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27 records – page 1 of 1.
Accession Number
2012-10-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-10-4
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 26 x 21 cm
Date
[between 1925 and 1935]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a photograph of a poster advertising the showing of the movie "Yiskor" or "Thou Shalt Remember" at the Standard Theatre. This film was released in 1925 and manufactured by S. Geyer Inc. in New York.
Subjects
Arts and culture
Performance and entertainment
Name Access
Standard Theatre
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-2-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-2-6
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
2.7 m of textual records
Date
2002-2010
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the operations and activities of the Koffler Center of the Arts. Records include programming and exhibitions materials and catalogues; records related to the Jewish Book Awards; prombotion material in print and AV and assembled into media binders; meeting minutes and general correspondence.
Custodial History
These records were left for the Archives when Koffler moved from the Prosserman JCC to the Artscape Youngplace.
Subjects
Arts and culture
Name Access
Koffler Centre of the Arts (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-6-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-6-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
8 cm of textual records
Date
1997-2004
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting Cyrel Troster's involvement with UJA Federation's Cultural Services Planning and Allocation Committee, Cultural Planning and Allocation, and the development of cultural policy. Also included is a program book and silent auction catalogue for an exhibit held at the Chinese Cultural Centre of Greater Toronto.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Arts and culture
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Troster, Cyrel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-16
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-16
Material Format
textual record
sound recording
Physical Description
ca. 20 cm textual records
1 audio cassette
Date
[19--]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of files related to the musical careers of musicians and composers including John Weinzweig, Nathan Appleby, Cantor Norman Summers, and Boris Charloff. Materials include audio cassettes, sheet music, concert programmes, correspondence, and lyrics.
Custodial History
Found in storage with donor unknown, presumed to have been left in music room of Latner Jewish Public Library.
Subjects
Arts and culture
Name Access
Weinzweig, John
Appleby, Nathan
Summers, Norman
Charloff, Boris
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-2
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 100 photographs
1 folder of textual records
Date
1920-1980
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of the Hersch family, a screenplay by Phillip Hersch, school certificates from Landsdowne School, Canadian naturalization certificates, thank you notes, a New Year's greeting card, and a Polish passport. Included are photographs of weddings, Europe vacations, class photos, houses in Toronto, Bar Mitzvah, Niagara falls, Channukah, Farms, studio sets, the beach, and snow scenes
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Norman Hersch until his death in the mid-1980s, at which point the donor took possession of the records and stored them until donating them to the OJA in March 2015.
Administrative History
Norman Hersch was a special effects technician for the CBC from the early 1950s until his retirement in the mid-1980s. He was married to a French woman from Western Canada named Margaret. He is buried in the Mount Albert area with his wife. He served in the Canadian military during the Second World War and graduated from Central Technical School upon his return. In later years, he started P & M Display in Yorkville. Norman's older brother Phillip was a screenwriter in Toronto. He wrote the CBC series Wojek. Their mother Lily (Polish) volunteered at Mount Sinai Hospital. Their father Alexander (Romanian) worked in stainless steel manufacturing. They lived around Cecil Street. Doug Wardle was a friend and colleague of Hersch's at CBC in the Special Effects Department.
Subjects
Arts and culture
Personal and family life
Name Access
Hersch, Norman
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
7 photographs : b&w ; 23 x 36 cm or smaller
Date
1928-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the life and cantorial career of Rev. Alexander Steinberg, and to a lesser extent his son, Ben Steinberg. Included are photographs of Cantor Steinberg, fellow cantors and the Shaarei Shomayim cheder class; Cantor Steinberg's scrapbook; hand-copied solo and choral music books; correspondence; and materials relaing to Ben Steinberg's cantata Echoes of Children memorializing the children who perished in the Holocaust.
Administrative History
Chazzan Alexander Steinberg was born Eliyahu Steinberg in Zhitomeir, Ukraine in 1893 to Chava and Chaim Steinberg. His father was the owner and operator of a lumber yard and, as a devout Jew, brought his son Eliyahu regularly to the synagogue where he developed a love of chazzanut and, in the then traditional apprenticeship method, studied the skills which would lead him eventually to a lifetime career in the music of the traditional synagogue.
At the age of 15 he emigrated to Winnipeg, Canada and worked in a men's clothing store until he could find employment as a cantor. He began his professional life as a visiting cantor in the 1920s, travelling to smaller communities in Alberta and Saskatchewan, officiating at services for Shabbat, High Holy Days and the Fesitvals, as well as presenting concerts of Hebrew and Yiddish song.
By the 1930s, he officiated regularly at the Atereth Yisrael Synagogue in Winnipeg and appeared as a concert cantor throughout the western Canadian provices (Lethbridge, Regina, Prince Albert, Edenbridge, Melville, Edmonton, Calgary, etc.) as well as Ontario (London, Hamilton, Kitchener, Sarnia, Ottawa, Fort William and Toronto) and as far away as St. Louis, Missouri and Detroit, Michigan.
He was appointed cantor of Atereth Yisrael Congregation of Winnipeg in 1930 and maintained a relationship with that Shul throughout his time in Toronto, visiting regularly to daven and present concerts.
After the death of his first wife, he married Polly Shapiro in 1928, and in 1933 he moved his family including four children (three, Sam, Ida and Laurie from his previous marriage) to Toronto, where for a time he served as cantor at Goel Tzedec Congregation.
In Toronto, Cantor Steinberg became renowned for his beautiful tenor voice and his knowledge of the liturgy. He was much sought after and officiated througout the Toronto area in synagogues such as the Hebrew Men of England, Ostrovtzer, Beth Jacob, Kiever, Goel Tzedec, Palmerston, Anshei Minsk and Lubavitcher. All this activity brought him to the attention of various synagogues in the United States as well and he travelled to Detroit and Rochester on several occasions.
In 1941, he was appointed Cantor at Shaarei Shomayim on St. Clair Ave., a congreation he served until 1950. He continued to serve outlying congregations in Hamilton, London and Sarnia until he was invited in 1953 to establish the King David Congregation in Toronto, to serve the unaffiliated during the High Holy Days. His cantorial career came to an end in April 1960 when he experienced a heart attach in London, Ontario while leading that community's Pesach service. He died at home in Toronto two days before Yom Kippur in 1960.
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Benjamin Steinberg is a composer, conductor, organist, and teacher. He was born in Winnipeg on 22 January 1930 and received his Bachelor of Music from the University of Toronto in 1961. He and his wife Mildred have two children.
