Search Results

New Search Photo Search Audiovisual Search
115 records – page 1 of 3.
Level
Item
ID
Item 3917
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3917
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1932
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Scope and Content
Identified in this photograph, pictured left to right, are: Israel Gang; Roy Shapiro; Rabbi Samuel Sachs; [unknown]; David Siegel; Sarah Siegel; Mark Zimmerman; [unknown]; [unknown]; [Carl or Murray] Keyfetz. This photograph was taken looking north on University Avenue.
Notes
Photograph is the same as photo 1876.
Name Access
Gang, Israel
Shapiro, Roy
Keyfetz, Carl
Goel Tzedec Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Beth Midrash Hagadol Synagogue
Sachs, Samuel, Rabbi
Subjects
Education
Religion
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1979-11-15
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
George Morrison fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 99; Item 41
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
George Morrison fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
99
Item
41
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1978]
Physical Description
1 slide : col. ; 35 mm
Name Access
Lincoln Place Nursing Home
Subjects
Older people
Religion
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Accession Number
1980-6-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
George Morrison fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 99; Item 158
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
George Morrison fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
99
Item
158
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1979
Physical Description
1 slide : col. ; 35 mm
Name Access
Shaar Shalom Synagogue
Subjects
Building
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Don Mills Road (Toronto, Ont.)
Thornhill (Ont.)
Accession Number
1980-6-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Zionist Centre cornerstone ceremony series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 37; Series 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Zionist Centre cornerstone ceremony series
Level
Series
Fonds
37
Series
3
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1962
Physical Description
21 negatives : b&w ; 11 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
The Zionist Centre's new building, home for the Toronto Zionist Council, was located at 788 Marlee Avenue.
The Toronto Zionist Council, the Toronto branch for the Zionist Organization of Canada, was founded in 1907.Their mandate was to promote the ideals of Z.O.C in Toronto, which necessitated the responsibility of heading up and organizing local programmes for the Toronto Jewish community.
This organization played a prominent role within the community, renting space to several Jewish organizations including: Ajalon Lodge, Camp Shalom, Canadian Zionist Federation, Hadassah Wizo, Herzl Zion Organization, Israel Medical Association, Jewish Agency, Jewish National Fund, Keltzer Sick Benefit Society, Keren Hatarbut, Linitzer Society, Sons of Abraham, Mozirer Society, Toronto Independent Benevolent Society, United Israel Appeal, Yavne Zion Congregation, Young Judaea, Youth & Hechalutz Zion Benevolent Society. The building also housed the Zionist Organization of Canada's national headquarters.
Many of these organizations were affiliated with the Toronto Zionist Council. Due to the volume of Zionist organizations operating out of the Zionist Centre, the building came to be regarded as the official centre for all Zionist activities in Toronto.
Plans for the new Zionist Centre of T.Z.C. were conceived in 1962 after the earlier building on Spadina Ave. was sold to the St. Vladimir's Ukrainian Institute.
Ground was broken on November 1, 1962 and a drawing of the building was put on display at the Diamond Jubilee Convention of the Zionist Organization of Canada held in Toronto.
The groundbreaking ceremony was held on Sunday December 23, 1962 at 11:00 am. The ceremony was officiated by members of the Toronto Zionist Council's building committee, which was comprised of: Louis L. Lockshin, Stephen E. Berger, John R. Devor, Controller Philip G. Givens, and Julius Hayman. Phil Givens--president--and Louis L. Lockshin--chairman of the building committee--conducted the ceremony.
Also present were Eliezer N. Dembitz, Consul of Israel; Joseph N. Frank, National President of the Zionist Organization of Canada; and Julius Hayman, President of the Central Division of Z.O.C.
Scope and Content
Series consists of the negatives documenting the laying of the cornerstone ceremony for the new Zionist Centre of the Toronto Zionist Council.
Notes
Selection for this series was based on the following criteria: site building, ceremonial, and members of the building committee.
Name Access
Zionist Centre
Toronto Zionist Council
Lockshin, Louis L.
Berger, Stephen E.
Devor, John R.
Givens, Philip G.
Hayman, Julius
Dembitz, Eliezer N.
Frank, Joseph N.
Zionist Organization of Canada
Ajalon Lodge
Camp Shalom
Canadian Zionist Federation
Hadassah-Wizo
Herzl Zion
Israel Medical Association
Jewish Agency
Jewish National Fund
Keltzer Sick Benefit Society
Keren Hatarbut
Linitzer Society
Sons of Abraham
Mozirer Society
Toronto Independent Benevolent Society
United Israel Appeal
Yavne Zion Congregation
Young Judeae
Youth & Hechalutz
Zion Benevolent Society
Subjects
Building
Zionism
Physical Condition
Negatives are cellulose triacetate.
Related Material
see also Zionist Organization of Canada fonds [fonds 28]
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
9
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1925-1989
Physical Description
31.8 m of textual records
319 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Immigrant Aid Society of Canada was established in 1920 by the newly-formed Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC). A Toronto branch was established in Toronto in a storefront office on Spadina Avenue, but the organization was rudimentary, and as the enthusiasm that spurred the founding of CJC died out, JIAS soon faltered. Then in 1922 it was taken over and reactivated under the cooperative support of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto, B'nai B'rith and the Council of Jewish Women. JIAS was legally incorporated on 30 August 1922. It also operated under the moniker of the Emergency Jewish Immigrant Aid Committee, and it changed its name to Jewish Immigrant Aid Services in 1954.
Charged with organizing emergency relief for European Jews in distress, JIAS became the central agency of the Jewish community to facilitate the lawful entry of Jewish immigrants into Canada, and provided them with welfare services, transportation, and assistance with accommodation and employment after their arrival. In addition, JIAS offered consultation services for sponsors of potential immigrants, ran a competitive foreign remittance service, and campaigned to counter the activities of unscrupulous steamboat agents, lawyers and influence peddlers, or “shtadlanim,” who often victimized immigrants and sponsors alike.
In conjunction with similar efforts by the CJC, JIAS was also actively engaged in negotiating for the increased admission of Jewish immigrants to Canada. In 1923, the federal government instituted a permit-based immigration program and JIAS competed with travel agents and solicitors in the private sector for these limited quota permits. After combating the anti-immigration policies of the Depression era, the outbreak of war in 1939 virtually closed the already limited avenues for immigration.
JIAS Canada was organized into a National Office in Montreal and regional offices in Winnipeg (Western Region), Toronto (Central Region) and Halifax (Eastern Region). The Central Region covered Ontario, and established a full-time head office in 1935 at 399 Spadina Avenue in Toronto (hence the Central Region was sometimes called simply the Toronto Office). The office later moved to 265 Spadina Avenue. JIAS Toronto’s board of directors met on a regular basis at different locations in Toronto, including 206 Beverley Street and in the Talmud Torah building at 9 Brunswick Avenue. The first JIAS Toronto board included notable Toronto residents such as Henry Dworkin, Mrs. Draiman, Mr. Kronick, Dr. Brodey and Mrs. Willinsky. The role of the board was to oversee the operations of the Central Region. It rendered decisions on issues relating to finances, procedures and policies, negotiations with the federal Immigration Branch, as well as individual cases that required their attention.
General meetings of the Central Region membership were held annually. The 1943 JIAS constitution states that regional annual meetings were to be held for “receiving and considering reports,” holding nominations and elections for the executive, and discussing JIAS’s program and policies.
In the post-war era, JIAS shifted its focus to renewed efforts on behalf of individual claimants and community support, while the focus for lobbying for a reversal of Canada's immigration policy fell increasingly under the jurisdiction of the CJC. A boom in immigration between 1947 and 1952 saw the arrival of large numbers of Jewish immigrants to all parts of Canada and the Toronto Office of JIAS renewed its efforts to meet the needs of this new influx. Major world events also sparked other waves of immigration from Hungary, Czechoslovakia, North Africa and Russia, to which JIAS responded in turn. JIAS worked in conjunction with other immigrant aid societies such as HIAS, the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, in the United States, to facilitate immigration to the United States, and later to Israel, where many of the immigrants and refugees coming to Canada had family and ultimately settled.
