Search Results

New Search Photo Search Audiovisual Search
50 records – page 1 of 1.
Accession Number
2014-10-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
10 cm textual records
ca. 70 photographs: b&w and col. ; 10 cm x 15 cm or smaller
1 scrapbook
Date
1963-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the activities of "Council '63", a branch of the Toronto Section of the National Council of Jewish Women of Canada (NCJWC). Types of records include a photograph album, a scrapbook, correspondence, souvenirs, meeting minutes, membership lists, program materials and budgets.
Administrative History
The "Council '63" Branch of the Toronto Section of the National Council of Jewish Women of Canada (NCJWC) was formed in 1963. Currently consisting of 20 members, the group was initially spearheaded by Barbara Norwich (d. 2011), and they met regularly in homes in the Cedarvale area. The group primarily did volunteer work, although it later evolved into a study group and book club.
Subjects
Women
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
National Council of Jewish Women (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
International Council of Jewish Women series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 38; Series 6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
International Council of Jewish Women series
Level
Series
Fonds
38
Series
6
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1940-1996
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
11 photographs
Admin History/Bio
The International Council of Jewish Women is made up of Jewish women's organizations from across the world. Founded in 1912 and revived in 1949, the ICJW's goals were to promote equal rights, women's rights, understanding, and peace throughout the world. It sought to spread knowledge about and strengthen Jewish cultural traditions, to help build Israel, and to encourage women to participate in community services. It cooperated actively as a non-governmental organization with UNESCO, and was an accredited observer at the United Nations. The National Council of Jewish Women has been a vital member of the ICJW, with a number of its members having served on the executive and as vice-presidents and presidents of the ICJW.
In a first attempt to form an international council of Jewish women, representatives from the National Council of Jewish Women in the United States, along with similar organizations in Great Britain and Germany, met in Rome in 1912. Their efforts were aborted with the onset of World War I, but in the 1920s, Jewish women's groups reconvened and ended up holding three meetings. After a long hiatus due to the devastation of World War II and the Holocaust, the International Council of Jewish Women was officially re-born in 1949 in Paris. The ICJW has held conventions every three years since 1954, and in countries around the world, including in Toronto in 1972, and in Vancouver in 1987.
The ICJW was organized in a committee system which communicated through a network of newsletters, mailings, and triennial meetings. Committees have included By-Laws, Community Services, Herczeg Israel Seminar, Newsletter, North American Committee, Public Relations, Resolutions, Soviet Jewry, Status of Women, and United Nations. The ICJW also held regional meetings, seminars such as the Rosa and Esteban Herczeg seminars in Jerusalem, and field trips.
Canadian presidents of the ICJW have included Antonia S. Robinson (1957-1960), and Helen Marr (1990-1993). While serving as president, Tony Robinson represented Jewish women of Canada at the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II.
Helen Marr served as president of National Council of Jewish Women of Canada, Toronto Section from 1973 to 1976, and as president of the NCJWC from 1981 to 1985. She married Gerald Marr, and has three children. Helen served as Canada's Vice-President to the ICJW from 1986-1989, and chaired the ICJW's triennial convention in Vancouver in 1987. She also held leadership positions with the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, Ben Gurion University, Canadian Jewish Congress, and the Skylight Theatre.
Scope and Content
Series contains records documenting the National Council of Jewish Women of Canada's involvement in the International Council of Jewish Women. It includes pamphlets and publicity material, newsletters, the 75th anniversary tribute book, by-laws and resolutions, material from conventions and other activities, correspondence, and photographs.
A portion of the records were generated during Helen Marr's presidency of the ICJW. These records include by-laws and guidelines, committee files, and mailings.
Notes
The International Council of Jewish Women was variously called the World Congress of Jewish Women, the World Conference of Jewish Women, and the World Organization of Jewish Women between 1912 and 1929.
Name Access
Helen Marr
World Congress of Jewish Women
World Conference of Jewish Women
World Organization of Jewish Women
Subjects
Human rights
Women
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Affiliated organizations sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 3-4; File 19
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Affiliated organizations sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
3-4
File
19
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1973-1987
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
6 photographs : col. ; 11 x 15 cm
Scope and Content
File contains six unidentified colour photographs of participants in an event, newsletters, facsimiles and originals of letters sent to Parliament and meeting reports, notices and minutes of the World Jewry Committee. Case files are attached to several of the letters. The file also contains a petition, a Passover program, with guest speaker Jim Peterson M.P., and an event poster. Among the members of the organization identified in the documents are Helen Marr, Jeanette Goldman and Stella Rozan.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
National history research and subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 38; Series 5; File 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
National history research and subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
38
Series
5
File
2
Material Format
textual record
Date
1967-1993
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of articles giving a history of the NCJWC, a fact sheet about what they have accomplished over the last 85 years, and articles and documents about services and programs they offer.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Protest activities sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 3-5; File 103
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Protest activities sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
3-5
File
103
Material Format
textual record
Date
1980-1982
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File contains correspondence, notices and newspaper clippings concerning the activities of the council in relation to Soviet Jewry. The primary correspondent is the Chairman of the committee, Jeanette Goldman.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2009-1-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-1-2
Material Format
textual record
moving images
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
2 videocassettes (each 44 min, 39 sec.)
Date
1969, 1997
Scope and Content
This accession consists of a 1969 letter from Senator A[rthur] W. Roebuck, responding to a thank-you letter sent by Mrs. Sydney Cooper and Mrs. Minden, co-chairs of Crown Gifts division, and Mrs. Allen A. Small, chair of the Women's Division of UJA. The letter refers to the recent visit of a group of women who visited the Parliament buildings in Ottawa and were received by Senator Roebuck. The other items in the accession are a video and guidebook set entitled 'Untying the Bonds... Jewish Divorce: a GET Education Video & Guidebook, Fall 1997."
Custodial History
The records were in the office of Frances Goldstein, Associate Director for Top Gifts at UJA's Centre for Philanthropy, before being transferred to the OJA. Goldstein was formerly the head of Women's Campaign.
Administrative History
The Canadian Coalition of Jewish Women for the GET was composed of all the major Jewish women's organizations, which joined forces in the late 1980s to have the federal Divorce Act amended. The Jewish Women's Federation was one of these organizations; the others were Jewish Women International of Canada, Emunah Women of Canada, Hadassah-WIZO Organization of Canada, Na’amat Canada, Canadian ORT, Women’s Federation CJA, National Council of Jewish Women of Canada, Status of Women Committee of Canadian Jewish Congress and Women’s League of Conservative Judaism. In 1990, as part of a lobbying group that included B'nai Brith, Canadian Jewish Congress, and religious groups of all faiths, the Coalition succeeded in having a protective clause added to the Divorce Act, ensuring that no spouse should retain barriers to the religious remarriage of their ex-spouse in a divorce in Canada. The Coalition went on after its successful legislative reform campaign to produce an educational video on Jewish divorce and continue with its activism and public awareness building.
Subjects
Women
Get (Jewish law)
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
International Council of Jewish Women series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 38; Series 6; File 5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
International Council of Jewish Women series
Level
File
Fonds
38
Series
6
File
5
Material Format
textual record
Date
1989-1996
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of seven copies of "The Newsletter", three published by ICJW France and four by ICJW Canada. The newsletters provide information about council activities and conferences, both local and international, and news of interest to council members.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
International Council of Jewish Women series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 38; Series 6; File 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
International Council of Jewish Women series
Level
File
Fonds
38
Series
6
File
2
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[195-?]-1995
Physical Description
9 photographs : b&w, sepia and col. ; 20 x 25 cm or smaller
Scope and Content
File consists of two photocopies of photographs taken at the opening session of the ICJW in London, England on May 23, 1954; a photograph taken at the 11th Regional Lation American Congress; a scrapbook page of four photographs celebrating Jewish culture; a photograph of 8 pictures of activities in council homes in Paris and Athens and a portrait of a group of council members.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
International Council of Jewish Women series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 38; Series 6; File 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
International Council of Jewish Women series
Level
File
Fonds
38
Series
6
File
3
Material Format
textual record
Date
[ca. 1958]-1995
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of six ICJW pamphlets.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 4; File 224
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
4
File
224
Material Format
textual record
Date
1993-1994
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 4; File 225
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
4
File
225
Material Format
textual record
Date
1994-1995
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
National Executive Council series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 38; Series 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
National Executive Council series
Level
Series
Fonds
38
Series
2
Material Format
textual record
Date
1933-1988
Physical Description
8 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
The National Executive Council was the main governing body of the National Council of Jewish Women of Canada.
