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Accession Number
1991-1-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1991-1-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
12 cm of mainly textual material
Date
1923-1971
Scope and Content
Accession consists of materials created by Anshel Wise which document his family and travel business. It consists of genealogical information on his family, two ledgers from his business which document transactions and shipping dates, one scribbler which includes information on steamship sailings, one blank letterhead with his company's logo, and a photograph of his 50th wedding anniversary.
Administrative History
Anshel Wise emigrated from Poland in 1910 and established his home in Toronto. He opened up a cigar store on Dundas street, which later turned into a travel agency called A. Wise Travel Bureau.
During the course of his career, Anshel helped bring in hundreds of Jews from Europe, primarily Poland using the shipping lines. He spoke many languages and was able to assist the community by providing advice and services in this area. Later in his career after the establishment of the welfare state, he began helping residents of the St. John's Ward by providing advice, finding the required documents that they needed and helping them apply for retirement benefits.
Descriptive Notes
Immigration.
Travel Business.
A. Wise Travel Bureau.
Subjects
Business
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Wise, Anshel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-5-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-5-4
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 item
Date
1985
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one Shopsy's Delicatessen menu from March 1985. The deli introduced a new menu on 1 April 1985. It is a laminated, oversized, three-panel menu and is from the deli located at Yonge and Front Streets, across from the former O'Keefe Centre.
Administrative History
Harry and Jennie Shopsowitz started the family business, Shopsy's Delicatessen, in 1921. The first location was on Spadina Avenue at Dundas Street and was initially an ice-cream parlour, although they quickly converted it into a delicatessen in 1922. Shopsy's became an institution in the city where the likes of Bob Hope, Al Waxman, Dennis Hull and Scotty Bowman were regular customers. Harry's three sons took over the business in 1947. The brothers, Sam and Israel, expanded the business by packaging and distributing their hotdogs and corned beef to grocery stores. Sam Shopsowitz, the more gregarious of the two brothers, was known as the "Corned Beef King".
Subjects
Food
Business
Restaurants
Name Access
Shopsy's Delicatessen (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-36
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-36
Material Format
textual record
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w (jpg)
1 textual record
Date
1923-2004
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one issue of the Jewish Standard, from June 2004, two scanned copy photographs of Sid Slepkov during the Second World War, and one scanned copy photograph of Sid's father Morris in front of his clothing store, the Fashion Cloak and Fur Co. in St. Catharines, Ontario.
The photographs are as follows:
1. Sydney Slepkov in decompression chamber, Second World War.
2. Morris Slepkov outside his store, 1923.
3. Sydney Slepkov, 1944.
Custodial History
The original photographs are in the possession of the donor. The OJA was granted permission to scan the photos in June 2007, as part of the Ontario Small Jewish Communities initiative. These copies were then donated to the Archives on 2007-06-04.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
World War, 1939-1945
Business
Communities
Name Access
Slepkov, Sid
Slepkov, Morris
Places
St. Catharines, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-7-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-7-10
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
19 photographs : b&w
1 folder of textual records
2 books
1 CD
1 vest and 1 hat
Date
1938-1986
Scope and Content
This accession consists of material documenting the donor's family, particularly her father, Nathan Rivelis. The items include a vest and hat worn by her father during the late 1950s as part of the Lion's Club. It also consists of an oral history of her father conducted in 1983; his school primer and English reader; photographs of the business and Hebrew classes; certificates; and finally, newspaper clippings.
Identified photographs are as follows:
01. Nate Rivelis with Rivelis staff, ca. 1982.
02. Lions club executive, ca 1955.
03. Rivelis storefront, [195-].
04. Rivelis interior, [195-].
05. Rivelis storefront, 1986.
Administrative History
The Rivelis family owned a large clothing store in North Bay from 1926 until 1986 called Rivelis. They sold men's and women's mid-range clothing and became famous in town for their annual sale held on November 16th. The business grew from a small family-run store to a large department store with twelve employees.
In addition to running the business, Nate Rivelis was also involved in the local Lion's Club and was the president of this organization from 1957-1958. He was the only Jewish member at that time. In addition, he also served as the president of the Hebrew school during the 1940s.