Custodial History
Custody of these records was transferred to the Ontario Jewish Archives by JIAS in 1983, as preparations were under way for the move to a new facility in North York. Much of the material was in four-cubic-foot boxes and in file cabinets.
The accession was divided into three sections: files which were at the JIAS office and had been retained in their original order; files which had been retrieved from a flood in the basement of 152 Beverley St. and consequently had been thrown into dry boxes without regard to order; files discovered in the furnace rooms at 150 and 152 Beverley St., intact but covered in coal dust. The bulk of the records were stored off-site, with dirty files being isolated from the rest.
The dust-covered materials were cleaned at an off-site location, placed in temporary boxes and transferred to the Archives and restored, as far as was possible, to their original order.
Clips were removed and replaced as appropriate with archivally acceptable ones. All materials were transferred to acid-free folders and boxes.
Scope and Content
Fonds contains the records of the Toronto Office (Central region) of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Canada. The fonds consists primarily of textual records: minutes, correspondence, financial records, reports, immigration files, naturalization case files, social service case files and the records of attempts to trace missing individuals. There are also photographs of special events, speakers and arriving immigrants.
The fonds represents an important resource for the study of Canadian Jewry, especially when taken in conjunction with the JIAS National Office records at the Canadian Jewish Congress National Archives in Montreal, and those of the Western Office at the Library and Archives of Canada. It documents the means by which a particular Canadian ethnic community has dealt with the problems of rescue, settlement and government relations. These records also offer insight into the relationship between the Toronto Office and the other branches of JIAS, and invite comparison with similar agencies in the United States, as well as those of other ethnic groups in Canada.
The material collected includes information about the countries of origin, transportation routes, settlement and employment patterns of Jewish immigrants to Canada in the twentieth century. The documents also touch upon important related issues such as advocacy, sponsorship, admission processes, health and social problems.
These records cover several waves of immigration following the Second World War: Holocaust survivors in the late 1940s, Sephardic (North African) and Hungarian Jews in the 1950s, Russian and Czechoslovakian Jews in the 1960s, and additional Russians in the 1970s.
The records also contain significant information for those researchers looking to conduct genealogical research into Jewish immigrants and their descendents.
The fonds has been arranged with one sous-fonds, which contains the records of the National JIAS office in Montreal. In total there are 17 series. The Toronto office (main fonds) series are: 1. Board of Directors and Executive Committee Minutes; 2. Annual meeting proceedings; 3. Reports; 4. Legal ; 5. Administration; 6. JIAS Committees; 7. External committees; 8. Financial ; 9. Arrivals; 10. Immigration case files; 11. Social service assistance case files; 12. Photographs; 13. Miscellaneous. The National Office sous-fonds is divided into the following series: 1. National executive meeting minutes; 2. National annual meeting proceedings; 3. National annual reports; 4. Publications; and Photographs.
Notes
Physical description note: Physical extent is based on fully processed records. Additional accessions are not included (see Related Material note below).
Associated material note: The CJC National Archive, in Montreal, has additional JIAS records from 1920-1989 including 275 m of textual records and graphic materials (3250 photos): collection number I0037; alpha-numeric designation MA 4. The National Archives of Canada, Manitoba branch, in Winnipeg, has Jewish Historical Society of Western Canada JIAS textual records from 1923-1950 on 18 microfilm reels: Former archival reference number MG28-V114 (no replacement listed). The originals of these records are maintained by the Jewish Historical Society of Western Canada.
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
Other OJA records relating to JIAS may be found in the following accessions: 1979-9-5; 1988-5-2; 1991-10-5; 2006-3-11.
Creator
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto
Accession Number
1983-8-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Sous-fonds
ID
Fonds 9-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Sous-fonds
Fonds
9-1
Material Format
textual record
Date
1926-1982
Physical Description
51 cm of textual records
14 photographs : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Immigrant Aid Society of Canada was organized into a national office in Montreal and regional offices in Winnipeg (Western Region), Toronto (Central Region) and Halifax (Eastern Region). The national office was responsible for directing and managing all the affairs of the organization, including defining national and international policy; administration of regional offices; national budget; fundraising; external relations with other organizations, such as the United Jewish Relief Agencies (UJRA) and Jewish Family & Child Services (JF&CS); and publicity. It also organized the annual meeting, special events and conventions.
Membership in JIAS was open to individuals, organizations or companies who paid an annual fee. General meetings of the membership were held at least once every two years, where reports were presented and considered, nominations and elections held for national officers and the national executive committee, policies, programs and problems discussed, and decisions taken.
The National Executive Committee of JIAS was composed of the following members: national president; three vice-presidents (the presidents of the Western, Central and Eastern regions), with the addition in the 1950s of a vice-president at large; three regional treasurers, eventually reduced to one national treasurer; secretary; and twelve members comprising four representatives from each region. In 1929 the ‘executive secretary’ position was renamed ‘executive director.’ According to the 1943 constitution, the executive was required to hold meetings at least three times a year, in alternate cities. In 1954 this was amended to twice a year.
During the early stages of JIAS's operations, it had to face the difficulty of being overstretched financially, as it sought to respond to and to change the often oppressive living conditions of new immigrants and the situation of those held in federal detention centres. The organization’s principled approach to immigrant welfare won JIAS much of its early success, as it became the preferred contact for government officials who had formerly dealt with numerous independent agencies, many of which had profited from the exploitation of desperate immigrants. This situation also profited the government, however, as the responsibility for establishing the priority of applications reverted increasingly to JIAS as it had to limit its appeals by the quotas imposed by the federal government.
JIAS was one of the founding organizations responsible for the establishment of the Canadian Council for Refugees (CCR) in 1978, which has since operated as a non-profit umbrella organization to coordinate the efforts of immigrant and refugee advocacy groups. JIAS continues to operate offices across Canada in Calgary, Edmonton, Halifax, Hamilton, London, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Vancouver, Windsor and Winnipeg. The JIAS National Office moved from Montreal to Toronto in 1989, with the appointment of Susan Davis to National Director, and is now located at 4580 Dufferin St., Suite 306, Toronto, Ontario.
Scope and Content
Sous-fonds consists of National Office records retained by the Toronto JIAS office as reference copies. Records include meeting minutes, speeches and reports from annual meetings, and the published annual reports produced from the annual meetings. The sous-fonds covers the years 1926 to 1982 and is divided into the following series: 1. National Executive meeting minutes; 2. National annual meeting proceedings; 3. National annual reports; 4. Publications; and 5. Photographs.
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Canada (creator)
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
1976-10-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1976-10-2
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 photograph
Date
[ca. 1935]-[ca. 1970]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the records of Cantor B. Charloff, including a photograph of Cantor B. Charloff and choir, a book of music entitled "Tfilas N'yiloh", a composition for Psalm 30, and music for Chanukah.
Subjects
Religion
Occupations
Name Access
Charloff, Boris