Scope and Content
Series is composed of two sub-series: National Presidents and National Administration.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2018-7-21
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-21
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
multiple media
Physical Description
113 cm of textual and other records
1 scrapbook
Date
1938-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Act to End Violence Against Women organization. Included are: meeting minutes of the executive board; a ledger containing executive board waivers of notice; meeting minutes and resolutions from the yearly conventions; photographs of Act to End Violence Against Women members; correspondence with other organizations; correspondence, research material, public reactions, and ephemera from various campaigns; a commemorative booklet for a B'nai Brith cantorial concert; a scrapbook on the formation of the B'nai Brith Women Claire Morry Chapter; constitutions, constitutional amendments, reports, budgets, resolutions and other records of Act to End Violence Against Women; member lists and honour roll of past chapters; material and correspondence with B'nai Brith Washington; UJA material concerning assimilation and intermarriage and 2001 Jewish census data results.
Administrative History
The first Canadian chapter of B'nai Brith Women International was formed in Windsor, Ontario in 1923. Other chapters were soon formed throughout Eastern Canada and additional chapters were established in Winnipeg and British Columbia after 1949. The organization was initially administered by the American B'nai Brith Women. In 1976, it finally became autonomous (although still affiliated with the American agency) and changed its name to B'nai Brith Women of Eastern Canada. In 1981, its name was changed again to B'nai Brith Women of Canada. In 1995, the organization became known as Jewish Women International of Canada (JWIC). In November 2011, the organization underwent a final name change to Act to End Violence Against Women.
JWIC is committed to social change, with a particular focus on improving the lives of women and their families. In the 1980s, the agency initiated programs to counter domestic violence and began operating safe housing for Jewish women and children known as ASTEH (Alternative Safe Temporary Emergency Housing). JWIC also runs the JWI Residential Treatment Centre for emotionally disturbed youth.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: Material in English, Russian and French.
Subjects
Charities
Family violence
Women
Name Access
Act to End Violence Against Women
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-14
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-14
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1.8 m of textual records and graphic material
Date
1989-2000
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records created by UJA Federation's Women's Campaign and Advocacy. The records consist of general subject files that document the breadth of work of the WC&A, including the operation of its executive board and committees, fundraising campaigns and the various giving levels, missions, volunteer management, outreach efforts, programming, as well as the WC&A's relationship with the Jewish Women's Federation.
Custodial History
These records appear to have originated with Frances Goldstein.
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Subjects
Philanthropy and fundraising
Women
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Jewish Women's Federation (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Sous-fonds
ID
Fonds 9-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Sous-fonds
Fonds
9-1
Material Format
textual record
Date
1926-1982
Physical Description
51 cm of textual records
14 photographs : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Immigrant Aid Society of Canada was organized into a national office in Montreal and regional offices in Winnipeg (Western Region), Toronto (Central Region) and Halifax (Eastern Region). The national office was responsible for directing and managing all the affairs of the organization, including defining national and international policy; administration of regional offices; national budget; fundraising; external relations with other organizations, such as the United Jewish Relief Agencies (UJRA) and Jewish Family & Child Services (JF&CS); and publicity. It also organized the annual meeting, special events and conventions.
Membership in JIAS was open to individuals, organizations or companies who paid an annual fee. General meetings of the membership were held at least once every two years, where reports were presented and considered, nominations and elections held for national officers and the national executive committee, policies, programs and problems discussed, and decisions taken.
The National Executive Committee of JIAS was composed of the following members: national president; three vice-presidents (the presidents of the Western, Central and Eastern regions), with the addition in the 1950s of a vice-president at large; three regional treasurers, eventually reduced to one national treasurer; secretary; and twelve members comprising four representatives from each region. In 1929 the ‘executive secretary’ position was renamed ‘executive director.’ According to the 1943 constitution, the executive was required to hold meetings at least three times a year, in alternate cities. In 1954 this was amended to twice a year.
During the early stages of JIAS's operations, it had to face the difficulty of being overstretched financially, as it sought to respond to and to change the often oppressive living conditions of new immigrants and the situation of those held in federal detention centres. The organization’s principled approach to immigrant welfare won JIAS much of its early success, as it became the preferred contact for government officials who had formerly dealt with numerous independent agencies, many of which had profited from the exploitation of desperate immigrants. This situation also profited the government, however, as the responsibility for establishing the priority of applications reverted increasingly to JIAS as it had to limit its appeals by the quotas imposed by the federal government.
JIAS was one of the founding organizations responsible for the establishment of the Canadian Council for Refugees (CCR) in 1978, which has since operated as a non-profit umbrella organization to coordinate the efforts of immigrant and refugee advocacy groups. JIAS continues to operate offices across Canada in Calgary, Edmonton, Halifax, Hamilton, London, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Vancouver, Windsor and Winnipeg. The JIAS National Office moved from Montreal to Toronto in 1989, with the appointment of Susan Davis to National Director, and is now located at 4580 Dufferin St., Suite 306, Toronto, Ontario.
Scope and Content
Sous-fonds consists of National Office records retained by the Toronto JIAS office as reference copies. Records include meeting minutes, speeches and reports from annual meetings, and the published annual reports produced from the annual meetings. The sous-fonds covers the years 1926 to 1982 and is divided into the following series: 1. National Executive meeting minutes; 2. National annual meeting proceedings; 3. National annual reports; 4. Publications; and 5. Photographs.
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Canada (creator)
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Personal series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 62; Series 1; File 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ben Kayfetz fonds
Personal series
Level
File
Fonds
62
Series
1
File
4
Material Format
textual record
Date
1985
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of the Council of National Ethnocultural Organizations of Canada Service Award received by Ben Kayfetz and a brochure and article about the event.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 2; File 362
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
2
File
362
Material Format
textual record
Date
1994
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Accession Number
2005-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
National biennial conventions and annual meetings series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 38; Series 1; File 28
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
National biennial conventions and annual meetings series
Level
File
Fonds
38
Series
1
File
28
Material Format
textual record
Date
1986
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of various reports of the National Executive Council meeting, November 16-18, 1986.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
National history research and subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 38; Series 5; File 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
National history research and subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
38
Series
5
File
4
Material Format
textual record
Date
[1989?]-1997
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of lists of 20 national presidents and past presidents of different sections of NCJWC and photocopies of a few of them.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 4; File 353
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
4
File
353
Material Format
textual record
Date
1983-1993
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 4; File 354
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
4
File
354
Material Format
textual record
Date
1992-1998
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Morris Norman collection
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 22; Item 46
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Morris Norman collection
Level
Item
Fonds
22
Item
46
Material Format
textual record
Date
1987
Physical Description
1 item
Name Access
Congregation Shaarei Tzedec (Toronto, Ont.)
Subjects
High Holidays
Synagogues
Women
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 48
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
48
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1936-2001
Physical Description
21.5 m of textual records
ca. 180 photographs : col. and b&w (ca. 165 col. negatives) ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Established in 1949 as the Bureau of Jewish Education, the Board of Jewish Education (BJE) is the central Jewish agency in Toronto whose mandate is to preserve, enrich, and promote Jewish education in the Greater Toronto area. Its primary tasks are to coordinate and provide leadership in teacher training and professional development, curriculum development, school administration, and inter-school activities, and also to allocate funds to affiliated Jewish schools raised through the annual UJA Federation fundraising campaign.