A soloist at age 8 in the synagogue choir conducted by his father, Cantor Alexander Steinberg, he began conducting choirs himself at age 12. At the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto from 1948-1951 and 1957-1960 he studied composition with John Weinzweig, piano with Samuel Dolin, and voice with Weldon Kilburn. After teaching from 1953-1958 in public schools in the Toronto area and studying music education at the University of Toronto, he served from 1961-1964 as head of the music department at Winston Churchill Collegiate Institute and from 1961-1964 and in the same capacity at Forest Hill Collegiate Institute from 1964-1986. He was director of school music (1950-1960) and music director (1960-1969) at Holy Blossom Temple, and in 1970 he became music director at Temple Sinai. His method for youth choirs, "Together Do They Sing" (New York 1961), was commissioned and published by the Union of American Hebrew Congregations.
Steinberg's music includes five sacred services (four published - 1963, 1969, 1969, and 1990 - by Transcontinental Music); works for choir and/or soloist and organ or orchestra (some published by Transcontinental Music and Israeli Music Publications); The Vision of Isaiah (1970) for tenor, choir, and organ or instrumental ensemble; Yerushalayim (1973) for soprano, choir, and orchestra; Echoes of Children (1979), a cantata for soloist, narrator, chorus, and orchestra (which won the International Gabriel Award and has twice been televised on PBS); and instrumental works including a suite for flute and string trio based on Israeli folksongs. Steinberg was invited by the city of Jerusalem to be an artist-in-residence in 1978 and 1980; he received the Kavod (Honour) Award of the Cantor's Assembly in 1983, and that same year received a composer's award from the American Harp Society for his Suite for Flute, Viola and Harp (1981, commissioned by Suzanne Shulman). A number of temples, synagogues, and congregations in the USA commissioned some 18 works from Steinberg between 1980 and 1991. He has also received commissions from Paul Brodie (Suite Sephardi 1980), the Chamber Players of Toronto (Suite for String Orchestra 1983), and Lawrence Cherney (Invocations 1990). Baritone Richard Allen recorded several of Steinberg's works on the cassette A Ben Steinberg Concert. (ca 1989, Transcontinental unnumbered).
Of Steinberg's music Michael Isaacson wrote, 'While conservative, pragmatic and always well-mannered, it is also gratefully mindful of its tradition in a deeply lyrical way' (Journal of Synagogue Music, June 1973). Steinberg has presented Jewish music on the CBC, has published articles on it, and has given many lecture-recitals on it in Australia, Canada, Japan, and the USA. He is a contributor to EMC, a member of the CLComp, and an associate of the Canadian Music Centre.
Descriptive Notes
Biographical Note: Further biographical information on Ben Steinberg is available with the accession record.
Subjects
Arts and culture
Performance and entertainment
Religion
Name Access
Steinberg, Alexander, 1893-1960
Steinberg, Ben
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-5
Material Format
textual record
sound recording
Physical Description
60 cm of textual records
2 DVDs
Date
[196-]-2000
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the life and literary career of Morris J. Granite. Included are manuscript copies of his published works, unpublished poems and essays, bound copies of articles written for the Canadian Jewish Outook, published issues of the same periodical, an essay describing his life in Lodz written to his grandchildren, Laura and Rebecca and an interview conducted with Morris by a group interested in establishing a Jewish Museum in Toronto.
Administrative History
Morris J. Granite (Granatstein) was born in 1911 in Lodz, Poland and in 1926, he immigrated with his family to Toronto, Canada. He had two sisters, Eva and Leah and a brother Layzer, who was killed in the Holocaust.
Morris served in the Royal Canadian Ari Force during the Second World War, and he worked as a teacher and draftsman in his early years and as a builder in his middle and later years. The buildings and homes he worked to create still stand in Cuba, Detroit, and Toronto. He also worked in Toronto, New York City, and Philadelphia as a waiter, power press operator, construction worker, and teacher at Hebrew and Yiddish schools. He was president of the Jewish Public Library, an editor of the Canadian Jewish Outlook, a member of the League of Canadian Poets, and a major supporter of artistic and progressive causes.
Throughout his life, he loved the written word. His published writings include several books of poetry: Street Corners (1935), My City Lodz (1995), Welcome to the Year 2000 (1999), and Toronto, My City (2000).
Morris was married to Barbara Moore Better and had two children, Ettie and David and two granchildren, Laura and Rebecca. Morris died in Toronto on April 29, 2001 of leukemia.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Use Conditions note: Copyright is held by the estate of M. J. Granite. Donor must be contacted prior to publication.
Subjects
Arts and culture
Communications and publishing
Personal and family life
Name Access
Granite, Morris
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-4
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 250 photographs (3 albums) : b&w and col. ; 53 x 43 cm and smaller
9 cm of textual records
Date
(191-)-(197-), 1992
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the Title, Samuels and Fishman families. Included are family photographs, and photos related to involvement with philanathropy and industry, materials related to Reliable Toy Company, Forest Hill Collegiate "Forester" year books, a land deed for the Ansheir Yoisher Misrachi Synagogue in Welland, news clippings relating to Alex Samuels death, a Holy Blossom "Tempelite" year book, a Crown Bakery Bread promotional item, a wedding menu from the marriage of Molly Fishman and Harry Title, Molly Fishman's high school diplomas and JNF certificates. There are a number of photos of the Fishman and Title families in Welland and the United States, photos of the Crowland Volunteer Fire Department with Sam and Frank Fishman, Turk family albums with Moishe Turk and Yeva Fishman, an album of a sefer torah dedication to Baycrest Hospital in memory of Leah Fishman, photos of the Samuels family, their trip to Israel, promotional photos from the Reliable Toy Company, Beth Tzedec founding board photos, and B'nai Brith Women photos.
