presentation piece.
Arrangement
Any files not clearly associated with a specific Jewish organization were attached to the Jewish communal service series itself.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Address
254-256 Victoria Street
Source
Landmarks

The six-storey Hermant Annex and 14-storey eastern tower were designed by Benjamin Brown in 1920 and 1930 respectively. The building is named after Percy Hermant and served as the headquarters for his company, Imperial Optical. The Hermant Building was built at Wilton Square - which was later renamed Dundas Square. Benjamin Brown's office was located in the Hermant Building in the 1940s. The offices of the Canadian Jewish Review were housed in the building on Dundas Square. The buildings were designated as heritage buildings in 1990.
Address
254-256 Victoria Street
Time Period
1920-present
Scope Note
The six-storey Hermant Annex and 14-storey eastern tower were designed by Benjamin Brown in 1920 and 1930 respectively. The building is named after Percy Hermant and served as the headquarters for his company, Imperial Optical. The Hermant Building was built at Wilton Square - which was later renamed Dundas Square. Benjamin Brown's office was located in the Hermant Building in the 1940s. The offices of the Canadian Jewish Review were housed in the building on Dundas Square. The buildings were designated as heritage buildings in 1990.
History
Percy Hermant was born in Mogilev, Russia in 1882. In 1897, he immigrated to Canada, arriving in New Brunswick, where he began working as a dry goods peddler. In 1900, he founded the Imperial Optical Company, the first prescription lens business in the Maritimes. This company eventually grew to be the largest company of its kind in the British Commonwealth. In addition to his successful business, he was very involved with philanthropic and community activities within Jewish and non-Jewish circles. He sponsored academic and musical scholarships.
Category
Architecture
Manufacturer
Medical
Source
Landmarks
Accession Number
2004-5-72
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2004-5-72
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1980-1987
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material pertaining to the Toronto Association of Professionals in Jewish Communal Service. The records include lists of members, correspondence, minutes of the Association, and minutes of other committees including the Ad Hoc Steering Committee, the Executive Committee, and the Program Committee.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-5-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-5-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
15 cm of textual records
8 architectural drawings
2 CDs
Date
1960-2011, predominant 2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of architectural drawings for the construction of the Northern YM-YWHA at 4600 Bathurst Street (1960) as well as floor plans for the proposed re-development of the site in 1999. Also included are submissions for the competition to design and build the Jewish War Veterans of Canada memorial at the Sherman Campus (2011).
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Subjects
Architecture
Charities
Veterans--Canada
Name Access
Young Men's Hebrew Association (Toronto, Ont.)
Bathurst Jewish Community Centre
Jewish War Veterans of Canada
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-10-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-10-8
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
5 photographs : col. ; 10 x 15 cm
Date
[199-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of three photographs of the exterior of the Lipa Green building from the parking lot, and two photographs of the Lipa Green building at the Bathurst St. entrance. A Nazi ensignia and the words PLO IRAQ and PLO have been spraypainted on the exterior brick. The photos of the Bathurst St. entrance were taken on 21 Jan. 1991.
Custodial History
There is no acquisition information for these photographs. The accession number has been assigned by the archivist.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Antisemitism
Architecture
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Address
119 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The Balfour Building is a Toronto landmark and designated heritage building that is located at 119 Spadina Avenue. It was designed by Benjamin Brown and was one of his most important commissions.
Address
119 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1930-Present
Scope Note
The Balfour Building is a Toronto landmark and designated heritage building that is located at 119 Spadina Avenue. It was designed by Benjamin Brown and was one of his most important commissions.
History
Built in 1930, the building is twelve storeys high and crowned by a two storey tower. It is considered one of the finest examples of Art Deco architecture in Toronto. Initially, many Jewish garment businesses were located in the building. It currently houses offices for several graphic design and advertising firms, shops and a post office. The Balfour Building was declared a heritage building by order of City Council in July of 1989.
Category
Architecture
Manufacturer
Source
Landmarks
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
Toronto Section series
Service Portfolio sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 38; Series 7-11; File 31
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
Toronto Section series
Service Portfolio sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
38
Series
7-11
File
31
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1978-1986
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
94 photographs : b&w and col. (34 negatives, 8 slides) ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Scope and Content
File consists of photographs taken at community service award events, newsclippings about the honorees and award winners and a press release announcing the selection of Marvelle Koffler as 1981 Community Service Award recipent.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Address
225 Richmond Street West
Source
Landmarks

The Gelber Brothers, Louis and Moses, were born in what is now Austria in the late nineteenth century. Together they founded the Imperial Clothing Company, which later became Gelber Brothers Woolens. Their head office was designed by Benjamin Brown and was located in the Gelber Building at 217-225 Richmond Street West. Although selling woolens was their main business, the brothers had other investments, including ownership of a service station at Simcoe and Richmond and a public garage at 287 Spadina Avenue.
Address
225 Richmond Street West
Time Period
1923-present
Scope Note
The Gelber Brothers, Louis and Moses, were born in what is now Austria in the late nineteenth century. Together they founded the Imperial Clothing Company, which later became Gelber Brothers Woolens. Their head office was designed by Benjamin Brown and was located in the Gelber Building at 217-225 Richmond Street West. Although selling woolens was their main business, the brothers had other investments, including ownership of a service station at Simcoe and Richmond and a public garage at 287 Spadina Avenue.