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1980-2-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1980-2-2
Material Format
text
graphic material
Physical Description
15 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1940-1962
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Workmen's Circle (Arbeiter Ring). Included are: three architectural drawings of the summer cottage for Camp Yunvelt (Pickering, Ont.); two group portraits (one with identification and one without); a bound periodical/journal from 1935; a hardcopy of Fertsik yor arbeter-ring: a geshikhte in bilder (English: Forty Years Workmen's Circle: A History in Pictures) put out by the National Executive Committee of the Workmen's Circle in 1940; a bound periodical/journal of Kultur un dertsiung (English: Culture and Education) for the year 1942; a bound periodical/journal of Der freynd (English: The Friend) for the year 1942; a booklet by Rev. Nathan Stolnitz's titled Some of the Numerous Comments and Reviews on Music in Jewish Life (1957?); a newspaper clipping titled "A bukh vom oyngt" (English: A Book That Opens) that was published in 1957; a hardcopy of Workmen's Circle, Pioneers and Builders put out by the Workmen's Circle Pioneers and Builders Committee in 1962; and two other Yiddish-language publications that have not been identified.
Administrative History
The Workmen's Circle (Yiddish: Arbeiter Ring) was founded in the United States by Jewish immigrants in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Circle branches were established in Canada in Montreal and Toronto in 1907 and 1908. In 1917, the Toronto branches incorporated as nonprofit organization called the Arbeiter Ring. The organization celebrated its centenery in 2017.
Descriptive Notes
Language: Most of the material in the accession is in Yiddish. The drawings are in English and a few of the publications are in English and Yiddish.
Subjects
Camps
Cottages
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Workmen's Circle (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Pickering (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1983-1-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1983-1-10
Material Format
sound recording
textual record
Physical Description
2 audio cassettes
1 folder of textual records
Date
1977
Scope and Content
Accession consists of an interview and corresponding transcript, with Jack Shindman, past-president of JIAS, on immigration and his family.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Shindman, Jack
Drutz, Danny
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Rovno, Ukraine
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1996-6-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1996-6-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
15 m of textual records
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the records of the Council of Jewish Federations of Canada. Also included within the records are those of the National Budgeting Conference (NBC).
Use Conditions
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Council of Jewish Federations of Canada
National Budgeting Conference
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1996-6-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1996-6-4
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1.5 m of textual records
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records of the North American Jewish Students Network.
Use Conditions
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Children
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
North American Jewish Students Network (Canada)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1986-11-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1986-11-4
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
4.2 m of textual records
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the operations of the Toronto Hebrew Free Loan Casa.
Use Conditions
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1976-9-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1976-9-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 text
Date
1910, 1928
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two copies of the constitution of Congregation Shaarei Tzedec, printed in 1910 and 1928 and a copy of the book, Fun folks moil = 1000 Yiddish Proverbs.
MG_RG
MG 3 A 36
Subjects
Religion
Name Access
Congregation Shaarei Tzedec (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-22
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-22
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1973-1983
Scope and Content
Accession consists of Toronto Secular Jewish Association newsletters from 1980 to 1983 and a photocopy of the SJA constitution and by-laws (1973).
Administrative History
Toronto's Secular Jewish Association (SJA) was founded in the late 1960s by 15 families who felt a strong identification with the humanistic, ethical and cultural roots of Judaism rather than with theistic or political affiliations.
MG_RG
MG2 B1Y
Subjects
Religion
Societies
Name Access
Toronto Secular Jewish Association
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1988-2-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1988-2-12
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1.8 cm of textual records
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records pertaining to the operation of the Kashruth Department of the Toronto Jewish Congress. The department was situated within the Orthodox Division.
Use Conditions
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Religion
Food
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Toronto Jewish Congress
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1988-10-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1988-10-1
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1.2 m of textual records
Date
1986-1987
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the Executive Director files of the CJC, Central Region. The files were created and accumulated by E. Y. Lipsitz.
Use Conditions
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1990-5-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1990-5-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
12 m of textual records
Date
[197-]-[199-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting various activities of the Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region, including the small communities, regional committees, eduction and culture. The records appear to have originated with E. Y. Lipsitz.
Use Conditions
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2005-8-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2005-8-4
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1907
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a Goel Tzedec Synagogue seat deed for Harry Yanover, purchased in 1907.
Administrative History
Goel Tzedec was established in 1883. It was originally an orthodox congregation founded by a group of recent immigrants from Lithuania and was first situated in a room at Richmond and York Streets. Three years later a former Methodist church at University Avenue at Elm Street was purchased and remodelled. In 1904 the congregation hired an architect to construct a new building and in February of 1907, the synagogue on University Avenue was dedicated. It became the largest synagogue in Toronto, accomodating 1200 congregants.
During the early decades of the twentieth century, Goel Tzedec became more ethnically mixed and established a religious school and women's auxiliary to help raise money and run special events. In 1925, the congregation joined the Conservative Synagogue Movement and introduced changes to its services.
In September of 1952, Goel Tzedec and its sister synagogue Beth Hamidrash Hagadol, amalgamated to form Beth Tzedec.
Harry Yanover was the grandfather of Rayna Rabin.
Subjects
Synagogues
Religion
Name Access
Yanover, Harry
Goel Tzedec Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2005-9-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2005-9-7
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1939
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a notice in Yiddish from Rabbi Meir Levy announcing to the Jewish community that shochtim Yichiel Wagman and Soloway, Hymie Weisfeld, Lazar Salkovitch, and Moishe Gross are valid, certified kosher butchers. These shochtim, it states, are well known in Toronto, learned in Torah, and they have been certified under the strictest rules of kashrut.
Subjects
Religion
Food
Occupations
Name Access
Levy, Meir Zvi
Wagman, Yichiel
Weisfeld, Hymie
Salkovitch, Lazar
Gross, Moishe
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2005-11-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2005-11-8
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
1 film reel ; 8 mm
Date
[197-?]
Scope and Content
Accession is an 8mm home movie reel of Succah at an unknown religious school.
Subjects
Religion
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-3-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-3-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
12.5 m of textual material and 6 boxes of index cards
Date
[195-?]-[198-]
Scope and Content
This accession consists of 43 cubic foot boxes of closed case files as well as six boxes of index cards created by the United Restitution Organization, Toronto Office. The case files document the Article 2 (boxes 1 - 11) and Hardship (boxes 12 - 43) programs. Most of the documentation within the case files are in German.