The BJE was established following the recommendations of a 1948 study of Jewish education in Toronto undertaken by Dr. Uriah Z. Engelman of the American Association for Jewish Education, and sponsored by the United Jewish Welfare Fund (UJWF; now, the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto) and the Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC), Central Region. In its constitution, the bureau was described as having the dual characteristics of being an autonomous agency of the UJWF and also as acting for the UJWF in the field of Jewish education. The bureau was governed by a board of governors with representatives from affiliated schools, the UJWF, CJC Central Region, and from the community at large. The inaugural meeting of the board took place on 20 March 1950.
The organizational structure of the Bureau of Jewish Education mirrored that of the UJWF, with a board of directors and executive committee, standing comittees, and a professional staff. Samuel Posluns was the first president of the BJE and Dr. Joseph Diamond was its first executive director, serving in this position for 18 years. In the 1950s, the staff consisted of the executive director, an administrative assistant, and a school consultant. Over time, the staff was expanded to meet the increased demand for BJE services as the number of affiliated schools grew. For example, the position of director of school finances was created in 1976 to oversee school budgets, monitor tuition fees and teacher salary profiles, and perform other duties relating to financial management.
The BJE's offices were located with those of the United Jewish Welfare Fund, first on Spadina Avenue and then on Beverley Street, until the 1960s, when the board moved to offices in the Jewish Public Library on Glen Park Avenue. The board remained there until 1983, when the BJE moved into the newly built Lipa Green Building, on Bathurst Street, along with the other departments of the Toronto Jewish Congress, as the UJWF was renamed in 1976.
During the 1950s and early 1960s, the BJE sponsored adult education programs in Toronto through the Institute for Jewish Studies, in collaboration with the Jewish Community Centre (JCC) and CJC. The BJE also provided assistance and advice to the CJC in support of Jewish education in the smaller Jewish communities in Ontario. The BJE's role in adult education diminished significantly after its reorganization in 1968, but this again became a responsibility for the BJE in the late 1990s.
The BJE has gone through several periods of reorganization since it was founded: in 1968, when the bureau became the Board of Jewish Education and its board was reduced in size significantly; in the late 1970s, with the implementation of recommendations of the 1975 UJWF Study Committee on Jewish Education; in the early 1990s, following the development of a strategic plan for the BJE; and in the late 1990s, following the recommendations of the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto Commission on Jewish Education (1996). The 1968 reorganization was the most significant of these, with the BJE Board of Directors reduced from over 80 members to just 20 members approved by the UJWF, and the number of standing committees was reduced to two. Stephen Berger was appointed as first chairman of the Board of Jewish Education in 1968, and in 1969, Rabbi Irwin E. Witty became the second executive director of the BJE. Later reorganizations typically involved alterations to the number and responsibilities of BJE committees.
Although its primary function is to support existing educational institutions, the BJE has also participated in establishing several new instititions in Toronto. In 1953, to meet the need for qualified teachers in affiliated schools, the BJE and CJC Central Region founded a Jewish teachers' seminary (Midrasha L'Morim) in Toronto, which was jointly funded by the BJE and CJC for many years. In 1960, the BJE and UJWF sponsored the establishment of a non-denominational Jewish high school, the Community Hebrew Academy of Toronto (CHAT), with the BJE Executive Director as its director. In 1978, the Orah School for Jewish Children from the Soviet Union was established by the BJE, to meet the special needs of the large numbers of recent immigrants from the Soviet Union.
At its founding, the BJE served a total of 21 day and supplementary schools. When it ceased functioning in 2012, the BJE served more than 70 day and supplementary schools in the Greater Toronto area, with the position of chair held by Baila Lubek and the position of executive director held by Dr. Seymour Epstein. The Board was replaced by the Mercaz and later, the Centre for Jewish Education.
Custodial History
The BJE records in accession 1995-8-2 were in the possession of Harvey Raben, formerly a school consultant with the BJE, for several years prior to his donation in 1995, while Raben worked on his Doctor of Education thesis on the history of the BJE.
Scope and Content
The fonds documents the interactions of the BJE with affiliated schools, the UJWF and its successors -- the Toronto Jewish Congress (TJC), Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto (JFGT) and UJA Federation of Greater Toronto -- and the community in its work of facilitating and financing Jewish education in Toronto. The bulk of the records consist of the files of the executive director, associate director and director of school finances, and minutes of the BJE Board of Directors and its committees. As well as meeting minutes, these records include memoranda, correspondence, committee reports, budget and financial statements, and a small number of photographs of individuals and of BJE events.
The fonds is arranged into eighteen series defined by the BJE's organizational units, projects and programs, institutions established by the BJE or its officers, and by record form. These series are as follows: Board of directors and executive committee, Executive director, Director of school finances, Subject files, School files, Chronological correspondence and memoranda, Newsletters and other publications, Midrasha L'Morim, Bible contests, Canada-Israel Secondary School Program, Community Hebrew Academy of Toronto, Orah School for Russian Jewish Children, Dr. Abraham Shore She'arim Hebrew Day School, Toronto Jewish Media Centre, Meyer W. Gasner Memorial Scholarship Fund, Principals councils, Association of Jewish Day School Administrators, and Parents Council of Hebrew Day Schools
Name Access
Board of Jewish Education
Subjects
Education
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
The records of the Educational and Cultural Committee in the Canadian Jewish Congress Central Region fonds document the CJC's involvement in the establishment of the BJE and the operation and funding of the Midrasha L'Morim. The UJA Federation of Greater Toronto fonds, accessions 2002-10-54, 2004-6-4 and 2004-6-9 contain records on the establishment of the Bureau of Jewish Education, the appointment of UJWF representatives to its board, the reorganization of the bureau as the Board of Jewish Education in 1968, the various studies conducted of the BJE, and the annual review and approval of allotments for Jewish education in Toronto by UJA Federation and its predecessors. Accession 2004-6-4 also contains records on the funding of Jewish education in Toronto by the UJWF in the late 1930s and the 1940s, prior to the establishment of the BJE.
Arrangement
Files at the BJE were typically organized alphabetically by subject with no clear division by function or program. While some files were kept in a central filing system maintained by an administrative assistant and shared by all professional staff, staff members also kept their own series of alphabetical subject files. Since staff responsibilities for programs and support of board committees shifted over time, records relating to these programs and activities became dispersed across several sets of files. The archivist has extracted files relating to programs, committees, and areas of activity from these various sets of subject files and defined series according to these activities, programs and functions. The remaining alphabetical subject files have been integrated into one subject file series. File titles have been edited to bring together records relating to similar topics, events and activities within this series.
The other two common filing methods employed at the BJE were to store correspondence, memoranda and committee minutes chronologically (often in 3-ring binders), and in series of "School files" -- files organized alphabetically by school name, containing correspondence and other records relating to the school. The school files have been brought together into one school file series. The chronological series have been left in their original order.
Creator
Board of Jewish Education (1949-2007)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dora Till fonds
United Jewish Welfare Fund series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 52; Series 6; File 5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dora Till fonds
United Jewish Welfare Fund series
Level
File
Fonds
52
Series
6
File
5
Material Format
textual record
Date
1959, 1982
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 4; File 84
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
4
File
84
Material Format
textual record
Date
1983-1985
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 4; File 85
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
4
File
85
Material Format
textual record
Date
1984-1985
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 4; File 86
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
4
File
86
Material Format
textual record
Date
1986
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 4; File 87
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
4
File
87
Material Format
textual record
Date
1986
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 4; File 88
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
4
File
88
Material Format
textual record
Date
1987
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 4; File 89
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
4
File
89
Material Format
textual record
Date
1989-1994
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 4; File 90
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
4
File
90
Material Format
textual record
Date
1956-1995
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Executive director series
Subject files sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 61; Series 1-1; File 75
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Executive director series
Subject files sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
61
Series
1-1
File
75
Material Format
textual record
Date
1957-1981
Physical Description
2 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Camp Council was formed in 1945 by five different groups running summer camps for Jewish youth: B’nai Brith, the National Council of Jewish Women, the Mothers’ and Babes’ Summer Rest Home Association, the United Jewish Welfare Fund of Toronto and the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A.