History
The Gelber Brothers were prominent members of the Toronto Jewish community. They were involved in many philanthropic and charitable activities and were active in many Jewish organizations.
Category
Architecture
Manufacturer
Source
Landmarks
Address
21 Dundas Square
Source
Landmarks

The six-storey Hermant Annex and 14-storey eastern tower were designed by Benjamin Brown in 1920 and 1930 respectively. The building is named after Percy Hermant and served as the headquarters for his company, Imperial Optical. The Hermant Building was built at Wilton Square - which was later renamed Dundas Square. Benjamin Brown's office was located in the Hermant Building in the 1940s. The offices of the Canadian Jewish Review were housed in the building on Dundas Square. The buildings were designated as heritage buildings in 1990.
Address
21 Dundas Square
Time Period
1930-present
Scope Note
The six-storey Hermant Annex and 14-storey eastern tower were designed by Benjamin Brown in 1920 and 1930 respectively. The building is named after Percy Hermant and served as the headquarters for his company, Imperial Optical. The Hermant Building was built at Wilton Square - which was later renamed Dundas Square. Benjamin Brown's office was located in the Hermant Building in the 1940s. The offices of the Canadian Jewish Review were housed in the building on Dundas Square. The buildings were designated as heritage buildings in 1990.
History
Percy Hermant was born in Mogilev, Russia in 1882. In 1897, he immigrated to Canada, arriving in New Brunswick, where he began working as a dry goods peddler. In 1900, he founded the Imperial Optical Company, the first prescription lens business in the Maritimes. This company eventually grew to be the largest company of its kind in the British Commonwealth. In addition to his successful business, he was very involved with philanthropic and community activities within Jewish and non-Jewish circles. He sponsored academic and musical scholarships.
Category
Architecture
Manufacturer
Medical
Source
Landmarks
Accession Number
2008-11-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-11-10
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
3 posters
Date
[ca. 1991]
Scope and Content
This accession consists of three posters for the Allied Jewish Community Services' Combined Jewish Appeal and Yom Kippur campaigns.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Address
197/199 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The Empire Clothing Company building was another fine example of commercial buildings designed by Benjamin Brown. The building was located at 197/199 Spadina Avenue at the corner of Phoebe Street and Spadina Avenue. Brown built the original and a later addition to the building.
Address
197/199 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1923-present
Scope Note
The Empire Clothing Company building was another fine example of commercial buildings designed by Benjamin Brown. The building was located at 197/199 Spadina Avenue at the corner of Phoebe Street and Spadina Avenue. Brown built the original and a later addition to the building.
History
Mr. Abraham M. Schiffer and Mr. William Leibel were the co-owners of Empire Clothing Co. and Cornell Tailored Clothing Ltd. The Empire Clothing Company Building served as the headquarters for both businesses. The Empire Clothing Company manufactured men's clothing and sold it wholesale. Leibel and Schiffer were also close neighbours, living only a few houses apart. William Leibel was a prominent member of the Toronto Jewish community. He was involved in many philanthropic and charitable activities and was active in many Jewish organizations, particularly in the area of Jewish education.
Category
Architecture
Manufacturer
Source
Landmarks
Part Of
William Stern fonds
Toronto Jewish community photographs series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 33; Series 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
William Stern fonds
Toronto Jewish community photographs series
Level
Series
Fonds
33
Series
4
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1930-[ca. 1984]
Physical Description
43 photographs : b&w and col. (15 negatives) ; 28 x 35 or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Bill Stern was very involved in the Toronto Jewish community. In particular, he was active with the United Jewish Welfare Fund, where he served as a divisional director, the Canadian Zionist Federation, as the executive director, the Canadian Society for the Weizmann Institute of Science, the Jewish Home for the Aged, the Jewish Film Festival and the Ontario Jewish Archives. He also assisted many organizations in a consulting capacity, following his leave from communal affairs.
Scope and Content
This series consists of photographs of individuals and organizations associated with the Toronto Jewish community. Bill Stern, along with other members of his family, are featured in many of the photographs, as they were members of the various organizations.
The photographs have been arranged chronologically and described at the item level.
Accession Number
1981-9-4
1985-6-6
1991-5-5
1991-5-6
1994-1-4
2004-5-96
2005-5-9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2017-8-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-8-10
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
3 photographs : b&w ; 13 x 9 cm and smaller
1 DVD
Date
[ca. 1920]-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the history of the Dora Wilensky Salsberg Memorial Fund at Jewish Family and Child. Included are: a Canadian Jewish News feature ("Legacy of Life") on Dora Wilensky; a Dora Wilensky Memorial Fund pamphlet; correspondence from J.B. Salsberg regarding Sharyn’s ongoing role with the Jewish Communal Service Graduate Studies Scholarship Program; correspondence regarding the Fund between Sharyn Salsberg Ezrin and Richard Cummings, Ron Levin, Gordon Wolfe, and Sam Helfenbaum; fund and endowment statements regarding the Dora Wilensky Memorial Fund; and correspondence between Sharyn and the Toronto Jewish Congress Endowment Fund. Also includes: records documenting the J.B. Salsberg Tribute Dinner held at Beth Sholom Synagogue on November 13, 1991; Canadian Jewish News and Toronto Life profiles of J.B. Salsberg; an interview of J.B. Salsberg by Sandy Naiman; J.B. Salsberg's eulogy by Irving Abella; and one DVD of a J.B. Salsberg video tribute. Also includes three photographs of J.B. Salsberg and Dora Wilensky, and four issues of various JF&CS publications.