Administrative History
Samuel (ca. 1882-1929, Russia) and Gussie (nee Moscovitz) (b. ca.1884, Romania) Fishman, immigrated to Welland Ontario from Romania. Both arrived to the USA as teenagers sometime around the turn of the century. Samuel and Gussie were married in the USA and by 1920 immigrated with their young family to the historic township of Crowland in Welland County. Here they opened and operated a men's clothing store. Together they had six children, Molly (b. 1909, USA), Abe (b. 1911, USA), Morris (b. 1916, USA), Ruth (b. 1915, USA), Ann (b. 1920, Ontario) and Ethel. Morris married Pauline and lived in St. Catherines, Ruth married Nate Oelbaum and lived in Tucson Arizona, Anne married Alec Rothman and lived in Port Colborne, Ethel married Eddie Matchtinger and lived in Toronto and Abe never married. Yeva Fishman, the niece of Samuel Fishman married Morris Turk. Her father was (Frank Fishman?) and her mother was Sara Leah Fishman. Molly Fishman married Harry Title (Teitelebaum) (b. ca. 1903). They had three children, Greta (nee Title) Greisman, Sandra (nee Title) Samuels and Stephen (m. Carole Hillman, niece of Ben Hillman). Harry Teitelbaum is the son of Israel and Frumeth Teitelbaum. He was born in Gdansk Poland (b. ca., 1903). Harry Title had four younger siblings Lloyd, Birdie (m. Witlin), Arthur and Lorelle (Lieba) the youngest who was born in Toronto. Harry arrived to Canada shortly after the first world war and worked in the garment industry. He and his brother Arthur founded the Title Dress Company in the late 1920s and operated the business out of 355 Adelaide St. West. In the late 1980s, the business moved from this location to Adelaide and Bathurst. Sandra Title (b. Oct 27, 1936, Toronto), the middle daughter of Molly Fishman and Harry Title, married Lawrence Samuels. Together they had five children Joanna, John, Noah, Tom and Caroline. Lawrence was the eldest son of Alex Samuels (d. 1966) and Kate (nee Goldberg) Samuels. He had two younger siblings Herbie and Florence (m. Bill Goodman). Lawrence's father Alex Samuels immigrated to Canada from Dubrovna, White Russia (present day Dubrouna, Belarus). He immigrated to Canada with his parents Samuel and Chana Samuels and his younger siblings Sol, Ben, Riva and Polly. Alex and his brothers Sol and Ben established Reliable Toy Company in (ca. 1929) on Carlaw Ave. They sold the company in 1990.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Business and commerce
Arts and culture
Places
Welland, Ont.
Toronto, Ont.
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1.2 m of textual records
ca. 250 photographs : b&w and col.
Date
1776, [191-]-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the records related to the life and career of Dr. Fred Wienberg. Included are textual and photographic records documenting his personal and family life, his medial career, scholarly activities, involvement with the Jewish community, his collecting of Judaica, medical antiques and art, and his synagogue involvement. Other items include the Ostrovtzer Mutual Benefit Society minute book and a 1776 letter from Jonas Phillips, a veteran of the American Revolutionary War and an American merchant in New York City and Philadelphia.
Administrative History
Fred Weinberg (1919-2003) was born in Ostrawiec, Poland on July 6, 1919 to Rose and Israel Weinberg. Israel immigrated to Canada in 1920 and his wife and children joined him several years later in March of 1924. The family settled in Toronto where Israel worked in the fur manufacturing business. Israel was a supporter and aficionado of cantorial music as well as a founder of the Associated Hebrew Schools of Toronto and the Ostrovtzer Synagogue on Cecil Street.
Fred completed his primary and secondary education at Clinton Street Public School and Harbord Collegiate. He also attended the Brunswick Talmud Torah, celebrating his bar mitzvah in 1932. Fred decided to pursue a medical career, graduating from the University of Toronto’s medical school in 1944. During his studies he enlisted in the army and completed officers’ training in April 1945, attaining the rank of Captain. During his military career he served in the RCAMC at Camp Borden, Christie St. Hospital and at the Stanley Barracks in Toronto. Towards the end of the war he served as Officer in charge of repatriation of the POWs.
After the war Fred pursued his post-graduate work at Seaview and Bellevue hospitals in New York City from 1946 to 1947 and then moved on to the Children’s and Washington University hospitals in St. Louis, Missouri the following year. He was subsequently accepted as a resident at Sick Kids Hospital in Toronto and was ultimately appointed Chief Resident under the supervision of the internationally renowned paediatrician, Dr. Alan Brown. In 1950, Dr. Weinberg was hired as a physician in paediatrics at Sick Kids Hospital, making him the first Jewish doctor on staff. In addition to his staff responsibilities, he also lectured and was a faculty member at the University of Toronto’s Medical School for many years.
By the mid-point of his career, Dr. Weinberg went on to specialise in Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), delivering lectures and publishing articles in medical journals. He also ran his own practice, which operated from 1950 to 1976, and later become Associate Medical Director of the Child Development Clinic, Neurology Division of Sick Kids until his retirement in 1984. He later continued his service at Sick Kids as a senior staff consultant and ran a specialized practice in Developmental Pediatrics for close to twenty years, which was later situated at 208 Bloor Street West.
Fred married Joy Cherry on December 16, 1952 at Goel Tzedec Synagogue. The couple had four children: Joel (b. 1953), Barry (b. 1955), Sari (b. 1956) and Deena (b. 1961). Throughout his life, Fred was actively engaged in Jewish communal work in a variety of capacities: assisting with the establishment of the United Synagogue Day School during the 1950s; as a fundraiser for the United Jewish Appeal (UJA); and as a participant in two of UJA’s early study missions to Israel in 1960 and 1961. He was also an influential figure within his synagogue, joining the Board of Directors of Beth Tzedec Synagogue during the late 1960s and serving as President from 1972 to 1975.
Fred and his wife Joy also collected Judaica, antiques and artwork. As a physician, Fred developed a passion and expertise in the area of medical antiques. He published articles in both the mainstream and Jewish press on subjects related to Jewish rituals, Judaica and art. He also had a regular column in the Canadian Journal of Diagnosis from 1998 to 2002 entitled “Antique instruments”. Over time, the Weinberg’s assembled a world-class collection of Judaica and became increasingly active in the museum world. Fred assisted in the establishment of Beth Tzedec’s Helene and Rubin Dennis Jewish Museum, contributing items from the couple’s Judaica collection and securing the acquisition of the renowned Cecil Roth collection for the Museum during the early to mid-1960s. As a result of his significant contributions, he was bestowed the title of honourary curator to the Museum. Dr. Weinberg later branched out and assisted with the Koffler Gallery’s Lifecycle exhibition in 1984 as guest curator. The following year, he served as a special presenter and instructor to the docents at the “Precious Legacy” Czech Judaica exhibition at the ROM. The Weinberg’s most significant contribution to the museum world, however, was marked in September of 2000, when they were honoured at the opening of the Dr. Fred and Joy Cherry Weinberg Gallery of Judaica at the ROM, featuring some of their most valuable and treasured pieces.