The index cards document the BEG and Russlandfaille programs and correspond to records that were transferred to the Holocaust Museum in Washington. The files were created during the early years of the URO that were donated by URO to the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. in October, 1990. That institution has approximately 100 boxes of closed case files from the Toronto Office. The index cards DO NOT correspond to any case files that we have as part of our holdings.
Custodial History
After the Toronto URO office closed, the one case worker left moved from the second floor of the Lipa Green Building to the same floor as the OJA the end of March, 2007. Before the move, the OJA was asked to take all of the historical files that were there in boxes, listed them and transferred them to the UJA Warehouse. The index cards are in the OJA vault.
Administrative History
In Canada, the United Restitution Organization (URO) was founded in 1953 under the aegis of the Canadian Jewish Congress. The funds advanced by the Claims Conference were administered by the CJC which also gave support by providing the URO with office space and clerical staff. Offices were set up in Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg and Vancouver. The Winnipeg and Vancouver offices closed in the 1970s and the Montreal office remained open until 2002, after which time the active cases were sent to the Toronto office. The Toronto office officially closed on April 1, 2007. There was one case worker, however, who contintued to tend to any active claims that were left. Her position was transfered to Jewish Family and Child in 2013. The URO dealt with a variety of different types of claims. The first and largest were the BEG cases (Bundesentschaedigungsgesetz), which translates as Federal Indemnification Law for the Compensation of Victims of National Socialist Persecution. This program provided compensation for individuals persecuted for political, racial, religious, or ideological reasons who suffered long-term damage to their health, imprisonment, death of family members, loss of property, reduced income, or reduced professional advancement. The other two major programs or cases covered by the URO were the Hardship Fund and Article 2. The Hardship Fund was established during the 1960s and was open to Jews who emigrated from the former Soviet Union who were not eligible for compensation under the BEG program. The Article 2 program, in turn, arose during the 1990s, after the unification of the German government. It is still operating today and is open to Jewish victims of Nazi persecution who met a certain critiera, and those who are eligible, are provided with a pension paid out in installments every three months each year.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Subjects
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
United Restitution Organization (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-4
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1906
Scope and Content
Accession contains one contract between Mr. Abraham Landsberg and the Chevra Tehillim (McCaul Street) Synagogue for the purchase of two seats in the congregational pews. The seats were utilized by Mr. Landsberg from 1906 until 1924, when the seats were transferred to his son Dr. Harry Landsberg.
Administrative History
Abraham Landsberg was an early Jewish immigrant to Toronto. Born in Russia in 1859, Abraham arrived in Canada with wife Rebecca, sister Mary and daughters Edith and Ray in 1892. After settling in Toronto, they had four more children: Jack, Lillian, Maurice and Harold. The family lived at 195 College Street. Abraham's sons took up diverse professions; his oldest, Jack, became a plumbing contractor, his middle son, Maurice, became a mechanic and his youngest son, Harold, became a dentist, setting up a practice with Dr. Benjamin Garfield.
Subjects
Religion
Name Access
Landsberg, Abraham
Beth Medrosh Hagodol Chevra Tehillim (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-16
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-16
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
9 photographs : col ; 15 x 10 cm
Date
1998-1999
Scope and Content
Accession consists of nine photographs of events at the Borochov Centre and the Toronto Heschel School. Seven of the photos are of childern observing Yom Hazikaron, one photo is of a Yom Ha'atz-Maul celebration, and one photo is a Yiddish Cultural Club group photo at the Borochov Centre.
Subjects
Religion
Education
Children
Name Access
Borochov Centre
Toronto Heschel School
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-17
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-17
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w ; 9 x 9 cm
Date
[195-?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two group photographs taken in Stratford, Ontario. The first is a farewell party photograph for Alec and Ann and the second is a photograph of a children's Purim party.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Religion
Children
Communities
Name Access
Miller, Molly
Places
Stratford, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-26
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-26
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 photograph ; b&w ; 26 x 21 cm
Date
[194-?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a photo of the Cecil Street Shul Choir. People in the photo that can be identified are Sam Katzman, Hyman Maker, "Butch" Landsberg, Sam Steinberg, Morris Adams, Lawrence Steinberg, Ben Steinberg, Norman Bellick and Cantor Alexander Steinberg.
Subjects
Religion
Name Access
Gollon, Marvin
Katzman, Sam
Maker, Hyman
Landsberg, "Butch"
Steinberg, Sam
Steinberg, Alexander
Steinberg, Ben
Adams, Morris
Steinberg, Lawrence
Bellick, Norman
Ostrovtzer Synagogue
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-10-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-10-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1977-2003
Scope and Content
Accession consists of materials documenting Congregation Iyr Hamelich, the Reform synagogue in Kingston. The records include the constitution, Sunday school minutes and policy documents, synagogue bulletins, correspondence and "Welcome to our Congregation" booklets.
Subjects
Religion
Name Access
Congregation Iyr Hamelich
Places
Kingston, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-1-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-1-4
Material Format
moving images
graphic material (electronic)
graphic material
Physical Description
4 film reels (57 min., 32 sec.) : 16 mm
1 DVD
8 photographs (jpgs) : b&w
1 photograph : b&w
Date
[195-]-[196-]
Scope and Content
This accession consists of four 16 mm films and one copy DVD, documenting the Moldaver family in Peterborough. The films were taken during the 1950s and 1960s and include images of a Camp Wahanowin family visit featuring people by the lake, boating, playing badminton and softball and waterskiing, as well as other cottage scenes of kids swimming and jumping off the dock, canoeing, and several families sitting by the lake.
The films also document several family and community events, such as a family vacation to Chicago, fancy parties, Chanukah and Purim celebrations, family dinners, and Bar Mitzvahs, including the Bar Mitzvah of the donor Joel Moldaver. There are also several scenes of family life in Peterborough including people skating outdoors, and group shots of people standing outside of their homes and getting into cars.
In addition, the accession contains electronic scans of eight family photographs, including the donor's grandparents and great-parents, his parents' wedding which was the first Jewish wedding in Peterborough, and three images of his own bar mitzvah. There is also one oversize photograph of the 1942 Plenary session of the Canadian Jewish Congress, where the formation of Israel was addressed (photo credit: Federal Photos, Montreal).
Photographs are as follows:
1. Annie and Philip Black in Peterborough, ca. 1939.
2. Bar Mitzvah at Reid Street.
3. Bar Mitzvah at Reid Street.
4. Bar Mitzvah at Reid Street with father Irving Moldaver, Aaron Black and Rabbi Babb.
5. David and Faigh Florence possibly on Aylmer St., ca 1939.
6. Irving Moldaver wedding portrait, 1938.
7. Peterborough wedding, Ernie Fine, Annie Black, Ruth and Irving Moldaver, Clara and Oskar Moldaver, 1938.
8. Ruth (Black) Moldaver wedding portrait, 1938.
9. CJC 5th plenary session, Jan. 10-12, 1942, Montreal.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Communities
Families
Religion
Name Access
Moldaver, Joel
Moldaver, Ruth
Moldaver, Irving
Places
Peterborough, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-2-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-2-3
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
25 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Date
[198-]-[199-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of staff and volunteers of UJA Federation of Greater Toronto and some of UJA's top donors. The images consist of portraits, and snapshots of the Walk with Israel, the UJA telethon, a UJA Blue Jays Day, as well as a few photographs taken in Israel for promotional purposes.