The United Jewish Welfare Fund eventually assumed responsibility for all camp property, including Camp Northland in Haliburton, and programming for all camps was organized as a unified service. The Jewish Camp Council Board of Directors included representatives from all five organizations, while the executive director of the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. acted as executive director of the Jewish Camp Council. Initially, the head office was located at Camp B'nai Brith, near Orillia, and then moved into the new Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. building at Spadina and Bloor in 1953.
Scope and Content
This file contains textual records relating to the operation of the Jewish Camp Council and the camps it oversaw. Records include reports, executive and community correspondence, financial records, camp pamphlets and program itineraries.
Accession Number
2004-5-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
General community activities series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 4; Series 11; File 17
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
General community activities series
Level
File
Fonds
4
Series
11
File
17
Material Format
textual record
Date
1982-1988
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of reports, correspondence, invitations, general assembly programs, and a Smolar Award book for 1988.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Executive Committee series
Executive Director sub-series
Executive Director's Correspondence sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
67
Series
5-5-1
File
298
Material Format
textual record
Date
20 Jan. 1980-18 Sept. 1980
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of reports.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Ontario Jewish Archives sous-fonds
Level
Sous-fonds
ID
Fonds 67-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Ontario Jewish Archives sous-fonds
Level
Sous-fonds
Fonds
67-1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Date
1971-2008
Physical Description
2.1 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
The Ontario Jewish Archives (OJA) was established in 1973 and remains in operation today. The OJA’s mandate is to acquire, preserve, and make available records documenting Ontario’s Jewish community. The Archives became a legal corporation on 24 February 1977 with authorization from the Federal Corporations Act and the Provincial Letters Patent.
The Toronto Jewish Historical Society (TJHS) established an Archives Committee in 1971, to preserve the records of Toronto’s Jewish community. This prompted the Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC) Central Region to work with the TJHS to establish an organization that would preserve records of Jewish communities across Ontario. At a CJC Central Region Officers’ meeting in 1973, TJHS president Victor Sefton proposed that the Historical Society’s Archives Committee become an official arm of the CJC. After approving the proposal, the CJC Central Region allocated a budget for operation of the Archives, and the two Committees merged, forming one archival organization that operated under the umbrella of the CJC Central Region.
After the Toronto Jewish Congress (TJC) formed in 1976, the Archives became accountable to the TJC but continued to report to the CJC Central Region. In 1992, the TJC and CJC transferred responsibility for the Archives to the United Jewish Appeal (UJA) Federation, and the Archives remains part of that organization today.
The OJA’s administrative structure includes a Board of Directors, the director of the archives, archivists, an assistant archivist, contract employees, and volunteers. The Board of Directors consists of six to twelve members, each approved by UJA Federation and current Board members. Meetings are held a minimum four times per year and are presided by a Chair or the Vice Chair in the Chair’s absence. The Archives Director manages daily operation of the Archives. From 1973 to around 2000, Stephen Speisman acted as Director of the Archives. Ellen Scheinberg served as Archives Director from October 2002 to January 2011. Dara Solomon began as the OJA's Director in May 2012.
Since 1973, the Archives has undergone unofficial and official name changes. When first established in 1973, the Archives was called the “Canadian Jewish Congress Central Region Archives.” After the Archives became accountable to the TJC, OJA letterheads and publicity material occasionally bore the name “Toronto Jewish Congress / Canadian Jewish Congress Central Region Archives.” When the Archives became a legal corporation in 1977, the corporation was named the “Ontario Jewish Archives Foundation” but the Archives’ public name remained unchanged. In 1992, the Archives’ public name officially became the “Ontario Jewish Archives.”
Scope and Content
This sous-fonds documents the formation, administration, and operation of the OJA. Records relating to the establishment of the Archives date from 1971-1973, while those relating to administration and operation date from 1973-2008.
This sous-fonds consists of Archives Committee meeting minutes, memoranda, policies, communications with parent organizations (mainly TJC), financial records, correspondence, records documenting the development of the OJA website, and a small amount of acquisition files. Records in the sous-fonds relate to Archives programs and projects, including tours, exhibits, presentations, workshops, and services. Activities of employee and volunteer work are also documented. Also present are budgets and posters from the Oskar Asher Schmidt Museum, which the Archives operated.
Notes
Access restriction note: The financial records, personnel and competition files and grant files are restricted to the public.
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
Additional records related to this sous-fonds can be found in the Sol Edell fonds, Victor Sefton fonds, accession 2006-7/7 and Cyrel Troster's records.
Arrangement
Correspondence was originally organized in chronological order and remains in the original order. Other records have been arranged according to function or activity.
Creator
Ontario Jewish Archives (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
This sous-fonds is comprised of accessions 2005-8/2, 2004-5/99 and 2004-6/5 along with MG8J and materials from the Sol Edell fonds.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 61
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
61
Material Format
multiple media
Date
[ca. 1920]-1994
Physical Description
3 m of textual records (19 v.) and other material
Admin History/Bio
The Schwartz-Reisman Jewish Community Centre, the Prosserman Jewish Community Centre (formerly the Bathurst Jewish Community Centre or BJCC) and the Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre (MNJCC) in Toronto are the current incarnations of what began, in 1919, as the Hebrew Association of Young Men's and Young Women's Clubs, later known as the Young Men's and Young Women's Hebrew Association of Toronto (Y.M.-Y.W.H.A.). The Y.M.-Y.W.H.A., in turn, began as a merger between several other small athletic clubs operating in the city. The original mandate was strictly athletic, but soon broadened to include other areas of interest, in order to provide a sense of Jewish identity and camaraderie through physical, educational, cultural and community based programming. During the 1920s, the 'Y' became known simply as the Young Men’s Hebrew Association (Y.M.H.A.) – the name under which it was incorporated in 1930.
For close to two decades, the ‘Y’ had rented rooms in the Brunswick Avenue and College Street area, including the basement facilities of the Brunswick Avenue Talmud Torah. By the mid-1930s, these facilities were overcrowded and unable to support the growing membership, particularly when the young women’s programming was reintroduced in 1936.
As a result, in 1937, the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. constructed its own athletic building at 15 Brunswick Avenue, next door to the Talmud Torah, to ease the overcrowding. However, the ‘Y’ still had to make use of five scattered buildings to meet its needs, including the Central Y.M.C.A. gym for its basketball teams. The early ‘Y’ was staffed by volunteers who were granted free memberships in exchange for their time and expertise.
On 3 February 1953, a new Jewish Community Centre was dedicated at the corner of Bloor Street and Spadina Avenue. By the end of the 1950s, the ‘Y’ was providing services for all ages, ranging from a nursery school to their Good Age Club for seniors.
As the Jewish community moved northward, so too did the ‘Y’, with the dedication of a new northern branch on 1 May 1961. This new branch, located at Bathurst Street and Sheppard Avenue, was created in order to address the athletic, educational, cultural and community needs of the expanding Jewish community in the north end of the city. Fourteen years later, an improved cultural and physical education wing was added as part of the completion campaign. This included the addition of the Leah Posluns Theatre and the Murray Koffler Centre of the Arts. In 1978, the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. changed its name to the Jewish Community Centre of Toronto, in order to better reflect its broader role in the community. A new Northeast Valley branch was also established in Thornhill in the early 1980s and later closed in the late 1990s.
In 1994, the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto took over the operation of the northern branch, due to financial difficulties. At this point, all three branches became independent of one another and were no longer constituted as the Jewish Community Centre of Toronto. They each had independent boards of directors, while still receiving some of their operating funds from the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto.