Dr. Fred Weinberg passed away on October 30, 2003 at 84 years of age. The Weinberg Endowment Fund was established by the family at the University of Toronto’s Jewish Studies Program to honour Fred’s passion for Jewish history, rituals and artefacts. That year the Weinberg family also set up a fund in Fred’s name in support of the Therapeutic Clown Program, a highly visible and successful program within Sick Kids’ Pediatric Division.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Use Conditions Note: Records contain patient names and medical information.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Arts and culture
Health services and medicine
Community service
Name Access
Weinberg, Fred, 1919-2003
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-16
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-16
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 60 cm of textual records
Date
1970-2014, predominant 1993-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting the literary career and communal involvement of Shirley Kumove. The bulk of the accession includes correspondence, contracts, newspaper clippings and flyers relating to the publishing, marketing and promotion of Kumove’s various books. Also included is working content for Shirley’s unpublished book, Yet More Words, an unannotated manuscript for Kumove’s published book, Drunk From the Bitter Truth, and various book reviews written by Shirley. Of note are rejection letters Shirley received from publishers while trying to publish, Words Like Arrows, as well as correspondence with author Roger Greenwald in which he attached an original short story manuscript entitled, Conversations With Scott.
Accession also includes, ALTA conference material, issues of Paken Trager, and brochures for the National Yiddish Book Centre, the Canadian Jewish Book Awards, and Yiddish Studies at the University of Toronto. Finally accession also includes minutes, flyers, and planning material for the Habonim Reunion Organizing Committee (1983). Of note is a document containing personal memories of Habonim activities and its history (author unknown).
Custodial History
Joel is the son of Shirley Kumove. He provided the OJA with the material while he was cleaning out Shirley's house to put it up for sale.
Administrative History
Shirley Kumove is a Toronto-based writer and translator of Yiddish literature and folklore who has published articles and books relating to folklore, literature and the art of Yiddish translation. She was born in 1931, the first of two children of Harry (Hersh Meyer) Recht and Rifka Lessman. Kumove received her education at Toronto's Borochov School and, less formally, in her parents' home where Yiddish was the language spoken. She then attended New York University and the University of Toronto. During her career she has worked as a teacher of Judaic Studies and a public relations and special projects consultant; then in the 1980s, she served as Executive Director of The United Synagogue of America, Ontario Region, and Executive Director of JIAS. From 1997 to 2003, she was also a columnist for Paken Trager (The Book Peddler), the journal of the National Yiddish Book Centre in Massachusetts. Through the years she also undertook short-term translating projects on contract.
Kumove is the author of two books on Yiddish folksayings, Words Like Arrows: A Collection of Yiddish Folk Sayings (1984) and More Words, More Arrows (1999). A third volume is yet unpublished. She was a contributing editor of Found Treasures: Stories by Yiddish Women Writers (1994), and her most recent books are Drunk From the Bitter Truth: The Poems of Anna Margolin (2005), and a translated novel, Ordinary Jews (2009). She also worked for a time on a translation of the memoirs of Puah Rakovsky, "a Jewish revolutionary," but this work was not completed or published. In addition to her writing, Kumove has travelled extensively throughout North America giving lectures to Jewish Studies students, community groups and at conferences.
Kumove is a member of the American Literary Translators Association (ATLA) and has served on the boards of several organizations including chairing the Jewish Affairs committee of the National Council of Jewish Women. Shirley is married to Leon Kumove and they have three sons, Martin (Moishe), Aaron and Joel, as well as many grandchildren.
Shirley Kumove is the recipient of awards from the federal Multicultural Department and the Ontario Arts Council, and she won the 2007 Helen and Stan Vine Canadian Jewish Book Award for Yiddish Translation for Drunk from the Bitter Truth.
Descriptive Notes
Related material note: accession #2009-7/11
Subjects
Arts and culture
Communications and publishing
Women
Societies and associations
Name Access
Kumove, Shirley
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-4-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-4-2
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
ca. 100 photographs : b&w and col. ; 61 x 27 or smaller
3 cm of textual records
Date
[ca. 1900]-1994, predominent 1920-1960
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a scrapbook compiled by Edward J. Levy documenting the personal lives and musical careers of Sidney Levy and Philip and Elie Spivak. The scrapbook primarily consists of photographs of the Spivak and Levy families but also includes the musical score for Dirge for Orchestra composed by Oskar Morawetz in memory of Elie Spivak, naturalization papers for Philip Spivak and Bella Spivak, bulletins of the Royal Conservatory of Music and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, photographs of other musicians including Zara Nelsova, newsclippings, Ed Levy's bar mitzvah certificate, postcards and invitations. There is also an oversized photograph of the 19th Season of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, featuring Elie Spivak, Philip Spivak and Sidney Levy.
Administrative History
Sidney (Solomon) Levy (1898-1971) was born in London, England in 1898, the son of Elizabeth (nee Goldstein) Levy. He was the oldest brother to six younger sisters. Sidney was a violist who first played in movie houses in East London, where he met Phillip and Elie Spivak. During the 1920s, he played on touring ocean liners. He immigrated to Toronto in 1929 where he again played movie theatres and then built a career with the CBC radio orchestra and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. He also played the O'Keefe Centre's opening night performance of Camelot.
Elie (2 Feb. 1902-23 July 1960) and Phillip (1906-ca. 1962) Spivak were born in Uman, Ukraine, the sons of Reverend Joseph (d. 1965) and Bella (nee Finkler) (d. 1962) Spivak. They were two of five children: Elie, Clara (1904-1984), Philip, Siam (d. ca. 1964, New York) and Thelma (m. Heller) (1917-2008).Their paternal grandfather, Yankel Spivak, was a famous chazzan. Their maternal grandfather, Ezra Finkler, was a successful wheat merchant in Ukraine, who was killed during the pogroms. Joseph and Bella Spivak, who were living with their children on the Finkler's large estate at the time, managed to escape through Poland and Germany, eventually arriving in Paris in 1910. At this time, Elie entered the Paris Conservatoire at the age of seven and studied violin with Henri Berthelier from 1910-1915. Around 1915, the Spivak family immigrated to England, where Clara later met Sidney Levy through her brothers, who at the time was a theatre musician. Elie continued his studies at the Royal College of Manchester with Adolphe Brodsky in 1916. In 1923, he founded the Elie Spivak String Quartet in Manchester, the first ensemble to give chamber music concerts over the new BBC network.
The Spivak family left London for Canada in the late 1920s. Elie was the first of the siblings to immigrate and after resideing for one year in New York City, he moved to Toronto in 1926. Philip and Clara followed in 1929, as did Sidney Levy. Joseph and Bella Spivak, along with their children Siam and Thelma, ended up settling in New York City. Sidney married Clara Spivak in a ceremony in New York in the year they immigrated. They had one son, Edward (b. 1934). Clara was active in the TSO's Women's Committee.