Identified individuals include: Paul Morton (donor), Lawrence Fein (donor), Bernie Gropper (donor), Glen Shear (donor), David Stalberg (donor), Ted Sokolsky (staff), Leanne Campbell (staff), Jeff Springer (staff), Avrum Rosenzweig (staff), Michael Doren (volunteer), Peter Chodos (volunteer), Miriam Rosenberg (volunteer), David Eisenstat (volunteer), Zvi Garcy (volunteer from Israel), Roz Davidson (past chair of Women's Campaign), and Lorraine Sandler (past chair of Women's Campaign).
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Frances Goldstein, Associate Director of Top Gifts at UJA Federation.
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Philanthropy and fundraising
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Fein, Lawrence
Gropper, Bernie
Shear, Glen
Stalberg, David
Sokolsky, Ted
Campbell, Leanne
Springer, Jeff
Rosenzweig, Avrum
Doren, Michael
Chodos, Peter
Rosenberg, Miriam
Eisenstat, David
Garcy, Zvi
Sandler, Lorraine
Morton, Paul
Davidson, Roz
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-3-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-3-4
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
12 photographs : col. ; 12 x 10 cm
Date
2002
Scope and Content
Accession consists of images of the Ontario Jewish Archives vault, processing room, research room and reception area taken by Ellen Scheinberg, upon being hired as the OJA's new Director in 2002. The photographs illustrate the state of the archives upon her arrival.
Custodial History
The photographs were taken by Ellen Scheinberg, Director of the Ontario Jewish Archives. They were kept in her office until she transferred them to the OJA on March 4, 2009.
Subjects
Archives
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-3-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-3-7
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
Date
2005-2007
Scope and Content
This accession consists of records related to the work of Susan Jackson as the Executive Director of the Latner Center for Jewish Knowledge and Heritage. The records include planning documents, summaries and reports, budgets and meeting minutes.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Susan Jackson, currently an Executive Philanthropic Officer with the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto and the former Executive Director of the (Latner) Centre for Jewish Knowledge and Heritage.
Administrative History
The Latner Centre for Jewish Knowledge and Heritage was created in 2005 as an entity of the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto. It included the Ontario Jewish Archives, the Holocaust Centre, the Latner Library, Jewish Information Service of Greater Toronto, and the Jewish media and pedagogic libraries. The Latner Centre then became the Centre for Jewish Knowledge and Heritage and eventually disbanded in 2008.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director (and whomever else) prior to accessing the records.
Descriptive Notes
Use condition note: Records of UJA Federation are closed for 10 years from date of creation.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Philanthropy and fundraising
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Jackson, Susan
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-5-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-5-6
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 photograph : sepia toned ; 16 x 24 cm (sight) on board 21 x 31 cm
1 folder of textual records
Date
12 Oct. 1940
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a photograph documenting the first Yom Kippur celebration for servicemen stationed in Iceland. Identified is Meyer Bubis (middle row, second from right) and Lionel Cohen (middle row, far left). Also included is a letter written by Meyer to his father on an envelope regarding the accompanying photograph. Also identified in the photo is Maxwell London (back row, seond from left) and Alfred Conway (formerly: Abraham Cohen) of the British military (to the left of the table in the white yarmulke and tallit).
Administrative History
Meyer Bubis was born on September 12, 1914 in Philadelphia to Solomon and Ida Bubis. His mother died soon after he was born and his father remarried Sarah (née Sane) Bubis. Meyer immigrated with his family to Ontario during the First World War. At the outbreak of the Second World War he enlisted with the Royal Canadian Army. He died in the Dieppe raid on August 19, 1942.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
Religion
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Bubis, Meyer, 1914-1942
Places
Iceland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-6-11
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-6-11
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1984
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one copy of Rabbi Abraham Fine's recollections of the Peterborough Jewish community. Manuscript contains one colour photograph of Rabbi Fine.
Custodial History
Manuscript was donated by Ken Beck. His parents lived in Peterborough from the early 1940s to the 1970s and Ken grew up there. Mr. Fine gave the manuscript to Ken's parents, and Ken maintained it in his possession until its donation to OJA.
Subjects
Religion
Communities
Name Access
Fine, Abraham
Places
Peterborough, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Jewish Community Centre Archives Committee series
Photograph collection sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 61; Series 2-2; File 39
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Jewish Community Centre Archives Committee series
Photograph collection sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
61
Series
2-2
File
39
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1958
Physical Description
11 photographs : b&w (2 negatives) ; 26 x 21 cm
Scope and Content
This file consists of photographs of the groundbreaking ceremonies for the northern Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. held in the winter of 1958. The photographs depict invited dignitaries and members of the executive reciting speeches at the podium. The photographs were used in the Y-Time newspaper.
Identified individuals in the photographs include Fred Gardiner, Rabbi Abraham Feinberg, Charles Draimin, Vernon Singer, Sam Granatstein, Ellis I. Shapiro, Samuel Factor M.P., H. Max Swartz and Nathan Phillips.
Subjects
Building
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Jewish Community Centre Archives Committee series
Photograph collection sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 61; Series 2-2; File 84
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Jewish Community Centre Archives Committee series
Photograph collection sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
61
Series
2-2
File
84
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1955
Physical Description
7 photographs : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Scope and Content
This file consists of photographs taken at the groundbreaking for the second Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home in Tollandale, near Barrie. Present are Dora and Morris Till, Dr. Lipson, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Lunenfeld and Al Ginsberg.
Subjects
Building
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Jewish Community Centre Archives Committee series
Photograph collection sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 61; Series 2-2; File 91
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Jewish Community Centre Archives Committee series
Photograph collection sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
61
Series
2-2
File
91
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1975
Physical Description
35 photographs : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm and 13 x 18 cm
Scope and Content
This file consists of photographs taken at the Northern Building Completion Program groundbreaking ceremonies on Sunday, 20 April 1975. The photos include images of the groundbreaking, plaque and flower presentations and the arrival and unveiling of the Jerusalem cornerstone flown in from Israel.
Identified individuals include invited guest Premier William Davis and Mrs. Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred Posluns, Murray and Marvelle Koffler, Amnon Gilad, John Wahl, Harold Green, Alex Fisher, Sam Granatstein, David Andrews, and Bert Fine.
Subjects
Building
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dr. A.I. Willinsky fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 81; Item 18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dr. A.I. Willinsky fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
81
Item
18
Material Format
moving images
Date
[ca. 1936]-1938
Physical Description
1 film reel (ca. 19 min.) : original, b&w, si. ; 16 mm
1 film reel (ca. 19 min.) : duplicate, 16 fps, b&w, si. ; 16 mm
1 DVD (ca. 19 min.) : duplicate, digital, b&w, si.
Scope and Content
Item is a documentary film about the rationale for, the construction of, and the opening ceremonies of the Holy Blossom Synagogue. Seen are shots of the crowded and dim classrooms within the old Bond St. Synagogue, its predecessor. Also seen are scenes of the official sod turning, the laying of the corner-stone, and some of the construction work on Holy Blossom at its new location at the corner of Bathurst Street and Ava Road. These are followed by various scenes of the new building’s interior and exterior. The film ends with the May 16, 1937 official opening ceremonies of, and the transfer of the Torah scrolls to, the new facility. Identified in the footage is Edmund Scheuer.