Subjects
Communities
Business
Name Access
Rosen, Rheta
Rivelis, Nathan
Places
North Bay (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-3-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-3-2
Material Format
textual record
textual record (electronic)
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
4 photographs : b&w and col. (jpg)
6 documents : b&w and col. (jpg)
Date
[1915?]-[200-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of brochures from the Cherney family businesses: their furniture store of fifty years, followed by Cherney Realty, established after 1984. Also included are a pamphlet on the Erica Cherney Inspiration Fund of the Community Counselling and Resource Centre of Peterborough. There is also a memorial card for the death of Harry Cherney in 1984. Electronic records include articles about Cherney's and Erica Cherney, City of Peterborough Awards of Merit for Harry and Erica Cherney, and four photographs.
Photograhps are as follows:
01. Award of Merit, Erica Cherney, 1977.
02. Award of Merit, Harry Cherney, 1981.
03. Harry Cherney on a sailboat, ca. 1978.
04. 40th Anniversary of Cherney Store, 1975. Left to right: Myer and Harry and Lou Cherney.
05. Rebecca Cherney, ca. 1915.
06. Tree of Life donated in honour of Harry Cherney.
07. Cherney business story in Peterborough Industrial Review, 1975.
08. Erica Cherney article in Business Advantage February, 1997, page 13.
09. Cherney ad, 1975.
10. Harry Cherney newspaper article about his death, Peterborough Examiner, December 29 1984, page 1.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Communities
Business
Name Access
Cherney, Erica
Places
Peterborough, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-3-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-3-1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
5 photographs : b&w and col. ; 20 x 26 cm or smaller
1 folder of textual records
Date
1941-1963
Scope and Content
This accession consists of five photographs documenting the Niagara Rug Company of Niagara Falls, Ontario. The photos include a group image of the company's staff and owner Abe Bogomolny standing in front of the original building on Centre Street, an interior shot of the factory on Victoria Street featuring the looms, two photos of Abe and Hymie Bogomolny inspecting raw materials in the factory on Victoria Street, as well as a portrait of Abe Bogomolny. The accession also consists of one copy of a Niagara Rug Co. promotional flyer.
Subjects
Business
Name Access
Niagara Rug Company
Enchin, Brenda
Bogomolny, Abe
Bogomolny, Hymie
Places
Niagara Falls (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Dorothy Dworkin fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 10
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dorothy Dworkin fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
10
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1900-1971
Physical Description
12 cm of textual records
53 photographs : b&w (10 negatives) ; 23 x 30 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Dorothy Dworkin (1890-1976) was a prominent health-care worker in the Toronto Jewish community and a founder of Mount Sinai Hospital (Toronto), whose family business, Dworkin Travel, assisted hundreds of European Jews immigrating to Canada. Dworkin was born in Latvia, one of ten children of William and Sarah Goldstick. She came to Canada in 1904, at 14 years of age. She studied nursing in the United States, by training at Mount Sinai Hospital in Cleveland. She then took her exams in midwifery, and in 1909, she received her diploma from the State Board of Ohio.
Ida Siegel and her brother Abe Lewis had set up a free Jewish Dispensary in Toronto on Elizabeth Street. They hired Dorothy to take charge of it after her return. She ran the dispensary during the afternoon when it was open and made house calls the rest of the day. In 1910 she helped form the dispensary's women's auxiliary. This organization distributed pasteurized milk and offered other services. Later on, they organized an orphanage for Jewish children.
In 1911 she married Henry Dworkin, who was the founder of the Toronto Labour Lyceum. The dispensary soon closed after her departure. Henry opened a small variety store in 1917, which later became the tobacco and shipping agency business called Dworkin Travel, located at 525 Dundas Street West. Together, the Dworkins helped bring in hundreds of Jewish immigrants to Toronto. They would travel to Poland, Roumania and Latvia in order to help the family members of their clients settle in Toronto. The couple had a daughter, Ellen, whom they referred to as Honey. In 1928, Henry was tragically killed in an automobile accident. The newspaper articles of the time indicated that as many as 20,000 people honoured him by attending his funeral.
After her husband's death, Dorothy ran the travel business and continued committing a great deal of her time to charitable work. She helped open Mount Sinai Hospital in 1922, and was the president of the Mount Sinai Women's Auxiliary. Throughout her life, Dorothy Dworkin played a pivotal role in helping to raise both public and financial support for this important institution.