Scope and Content
This fonds consists of the records created and accumulated by the Jewish Community Centre of Toronto -- which included the Bloor branch and the northern Bathurst Jewish Community Centre -- and its predecessor, the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. The records include textual records maintained by the office of the executive director, financial reports, architectural plans, Y-Times newsletters, program material, photographs and oral histories.
The records have been arranged into the following series: Executive director, Jewish Community Centre Archives Committee, Publication Committee, Communications Department, Sports Celebrity Dinner, and Combined Building Campaign Committee.
Notes
Includes 2539 photographs, 42 drawings, 13 sound recordings, 4 artifacts and 2 posters.
Name Access
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto
Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre
Subjects
Community centers
Related Material
See photo #2369-2646, 3412, 3519, 3804, 4201, 5004, 6125, accession #1986-7-8, MG2 N1a
Creator
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
2004-6-6
2004-5-13
2004-5-2
1988-11-7
1988-4-9
1984-7-2
1983-12-1
1982-12-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Vocational Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 75
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Vocational Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
75
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
moving images
Date
1947-2006
Physical Description
5.1 m of textual records and graphic material
1 DVD
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Vocational Services (JVS) was established on 16 June, 1947. After the war, thousands of survivors arrived in Canada in search of homes, education for their children and jobs. The returning servicemen, in turn, were also in need of employment as well. The first two years of its existence, it catered to these two groups. By 1949, it expanded its mandate to become a community-wide agency.
Max Enkin, the founder of the famous post-war "tailor scheme," became its first president and chairman of the board. Under this scheme, he and other members of his delegation were able to bring over 6000 survivors to Canada. Other members of the board included Lipa Green, Sydney Harris, Dr. Albert Rose and Louis Locksin. The executive director was Norman Stack. He served for a few years and was replaced by Milton Freidman in 1949. Freidman was a social worker who relocated to Toronto from Buffalo and spent close to 40 years in this position, retiring in 1985.
Its early mandate was to serve as a placement service for applicants and employers and to provide individual counselling services to its clients. Its office was situated above the original Tip Top Tailor building at 455 Spadina Avenue. It later moved its office to 152 Beverley Street and then in the 1960s to Tycos Drive. By the 1960s, JVS began to expand its services to all segments of society including newcomers, people with disabilities and from all sectors of life. The staff included social workers, psychologists, job counsellors and clerical staff.
During the 1980s, Bernie Berger became the new executive director. He served in that capacity until 1991. He was replaced by Ed Segalowitz. During this period, JVS set up a seniors' program called ATLAZ on the grounds of the Baycrest Home for the Aged. It was funded by the Bick family and was intended to create programs to keep seniors occupied. Today, this program is called the Al Green Resource Centre and provides employment, placement, training and volunteer opportunities to adults of all ages and with developmental disabilities. JVS also launched a youth program called Youthinc and a women's program.
Karen Goldenberg became executive director in 1998 and was replaced by Frank Markel in 2011 after her retirement. JVS has expanded its clientele, helping people from all backgrounds with diverse needs to identify their strengths and goals, develop skills, and achieve success in school, work and life. By 2009 it offered an expansive range of over 40 employment-related support programs and services throughout the Greater Toronto Area to thousands of unemployed and underemployed individuals and served 23,000 people.They operated out of 12 locations and have approximately 200 professionals on staff.
Kim Coulter became President and CEO in 2013.
Custodial History
The case files were located in the vault with no accession number. They were likely transferred to the OJA during the 1970s or 1980s.They were assigned accession number 2002-10/34.
The remaining records were in the possession of Amanda Batchelor of JVS, who had acquired the material from various past board and committee members for the creation of the 60th anniversary book.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the activities, programs, finances, operation and history of the Jewish Vocational Services. Included are meeting minutes, photographs, correspondence, surveys, reports, financial statements, certificates, bulletins, newsletters, newsclippings, press releases, anniversary books, and one DVD.
Name Access
Jewish Vocational Services of Toronto
Subjects
Charities
Immigrants--Canada
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Creator
Jewish Vocational Services of Toronto (1947-)
Accession Number
2002-10/34
2008-9/6
2010-11/7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 67
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
67
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1936-1991, predominant 1938-1976
Physical Description
10 m of textual records
5541 photographs, 25 x 20 cm and smaller, and other media
Admin History/Bio
The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto was incorporated in Ontario in March 1917 to coordinate the fundraising activities of Jewish charitable, philanthropic, and social service agencies in Toronto. In 1918, ten separate agencies were funded by the FJPT. By 1937, fourteen agencies were funded. The Great Depression of the 1930s and the development of several newer Jewish aid, education and medical care organizations created both increased need for resources and growing competition for ever-more scarce dollars. Within a very few years this funding crisis forced a major review of the organization.
During 1936 a series of special meetings of leading individuals were held to examine the income and expenditures of all Toronto Jewish agencies and also to speculate about the need for a new Toronto Jewish "Community Chest" as the sole fund-raising organization for a federation of all Jewish agencies including the FJPT. In 1938, the new United Jewish Welfare Fund was formally constituted. Added to the FJPT's previous list of Toronto client agencies in 1938 were: the Canadian Jewish Congress, the Hebrew National Association, the Jewish Immigrant Aid Association, the Mizrachi Society, the Toronto Free Loan Association, the Geverkshaften, and Old Folks Home, and the United Palestine Appeal, raising the total number of agencies to 22.
When the State of Israel was established in 1948, the UJWF's annual fundraising campaign was combined with the CJC's United Palestine appeal to form a new, combined campaign named the United Jewish Appeal (UJA). In 1967, the UJA name was legally changed to the United Jewish Appeal of Metropolitan Toronto.
In mid-1976, the organization's public name was changed to the Toronto Jewish Congress. Although initially thought of as a merger between the UJWF and the CJC, the actual result was the expansion of the UJWF responsibilities to include local education and welfare services previously shared with the Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region. The UJWF, however, remained the legal senior entity.
In 1991 the public name was again changed to the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto and in 1999, to UJA Federation of Greater Toronto. By this date, over 30 beneficiary and affiliated agencies, 49 affiliated schools and five Federation departments were fully or partly funded by the UJA Federation.
In June, 2010, the organization altered its legal structure, with the senior legal entity becoming the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of 25 series: Annual Meetings, Annual Reports, Board of Directors, Constitution Committee, Executive Committee, Officers Committee, Budget and Finance Committee, Administration Committee, Social Planning Committee, Committee on Capital Needs and Planning, Central Committee on Scholarships in Aid, Joint Committee of the BJE and UJWF Study on Jewish Education, Nominations Committee, Pension Fund Committee, Coordinating Committee, Special Ad Hoc and Temporary Committees, Annual Campaign, Client Agencies, Joint Committee of the CJC and the UJWF, Committee on Community Organization, Sub-Committee on Construction and Administration of Community Schools, Joint Committee on Fundraising, Personnel Committee, Community Leadership Development Council, and Israel at Fifty Community Celebration.
Over 4500 photographs and a variety of other media are managed within Series 17, Campaign records.
Notes
For exact details about the contents of individual series and sub-series, please review their scope and contents notes.
Name Access
United Jewish Welfare Fund
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto
United Jewish Appeal
Toronto Jewish Congress
Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Subjects
Charities
Fund raising
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
For records of the predecessor of the UJWF, see Fonds 66, the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds.
Further detailed documentation of the proposed merger between the UJWF and the CJC (creation of the TJC) may be found in Fonds 67, Sub-sub-series 5-5-1, Files 171 and 221.
Further documentation on the United Jewish Welfare Fund may be found within Fonds 9, Series 7, records of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society.
For further detailed records of a key community leader's involvement with the UJWF see Accession 1982-8-8, the records of Samuel Godfrey, 1943-1972.
Creator
United Jewish Welfare Fund (1938-)
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2013-8-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-8-3
Material Format
text
Physical Description
1 book : 166 p.