Notes
In 1988 a dupe negative and new check print were struck from the original positive print. As part of the new print production, both the original magnetic and optical sound tracks were utilized. This work was commissioned by and paid for by the Toronto Jewish Congress for its Archives.
Previously reel # 12
Name Access
Holy Blossom Temple (Toronto, Ont.)
Subjects
Building
Synagogues
Torah scrolls
Physical Condition
Film has slight vinegar smell
Places
Ava Road (Toronto, Ont.)
Bathurst Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Bond Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Jewish community events series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 37; Series 7; Item 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Jewish community events series
Level
Item
Fonds
37
Series
7
Item
2
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[1954?]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 11 x 13 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph is of a groundbreaking ceremony that is likely for Baycrest Hospital, as the man standing 3rd from the left is Abe Posluns, President of the Jewish Home for the Aged and Baycrest Hospital.
Standing on the far left is J. Irving Oelbaum.
Name Access
Baycrest Hospital
Oelbaum, J. Irving, 1899-1966
Posluns, Abe
Subjects
Building
Hospitals
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Jewish community events series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 37; Series 7; Item 6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Jewish community events series
Level
Item
Fonds
37
Series
7
Item
6
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1951]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 11 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
In 1913 a charitable organization called the Ezras Noshim Society was formed to help elderly women. Ezras Noshim start collecting funds in 1917 to purchase a home that would be converted into Toronto's first Jewish Old Folks Home. The forerunner to Baycrest Centre opened in 1919 as the Toronto Jewish Old Folks Home on Cecil Street in downtown Toronto where the women of Ezras Noshim made beds, cooked kosher meals, washed sheets and sponsored fund-raising events.
In 1954, the Jewish Home for the Aged opened on Bathurst Street to accomodate their expanding needs and a new feature -- Baycrest Hospital.
This location continued to expand including a new building for residents in 1968, the Baycrest Terrace and The Joseph E. and Minnie Wagman Centre in 1976. These additions enabled Baycrest to expand their services to include a community centre, an enhanced apartment building, a home for the aged, a day care service and a hospital.
In 1986 a new Baycrest Hospital was erected, and in 1989, the Rotman Research Institute, which is also affiliated with the University of Toronto, opened to create a research facility enabling top researchers to study and find new treatment methods for the elderly.
In recent years, Baycrest's research activities have expanded to include the Clinical Epidemiology and Evaluation Unit (est. 1995), which evaluates clinical programs and conducts long-term studies of health issues affecting older adults and the Kunin Lunenfeld Clinical Research Unit (est. 1996), which links researchers with Baycrest clinical departments to enable prompt implementation of research findings. These two programs merged in 1998 to become the Kunin-Lunenfeld Applied Research Unit.
Apotex Centre, the Jewish Home for the Aged and the Louis and Leah Posluns Centre for Stroke and Cognition opened in 2000. This centre is responsible for residents with progressive dementia and vascular dementia.
Baycrest Centre also provides numerous cultural and religious programs for the inhabitants and the greater community, including a heritage museum, art exhibits and a Holocaust program.
Scope and Content
Photograph of the groundbreaking ceremony for Baycrest Hospital on Bathurst Street, which was erected along with the new building of the Jewish Home for the Aged.
Abe Posluns is on the far right.
Name Access
Baycrest Hospital
Posluns, Abe
Subjects
Building
Hospitals
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Bathurst Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Zionist Centre cornerstone ceremony series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 37; Series 3; Item 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Zionist Centre cornerstone ceremony series
Level
Item
Fonds
37
Series
3
Item
1
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1962
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 11 x 13 cm
Name Access
Gilbert, Al, 1922-
Subjects
Building
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 39; Item 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
39
Item
2
Material Format
graphic material
Date
October 4, 1966
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 26 x 21 cm and 10 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
David Dunkelman (1883-1978) was born in Poland to Elias and Leah Dunkelman. He came to Canada with his parents in 1895, settling in Toronto. On 19 January 1910, he married Rose Miller (1889-1949), and together they had 6 children: Joseph, Ernest, Benjamin, Theodora, Veronica (Ourisman), and Zelda (Wilner). David Dunkelman was very active throughout his life in Zionist causes and in philanthropic and communal work. He was the founder, president and chairman of the board of Tip Top Tailors Ltd. (1911) which was one of the largest clothing manufacturers in Canada. For over 50 years David was one of the leaders of the Zionist Organization of Canada. He was also director of the Jewish Home for the Aged and Baycrest Hospital, one of the founders of the North Toronto YMHA, a founder and supporter of the Associated Hebrew Schools of Toronto, and one of the founders of a village in Israel known as Gan Chaim. He was a member of several clubs and lodges including B'nai Brith, the Empire Club, the Primrose Club and the Canadain Friends of Hebrew University. David married Pearl Reisman Rotenberg in 1950, after the death of his wife Rose Dunkelman in 1949.
Scope and Content
Photograph is of (left to right) Marvin Gerstein, Morry Wingold and David Dunkelman with some other gentlemen at the Mount Sinai extension groundbreaking in Toronto. The view is through the handle of a shovel.
Name Access
Gerstein, Marvin
Wingold, Morry
Dunkelman, David
Dunkelman, Benjamin
Dunkelman, Ernest
Dunkelman, Joseph
Dunkelman, Zelda
Dunkelman, Theodora
Dunkelman, Veronica
Rotenberg, Pearl Reisman
Subjects
Building
Hospitals
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1948
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph is of the sod turning for Beth Isaiah Synagogue in Guelph, Ontario.
Individuals in the photograph include: Nimoy Wolfond, Lou Brown, Joe Brown, Sam Acker, Jacob Adler, Joe Wolfond, Henry Rozen, Moshe Enushevsky, Mothie Brown, and Rubin Brown.
Notes
Identifying information is with accession record.
Name Access
Acker, Sam
Adler, Jacob
Beth Isaiah Congregation (Guelph, Ont.)
Brown, Joe
Brown, Lou
Brown, Mothie
Brown, Rubin
Enushevsky, Moshe
Rosen, Henry
Wolfond, Joe
Wolfond, Nimoy
Subjects
Building
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Guelph (Ont.)
Accession Number
1993-1-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Name
Lillian Beube
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
1972
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Lillian Beube
Number
AC 027
Subject
Nonprofit organizations
Interview Date
1972
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Morris Silbert
AccessionNumber
1978-2-2
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
Second side inaudible
Use Restrictions
Conditional access. Researchers must receive permission from the interviewee or his/her heir prior to accessing the interview. Please contact the OJA for more information.
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Beube, LIllian
Silbert, Morris
Geographic Access
Hamilton
Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Morris Fishman
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
12 July 1977
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Morris Fishman
Number
AC 036
Subject
Antisemitism
Nonprofit organizations
Communities
Synagogues
Societies
Food
Occupations
Clubs
Interview Date
12 July 1977
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Richard Menkis
Total Running Time
Side 1 46 minutes Side 2 17 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Morris Fishman was born September 29, 1916 in New Jersey. His family moved to Welland, Ontario when he was an infant. He attended elementary and high school in Welland and completed two years at the University of Toronto. He worked in a family men's wear business in Welland. Morris was actively involved in the Jewish community including participation in the Anshe Yosher Congregation, the Jewish Cultural Society and the Jacob Goldblatt B'nai Brith Lodge. He was married and had two daughters.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Fishman, Morris
Geographic Access
Welland
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\AC 036 Fishman\AC 036 transcript.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Morris Fishman praises the efforts of the non-Jewish community in Welland, Ontario to support the building of a new synagogue following a fire that destroyed the old synagogue in 1954.