Over the years, she also became the honourary president of the Sinais, a member of the Mount Sinai Hospital Board, president of the Continental Steamship Ticket Agents Association, a trustee of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies, and director of the Labour Lyceum. She continued to run the business and support the activities of Mount Sinai until her death in 1976, at the age of 86.
Custodial History
The records were donated by Dorothy Dworkin's daughter, Honey Arthurs, on April 9th, 1973.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of material created and collected by Dorothy Dworkin. This includes documents relating to her work at Mount Sinai Hospital and at Dworkin Travel, personal papers and family photographs.
Notes
33 photographs are originals and 10 are copy photographs. The negatives and copy photographs were made by the OJA after acquiring the photographs.
Name Access
Goldstick
Ida Siegel
Subjects
Business
Families
Labor
Related Material
See fonds #45, Betty Goldstick Lindgren fonds. Her sister's fonds includes family photographs and records.
Creator
Dworkin, Dorothy, 1890-1976
Accession Number
2005-4-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Benjamin Dunkelman fonds
Business series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 2; Series 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Benjamin Dunkelman fonds
Business series
Level
Series
Fonds
2
Series
3
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
architectural drawing
Date
1898, 1941-1988
Physical Description
56 photographs and other material
Admin History/Bio
Ben Dunkelman’s involvement in business was wide-ranging. He served as president of Tip Top Tailors after his father and as president of Cloverdale Shopping Centre. He also, along with his wife Yael, opened the Dunkelman Gallery for modern art and Dunkelman's restaurant.
Scope and Content
Series consists of photographs, correspondence, pamphlets and papers documenting Benjamin Dunkelman’s business activities. The files are organized into three sub-series: Tip-Top Tailors, Constellation Hotel, and Dunkelman Gallery.
Notes
Physical description: Includes 6 cm of textual records, 5 architectural drawings, and 1 postcard.
Subjects
Business
Physical Condition
Most photographs are warped.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
4
Material Format
multiple media
Date
[ca. 1900]-2010
Physical Description
3.1 metres of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Sol Edell (1919-2000) was a prominant member of the Toronto Jewish community who initially pursued a career as a pharmacist and was later founder and president of the property development company, Elmdale Investments. He held positions as board member or chair in a wide variety of religious, educational and social service organizations and institutions both in Canada and Israel. In Toronto, these included: Clanton Park Synagogue, Adas Israel Synagogue, Jones Avenue Cemetery, Canadian Jewish Congress and the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto (formerly Toronto Jewish Congress, and now the United Jewish Appeal Federation of Greater Toronto).
Edell was born in Toronto on 5 March 1919, the son of Pesach and Molly Edell. He attended Harbord Collegiate and graduated from the Toronto College of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, in 1943 while on leave of absence from the army. He was enlisted in the Canadian Armed Forces during the Second World War and served in the signal corps.
After he completed his army service, he opened Edell’s Drug Store at 1978 Queen Street in Etobicoke in 1948, the first shomer Shabbat drug store in the city. He operated a second store at 494 Spadina Avenue in the late 1940s. In 1955 the Queen Street location was expropriated by the City of Toronto. Subsequently, Edell founded Elmdale Investments, the company which built and managed the Elmhurst Plaza in Etobicoke. He reopened the drug store, which was renamed Elmhurst Drugs in the plaza. He also invested in two retail textile stores, Deltex Drapery and Dodd’s Drapery which had been founded by group of businessmen including his cousin Israel Edell.
In 1952 he married Dolly Weinstock, the daughter of Moishe and Sylvia Weinstock. They lived in the newly developed suburb of North York with their four children: Ethel, Simcha, Malka and Joseph. After 10 years of marriage, Dolly died and in 1966, he married Celia Rogen Hoffman.
Sol Edell was a founding member and first president of the Clanton Park Congregation. He was actively involved in the construction of the synagogue and its development. He continued to be affiliated with Shomrai Shabbos where his grandfather Rabbi Yosef Weinreb had been the rabbi. He was also involved with Adas Israel, the synagogue in Hamilton where his wife Celia had been an active member.
He was chair of the Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region -- Toronto Jewish Congress Archives Committee, which subsequently became the Ontario Jewish Archives. During his tenure, the archives was responsible for the reconstruction of the Kiever Synagogue which had been built in the early 1900s but had fallen into a state of disrepair by the 1960s.