Administrative History
Dora Wilensky Salsberg was one of Toronto’s earliest professionally trained Jewish social workers and a leader in the Canadian social work field. She was born in Russia on July 28, 1902 to Hyman and Mary Wilensky. She had three younger sisters: Bertha (b. 1903) Jenny (b. 1905), and Fagel (b.1910). In 1907, the family immigrated to Toronto where Hyman worked at a cap factory.
Dora had the highest marks in the province of Ontario upon graduating from high school and graduated as a gold medalist in modern history from McMaster University in Toronto. She initially pursued a career in teaching, but had difficulty securing a job due to discrimination. When her only job offer from Oshawa was given on the condition that she change her last name, Dora decided to become a social worker.
After studying at the New York School for Social Work and working briefly in Chicago, Dora returned to Toronto and took up the position as Executive Director of the Jewish Family Welfare Bureau in 1931. When the JF&CS was formed in 1943 she served as its first Executive Director. Under her leadership, JF&CS gained a reputation as being one of the most advanced and progressive agencies in Toronto. She was among the first to hire a psychiatric social worker and to introduce play therapy as part of treatment; she remained on top of advances being made in the field in other countries and encouraged her staff to regularly engage in professional development activities.
Dora attempted to enter the United States for professional development in the fall of 1948. She was refused entry by the commissioner of immigration and naturalization. Her aim was to attend a postgraduate course in social work at the University of Pennsylvania. In spite of numerous official letters of endorsement, her application for admission was denied.
Dora was also actively involved in various professional organizations. She was a member of the National Board of the Canadian Association of Social Workers, served on the Board of Governors and various committees of the Canadian Welfare Council, and was active on the Social Planning Council (formerly the Welfare Council of Toronto). In addition, she was instrumental in the establishment of the University of Toronto’s post-graduate course in social work. For her service to the field, she earned both the King George V and Coronation medals.
In 1927, Dora married J. B. Salsberg. Although she legally adopted his name, she always used her maiden name professionally. They did not have any children. On March 20, 1959, Dora passed away from cancer at the age of 56.
Subjects
Charities
Charities
Name Access
Salsberg, J. B. (Joseph B.), ca. 1903-1998
Wilensky, Dora, 1902-1959
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-3-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-3-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1.28 m of textual records
Date
1935, 1960-1998, predominant 1980-1998
Scope and Content
The records consist of materials documenting the programs and social services administered by JIAS Toronto, predominantly from the 1960s through the 1990s. The records include reports and essays, case files, statistics reports, staff manuals and other resources, budget documents, minutes of meetings, resources JIAS produced for immigrants and resources from JIAS's education programs. Much of the material from the 1980s and 1990s deals with integration, particularly of Soviet Jews. There are records relating to the Integration Committee, the provision of "direct relief aid" and other services to clients, and research and analytical reports.
The earlier case files from 1935 and 1948-1981 concern reimbursement for immigrants' transportation costs. Later case files contain only one sheet, a case report, which includes personal and immigration information, occupation, remarks, sponsor’s information and an employment history. Some files also have: identification cards from United HIAS Service with sailing information; summary of assistance forms kept by JIAS case workers; and other administrative paperwork.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Name Access
JIAS Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Address
Dundas and Elizabeth Streets
Source
Landmarks

Dr. Max Kates was a Jewish dentist in Toronto. He was married to Lillian Kates, who was the founder of Camp Arowhon, a popular Jewish summer camp in Algonquin Park.
Address
Dundas and Elizabeth Streets
Time Period
ca. 1921-present
Scope Note
Dr. Max Kates was a Jewish dentist in Toronto. He was married to Lillian Kates, who was the founder of Camp Arowhon, a popular Jewish summer camp in Algonquin Park.
History
This building was designed by Benjamin Brown and was commissioned by Dr. Kates to house several stores and offices. It still stands today at the corner of Dundas and Elizabeth Streets in the heart of Toronto’s former St. John’s Ward; the area that first received the thousands of Jewish immigrants fleeing the pogroms in Russia and Eastern Europe.