In Toronto, Elie Spivak was first violin (1929-1942) of the Conservatory String Quartet and concertmaster (1931-1948) of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. In 1945, he gave the North American premiere of the Khachaturian Violin Concerto with the Boston Pops Orchestra. He was the first Canadian musician invited to Israel, touring the country for five months in 1950 as guest of the Jerusalem String Quartet. He led the Spivak String Quartet (1951-1956) and was heard frequently over CBC radio. He examined for the Royal Conservatory of Music (RCM) in Toronto and adjudicated for Kiwanis Festivals and the Canadian National Exhibition. He taught violin at the RCM from 1922 until his death. He also taught in the University Settlement Music School. Elie was a member of Goel Tzedec Synagogue and was married to Hilda (nee Narrol) Spivak. He had two sons, David and Michael.
Philip Spivak played the cello and was first stand with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. He also played in a chamber orchestra. He married the famous cellist Zara Nelsova, later divorced and remarried Iris Cooper. Philip was a member of Holy Blossom Temple.
Subjects
Arts and culture
Performance and entertainment
Name Access
Spivak, Elie, 1902-1960
Spivak, Phillip, 1906-ca. 1962
Levy, Sidney, 1898-1971
Levy, Edward, 1934-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-1-26
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-1-26
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 poster : col. ; 26 x 37 cm
Date
1973
Scope and Content
The accession consists of a poster for Grine Felder presented by the Toronto Yiddish Theatre, directed by Jacob Sandler and presented at Lawrence Park Collegiate on Sat. March 3, 1973. Poster also lists Canadian Jewish Congress, Negev Book Store and Pollock's as locations to buy tickets.
MG_RG
MG4A1e
Subjects
Arts and culture
Performance and entertainment
Name Access
Toronto Yiddish Theatre
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Koffler Centre of the Arts fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 100
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Koffler Centre of the Arts fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
100
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1967-2013
Physical Description
1.9 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
The Koffler Centre of the Arts was established in 1977, as part of the Bathurst Jewish Community Centre at Bathurst Street and Sheppard Ave., to enrich the cultural life of Toronto through arts education and exhibitions. The Koffler exists to encourage and develop the creative and artistic potential of the diverse community it serves. The Koffler Gallery as a public gallery and member of the Ontario Association of Art Galleries exhibits, interprets and documents works of excellence in the visual arts with a focus on contemporary Canadian art, including the work of visual artists, emerging artists, and programming of special interest in the Jewish Community.
The Koffler has offered an array of programmatic, education and learning programs, including national and international art exhibitions, educational tours and workshops, literary arts programs, art classes, lectures, concerts, film screenings, and theatre performances. The Koffler has also served public and private school students and their teachers through Koffler Gallery exhibition tours and workshops.
The Koffler Centre is governed by an executive board, standing and ad-hoc committees and is funded by endowments, donations and sponsorhips as its primary sources of funding. The Koffler also receives annual operating support from the UJA Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto and all levels of government, including the City of Toronto, the Ontario Arts Council and the Canada Council. The staff consists of an Executive Director, curators, and administrative support staff.
In 2013, after five years of off-site programs, the Koffler Centre of the Arts opened its administrative offices and the new Koffler Gallery at Artscape Youngplace on Shaw Street in downtown Toronto. The Artscape Youngplace facilities showcase Koffler Gallery exhibitions, public programs, expanded school and education programs, as well as Koffler cross-disciplinary programs – literary events, theatre readings and performances, concerts, workshops and more.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the activities and functions of the Koffler Centre of the Arts and its role in bringing Jewish-inspired visual, dance, dramatic and musical arts to the community. Included are records related to its Board of Directors and committees, its former affiliation with the Bathurst Jewish Community Centre and the YM-YWHA, building campaigns, financial operations, art exhibitions, the Jewish Book Fair and Bookmark Project, educational programming, performances and special events. Records include meeting minutes, memoranda, correspondence, committee reports, budget and financial statements, press clippings and reviews, program guides, art exhibition catalogues, artist statements and CVs, promotional material, photographs, architectural drawings, a sound recording and moving images. The fonds is arranged into the following ten series: Board of Directors, Committees, Planning and Development, Financial and Administrative, Public Relations, Educational Programming, Book Fair, Art Exhibitions, Performances and Events and the Bookmark Project.
Notes
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION NOTE: Includes 672 photographs, 3 architectural drawings, 1 sound recording, and 7 moving images.
Name Access
Koffler Centre of the Arts (Toronto, Ont.)
Subjects
Arts and culture
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
1982-7-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1982-7-6
Material Format
object
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 poster
3 cm of textual records
Artifacts
Date
1928-[ca. 1944]
Scope and Content
This accession includes a Standard Theatre poster for the play "Shaindele from Slabodke", staring Mischa and Lucy German (1928). Also included are pages from a scrapbook with Jewish Standard editorial writings from the 1930s by Hye Bossin. Topics include life on Spadina Avenue and in Kensinton Market, Yiddish entertainers, Emma Goldman's visit to Toronto, Caplan's Cafe, athletes and the Toronto islands. As well, there is a metal plate for F.B. Harris, circa 1944, with an inscription on it in memory of Sgt. F.B. Harris who "died in his country's service 6 June, 1944".
Subjects
Arts and culture
Performance and entertainment
Name Access
Standard Theatre
Goldman, Emma
Harris, Fred. B.
Bossin, Hye
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1976-6-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1976-6-1
Material Format
textual record
object
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 typewriter
Date
[between 1900 and 1939]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of Shimon Nepom's folding Corona Typewriter in Yiddish, with case. Accession also includes poems handwritten in Yiddish in a 1933 journal book.
Administrative History
Shimon Nepom was a Yiddish poet, born in Elizavetgrad, Kherson in 1882 and died in Toronto in 1939. He was an author as well, and a TTC motorman.
MG_RG
MG 6D
Subjects
Arts and culture
Name Access
Nepom, Shimon, 1882-1939
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1995-9-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1995-9-2
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 poster : col. ; 71 x 117 cm
Date
1947?
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a poster for the Victory Theatre on Spadina Ave., which was the former Standard Theatre. The poster is for a 3-act comedy entitled "Married Slaves" starring Chana Hollander. The poster is in Yiddish and English.
Custodial History
Little is known about the custodial history of this poster or how it came into the possession of the Canadian Jewish News.
Subjects
Performance and entertainment
Arts and culture
Name Access
Hollander, Chana
Victory Theatre
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2005-6-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2005-6-2
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
10 cm of textual records and graphic material
Date
[ca. 1955-1987]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a binder of materials related primarily to a Yiddish theatre production entitled "Shver tzu Zein a Yid" ("Hard to be a Jew") by Shalom Aleichem. This play was produced by Sylvia Grimson for the Yiddish Renascence Theatre and held at the Crest Theatre in 1975. The binder includes: photographs, critiques, letters of support, and reviews. Some loose copies of photographs of the The Heritage Players are also included.