Sol Edell was also involved in a number of Zionist organizations. He was the founding chair of the Aliyah Support Committee of the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto, whose mandate was to assist Torontonians who had moved to Israel and ease their transition into Israeli society. He was also an active member of the Mizrachi organization and its affiliated institutions. Another one of Sol Edell’s interests was ensuring the preservation of local cemeteries. He was president of the Jones Avenue Cemetery and on the board of Pardes Shalom and the Bathurst Lawn Cemetery, Clanton Park section.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting Sol Edell's business activities, community involvement and personal life. Included is correspondence, meeting minutes, photographs, financial records, legal records, publications, audio-visual material, invitations, newspaper clippings, artifacts, lists, reports, speeches, and architectural drawings.
The fonds is organized into the following eleven series: Personal; Edell's Drug Store and Elmhurst Pharmacy; Elmdale Investments; Deltex Drapery and Dodd's Drapery; Adas Israel Synagogue; Clanton Park Synagogue; Shomrai Shabbos; Aliyah; Cemetery and funeral home; Historical materials; and, Activities and organizations.
Notes
Physical description note: includes 739 photographs, 232 architectural drawings, 11 audio cassettes, 9 audio reels, 13 film reels, 7 videocassettes, 4 slides, 1 plaque, 4 badges, and 1 key.
Name Access
Edell Solomon, 1919-2000
Clanton Park Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Edell, Dolly
Edell, Celia
Edell's Drug Store
Elmhurst Pharmacy
Jones Avenue Cemetery
Canadian Jewish Congress/ Toronto Jewish Congress Archives
Aliyah Support Committee
Subjects
Business
Pharmacists
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Physical Condition
The bulk of the architectural drawings are currently being stored rolled up. They should be flattened and encapsulated in melinex.
Film and sound reels should be digitized.
Related Material
See fonds #5 for material related to Paul Edell.
See accession #2012-10/9 for material related to the Edell family.
Creator
Edell, Solomon, 1919-2000
Accession Number
2002-12-2
2008-8-29
2011-5-4
2012-10-9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
Deltex Draperies Ltd. and Dodd's Draperies Ltd. series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 4; Series 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Solomon Edell fonds
Deltex Draperies Ltd. and Dodd's Draperies Ltd. series
Level
Series
Fonds
4
Series
4
Material Format
textual record
architectural drawing
Date
1964-1993
Physical Description
8 cm of textual records
7 architectural drawings
Admin History/Bio
In 1964, Sol Edell invested in a retail textile store, Deltex Draperies Ltd., which had been founded by a group of businessmen including his cousin, Israel Edell. In 1971, they opened a second store, Dodd's Draperies Ltd., and in 1979, the two companies merged under the name Dodd’s Draperies Ltd.. In 1987, the store closed and the building was sold. During their lengthy business association, Israel Edell supervised the day-to-day operation of the stores while Sol Edell was responsible for the overall financial management and the construction of the new premises at 1445 Bathurst Street.
Scope and Content
Series consists of correspondence, minute books, documents of incorporation and stock certificates relating to the establishment of both Deltex Draperies and Dodd’s Draperies and the eventual merger of the two stores. In addition, series includes minutes and financial reports dealing with the operation of both companies. Also included are correspondence and blueprints relating to the construction of the building at 1445 Bathurst Street as well as the sale of that building.
Name Access
Deltex Draperies Ltd.
Dodd's Draperies Ltd.
Edell, Israel
Subjects
Business
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Hoffman family fonds
Business series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 6; Series 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Hoffman family fonds
Business series
Level
Series
Fonds
6
Series
1
Material Format
architectural drawing
textual record
Date
1950-1976
Physical Description
2 cm of textual records
1 architectural drawing
Admin History/Bio
Max Hoffman was the owner of Hamilton Heating and Plumbing and part owner of M. and S. Real Estate Holdings. His partner in the latter company, Sol Hoffman, was also the executor of Max Hoffman's estate. Celia Hoffman was a member of a women's investment club, Iona Share.
Scope and Content
Series consists of correspondence and cheques relating to Max Hoffman's business Hamilton Heating and Plumbing. Also included are a ledger and the financial statements of the Estate of Max Hoffman and M. and S. Real Estate Holding. In addition, there are legal documents and a newspaper clipping about an investment club, Iona Share.