Category
Architecture
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
Personal series
Community activities sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 4; Series 1-3; File 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
Personal series
Community activities sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
4
Series
1-3
File
3
Material Format
object
Date
26 Mar. 1995
Physical Description
1 plaque : metal ; 28 x 22 cm
Scope and Content
File consists of a plaque honouring Sol Edell for his service to the community.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
Toronto Section series
Service Portfolio sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 38; Series 7-11; File 32
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
Toronto Section series
Service Portfolio sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
38
Series
7-11
File
32
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1966-1987
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
31 photographs : b&w and col. (17 negatives) ; 15 x 10 cm or smaller
Scope and Content
File consists of photographs, newsclippings, letters, a poem, and speeches related to Ada List who was one of four NCJW honorees recognized for her volunteer contributions at a luncheon on March 29, 1984.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 61
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
61
Material Format
multiple media
Date
[ca. 1920]-1994
Physical Description
3 m of textual records (19 v.) and other material
Admin History/Bio
The Schwartz-Reisman Jewish Community Centre, the Prosserman Jewish Community Centre (formerly the Bathurst Jewish Community Centre or BJCC) and the Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre (MNJCC) in Toronto are the current incarnations of what began, in 1919, as the Hebrew Association of Young Men's and Young Women's Clubs, later known as the Young Men's and Young Women's Hebrew Association of Toronto (Y.M.-Y.W.H.A.). The Y.M.-Y.W.H.A., in turn, began as a merger between several other small athletic clubs operating in the city. The original mandate was strictly athletic, but soon broadened to include other areas of interest, in order to provide a sense of Jewish identity and camaraderie through physical, educational, cultural and community based programming. During the 1920s, the 'Y' became known simply as the Young Men’s Hebrew Association (Y.M.H.A.) – the name under which it was incorporated in 1930.
For close to two decades, the ‘Y’ had rented rooms in the Brunswick Avenue and College Street area, including the basement facilities of the Brunswick Avenue Talmud Torah. By the mid-1930s, these facilities were overcrowded and unable to support the growing membership, particularly when the young women’s programming was reintroduced in 1936.
As a result, in 1937, the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. constructed its own athletic building at 15 Brunswick Avenue, next door to the Talmud Torah, to ease the overcrowding. However, the ‘Y’ still had to make use of five scattered buildings to meet its needs, including the Central Y.M.C.A. gym for its basketball teams. The early ‘Y’ was staffed by volunteers who were granted free memberships in exchange for their time and expertise.
On 3 February 1953, a new Jewish Community Centre was dedicated at the corner of Bloor Street and Spadina Avenue. By the end of the 1950s, the ‘Y’ was providing services for all ages, ranging from a nursery school to their Good Age Club for seniors.
As the Jewish community moved northward, so too did the ‘Y’, with the dedication of a new northern branch on 1 May 1961. This new branch, located at Bathurst Street and Sheppard Avenue, was created in order to address the athletic, educational, cultural and community needs of the expanding Jewish community in the north end of the city. Fourteen years later, an improved cultural and physical education wing was added as part of the completion campaign. This included the addition of the Leah Posluns Theatre and the Murray Koffler Centre of the Arts. In 1978, the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. changed its name to the Jewish Community Centre of Toronto, in order to better reflect its broader role in the community. A new Northeast Valley branch was also established in Thornhill in the early 1980s and later closed in the late 1990s.
In 1994, the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto took over the operation of the northern branch, due to financial difficulties. At this point, all three branches became independent of one another and were no longer constituted as the Jewish Community Centre of Toronto. They each had independent boards of directors, while still receiving some of their operating funds from the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto.
Scope and Content
This fonds consists of the records created and accumulated by the Jewish Community Centre of Toronto -- which included the Bloor branch and the northern Bathurst Jewish Community Centre -- and its predecessor, the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. The records include textual records maintained by the office of the executive director, financial reports, architectural plans, Y-Times newsletters, program material, photographs and oral histories.
The records have been arranged into the following series: Executive director, Jewish Community Centre Archives Committee, Publication Committee, Communications Department, Sports Celebrity Dinner, and Combined Building Campaign Committee.
Notes
Includes 2539 photographs, 42 drawings, 13 sound recordings, 4 artifacts and 2 posters.
Name Access
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto
Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre
Subjects
Community centers
Related Material
See photo #2369-2646, 3412, 3519, 3804, 4201, 5004, 6125, accession #1986-7-8, MG2 N1a
Creator
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
2004-6-6
2004-5-13
2004-5-2
1988-11-7
1988-4-9
1984-7-2
1983-12-1
1982-12-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
General community activities series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 4; Series 11; File 21
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
General community activities series
Level
File
Fonds
4
Series
11
File
21
Material Format
textual record
Date
1991-1992
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of an invitation and an issue of the "Shofar" newsletter (Apr. 1992).
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
General community activities series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 4; Series 11
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
General community activities series
Level
Series
Fonds
4
Series
11
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1950-2010
Physical Description
77 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
In addition to his ongoing involvement with Clanton Park, the Canadian Jewish Congress Archives, the Aliyah Support Group, Jones Avenue Cemetery, Shomrai Shabbos and Adas Israel, Sol Edell undertook special projects on behalf of a wide array of Jewish organizations. These include cultural (Toronto Cantorial Scholarship Fund), educational (Netivot Hatorah and Yeshivat Or Chaim Ulpanat Orot), religious (Union of Jewish Orthodox Congregations), social welfare (Association of Jewish Seniors and Co-Ordinated Services to the Jewish Elderly) and Zionist (Canadian Friends of Yeshivat Hakotel and State of Israel Bonds) organizations.