Administrative History
Sylvia Fistell Grimson was born in Montreal ca. 1920s (she was never registered at birth) and grew up in Toronto. As a single mother of one son, Grimson worked for several years in factories and government offices before opening an antique store at Yonge and Wellesley which she ran for ten years. Grimson taught ballet and modern dance, wrote poetry, and always had a passion for theatre, Yiddish culture, and the need for Jewish self expression. Her dream was to bring Yiddish professional theatre to Toronto. In 1972, Grimson founded the Yiddish Renascence Theatre (which later became the Toronto Jewish Arts Theatre?) for which she produced the plays "Shver tzu Zein a Yid" and "The Three Lives of Adam". She has also performed in other plays such as "Come Blow Your Horn" and with The Heritage Players. She continues to live in Toronto, write poetry, and is also working on a book.
Subjects
Performance and entertainment
Arts and culture
Name Access
Grimson, Sylvia
Yiddish Renascence Theatre
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2005-11-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2005-11-1
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w ; 51 x 41 cm and 21 x 26 cm
1 item
Date
[ca. 1940]-[196-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 2 photographs and a sign related to the Jewish Public Library. One photograph is of Ben Zion Hyman, founder of the library, in graduation dress. There is writing in Hebrew on top of the photograph dated October 1940. A second photograph is of Bert Godfrey, Eddie Gelber and two other gentlemen sitting in the library. The sign is from the 1960s and has the address and operating hours of the library along with some other information for the patrons
Custodial History
The items were housed in the library and found during renovations.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Organizations
Arts and culture
Name Access
Jewish Public Library (Toronto, Ont.)
Hyman, Ben Zion
Godfrey, Bert
Gelber, Eddie
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2005-11-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2005-11-4
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Date
1956
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two photographs taken at a dinner honouring Ben Zion Hyman and the 15th anniversary of the Jewish Public Library. One photo is of the head table and several other smaller tables at the dinner, while the second photo is a posed group shot with Ben Zion Hyman. Also pictured are: Kalman Berger (top row, 6th from left), J. Marcus, Dave Green (top row, 9th from left), J. Bailin, Henry Papernik (top row, 2nd from left), R. Madesker, and Myer Gasner (bottom row, far right).
Subjects
Arts and culture
Events and celebrations
Organizations
Name Access
Hyman, Ben Zion
Berger, Kalman
Jewish Public Library (Toronto, Ont.)
Gasner, Myer
Marcus, J.
Green, Dave
Papernik, Henry
Bailin, J.
Madesker, R.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-24
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-24
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 20 x 25 cm + identification key
Date
[between 1940 and 1943]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a photograph of the Mandolin Orchestra of the Jewish Labour League, with a chart identifying some of the members. The Jewish Labour League is the precursor to the United Jewish Peoples' Order. Those that can be identified are: Jules Londin, Natalie Bruner, Claire Posen, Al Davidson, Shirley Seigel, Daniel Halperin, Pearl (nee Shimmerman) Fromstein?, Morris Ant?, Jack Parlow, Sol Shiner, Sol Blackman, Irving Schwartz, Sid Dolgay, Leon Temkin, Jack Kirk, , Mr. Philip Padoliak/Podoliak (teacher and conductor), Sol Baker (League Worker), Lilly Rosen, Al Bloom, Mae Harris and Lennie Dolgay.
Subjects
Arts and culture
Name Access
Jewish Labour League
United Jewish People's Order
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-35
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-35
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (jpg)
Date
1965, 1980
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two scanned photographs documenting Ruth Gorbet in two Little Theatre productions. The first photograph is of Ruth playing Sherry in a local production of Bus Stop in 1965. The second image is of Ruth playing Yenta in Fiddler on the Ruth in 1980.
Custodial History
These photographs were donated as part of the Small Jewish Ontario Communities initiative. The donor kept the originals and provided the OJA with the scans.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Arts and culture
Small communities
Name Access
Gorbet, Ruth
Places
Owen Sound, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-40
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-40
Material Format
textual record (electronic)
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
16 documents (pdf and jpg)
7 photographs (jpg)
Date
1954-1992
Scope and Content
Accession consists of scanned copies of material reflecting Lee Jourard's involvement in theatre in the Belleville area. There are eight theatre programmes, most of them of plays produced by the Belleville Theatre Guild, in which Jourard was a cast member and/or on the backstage crew. The records also include scanned newspaper clippings about Jourard's talks and plays (including photographs), and seven scanned copy photographs of Jourard.
The photographs are as follows:
01. A Thurber Carnival programme, 1964
02. Albert-St Catharines Review Playbill, Dec 3 1960
03. Belleville Advertiser, June 1971, page 21. Cast of The Drunkard. Lee Jourard in top hat far left.
04. Belleville Advertiser, June 1971, page21. Lee Jourard and Linda Archer dressed for their roles in The Drunkard.
05. Belleville Intel, April 17 1969, page 3.
06. Belleville Intel, Feb 13 1970. Flo Yannover as Queen Mother Yoland in the Lark.
07. Lee Jourard talk advert.
08. Programme Diary of Anne Frank, 1992.
09. Belleville Theatre. Lee Jourard in A Man For All Seasons.
10. Belleville Theatre. Photo of Lee Jourard at Rehersal, 1962.
11. Belleville Theatre Programme, 1962.
12. Birth announcement for Matthew Jourard, 1994.
13. Lee Jourard in costume receiving news of birth of grandson Mathew Joseph Jourard, 1994.
14. Cable Communications, Vol 43, No 10, Oct 1977.
15. Lee Jourard. CableVue 4 went colour, 1977.
16. Lee Jourard as Robert de Baudricourt and Milton A. Crystal as Brother Ladvenu in The Lark, March 1, 1970.
17. My Three Angels, 1960.
18. The Drunkard, June 2 to 12, 1971. Lee Jourard as Lawyer Cribbs and Edward Middleton as Stewart Arnott.
19. The Lark, 1970.
20. The Man Who Came to Dinner, 1956.
21. You Can't Take It With You, cast photo on stage, 1954.
22. You Can't Take It With You programme, 1954.
Administrative History
Entertainer Lee Jourard is well-known in the city of Belleville for his support of the arts and his community involvement. He worked as a broadcaster for CJBQ radio, was the first Community Programs Director at the Cablevue 4 television station, and was a founding member of Belleville's Cultural Awards Committee and the Harbour Improvement Committee. He is a longtime member of the Belleville Theatre Guild, having been in the cast and crew of many of its producations from the 1950s through the 1990s. Jourard is also a member of the Bay of Quinte Power Squadron and the Moira River Conservation Authority Advisory Board. In 2007 he was named Senior of the Year in the City of Belleville.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Arts and culture
Name Access
Jourard, Lee
Places
Belleville, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-3-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-3-6
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1926-1944
Scope and Content
This accession consists of material documenting Louis Herman's career as an entertainer in Toronto during the late 1920s until the early 1940s. The records consist of concert programs, correspondence from Jewish organizations that hired him to perform, an invitation, press clippings as well as photocopies of photographs and concert posters.