Name Access
Hoffman, Sol
Hamilton Heating and Plumbing
Iona Share Investment Club
M. and S. Hoffman Real Estate Holdings
Subjects
Business
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Lipa Green fonds
Business series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 20; Series 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Lipa Green fonds
Business series
Level
Series
Fonds
20
Series
2
Material Format
textual record
Date
1934-[196-]
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
Scope and Content
Series consists of records documenting Lipa Green's business in the building trades. Included are two business patents, Greenview (later Greenwin) Construction Co. business correspondence and tenders, and financial records.
Subjects
Business
Source
Archival Descriptions
Name
Joseph Fremar
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
14 May 1974
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Joseph Fremar
Number
AC 021
Subject
Business
Food
Occupations
Interview Date
14 May 1974
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Bess Shockett
Total Running Time
021: 12:59 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Joseph "Joe the Orangeman" Fremar was a produce merchant in Kensington Market and opened his location on Augusta Avenue in 1938. Freamar, commonly referred to as the "Orangeman" was a member of the Kiever Synagogue.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Fremar, Joseph
Kiever Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Shockett, Bess
Geographic Access
Augusta Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
Kensington Market (Toronto, Ont.)
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
Started at location on 334 Augusta Street in 1938
Only one other merchant on Augusta at that time. He sold vegetables
His home was on Oxford Street
Since he arrived in 1938 most of the merchants have “changed around”
When he arrived in 1938 the Anshe Lida Synagogue was located on Augusta. It was located at the current fish store location
The congregants were originally from Romania
There were no religious Jewish Schools on Augusta at the time
Synagogues at the time were: Lubavitcher on Grange; Kiever on Denison; Minsker.
A man by the name of Biasky (?) brought Joseph into the Kiever Synagogue which he attended only on holidays. He also attend the Londoner Synagogue on Spadina
Joseph is still a Kiever member, does not attend but pays dues to in order to maintain his cemetery plot, which the Kiever holds at the Roselawn Cemetery.
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Joseph Fremar, also known as "Joe the Orange Man", talks about the social politics and financial expectations around belonging to certain Toronto synagogues versus others.

In this clip, Joseph Fremar, also known as "Joe the Orange Man", talks about the changing population of Toronto

Name
Bertha (Herbert) Allen
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
January 1975
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Bertha (Herbert) Allen
Number
AC 007
Subject
Business
Motion picture theaters
Interview Date
January 1975
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Lillian Bernstein
Total Running Time
Side 1: 36 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Bertha Allen was married to Herbert Allen. Herbert, his brothers, Jule and J. J., and his brother-in-law, Louis Rosenfeld were pioneers in the motion picture industry in Canada. They opened a chain of theatres across Canada in the 1910s and 1920s. In Toronto, they built several theatres including the Tivoli Theatre, Bloor Theatre, College Theatre, Parkdale Theatre, Beach Theatre, St. Clair Theatre, Danforth Theatre and Hollywood Theatre.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Allen, Bertha
Allen, Jule
Allen, J. J.
Rosenfeld, Louis
Geographic Access
Toronto, Ont.
Brantford, Ont.
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Transcript
0.00: Bertha is the widow of Herbert Allen
0.43: Herbert’s father was Barney Allen. Herbert and his brothers were born in Bradford, Pennsylvania. Barney sent his older sons, Jule and J.J., to Brantford, Ontario in 1907 where they opened up a theatre called The Gem.
3.44: Jule married Bertha’s sister, Sarah.
3.55: Jule and J.J. opened up another theatre called The Theatorium.
5.00: Barney, his wife, Goldie and their 2 remaining children, Herbert and Sol, moved to Brantford around 1907.
5.58: Jule and Sarah moved to Calgary where they opened other theatres.
7.05: Bertha was not aware of any antisemitic encounters.
7.52: Bertha recalls her in-laws as very generous and charitable.
9.24: The brothers formed a company in Western Canada called The First National Film Exchange of Canada.
10.07: The brothers came to Toronto and built the Canada Theatre which later became the Tivoli circa 1916. Herbert became a manager at The Tivoli.
12.39: The Allen brothers built several theatres including the Bloor Theatre, College Theatre, Parkdale Theatre, Beach Theatre, St. Clair Theatre and Danforth Theatre. Leon Yolles was the architect for Bloor and College Theatres.