Scope and Content
Series consists of records documenting Sol Edell's involvement with a wide variety of Jewish educational, social and religious organizations and institutions in Canada, the United States, and Israel. Included are meeting minutes, publications, reports, photographs, correspondence, invitations, programmes, financial records, an architectural drawing, and a sound recording. While many of these organizations such as Eitz Chaim, Or Chaim Ulpanat Orot (educational), Mizrachi Organization of Canada, Emunah Women (Zionist) and Beth Jacob V’Anshe Drildz (synagogue) are orthodox, others such as Associated Hebrew Day Schools (educational), State of Israel Bonds (Zionist) and Co-ordinated Services to the Jewish Elderly (social welfare) have no religious affiliation.
Notes
Physical description note: includes 26 photographs, 1 audio cassette, and 1 architectural drawing.
Name Access
Eitz Chaim
Or Chaim Ulpanat Orot
Mizrachi Men’s Organization
Emunah Women
Beth Jacob V'Anshei Drildz (Toronto, Ont.)
Associated Hebrew Day Schools
State of Israel Bonds
Co-ordinated Services to the Jewish Elderly
Camp Moshava
Harbord Collegiate
Netivot Hatorah
Union of Jewish Orthodox Congregations
B'Nei Akiva
Toronto Committee for Bikur Cholim Hospital
Subjects
Charities
Children
Education
Fund raising
Older people
Religion
Zionism
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 67
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
67
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1936-1991, predominant 1938-1976
Physical Description
10 m of textual records
5541 photographs, 25 x 20 cm and smaller, and other media
Admin History/Bio
The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto was incorporated in Ontario in March 1917 to coordinate the fundraising activities of Jewish charitable, philanthropic, and social service agencies in Toronto. In 1918, ten separate agencies were funded by the FJPT. By 1937, fourteen agencies were funded. The Great Depression of the 1930s and the development of several newer Jewish aid, education, and medical care organizations created both increased need for resources and growing competition for ever-more scarce dollars. Within a very few years this funding crisis forced a major review of the organization.
During 1936 a series of special meetings of leading individuals were held to examine the income and expenditures of all Toronto Jewish agencies and also to speculate about the need for a new Toronto Jewish "Community Chest" as the sole fund-raising organization for a federation of all Jewish agencies including the FJPT. In 1938, the new United Jewish Welfare Fund was formally constituted. Added to the FJPT's previous list of Toronto client agencies in 1938 were: the Canadian Jewish Congress, the Hebrew National Association, the Jewish Immigrant Aid Association, the Mizrachi Society, the Toronto Free Loan Association, the Geverkshaften, and Old Folks Home, and the United Palestine Appeal, raising the total number of agencies to 22.
When the State of Israel was established in 1948, the UJWF's annual fundraising campaign was combined with the CJC's United Palestine appeal to form a new, combined campaign named the United Jewish Appeal (UJA). In 1967, the UJA name was legally changed to the United Jewish Appeal of Metropolitan Toronto.
In mid-1976, the organization's public name was changed to the Toronto Jewish Congress. Although initially thought of as a merger between the UJWF and the CJC, the actual result was the expansion of the UJWF responsibilities to include local education and welfare services previously shared with the Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region. The UJWF, however, remained the legal senior entity.
In 1991 the public name was again changed to the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto and in 1999, to UJA Federation of Greater Toronto. By this date, over 30 beneficiary and affiliated agencies, 49 affiliated schools and five Federation departments were fully or partly funded by the UJA Federation.
In June, 2010, the organization altered its legal structure, with the senior legal entity becoming the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of 25 series: Annual Meetings, Annual Reports, Board of Directors, Constitution Committee, Executive Committee, Officers Committee, Budget and Finance Committee, Administration Committee, Social Planning Committee, Committee on Capital Needs and Planning, Central Committee on Scholarships in Aid, Joint Committee of the BJE and UJWF Study on Jewish Education, Nominations Committee, Pension Fund Committee, Coordinating Committee, Special Ad Hoc and Temporary Committees, Annual Campaign, Client Agencies, Joint Committee of the CJC and the UJWF, Committee on Community Organization, Sub-Committee on Construction and Administration of Community Schools, Joint Committee on Fundraising, Personnel Committee, Community Leadership Development Council, and Israel at Fifty Community Celebration.
Over 4500 photographs and a variety of other media are managed within Series 17, Campaign records.
Notes
For exact details about the contents of individual series and sub-series, please review their scope and contents notes.
Name Access
United Jewish Welfare Fund
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto
United Jewish Appeal
Toronto Jewish Congress
Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Subjects
Charities
Fund raising
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
For records of the predecessor of the UJWF, see Fonds 66, the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds.
Further detailed documentation of the proposed merger between the UJWF and the CJC (creation of the TJC) may be found in Fonds 67, Sub-sub-series 5-5-1, Files 171 and 221.
Further documentation on the United Jewish Welfare Fund may be found within Fonds 9, Series 7, records of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society.