Date
[198-?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one cookbook published by the Sisterhood of the Shaar Hashomayim Synagogue and the Dorothy Rothschild Chapter of Hadassah (Sudbury).
Subjects
Food
Women
Name Access
Shaar Hashomayim Synagogue
Hadassah-Wizo
Places
Subury, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
General community activities series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 4; Series 11; File 74
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
General community activities series
Level
File
Fonds
4
Series
11
File
74
Material Format
textual record
Date
1978-1992
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of meeting agendas and minutes, financial statements, and correspondence.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee meeting agendas, minutes, reports and correspondence series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 1; File 221
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee meeting agendas, minutes, reports and correspondence series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
1
File
221
Material Format
textual record
Date
1990
Physical Description
1 folder of textual materials
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Accession Number
2005-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Benjamin Dunkelman fonds
Arab-Israeli War series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 2; Series 5; File 24
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Benjamin Dunkelman fonds
Arab-Israeli War series
Level
File
Fonds
2
Series
5
File
24
Material Format
textual record
Date
1977-1984
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File contains two copies of minutes of the executive meeting of the Jewish War Veterans of Canada on 13 March 1977, which Dunkelman attended. The file also contains related correspondence and a 7-page newsletter.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
International Council of Jewish Women series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 38; Series 6; File 6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
International Council of Jewish Women series
Level
File
Fonds
38
Series
6
File
6
Material Format
textual record
Date
1990
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of one copy of "Women 2000", issue no. 3, a newsletter listing activities of non-governmental organizations. The reason for the publication is to promote the goals of the Nairobi Forward-Looking Strategies for the Advancement of Women. A newsletter column is devoted to International Council of Jewish Women as an organization dealing entirely or mainly with women.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds
Women's Auxiliary series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 14; Series 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds
Women's Auxiliary series
Level
Series
Fonds
14
Series
4
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Date
1953-2009
Physical Description
1.2 m of textual records
960 photographs
2 coins
Admin History/Bio
The Women's Auxiliary (WA) of the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care was established in 1955 as a fundraising arm of the Baycrest Centre as well as a provider of services to the residents and patients. It represented the amalgamation of the two women’s auxiliaries that had previously operated at the Jewish Old Folks’ Home (Baycrest’s predecessor) – The Ladies Executive and the Young Ladies Auxiliary. Dora Till served as the founding President and was succeeded by Lillian Soles in 1959.
The WA’s initial activities included running the volunteer service, the Beauty Salon, the Tuck Shop, religious and festival programming, communicating information about Baycrest to the community, and managing the memorial books and card services. These activities soon expanded to include recreational programming for residents, such as outings, an annual fashion show, and Mazel Tov nights, running Baycrest’s Day Care program, and managing the library, Gift Shop, and Snack Bar. Originally, the WA raised funds through membership fees, the sale of happiness and condolence cards, and memorial inscriptions. In 1959 the WA began organizing an annual Theatre Night fundraising event, which was supplanted by an annual Auxilorama in 1968. During the 1960s members of the WA served in Baycrest’s Women’s Corp to help raise money for the Building Expansion Fund. In 1971, the WA established a junior auxiliary called the Capricorn Group.
Today the WA continues to run many of its programs and services and to fundraise through annual events and campaigns such as, a Gala evening, a spring sale (or Bargain Bonanza), Games Girls Play (an evening of board games and arts and crafts activities), and a Women of Baycrest campaign (to support research into women’s brain health and aging). In 2000, the Women’s Auxiliary Winter Garden opened in the Apotex Centre, which was sponsored by the WA.
Scope and Content
Series consists of records documenting the formation, governance, and activities of the Women's Auxiliary of Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care. Included are meeting notices, agendas, and minutes, reports, speeches, correspondence, lists, invitations, financial records, theatrical scripts, a scrapbook, photographs, newspaper clippings, programmes, brochures, booklets, a survey, statistics, flyers, a certificate, memos, newsletters, questionnaires, and coins.
Series is arranged into the following sub-series: 1. Board of Directors and Executive Committee; 2. Annual meetings; 3. Committees and meetings; 4. Capricorn Group; 4. Festival Committee; 5. Programs and services; 6. Volunteer program; 7. Fundraising; 8. Membership; 9. Publications and publicity; 10. Finance; 11. Administrative functions; and, 12. Events. Records are described to the file level with some item level description.
Name Access
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care. Women's Auxiliary
Related Material
For additional records related to the Women's Auxiliary, see the Dora Till fonds 52, series 2.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 17
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
17
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1936-1992
Physical Description
47 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
By 1919 the plight of post-war Eastern European Jewry and the need for a united community voice for Canadian Jewry led to the creation of the Canadian Jewish Congress. Its founding meeting was held on March 16, 1919 in Montreal. Though it briefly maintained a tiny regional office in Toronto, the CJC remained inactive until 1933, when it fully reconvened by opening offices in Winnipeg, Montreal, and Toronto. Egmont L. Frankel was the first President of the new Central Division in Toronto. While the National Office in Montreal focused on the overarching issues of the social and economic rights of European Jewry, assistance for Jewish immigrants, and combating prejudice in Canada, the Toronto office dealt with local violent anti-Jewish demonstrations as well as continuing discrimination both in employment and in access to public recreational facilities. The structure was based on regular national biennial plenary conferences at which policies were delineated and national and regional executives were elected. Between plenary sessions, National and Regional Councils were in charge. These were augmented by the following standing committees: Administrative, Officers, Personnel, Financial, Publications, and Educational and Cultural. Special committees were created to deal with issues such as: youth, community loans, kashruth, fundraising, Israel, Russian Jewry, and various emergency issues such as refugees, immigration, and housing.
During the 1930s the Central Division Office moved several times and occupied offices in the following locations; Yonge St., the Bond St. Synagogue, Scheuer House, the Zionist Building, and its long-term home at 150-152 Beverley Street where it remained until its July, 1983 move to the Lipa Green Building in North York. Its activities expanded to include taking responsibility for Jewish educational standards but, by 1941, its main efforts shifted to support for Canada’s war effort. Immediately after the end of the war, the focus again shifted to Jewish immigration projects and the maintenance of Jewish identity in small communities. By 1950, the CJC’s use of the title “division” was changed to “region” to accommodate internal operational “divisions” within each region. Also, by then, the Central Region was busy expanding its programs for all Ontario Jewish communities, creating a province-wide council of youth groups, and working with the newly-created Bureau of Jewish Education (later Board of Jewish Education, now Mercaz). Standardization of kashruth rules in Ontario was implemented. As well, regular educational conferences and cultural events were held throughout the province, while province-wide fund-raising efforts in support of Moess Chittin for relief projects in Israel and for local Congress activities were expanded. Many of its educational and cultural responsibilities necessitated working with other Jewish organizations such as the United Jewish Welfare Fund, Jewish Immigrant Aid Society (JIAS), Hadassah, the Canadian Legion, B’nai Brith, the World Jewish Congress, the American Jewish Congress, and the many Landsmenshaften (Jewish mutual benefit societies, each formed by immigrants originating from the same Eastern European community).
During the 1960s, the Central Region began sending Moess Chittin relief shipments to Cuban Jews unable to acquire kosher foods for Passover. Its lobbying efforts included participation in the Royal Commissions on Hate Propaganda, and its greatest success came with the introduction and implementation of Ontario’s Fair Employment and Fair Accommodation Practices legislation, an achievement in which Congress played a pivotal role.
From 1971 to 1989 the major focus became international and Canada-wide lobbying for, and providing support to, Soviet Jewry. Virtually all local and Canadian efforts to assist the Soviet Jewish “refusniks” were organized and coordinated in Toronto by the CJC Ontario Region office, which provided staff and funding for the many lobbying activities and public demonstrations which characterized this successful effort.