13.20: The Allen brothers became bankrupt in 1923 or 1924.
13:40: The Allen brothers built the Allen Theatre in Cleveland, a building in Detroit. They had a representative in England. Wanted to expand through Europe.
16.20: Bertha suggests bankruptcy was due in part to a conflict with Paramount Pictures.
17.08: Herbert and Bertha’s brother, Louis Rosenfeld, joined Jule and J.J. to re-establish the business. Herbert was able to secure theatres in Kitchener. Louis was able to secure the Columbia franchise to distribute Columbia pictures. They became distributors and exhibitors.
19.16: Bertha refers to an article discussing a proposed deal between Adolph Zucker and the Allen brothers.
19.38: Famous Players became partners with the Allens circa 1927.
21.10: The Hollywood Theatre was the first theatre in Canada to run a double theatre.
21.45: Bertha discusses the family’s contributions to the community e.g. donation to a hospital, contributing films during both wars.
23.43: Bertha refers to an article that cites Herbert Allen’s efforts in organizing a motion picture company for war services.
25.00: Bertha describes some of Herbert’s involvement in community service.
26.45: The family belonged to Goel Tzedek which became the Beth Tzedec Synagogue and later belonged to Holy Blossom.
29.33: Bertha describes the involvement of the Allen brothers’ offspring in the business.
30.40: Bertha explains the history of the various buy-outs and reoranization of the business. At the time of the interview, Bertha & Herbert’s son, Barry, was the owner of the business.
32.29: Bertha describes Herbert’s actions to support Canada’s war effort in both world wars (e.g. officers training corps, fund-raising, working in the reserves).
34.34: Herbert was dedicated to serving the Variety Club.
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Isidore Kaplan
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
3 June 1975
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Isidore Kaplan
Number
AC 009
AC 010
Subject
Business
Communities
Interview Date
3 June 1975
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Sophie Milgram
Total Running Time
009A: 29 minutes 009B: 41 minutes 010A: 30 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
Reduced sound quality at times.
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Isidore Kaplan was born in Vilna in 1910. His father was the first Jew to settle in Kirkland Lake, Ontario. Isidore's father, a successful businessman, opened a general store in 1915 and a movie theatre in 1923. The Jewish community of Kirkland Lake grew to 135 families and was able to support a synagogue, kosher butcher and after-school cheder at its peak.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Kaplan, Isidore
Milgram, Sophie
Geographic Access
Kirkland Lake, Ont.
Cobalt, Ont.
Englehart, Ont.
Krugerdorf, Ont.
Swastika, Ont.
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
AC 009: Side 1
0.20: Isidore was born in a town near Vilna in 1910.
0.40: Isidore had 2 brothers and 1 sister, all immigrated to Canada.
1.20: Isidore’s father came alone to America initially in 1907, went back to Europe to take care of a leather business. Returned a second time to America (New York) in 1912. Came to Toronto because of a contact.
6.15: Isidore’s father and friend, Mr. Teitlebaum, moved to Cobalt in northern Ontario to pursue employment opportunities that were the result of the growth of the mining industry. Mentioned the mining of cobalt and silver.
7.50: Isidore’s father and Teitlebaum walked from Cobalt to Timmins via Engelhart and Swastika. Described the development of the Jewish community in northern Ontario. Existing Jewish cemetery. Were offered land to farm by the government in Krugerdorf. 25-30 Jewish families started farming.
9.43: Explained that some of the Jews who settled the area had escaped from the Russo-Japanese war.
10.27: Reported that the Ontario government helped to bring out Jewish prisoners who had been captured by the Japanese.
11.55: Related a story of Isadore’s father rooming with a Jewish woman, Mrs. Rosa Brown in Swastika.
14.11: Listed names (?) of the agents for the town site and explained about the purchase of lots.
15.50: Isidore’s father was the first Jew in Kirkland Lake. He opened a general store in 1915. Related a story about how he acquired the materials to build the store. Described the construction of the store.
23.00: Isidore’s father’s brother-in-law, Max, became a partner in the business in 1915.
25.45: Isidore’s father traveled to Toronto to purchase supplies. Ordered groceries from Rubin and Fine who were in the grocery business in Toronto.