For further detailed records of a key community leader's involvement with the UJWF see Accession 1982-8-8, the records of Samuel Godfrey, 1943-1972.
Creator
United Jewish Welfare Fund (1938-)
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
9
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1925-1989
Physical Description
31.8 m of textual records
319 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Immigrant Aid Society of Canada was established in 1920 by the newly-formed Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC). A Toronto branch was established in a storefront office on Spadina Avenue, but the organization was rudimentary. As the enthusiasm that spurred the founding of CJC died out, JIAS soon faltered. Then in 1922 it was taken over and reactivated under the cooperative support of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto, B'nai B'rith, and the Council of Jewish Women. JIAS was legally incorporated on 30 August 1922. It also operated under the moniker of the Emergency Jewish Immigrant Aid Committee, and it changed its name to Jewish Immigrant Aid Services in 1954.
Charged with organizing emergency relief for European Jews in distress, JIAS became the central agency of the Jewish community to facilitate the lawful entry of Jewish immigrants into Canada, and provided them with welfare services, transportation, and assistance with accommodation and employment after their arrival. In addition, JIAS offered consultation services for sponsors of potential immigrants, ran a competitive foreign remittance service, and campaigned to counter the activities of unscrupulous steamboat agents, lawyers, and influence peddlers, or “shtadlanim,” who often victimized immigrants and sponsors alike.
In conjunction with similar efforts by the CJC, JIAS was also actively engaged in negotiating for the increased admission of Jewish immigrants to Canada. In 1923, the federal government instituted a permit-based immigration program and JIAS competed with travel agents and solicitors in the private sector for these limited quota permits. After combating the anti-immigration policies of the Depression era, the outbreak of war in 1939 virtually closed the already limited avenues for immigration.
JIAS Canada was organized into a national office in Montreal and regional offices in Winnipeg (Western Region), Toronto (Central Region), and Halifax (Eastern Region). The Central Region covered Ontario, and established a full-time head office in 1935 at 399 Spadina Avenue in Toronto (hence the Central Region was sometimes called simply the Toronto Office). The office later moved to 265 Spadina Avenue. JIAS Toronto’s board of directors met on a regular basis at different locations in Toronto, including 206 Beverley Street and in the Talmud Torah building at 9 Brunswick Avenue. The first JIAS Toronto board included notable Toronto residents such as Henry Dworkin, Mrs. Draiman, Mr. Kronick, Dr. Brodey and Mrs. Willinsky. The role of the board was to oversee the operations of the Central Region. It rendered decisions on issues relating to finances, procedures and policies, negotiations with the federal Immigration Branch, as well as individual cases that required their attention.
General meetings of the Central Region membership were held annually. The 1943 JIAS constitution states that regional annual meetings were to be held for “receiving and considering reports,” holding nominations and elections for the executive, and discussing JIAS’s program and policies.
In the post-war era, JIAS shifted its focus to renewed efforts on behalf of individual claimants and community support, while the focus for lobbying for a reversal of Canada's immigration policy fell increasingly under the jurisdiction of the CJC. A boom in immigration between 1947 and 1952 saw the arrival of large numbers of Jewish immigrants to all parts of Canada and the Toronto Office of JIAS renewed its efforts to meet the needs of this new influx. Major world events also sparked other waves of immigration from Hungary, Czechoslovakia, North Africa, and Russia, to which JIAS responded in turn. JIAS worked in conjunction with other immigrant aid societies such as HIAS, the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, in the United States, to facilitate immigration to the United States, and later to Israel, where many of the immigrants and refugees coming to Canada had family and ultimately settled.
Custodial History
Custody of these records was transferred to the Ontario Jewish Archives by JIAS in 1983, as preparations were under way for the move to a new facility in North York. Much of the material was in four-cubic-foot boxes and in file cabinets.
The accession was divided into three sections: files which were at the JIAS office and had been retained in their original order; files which had been retrieved from a flood in the basement of 152 Beverley St. and consequently had been thrown into dry boxes without regard to order; files discovered in the furnace rooms at 150 and 152 Beverley St., intact but covered in coal dust. The bulk of the records were stored off-site, with dirty files being isolated from the rest.
The dust-covered materials were cleaned at an off-site location, placed in temporary boxes and transferred to the Archives and restored, as far as was possible, to their original order.
Clips were removed and replaced as appropriate with archivally acceptable ones. All materials were transferred to acid-free folders and boxes.
Scope and Content
Fonds contains the records of the Toronto Office (Central region) of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Canada. The fonds consists primarily of textual records: minutes, correspondence, financial records, reports, immigration files, naturalization case files, social service case files and the records of attempts to trace missing individuals. There are also photographs of special events, speakers and arriving immigrants.
The fonds represents an important resource for the study of Canadian Jewry, especially when taken in conjunction with the JIAS National Office records at the Canadian Jewish Congress National Archives in Montreal, and those of the Western Office at the Library and Archives of Canada. It documents the means by which a particular Canadian ethnic community has dealt with the problems of rescue, settlement and government relations. These records also offer insight into the relationship between the Toronto Office and the other branches of JIAS, and invite comparison with similar agencies in the United States, as well as those of other ethnic groups in Canada.