Administrative History
Louis Herman was born on 4 January 1911. His father, Reverand Samuel Herman, was a cantor who first worked in Montreal and then moved with his family to Toronto. They lived at 20 Major Street during the 1920s and 1930s.
Louis was a child prodigy who studied under Cantor Yossele Rosenblatt. He established a music career as a boy, singing soprano with the synagogue choir and later performing on the Maxwell Coffee Hour in the United States, which was hosted by the New York Jewish radio station WEVD.
During the 1920s and 1930s he sang professionally and performed at a variety of venues, entertaining Jewish organizations and groups in Toronto. He also performed outside of the city at that time in the American mid-west and the northeast.
After the start of the war, Louis enlisted and became a private in the Canadian Army. He entertained the troops, appearing in stage shows in Canada and overseas, often appearing with famous acts like Wayne and Shuster. He also saw combat duty.
After the war he returned to Canada and studied at the Royal Conservatory of Music. After completing his studies, he decided to become a cantor like his father. He married Yetta and moved with their children to Camden, New Jersey in 1957 in order to serve as the cantor to Congregation Beth El. They lived there until the late 1960s, when the the synagogue was relocated to Cherry Hill. Cantor Herman retired in 1982. He passed away on December 16, 2004. His son David is the Rabbi Shaarei Tfiloh in Baltimore.
Use Conditions
None
Subjects
Performance and entertainment
Arts and culture
Name Access
Herman, Louis
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-5-18
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-5-18
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w
1 folder textual records
1 poster
Date
[ca. 1920]-[ca. 1955]
Scope and Content
This accession consists of material documenting the career of Louis Herman. It includes music programs dating from around 1920 until 1939, bulletins, the Y-Times (1938 & 1942) as well as correspondence, newsletters, skits, music and programs from the war years. Finally, it includes a poster as well as three photographs of Louis Herman taken during the course of his career.
Custodial History
The material was donated to the OJA by Louis' son.
Administrative History
Louis Herman was born on 4 January 1911. His father, Reverand Samuel Herman, was a cantor who first worked in Montreal and then moved with his family to Toronto. They lived at 20 Major Street during the 1920s and 1930s.
Louis was a child prodigy who studied under Cantor Yossele Rosenblatt. He established a music career as a boy, singing soprano with the synagogue choir and later performing on the Maxwell Coffee Hour in the United States, which was hosted by the New York Jewish radio station WEVD.
During the 1920s and 1930s he sang professionally and performed at a variety of venues, entertaining Jewish organizations and groups in Toronto. He also performed outside of the city at that time in the American mid-west and the northeast.
After the start of the war, Louis enlisted and became a private in the Canadian Army. He entertained the troops, appearing in stage shows in Canada and overseas, often appearing with famous acts like Wayne and Shuster. He also saw combat duty.
After the war he returned to Canada and studied at the Royal Conservatory of Music. After completing his studies, he decided to become a cantor like his father. He married Yetta and moved with their children to Camden, New Jersey in 1957 in order to serve as the cantor to Congregation Beth El. They lived there until the late 1960s, when the the synagogue was relocated to Cherry Hill. Cantor Herman retired in 1982. He passed away on December 16, 2004. His son David is the Rabbi Shaarei Tfiloh in Baltimore.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Related material note: also see accession 2007-3-6.
Subjects
Arts and culture
Performance and entertainment
Name Access
Herman, Louis
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Isidore Kaplan
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
3 June 1975
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Isidore Kaplan
Number
AC 009
AC 010
Subject
Small communities
Arts and culture
Business and commerce
Interview Date
3 June 1975
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Sophie Milgram
Total Running Time
009A: 29 minutes 009B: 41 minutes 010A: 30 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
Reduced sound quality at times.
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Isidore Kaplan was born in Vilna in 1910. His father was the first Jew to settle in Kirkland Lake, Ontario. Isidore's father, a successful businessman, opened a general store in 1915 and a movie theatre in 1923. The Jewish community of Kirkland Lake grew to 135 families and was able to support a synagogue, kosher butcher and after-school cheder at its peak.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Kaplan, Isidore
Milgram, Sophie
Geographic Access
Kirkland Lake, Ont.
Cobalt, Ont.
Englehart, Ont.
Krugerdorf, Ont.
Swastika, Ont.
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
AC 009: Side 1
0.20: Isidore was born in a town near Vilna in 1910.
0.40: Isidore had 2 brothers and 1 sister, all immigrated to Canada.
1.20: Isidore’s father came alone to America initially in 1907, went back to Europe to take care of a leather business. Returned a second time to America (New York) in 1912. Came to Toronto because of a contact.
6.15: Isidore’s father and friend, Mr. Teitlebaum, moved to Cobalt in northern Ontario to pursue employment opportunities that were the result of the growth of the mining industry. Mentioned the mining of cobalt and silver.
7.50: Isidore’s father and Teitlebaum walked from Cobalt to Timmins via Engelhart and Swastika. Described the development of the Jewish community in northern Ontario. Existing Jewish cemetery. Were offered land to farm by the government in Krugerdorf. 25-30 Jewish families started farming.
9.43: Explained that some of the Jews who settled the area had escaped from the Russo-Japanese war.
10.27: Reported that the Ontario government helped to bring out Jewish prisoners who had been captured by the Japanese.
11.55: Related a story of Isadore’s father rooming with a Jewish woman, Mrs. Rosa Brown in Swastika.
14.11: Listed names (?) of the agents for the town site and explained about the purchase of lots.
15.50: Isidore’s father was the first Jew in Kirkland Lake. He opened a general store in 1915. Related a story about how he acquired the materials to build the store. Described the construction of the store.
23.00: Isidore’s father’s brother-in-law, Max, became a partner in the business in 1915.
25.45: Isidore’s father traveled to Toronto to purchase supplies. Ordered groceries from Rubin and Fine who were in the grocery business in Toronto.
28.00: Business was very slow for several months. Competed with ?Labarge?
29.00: Mrs. Brown suggested that Isidore’s father start to sell meat.
AC 009: Side 2
0.40: Mrs. Rosa Brown helped solicit customers who were uneasy about doing business with Jews.
2.55: Isidore’s father offered more competitive prices. Business increased.
5.26: Expanded business to sell ice cream. Business prospered.