28.00: Business was very slow for several months. Competed with ?Labarge?
29.00: Mrs. Brown suggested that Isidore’s father start to sell meat.
AC 009: Side 2
0.40: Mrs. Rosa Brown helped solicit customers who were uneasy about doing business with Jews.
2.55: Isidore’s father offered more competitive prices. Business increased.
5.26: Expanded business to sell ice cream. Business prospered.
7.17: Described incident which he suspected was anti-Semitic involving the deliberate starting of a fire in the store in 1917. The store was destroyed.
8.35: Isidore’s uncle Max Kaplan, brother to his mother was his father’s business partner.
9.30: Isidore’s father rebuilt store. Once again the business prospered.
11.45: In 1921 ?Percussis? opened a store
12.48: Isidore’s father bought furs (e.g.beaver) and sold them to Hudson’s Bay outlet.
13.30: In 1921 Isidore’s father purchased 2 lots across the street from Harry Oaks to build a movie theatre.
15.20: Related problems regarding the purchase (e.g. inability to secure a mortgage, difficulty acquiring building supplies, leveling the property, etc.). Described how Harry Oaks (who was described as a very wealthy man) arranged for Isidore’s father to borrow money from the Royal Bank. Isidore attributed this to their trusting relationship.
19.50: The building was also used as a meeting hall for 2 Lodges, Masonic and ?
20.53: The theatre was completed in 1923.
23.40: Brought the family from Poland to Kirkland Lake, 4 children, his wife and Isidore’s aunt in 1923. Isidore’s grandmother was unable to come due to health reasons. Initially, Isidore’s father purchased tickets from ?Jurovski?, local travel agent but all was lost so he purchased tickets directly from White Star line.
25.30: 1 other Jewish family in Kirkland Lake, ?Stotts?
26.00: Other Jewish families moved into Kirkland Lake around 1924 to 1927.
27.00: By 1927, there were enough Jews to have a Minyan for Yontif in Kirkland Lake. Held services in the first theatre. Before 1927, Jews traveled to Englehart for religious services.
27.55: Mentioned a large fire in northern Ontario in 1922. (Kirkland Lake was spared.) The original synagogue in Englehart was destroyed. Rented another hall for religious services.
28.28: Mentioned a pious Jew who was a farmer who acted as prayer leader, Baal Tefilah.
AC 010: Side 1
0.22: Mr. Finkleman and Mr. Levinsky paid $350 for a lot and built a synagogue in 1928 in Kirkland Lake. Originally, held services in the back of Mr. Levinsky’s candy store.
2.55: About 12-14 Jewish families in Kirkland Lake by 1927.
3.20: Jews worked as merchants or miners. Isidore’s father helped find jobs for miners. Listed names of local merchants.
6.50: Reported 135 Jewish families in Kirkland Lake. Cited incidents of antisemitism. E.g. Isidore’s uncle who served on town council could not be elected Mayor because he was Jewish, antisemitic comments.
7.58: In 1975, reported that 8 Jewish families remained in Kirkland Lake, Shul was closed. Jews have moved from surrounding areas.
9.23: First Rabbi, Ruben, came to Kirkland Lake in 1928.
11.55: Next Rabbi, ?Luvich? originated from Holland. Related story about how Isidore’s, uncle Max approached a member of parliament, Russell Gordon, in order to prevent the Rabbi from being sent back to Europe.
13.45: Jewish community in Kirkland Lake continued to grow until 1937. Reported community decline with a downturn in the economy with the outbreak of the Second World War, a mining strike and closures of mines.
18.50: Synagogue rebuilt in 1945. The bima was purchased from a synagogue in Montreal by Mr. Stott. The bima had been built in Hungary.
21.10: Kirkland Lake supported a local kosher butcher, Turkin
22.06: The Rabbi from Kirkland Lake traveled by train to Jewish communities in outlying areas.
22.55: Discussed high rate of intermarriage.
24.35: Jewish education taught by Rabbi in after-school program.
25.16: Reported that children of founding Jewish families tended to be University educated. Children left Kirkland Lake and did not return.
Source
Oral Histories

Isidore Kaplan's father was the first Jewish resident of Kirkland Lake, Ontario. In this clip, Isidore relates his father's journey in 1912 from Toronto to Kirkland Lake in northern Ontario via Engelhart and Swastika.