As of November 1975, the CJC Central Region’s responsibilities in Toronto were radically altered. To improve cost efficiency in Toronto, CJC educational and social service program activities were merged with similar programs already provided by Toronto’s United Jewish Appeal. The UJA assumed sole responsibility for these amalgamated programs in Toronto and was renamed Toronto Jewish Congress. The CJC Central Region still retained province-wide responsibilities for Ontario’s smaller Jewish communities, and its office remained in Toronto. Also, following this reorganization, its name was changed to Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region. Although CJC no longer provided direct social and educational programs to Toronto, the TJC’s senior executive was, at the time, still obliged to continue to keep it notified about developments concerning previous Congress responsibilities.
Since 1983 the Ontario Region’s offices have been, like those of the UJA Federation, located in the Lipa Green Building, 4600 Bathurst St., North York. It continued its work of financially supporting various Israeli institutions and, as well, fostering Canada-Israel relations. It also spearheaded the movement to support and protect Jews in Arab lands, especially in Syria. Funding for the Canadian Jewish Congress now comes from the Canadian Council for Israel and Jewish Advocacy, which redistributes a portion of the funds raised by local Jewish Federations across Canada. The CJC National Office then funds the regional offices. As of 2009, the Ontario Region’s central mandate is to represent the Jewish community to Ontario residents and government on issues of social justice and public policy. Its structure remains the same: an Officers’ group supported by various volunteer committees and a small professional staff together deliberating on regional issues and implementing national policies at the regional level.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of the records of the Ontario Region office of the Canadian Jewish Congress. Of primary importance in documenting this organization’s history are its minutes of the Executive and Administrative Committees and the various standing, and short-term committees such as Community Organization, Finance, Fund Raising, Educational and Cultural, Research, Immigration, War Efforts, and Jewish Education. Most of these records are still managed all together within Fonds 17, Series 1. Fonds 17, Series 2 contains the general subject and correspondence files of these committees. Records in both series require further processing.
Records now found in Series 3 document the efforts of the Committee for Soviet Jewry in coordinating the activities of the many Toronto and Ontario organizations involved in assisting Soviet Jewry during the 1971 to 1989 period.
Series 4 consists of administrative and committee records of the United Jewish Refugee and War Relief Agencies in Toronto from 1938 through 1967. These document its work rescuing the survivors of European Jewish communities, settling as many as possible in Ontario, and providing assistance to those attempting to obtain restitution payments.
Series 5 consists of the records of the Community Relations Committee (1938-1976). Responding to depression-era anti-Semitism in Canada, the Canadian Jewish Congress and B’nai Brith together established in 1938 a new joint committee. Since then this Committee has documented racist threats in Canada; initiated advocacy activities to work for improved civil rights; promoted legislation combating hate; worked to ensure equality of access to employment, education and accommodation; and investigated specific incidents of discrimination. The Committee, for example, played a key role in achieving the Anti-Discrimination Act of 1944, and the Fair Employment Practices Act of 1951, key steps leading to Canada’s current Human Rights Code. Although originally named Joint Public Relations Committee in 1938, a series of name changes later occurred; s follows: Joint Community Relations Committee, Central Region (1962-1978), Joint Community Relations Committee, CJC, Ontario Region (ca. 1978-ca. 1991) Community Relations Committee, CJC, Ontario Region (ca. 1991-present) Records in this series were reorganized into 5 sub-series and a further 9 sub-sub-series during the 2009 to 2011 period. For further details please view the database records for Fonds 17, Series 5. Although this series will eventually hold all CRC records up to 1992, only those prior to 1979 are currently fully processed.
Notes
Physical description note: Includes 1839 photographs, 89 audio cassettes, 11 videocassettes, 4 drawings, and 6 microfilm reels (16 mm).
Processing note: Processing of this fonds is ongoing. Additional descriptive entries will be added in future.
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Congress. Ontario Region
Subjects
Pressure groups
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the Archivist prior to accessing some of the records
Arrangement
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the Archivist prior to accessing some of the records.
Creator
Canadian Jewish Congress. Ontario Region (1919-2011)
Places
Ontario
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
9
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1925-1989
Physical Description
31.8 m of textual records
319 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Immigrant Aid Society of Canada was established in 1920 by the newly-formed Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC). A Toronto branch was established in Toronto in a storefront office on Spadina Avenue, but the organization was rudimentary, and as the enthusiasm that spurred the founding of CJC died out, JIAS soon faltered. Then in 1922 it was taken over and reactivated under the cooperative support of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto, B'nai B'rith and the Council of Jewish Women. JIAS was legally incorporated on 30 August 1922. It also operated under the moniker of the Emergency Jewish Immigrant Aid Committee, and it changed its name to Jewish Immigrant Aid Services in 1954.
Charged with organizing emergency relief for European Jews in distress, JIAS became the central agency of the Jewish community to facilitate the lawful entry of Jewish immigrants into Canada, and provided them with welfare services, transportation, and assistance with accommodation and employment after their arrival. In addition, JIAS offered consultation services for sponsors of potential immigrants, ran a competitive foreign remittance service, and campaigned to counter the activities of unscrupulous steamboat agents, lawyers and influence peddlers, or “shtadlanim,” who often victimized immigrants and sponsors alike.
In conjunction with similar efforts by the CJC, JIAS was also actively engaged in negotiating for the increased admission of Jewish immigrants to Canada. In 1923, the federal government instituted a permit-based immigration program and JIAS competed with travel agents and solicitors in the private sector for these limited quota permits. After combating the anti-immigration policies of the Depression era, the outbreak of war in 1939 virtually closed the already limited avenues for immigration.
JIAS Canada was organized into a National Office in Montreal and regional offices in Winnipeg (Western Region), Toronto (Central Region) and Halifax (Eastern Region). The Central Region covered Ontario, and established a full-time head office in 1935 at 399 Spadina Avenue in Toronto (hence the Central Region was sometimes called simply the Toronto Office). The office later moved to 265 Spadina Avenue. JIAS Toronto’s board of directors met on a regular basis at different locations in Toronto, including 206 Beverley Street and in the Talmud Torah building at 9 Brunswick Avenue. The first JIAS Toronto board included notable Toronto residents such as Henry Dworkin, Mrs. Draiman, Mr. Kronick, Dr. Brodey and Mrs. Willinsky. The role of the board was to oversee the operations of the Central Region. It rendered decisions on issues relating to finances, procedures and policies, negotiations with the federal Immigration Branch, as well as individual cases that required their attention.
General meetings of the Central Region membership were held annually. The 1943 JIAS constitution states that regional annual meetings were to be held for “receiving and considering reports,” holding nominations and elections for the executive, and discussing JIAS’s program and policies.
In the post-war era, JIAS shifted its focus to renewed efforts on behalf of individual claimants and community support, while the focus for lobbying for a reversal of Canada's immigration policy fell increasingly under the jurisdiction of the CJC. A boom in immigration between 1947 and 1952 saw the arrival of large numbers of Jewish immigrants to all parts of Canada and the Toronto Office of JIAS renewed its efforts to meet the needs of this new influx. Major world events also sparked other waves of immigration from Hungary, Czechoslovakia, North Africa and Russia, to which JIAS responded in turn. JIAS worked in conjunction with other immigrant aid societies such as HIAS, the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, in the United States, to facilitate immigration to the United States, and later to Israel, where many of the immigrants and refugees coming to Canada had family and ultimately settled.
Custodial History
Custody of these records was transferred to the Ontario Jewish Archives by JIAS in 1983, as preparations were under way for the move to a new facility in North York. Much of the material was in four-cubic-foot boxes and in file cabinets.
The accession was divided into three sections: files which were at the JIAS office and had been retained in their original order; files which had been retrieved from a flood in the basement of 152 Beverley St. and consequently had been thrown into dry boxes without regard to order; files discovered in the furnace rooms at 150 and 152 Beverley St., intact but covered in coal dust. The bulk of the records were stored off-site, with dirty files being isolated from the rest.