7.17: Described incident which he suspected was anti-Semitic involving the deliberate starting of a fire in the store in 1917. The store was destroyed.
8.35: Isidore’s uncle Max Kaplan, brother to his mother was his father’s business partner.
9.30: Isidore’s father rebuilt store. Once again the business prospered.
11.45: In 1921 ?Percussis? opened a store
12.48: Isidore’s father bought furs (e.g.beaver) and sold them to Hudson’s Bay outlet.
13.30: In 1921 Isidore’s father purchased 2 lots across the street from Harry Oaks to build a movie theatre.
15.20: Related problems regarding the purchase (e.g. inability to secure a mortgage, difficulty acquiring building supplies, leveling the property, etc.). Described how Harry Oaks (who was described as a very wealthy man) arranged for Isidore’s father to borrow money from the Royal Bank. Isidore attributed this to their trusting relationship.
19.50: The building was also used as a meeting hall for 2 Lodges, Masonic and ?
20.53: The theatre was completed in 1923.
23.40: Brought the family from Poland to Kirkland Lake, 4 children, his wife and Isidore’s aunt in 1923. Isidore’s grandmother was unable to come due to health reasons. Initially, Isidore’s father purchased tickets from ?Jurovski?, local travel agent but all was lost so he purchased tickets directly from White Star line.
25.30: 1 other Jewish family in Kirkland Lake, ?Stotts?
26.00: Other Jewish families moved into Kirkland Lake around 1924 to 1927.
27.00: By 1927, there were enough Jews to have a Minyan for Yontif in Kirkland Lake. Held services in the first theatre. Before 1927, Jews traveled to Englehart for religious services.
27.55: Mentioned a large fire in northern Ontario in 1922. (Kirkland Lake was spared.) The original synagogue in Englehart was destroyed. Rented another hall for religious services.
28.28: Mentioned a pious Jew who was a farmer who acted as prayer leader, Baal Tefilah.
AC 010: Side 1
0.22: Mr. Finkleman and Mr. Levinsky paid $350 for a lot and built a synagogue in 1928 in Kirkland Lake. Originally, held services in the back of Mr. Levinsky’s candy store.
2.55: About 12-14 Jewish families in Kirkland Lake by 1927.
3.20: Jews worked as merchants or miners. Isidore’s father helped find jobs for miners. Listed names of local merchants.
6.50: Reported 135 Jewish families in Kirkland Lake. Cited incidents of antisemitism. E.g. Isidore’s uncle who served on town council could not be elected Mayor because he was Jewish, antisemitic comments.
7.58: In 1975, reported that 8 Jewish families remained in Kirkland Lake, Shul was closed. Jews have moved from surrounding areas.
9.23: First Rabbi, Ruben, came to Kirkland Lake in 1928.
11.55: Next Rabbi, ?Luvich? originated from Holland. Related story about how Isidore’s, uncle Max approached a member of parliament, Russell Gordon, in order to prevent the Rabbi from being sent back to Europe.
13.45: Jewish community in Kirkland Lake continued to grow until 1937. Reported community decline with a downturn in the economy with the outbreak of the Second World War, a mining strike and closures of mines.
18.50: Synagogue rebuilt in 1945. The bima was purchased from a synagogue in Montreal by Mr. Stott. The bima had been built in Hungary.
21.10: Kirkland Lake supported a local kosher butcher, Turkin
22.06: The Rabbi from Kirkland Lake traveled by train to Jewish communities in outlying areas.
22.55: Discussed high rate of intermarriage.
24.35: Jewish education taught by Rabbi in after-school program.
25.16: Reported that children of founding Jewish families tended to be University educated. Children left Kirkland Lake and did not return.
Source
Oral Histories

Isidore Kaplan's father was the first Jewish resident of Kirkland Lake, Ontario. In this clip, Isidore relates his father's journey in 1912 from Toronto to Kirkland Lake in northern Ontario via Engelhart and Swastika.

In this clip, Isidore Kaplan describes the decline of Kirkland Lake, Ontario

Name
Jennie Goldstein and Mr. and Mrs. Boris Coopersmith
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
January 26, 1975
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Jennie Goldstein and Mr. and Mrs. Boris Coopersmith
Number
AC 147
AC 148
Subject
Arts and culture
Performance and entertainment
Interview Date
January 26, 1975
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Stephen Spiesman
Total Running Time
AC147A: 44. minutes
AC148B: 45. minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Jennie Goldstein immigrated from Russia to Toronto in 1914. While living and working in The Ward, Jennie married Harry Goldstein, who was noted as both a "dresser" and actor in Toronto's Lyric and Standard Theatres. After Harry's passing Jennie became a supplier of costumes for the Yiddish Theatre. In 1920, to help support the family, Jennie opened a 'deli" stand alongside the original Shopsy's deli located in the area of Kensington Market. Jennie and Harry's daughter Bess married Boris Coppersmith whose parents, Yossel and Nessie, owned a variety store at Spadina and Baldwin Street.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Harris, Harry
Pasternak, Chanina
Goldstein, Jennie
Coopersmith, Boris
Coopersmith, Bess
Standard Theatre
Lyric Theatre
Speisman, Stephen
Geographic Access
St. John's Ward
Kensington Market
Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Jennie Goldstein describes the early years of Toronto's Yiddish theatres such as the Tivoli and the Standard, and actors such as Harry Harris and Chanina Pasternak.

In this clip, Jennie Goldstein describes the performances and actors of the Lyric Theatre circa 1914

Name
Nathan Cassels
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
November 7, 1988
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Nathan Cassels
Number
AC 207
Subject
Arts and culture
Performance and entertainment
Interview Date
November 7, 1988
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Carol Rosenthal
Total Running Time
Side 1 30 minutes 30 seconds Side 2 13 minutes 30 seconds
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Nathan Cassels was born in Montreal in 1903. As a child, his family moved to Toronto. He studied clarinet with Mr. Glass and performed with the Russian Juvenile Concert Band for two years. He left school after grade three and started working as a plumber at age 13. He played clarinet with the 110th Regimental Band during the First World War. His music career spanned 60 years. He moved to Detroit in 1926 because of the many Big Band opportunities. He returned to Toronto in the 1930s where he played with the Romanelli Band for 18 years and free-lanced as a studio musician. He later divided his time between work as a traveling textile salesman and musician. He was married and had one daughter born in 1937.
Material Format
sound recording
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\AC 207 Cassels\AC 207 notes.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Nathan Cassels recalls a trip taken by the Russian Juvenile Concert Band to Detroit, Michigan.

In this clip, Nathan Cassels reminisces about his early career as a musician with various bands.

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