The material collected includes information about the countries of origin, transportation routes, settlement and employment patterns of Jewish immigrants to Canada in the twentieth century. The documents also touch upon important related issues such as advocacy, sponsorship, admission processes, health and social problems.
These records cover several waves of immigration following the Second World War: Holocaust survivors in the late 1940s, Sephardic (North African) and Hungarian Jews in the 1950s, Russian and Czechoslovakian Jews in the 1960s, and additional Russians in the 1970s.
The records also contain significant information for those researchers looking to conduct genealogical research into Jewish immigrants and their descendents.
The fonds has been arranged with one sous-fonds, which contains the records of the National JIAS office in Montreal. In total there are 17 series. The Toronto office (main fonds) series are: 1. Board of Directors and Executive Committee Minutes; 2. Annual meeting proceedings; 3. Reports; 4. Legal ; 5. Administration; 6. JIAS Committees; 7. External committees; 8. Financial ; 9. Arrivals; 10. Immigration case files; 11. Social service assistance case files; 12. Photographs; 13. Miscellaneous. The National Office sous-fonds is divided into the following series: 1. National executive meeting minutes; 2. National annual meeting proceedings; 3. National annual reports; 4. Publications; and Photographs.
Notes
Physical description note: Physical extent is based on fully processed records. Additional accessions are not included (see Related Material note below).
Associated material note: The CJC National Archive, in Montreal, has additional JIAS records from 1920-1989 including 275 m of textual records and graphic materials (3250 photos): collection number I0037; alpha-numeric designation MA 4. The National Archives of Canada, Manitoba branch, in Winnipeg, has Jewish Historical Society of Western Canada JIAS textual records from 1923-1950 on 18 microfilm reels: Former archival reference number MG28-V114 (no replacement listed). The originals of these records are maintained by the Jewish Historical Society of Western Canada.
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
Other OJA records relating to JIAS may be found in the following accessions: 1979-9-5; 1988-5-2; 1991-10-5; 2006-3-11.
Creator
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto
Accession Number
1983-8-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2017-12-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-12-1
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
8 videocassettes : Betacam SP and Digital Betacam
Date
1998-2006
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 8 videocassettes that belonged to UJA Federation of Greater Toronto's Creative Department. Cassettes include: United Jewish Appeals The Campaign for Fifty (1998), UJA Federation Symposium of Hope (2003), UJA Federation 2004 "What Will Tomorrow Hold?" Canvasser Training (2003), UJA Federation Tomorrow Campaign "End Video" (2004), UJA Federation Tomorrow Campaign "Tomorrow Campaign" (2004), UJA "Israel Emergency Campaign" (2006)
Custodial History
Amit Louis and Amy Krasin of the Creative Department were cleaning out an old desk in the summer of 2017 and found the tapes. Amit suggested bringing the tapes to the archives, which Amy did sometime thereafter.
Administrative History
UJA Federation's Tomorrow Campaign is Canada’s largest non-profit community development project. It is Federation's response to the need for new facilities and services brought about by the growth of Toronto’s Jewish community.
Subjects
Charities
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Places
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-3-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-3-6
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
3 folders
Date
1999-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of correspondence and other material documenting UJA Federation of Greater Toronto and funded agencies including Jewish Immigrant Aid Services (JIAS) and Community Planning and Allocation (CP&A).
Subjects
Charities
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 4; File 66
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
4
File
66
Material Format
textual record
Date
1996
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee meeting agendas, minutes, reports and correspondence series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 1; File 392
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee meeting agendas, minutes, reports and correspondence series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
1
File
392
Material Format
textual record
Date
1993
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Accession Number
2005-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 2; File 1166
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
2
File
1166
Material Format
textual record
Date
1979 - 1981
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Accession Number
2005-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
1991-10-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1991-10-8
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
Date
1974-1991
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material pertaining to the Sephardic community in Toronto including a "Final Report - Integration - North African Jewish Community in Metro Toronto" (1974), two reports by Joseph Kage, a presentation by Leon Oziel (1984), listings of Sephardic congregations and Chevra Kadisha and their officers, and letterheads for organizations and schools. In addition there is a paper titled "A History of the Sephardim in Toronto" written by a student William Myers for a university course in history. The course director was Professor Irving Abella.
Subjects
Sephardim
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1998-2007
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material relating to Barbara Barak's position dealing with Jewish Information Service of Greater Toronto, including two planning resources from the Latner Centre for Jewish Knowledge and Heritage, a UJA project proposal application for software and website development, and a Jewish community resource guide and flyers for Jewish education, childcare programs and community services.
Custodial History
These records were in the possession of Barbara Barak, senior coordinator for JIS.
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-4
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1998-2001
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the Jewish community services directory, created by Jewish Information Service.
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 2; File 101
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
2
File
101
Material Format
textual record
Date
1998
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Accession Number
2005-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 2; File 232
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
2
File
232
Material Format
textual record
Date
1998
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Accession Number
2005-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2012-2-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-2-2
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
37 photographs (jpg) : b&w and col. ; 33 MB
Date
1958-2005
Scope and Content
Accession consists of born-digital images and digital scans of original photographs depicting the 2005 closing ceremonies of the Beth El Synagogue in Cornwall as well as exterior and interior images of the synagogue, the congregants, community events and B'nai Brith members.