In this clip, Morris Fishman discusses the Jacob Goldblatt B’nai Brith Lodge in Welland, Ontario.

Name
Montague Raisman
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
11 July 1982
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Montague Raisman
Number
AC 064
Subject
Nonprofit organizations
Human rights
Antisemitism
World War, 1939-1945
Interview Date
11 July 1982
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Jack Lipinsky
Total Running Time
064: 39 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
Low sound quality
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Montague Raisman came to Canada from England in 1926. He was actively involved in B'nai Brith Toronto Lodge and held positions of office. He served as the Commanding Officer for the B'nai Brith Air Cadet Squadron in Toronto during the Second World War. He was instrumental in the formation of the Joint Public Relations Committee, a united Jewish voice in response to pro-Nazi activity.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Raisman, Montague
B'nai Brith
Lipinsky, Jack
Canadian Jewish Congress
Geographic Access
Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Montague describes the formation of the B'nai Brith Air Cadet Squadron during the Second World War. He discusses the recruitment and training of the officers and cadets. He explains how this squadron was instrumental in changing recruitment qualifications to allow entry of new immigrants and black cadets.

In this clip, Montague Raisman discusses the events leading up to an association between B

Name
Rabbi Dr. David Monson
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
1 Dec. 1982
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Rabbi Dr. David Monson
Number
AC 070
Subject
World War, 1939-1945
Religion
Interview Date
1 Dec. 1982
Quantity
1
Interviewer
(not stated, likely Jack Lipinsky)
Total Running Time
070A: 27 minutes 070B: 11 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Rabbi David Monson came to Toronto from Ottawa in June 1939 to serve as the rabbi of the Shaarei Shomayim Synagogue. He served on the board of the Brusnswick Talmud Torah. He was a member of B'nai Zion and B'nai Brith and was the long-serving rabbi of Beth Shalom.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Monson, David
Canadian Jewish Congress. Ontario Region
Shaarei Shomayim Congregation (Toronto, Ont.)
Lipinsky, Jack
Geographic Access
Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Rabbi Monson discusses his early positive working relationships with rabbis within the Toronto Jewish community and explains how sectionalization became a post WWII phenomenon.

In this clip, Rabbi Monson discusses the role and responsibilities of the Canadian Jewish Congress in Toronto from 1939 to 1948.

Name
Barney and Tillie Nosov [with Wilfred Kideckel]
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
22 September 1975
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Barney and Tillie Nosov [with Wilfred Kideckel]
Number
AC 011
Subject
Families
Religion
Interview Date
22 September 1975
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Fred Schaeffer
Total Running Time
side 1: 43:39 minutes
side 2: 43:36 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
Most of the interview is conducted with Barney Nosov. Wilfred Kideckel is also featured on the tape, and Tillie Nosov is interviewed briefly.
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Conditional access. Researchers must receive permission from the interviewee or his/her heir prior to accessing the interview. Please contact the OJA for more information.
Biography
Barney Nosov arrived in Canada in 1916. Nosov lived in Ansonville, Ontario. He was a merchant, owned a store, and was also in politics for many years.
Wilfred Kideckel was born in Kreugerdorf on a farm in 1917. His father was one of the first immigrants to the area. Kideckel had 10 people in his family. He moved to Ansonville and got married. Kideckel moved to Toronto in 1942.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Nosov, Barney
Nosov, Tillie
Kideckel, Wilfred
Geographic Access
Kriegerdorf, Ont.
Cochrane, Ont.
Cobalt, Ont.
Ansonville, Ont.
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Transcript
AC 011: SIDE 1
BARNEY NOSOV
0.24: Nosov talks about how he came to Ansonville, Ontario. Talks about his aunt, Mrs. Perkiss?
1.14: Nosov talks about the families in Cochrane – was about 6 families. Rothchild, Kurtzer? Perkiss, Bernstein. Rothchild’s son was mayor at that time.
2.16: First Jewish people in Cochrane were peddlers. Cochrane is close to Cobalt, which had more Jews.
3.29: Nosov arrived in Canada in 1916. Opened a store in 1917.
4.37: Nosov talks about other Jewish families who were there when he arrived, and who came later. Mentions Korman.
5.18: There was religious instruction at that time; was a cheder; Korman was a teacher.
5.46: 1922 Korman decided to build a synagogue. Was about 16 Jewish families at that time.
6.44: Rabbi Gordon donated a sefer Torah .
7.25: Nosov tells a story about the Lubachitcher Rabbi.
8.10: Nosov talks about children being sent (conscripted?) into the army [unsure where this took place]. When the children were allowed to leave the army, they all prayed at a specific synagogue.
9.56: Nosov talks about a synagogue located on Synagogue Street.
10.52: Nosov talks about the synagogue they built. Rabbi was named Rabinovitch.
11.44: Congregation functioned until 1930, and then Nosov sold the building.
11.55: Nosov talks about himself – he was a merchant, owned a general store, was in politics. Nosov was a councilor for many years from 1930 to 1944.
13.43: Nosov explains how he got started in politics – he felt discriminated against in business, so he decided to tell the public what was going on. He ran for fun; never believed he would even get elected.
16.25: Nosov talks about antisemitism
19.43: Nosov tells a story to describe the antisemitism. a Jewish dentist wanted to go to a small town (Hansville?). Came to Nosov’s store and Nosov told him he had no chance of getting a job, because he was Jewish. No Jewish dentists allowed in that time. They would rather have no dentist at all in town.
22.23: Nosov talks about the first mayor of Ansonville who was a gentile; used to hire Jews in early 1920s.
23.18: Nosov talks about talked about a farming settlement in Kreugerdorf (most settlers there were Russian immigrants)
25.25: Kreuger was a German (not Jewish), and he taught people how to work the land. That’s why the land is named Kreugerdorf
WILFRED KIDECKEL
Born in Kreugerdorf on a farm in 1917. His father was one of the original immigrants. Family of 10. Doesn’t have too many memories of the farm.
26.57: Kideckel talks about how his father got to Krugerdorf (thought he would get free land).
27.45: Kideckel talks about Jewish life in Kriegerdorf. Talks about how his father used to chop wood in return for someone teaching his children to read Hebrew. Still a cemetery there, but no people living there.
28.57: Kideckel moved to Ansonville, got married, moved to Toronto in 1942.
30.17: [no sound audible for the rest of the recording]
43.39: End
AC 011: SIDE 2
TILLIE NOSOV
0.08: Nosov came to farm in Kreugerdorf in 1906. Maiden name Abromson?, 11 children in her family.
0.59: Nosov talks about her childhood and her family; what her house looked like.
2.15: Nosov talks about her father working on the railroad and on the farm.
2.54: Nosov talks about what she did on the farm; life on the farm; religious life on the farm. People kept kosher; women’s roles on the farm equal to men.
WILFRED KIDECKEL
4.33: Kideckel talks about inter-dating – the Jewish mayor used to discourage it.
5.05: [no sound audible for the rest of the recording]
43.36: End
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Tobie Taback
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
February 23, 1983
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Tobie Taback
Number
AC 136
Subject
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Interview Date
February 23, 1983
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Jack Lipinsky
Total Running Time
34 minutes 58 secons
Conservation
Copied November 2006
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Tobie Taback was the long-time secretary for the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society in Toronto. He retired in 1982.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Society (Toronto, Ont.)
Taback, Tobie
Lipinsky, Jack
Geographic Access
Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Tobie Taback discusses the helplessness faced by JIAS in bringing immigrants out of Europe during the period of Canada's strict "no immigration" policy.