The dust-covered materials were cleaned at an off-site location, placed in temporary boxes and transferred to the Archives and restored, as far as was possible, to their original order.
Clips were removed and replaced as appropriate with archivally acceptable ones. All materials were transferred to acid-free folders and boxes.
Scope and Content
Fonds contains the records of the Toronto Office (Central region) of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Canada. The fonds consists primarily of textual records: minutes, correspondence, financial records, reports, immigration files, naturalization case files, social service case files and the records of attempts to trace missing individuals. There are also photographs of special events, speakers and arriving immigrants.
The fonds represents an important resource for the study of Canadian Jewry, especially when taken in conjunction with the JIAS National Office records at the Canadian Jewish Congress National Archives in Montreal, and those of the Western Office at the Library and Archives of Canada. It documents the means by which a particular Canadian ethnic community has dealt with the problems of rescue, settlement and government relations. These records also offer insight into the relationship between the Toronto Office and the other branches of JIAS, and invite comparison with similar agencies in the United States, as well as those of other ethnic groups in Canada.
The material collected includes information about the countries of origin, transportation routes, settlement and employment patterns of Jewish immigrants to Canada in the twentieth century. The documents also touch upon important related issues such as advocacy, sponsorship, admission processes, health and social problems.
These records cover several waves of immigration following the Second World War: Holocaust survivors in the late 1940s, Sephardic (North African) and Hungarian Jews in the 1950s, Russian and Czechoslovakian Jews in the 1960s, and additional Russians in the 1970s.
The records also contain significant information for those researchers looking to conduct genealogical research into Jewish immigrants and their descendents.
The fonds has been arranged with one sous-fonds, which contains the records of the National JIAS office in Montreal. In total there are 17 series. The Toronto office (main fonds) series are: 1. Board of Directors and Executive Committee Minutes; 2. Annual meeting proceedings; 3. Reports; 4. Legal ; 5. Administration; 6. JIAS Committees; 7. External committees; 8. Financial ; 9. Arrivals; 10. Immigration case files; 11. Social service assistance case files; 12. Photographs; 13. Miscellaneous. The National Office sous-fonds is divided into the following series: 1. National executive meeting minutes; 2. National annual meeting proceedings; 3. National annual reports; 4. Publications; and Photographs.
Notes
Physical description note: Physical extent is based on fully processed records. Additional accessions are not included (see Related Material note below).
Associated material note: The CJC National Archive, in Montreal, has additional JIAS records from 1920-1989 including 275 m of textual records and graphic materials (3250 photos): collection number I0037; alpha-numeric designation MA 4. The National Archives of Canada, Manitoba branch, in Winnipeg, has Jewish Historical Society of Western Canada JIAS textual records from 1923-1950 on 18 microfilm reels: Former archival reference number MG28-V114 (no replacement listed). The originals of these records are maintained by the Jewish Historical Society of Western Canada.
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
Other OJA records relating to JIAS may be found in the following accessions: 1979-9-5; 1988-5-2; 1991-10-5; 2006-3-11.
Creator
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto
Accession Number
1983-8-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Toronto Hebrew Free Loan Association fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 85
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Toronto Hebrew Free Loan Association fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
85
Material Format
textual record
Date
1922-1999
Physical Description
6.6 m of textual records
Admin History/Bio
The original Toronto Hebrew Free Loan agency was formed in 1911 under the Associated Hebrew Charities. Its Hebrew name was G'milath Chasodim, which means to do good deeds. Initially all of the loans that it gave out were guaranteed by individuals from the community. This body went into debt in 1917. In 1922, with the administrative support of the Toronto Federation of Jewish Philanthropies and the financial support of B'nai Brith, a new free loan society was established.
The first President was Sam Kronick, the Vice President was Nathan Phillips and the Treasurer, Elias Pullan, three extremely high profile citizens within the community and Toronto. The first meeting was held at the Zionist Institute on Beverley Street. By 1923 they had hired a secretary and executive secretary, Moses Oelbaum. The society was incorporated on 12 July 1924. Their mandate was to prevent pauperism and preserve the self respect of individuals. Many of the early loans that came in during that period were through referrals from other Jewish organizations. In 1925, they reviewed 625 applications and approved 510 loans which ranged from $25 to $200, allocating $9307.92 in total. They did not charge interest and had the borrower repay the loan at a rate of $2 to $10 a week.
In 1942 the Moses Oelbaum fund was established with capital of $10,000. Historically, B'nai Brith and the National Council of Women provided the funds for student loans.In 1957, the Scholarship Aid program began to operate under the auspices of the United Jewish Welfare Fund. By 1974, the THLA had given out over 5 million dollars in loans to over 20,000 families. In 1985, through a merger of Toronto's business, personal and educational loan agencies, the Toronto Jewish Free Loan Cassa was formed.
Today, the Loan Cassa has over 700 active clients and gives out over $1,500,000 in loans each year to the needy as well as in the form of scholarships and business start up loans. The rate of defaults has been extremely low, less than one percent. As a result, this program has helped strengthen the community by sustaining and investing in its members. The name was formally changed to Jewish Free Loan Toronto in 2012.
Scope and Content
The records consist of minutes of meetings, correspondence, financial statements, loan ledger books, loan guarantee cards, case files, cash books and receipts, court records relating to trusts and wills and other material.
Name Access
Toronto Jewish Free Loan Association
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Creator
Toronto Jewish Free Loan Association
Accession Number
1986-11/4; MG 201D; 1989-12/2, 1999-7/1; 2004-5/122.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 4; File 83
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
4
File
83
Material Format
textual record
Date
1992-1994
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 2; File 1103
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
2
File
1103
Material Format
textual record
Date
1996
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Accession Number
2005-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Maurice Berg fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 41
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Maurice Berg fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
41
Material Format
multiple media
Date
[191-]-[ca. 1989]
Physical Description
29 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Maurice "Moishe" Berg (1913-1993) was a Toronto businessman who devoted much of his life to Jewish communal work and particularly to Zionist work. He was born on July 29th, 1913 in Russia to Rachel and Jacob Hochberg. He came to Canada in 1920, with his mother, two brothers, and one sister.
Berg was educated in Toronto and became president of Maple Leaf Press, a printing and office furniture company that was founded in 1945. He was also an active member and leader of Canadian Young Judaea and past president of Ajalon Lodge. He became president of the Central Region of Young Judaea, and later, national president. He was also chairman of the Regional Young Judaea Committee and chairman of the Biluim Committee. Berg was instrumental in starting up Camp Shalom. He also served on the Board of Directors of the YM & YWHA and was active with many other Jewish groups and organizations. He was affliliated with Adath Sholom Congregation. Maurice Berg died on February 27th, 1993.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of records related to the personal and professional life of Maurice Berg and his involvement with various Zionist organizations. These organizations include Ajalon Lodge and Canadian Young Judaea. The records include scrapbooks, correspondence, photographs, certificates, programmes, ephemera, clippings, bulletins, and an award certificate.
Notes
Includes 111 photographs : b&w and col., 3 scrapbooks, 1 album of philatelic records, and 1 artifact (Artifact #291).
Name Access
Berg, Maurice, 1913-1993
Subjects
Zionism
Physical Condition
Good.
Related Material
See also photo #4627, 4628, and 4650
See also fonds 2 : 6 : 62 : Item 1
See also fonds 28-1 : 4 : 12
See also fonds 28-1 : 7 : 22
Arrangement
The fonds has been arranged and described as 21 files and 1 item by the archivist. The original order was maintained where it was discernible. The scrapbooks were kept intact though some were taken out of their original physical enclosure where possible for conservation purposes. The records have been placed in acid-free folders
Creator
Berg, Maurice, 1913-1993
Accession Number
1988-11-14
Source
Archival Descriptions
50 records – page 1 of 1.

Narrow By

Collection Name

Source

Format

Date

Description Level

Subject

Name

Place

Language

Restrictions

Available Digital Content