Custodial History
The photographs were acquired by the OJA for the Ontario's Small Jewish Communities exhibit, but they were never accessioned until February 2012.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-3-18
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-3-18
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1107 photographs : b&w and col. ; JPG
36 col. contact sheets
1 folder textual records
Date
1906-2002
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 1107 colour and black and white photographs of Jewish life in Windsor, Ontario. The digital photographs on four discs are scanned from original photographs found on 36 colour contact sheets. There is also a finding aid detailing the Photo #, Category, Date, and Caption/Description.
Custodial History
Likely originated from Rabbi Plaut and somehow ended up at Windsor Jewish Community Centre
Administrative History
Jonathan Plaut was an important rabbi in Windsor, Ontario who wrote a history of Windsor's Jewish community.
Places
Windsor (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Jewish community involvement series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 92; Series 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Joseph Baruch Salsberg fonds
Jewish community involvement series
Level
Series
Fonds
92
Series
4
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Date
1914-1993
Physical Description
11 cm of textual records (1 v.) and other material
Scope and Content
Series consists of records documenting J.B. Salsberg's involvement with various Jewish organizations, including: the I.L. Peretz School, the Canadian Jewish Congress, UJA Federation, the New Fraternal Jewish Association, the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care and the Canadian Zionist Federation. Included are medallions, pins, a coin, a poster, certificates, photographs, meeting minutes, a test, booklets, event programmes, a transcript, bulletins, notes, newspaper clippings, articles, reports, newsletters, a brochure, and a flyer.
Notes
Physical description note: includes 17 photographs, 4 pins, 4 medallions, 1 coin, 1 poster, and 1 certificate.
Related Material
For other records documenting the CJC's Committee for Soviet Jewry see also fonds 17, series 3.
For other NFJA records see MG 2B-1P and MG9 ("Fraternally Yours" publications).
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dr. Alexander Brown fonds
Jewish communal activities series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 95; Series 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dr. Alexander Brown fonds
Jewish communal activities series
Level
Series
Fonds
95
Series
4
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1934-1982, predominant 1958-1982
Physical Description
7 cm of textual records
37 photographs
Scope and Content
Series consists of textual records documenting Dr. Alexander Brown's various Jewish communal activities. Included are meeting minutes, speeches, publications, correspondence, invitations, flyers, photographs, biographies, newspaper clippings, brochures, a list, and a programme.
Notes
Photographers and photography studios are identified on the photographs.
Physical Condition
A number of the photographs are starting to curl along the edges and have become stiff due to poor storage conditions.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
1999-2-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1999-2-2
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
2 folders of textual records
4 photographs : col. (2 negatives) ; 13 x 18 cm
Date
1976-1978
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material pertaining to the Jewish community of Sarnia and Ahavas Isaac Synagogue. Included is a 25th anniversary commemorative book, newsletters, bulletins, flyers, programs for religious events, information for synagogue visitors, correspondence, and press clippings documenting shule and community events. There are 2 photos of children at an Israel dance festival (Rikudiyah) in a gymnasium.
Administrative History
The Sarnia Jewish community worshiped at the old Davis Street Synagogue which was established in 1922. In 1950 ground was broken and the cornerstone laid for the Ahavas Isaac Synagogue and Community Centre. The new building opened in 1951.
Alvin Fox was president of the congregation in the early 1980s and his wife Valerie was active in the Sisterhood.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-8-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-8-4
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
4 photographs : b&w (jpg)
4 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Date
[194-]-2005
Scope and Content
This accession consists of textual records and photographs documenting the Belleville Jewish community and the Sons of Jacob Synagogue. The textual records include a dedication book from the Synagogue as well as documents related to the Synagogue's reunion weekend in 2005. The photographs depict the Judaeans basketball team, a Young Judaea conference, the Synagogue's dedication ceremonies, as well as a children's Purim play.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-12-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-12-2
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
17 photographs : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Date
1924-1996
Scope and Content
This accession consists of records documenting the Jewish community of Cornwall. The records include newsclippings; B'nai Birth meeting minutes, dues ledger book and membership pins; Hadassah meeting minutes; photographs; Beth El Synagogue correspondence, memorial book, president speeches, congregational meeting minutes, annual general meeting minutes and financial statements; and a cemetery plan and ledger book.
Custodial History
The records were in the custody of Mark Goldhamer, former president of the Beth El Synagogue and were originally lent to the Archives for research purposes for the Small Jewish Communities project. Upon discussion with the director of the Archives, Mark decided to donate the records to the OJA and thus they were transferred via Sharon Gubbay Helfer, oral historian and researcher/writer on the small Jewish Communities project.
Subjects
Communities
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 4; File 154
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
4
File
154
Material Format
textual record
Date
1952-1999
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 4; File 155
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
4
File
155
Material Format
textual record
Date
1952-1999
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 4; File 174
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
4
File
174
Material Format
textual record
Date
1975-1997
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
50 records – page 1 of 1.

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