In this clip, Tobie Taback discusses the activities of Jewish Immigrant Aid Society (JIAS) employees during the years 1937-39, the obstacles they faced vis a vis immigrant applications and the "parcels to Russia and Poland" aid program run by JIAS.

Name
Max Enkin
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
April 13, 1986
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Max Enkin
Number
AC 113
AC 114
Subject
Antisemitism
Immigrants--Canada
Labor unions
Nonprofit organizations
Occupations
Refugees--Canada
Interview Date
April 13, 1986
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Phyllis Platnick
Total Running Time
AC113: 19:40 minuets
AC114:
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Max Enkin was founder and a leading member of the Jewish Vocational Service of Toronto. The original purpose of the organization was to help survivors of the Second World War find employment. In 1947, as Associate Administrator and representative for the Men's Clothing sector in Ontario, Max Enkin became involved in The "Tailor Project". The project was designed to identify and select skilled tailors from the DP camps of Europe and help to settle them in Canada.
Max Enkin was awarded the OBE in Recognition of services to Wartime Prices.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Enkin, Max
Platnick, Phyllis
Geographic Access
Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
AC 113
History of Immigration of Skilled Tailors from the Displaced Person Camps after WWII 1946 –
0.07: How the project got started
0.20: Canadian Government in relation to skilled workers in Canada 1946
1.19: Canadian Jewish Congress in relation to DP camps in Europe.
2.45: Canadian Government restricted immigration 1946.
3.11: Canadian Jewish Congress in relation to Garment industry.
4.13: Canadian Government in relation to UNRRA and immigration to Canada (UNRRA: United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration founded 1943 and became part of the UN in 1945).
5.29: JIAS Jewish Immigrant Aid Services.
5.39: Congress and Immigration to Canada.
5.58: Garment industry Union and Immigration to Canada
6.30: McNamara Deputy Minister of Labour from Winnipeg (circa 1946).
7.18: Labor and Management Representatives of the ILGE 1946 (ILGE - International Ladies Garment Workers Union?). Mr. Sam Hirsch of Winnipeg, representative of the Union for Men & Women. Mr. Bernard Shane of Montreal, Executive Director of the ILGE. Mr.? Solomon of Montreal, representative of Manufacturers Union of Montreal. Sam Posluns of Toronto representative of the Women’s Union. Max Enkin of Toronto, representative of the Men’s Union Ontario.
9.05: Beginning of the project by the ILGE to bring Jews from DP camps in Europe to Canada. Trip to London England by the 5 member body of ILGE. Difficulty in gaining clearance papers to gain entry into Germany & Austria.
11.34: C.D Howe Canadian Cabinet Minister serving under McKenzie King Meeting with ILGE in Canada House, London England.
13.20: Enkin meeting with C.D. Howe and question of quota of Jews allowed into Canada.
14.13: Federal Liberal Government, Quebec and Ottawa vis a vis Jewish immigration.
15.5: McKenzie King, Prime Minister and Ernest Lapointe, Member of Parliament/Quebec and immigration of Jews.
15.56: Jewish population, Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 3 largest centers 17.0-19.4: Antisemitism in Canada.
End: Rest of tape 19.50 -30.42 inaudible.
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Max Enkin discusses the organizations, government departments and union representatives involved in the development and implementation of the Tailor Project.

In this clip, Max Enkin discusses the Liberal Government

Name
Morris Silbert
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
1986
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Morris Silbert
Number
AC 123
AC 124
Subject
Agriculture
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Communities
Interview Date
1986
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Brooky Robins
Total Running Time
AC123A - 30. minutes AC123B - 31. minutes AC124A - 46. minutes. AC124 Side2 - 44 minutes good
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Morris Silbert was born in 1912 on a farm outside of Hamilton. His parents came from Lithuania. His father arrived in Canada in 1905 and his mother and 3 older siblings joined him in 1906. Morris spent his youth growing up on farms and at age 16 in 1928 his family moved to Hamilton. In his youth, Morris was involved in several Jewish organizations including Young Judea, AZA and Hashomer Hatzair. He was married in 1938. He served in the army in 1943 during the Second World War. Morris was second vice president of the Council of Jewish Organizations, served on the executive, was chairman of the nursery school board and participated on several committees.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Silbert, Morris
Robins, Brooky
Geographic Access
Hamilton
Wentworth
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Morris Silbert shares memories about Jewish peddlers who were welcomed on his family's farm in southern Ontario. He includes names of peddlers with descriptions of their wares and their carts.

In this clip, Morris Silbert shares memories about Jewish peddlers who were welcomed on his family

In this clip, Morris Silbert describes the restructuring of the Hamilton Jewish community as a result of the Depression in the 1930s. He explains how the Council of Jewish Organizations was formed to replace United Hebrew Association.

Name
Edna Jacobs
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
December and March 1986
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Edna Jacobs
Number
AC 125
Subject
Families
Travel
Education
Occupations
Antisemitism
Girl Guides
Religion
Volunteers
Interview Date
December and March 1986
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Nancy Draper
Total Running Time
Side 1: 36 minutes Side 2: 46 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Edna (nee Frankel) Jacobs was born March 20, 1904 in Toronto, Her parents, Sigmund and Paula Frankel, were early immigrants from Germany. Edna attended Havergal from kindergarten through high school. She studied general arts for two years at the University of Toronto. She married Arthur Jacobs, the son of Rabbi Solomon Jacobs, in 1936. Together, they had one daughter, Patsy and a baby who died during infancy. Edna was involved with the Girls Club and the Junior Council of Jewish Women.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Toronto Girl's Club
Toronto Council of Jewish Women
Geographic Access
Toronto
Germany
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\AC 125 Jacobs\AC 125 notes.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Edna Jacobs shares memories from a trip she and her family took to Biblis, Germany to celebrate her grandparents’ golden anniversary.

In this clip, Edna Jacobs reminisces about several prominent Toronto Jewish families.

115 records – page 1 of 3.

Narrow By

Collection Name

Source

Format

Date

Description Level

Subject

Name

Place

Language

Restrictions

Available Digital Content