In this clip, Isidore Kaplan describes the decline of Kirkland Lake, Ontario

Name
Dr. Sydney Wise
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
September 29, 2003
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Dr. Sydney Wise
Number
AC 278
Subject
Business
Immigrants--Canada
Physicians
Interview Date
September 29, 2003
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Ellen Scheinberg
Total Running Time
Side 1: 46 min.
Side 2: 30 min.
Conservation
Digital copy made April 11, 2011.
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Dr. Sydney Wise was a Toronto physician and was a long-time volunteer at the Ontario Jewish Archives. Sydney was married to Mimi Wise who had been an active member of Hadassah-Wizo for most of her life. Sydney's father, Anshel Wise, opened a cigar store on Dundas street, which later turned into a steamship agency called A. Wise Travel Bureau that helped bring immigrants over from Europe.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Wise, Anshel
Wise, Sydney
Scheinberg, Ellen
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories

In this portion of the interview, Syd describes his father, Anshel Wise’s, cigar store and travel business that opened in the Ward in 1918. Anshel was one of the first steamship agents in Toronto.

In this portion of the interview, Sydney describes his entry into medical school at the University of Toronto. He outlines some of the challenges encountered by Jewish medical students in their search for internship positions.

Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Businesses series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 18; Series 2; File 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Businesses series
Level
File
Fonds
18
Series
2
File
1
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1966]
Physical Description
4 negatives : b&w ; 10 x 13 cm
Scope and Content
File consists of images of the interior of Mr. Klermintz' tailor shop on Queen Street West. Included are two photographs of the tailor shop workroom and two photographs of a young woman helping a customer on the sales floor.
Name Access
Klermintz, Mr.
Subjects
Business
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Queen Street West (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Morris Norman collection
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 22; Item 13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Morris Norman collection
Level
Item
Fonds
22
Item
13
Material Format
object
Date
[ca. 1950]
Physical Description
1 item
Subjects
Business
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2012-10-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-10-12
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
21 photographs : b&w (14 negatives) ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
1 folder of textual records
Date
[196-], [197-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of Kalmen Greenspans & sons butcher shop at 170 Brunswick Avenue at Harbord Street. The photographs depict Greenspan and other staff members inside the butcher shop as well as the exterior of the shop. There is also one earlier photograph of the exterior. The textual records include order forms and letterhead.
Subjects
Business
Food
Name Access
Greenspan, Harry
Greenspan, Kalmen
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-11-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-11-2
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
6 photographs : b&w and col. ; 15 x 20 cm and 9 x 15 cm and 11 x 8 cm
1 photograph (electronic) : jpg
Date
1930-2001
Scope and Content
Accession consists of three colour photographs from the reunion of the Baldwin Club, a young men's club from the 1940s based in Kensington Market. The reunion took place in 2006 at the Steeles Deli. The photographs feature: Pearl Godfrey with Rose Simon Zand and her husband David Zand (Rose Simon Zand grew up in the market and her family owned a grocery store); Jack Gelman (founder of the Baldwin Club. His parents owned P. Gelman Fruit and Groceries at 174 Baldwin Street). To his right is his wife. Seated are Rose Simon and Pearl Godfrey; Left to right: Solly Raykeff, Jackie Gelman, Mel Lastman.
Also included are three black and white photographs depicting 1) Three women in front of 172 Baldwin, left to right: Sandy Shabinsky, Katie Lottman Grossman, Ruth Berman; 2) Two girls in front of 172 Baldwin: left to right: Bella Tichberg (Judy Lottman Tichberg's daughter) and her cousin Henry; 3) Jake Lottman and his father Sam Lottman at 181 Baldwin shown cracking eggs for a photo taken for Queen Elizabeth's visit to Toronto.
Also included is one electronic photo of three women working at Lottman's bakery (Helen Wiseman who worked at the bakery for 50 years, Katie Lottman Grossman's mother in law Brancha Loffman, and Gertie who also worked at the bakery for many years)
There is also a small amount of textual records including two newspaper articles entitled "From Humble Beginnings in Kensington" (National Post, 2006) and "Demise of Lottman's Bakery mounred by all" (CJN, Thursday, November 29, 1984); a cookbook of recipes by Rose Simon entitled Recipes by Rose (2001); as well as five photocopies of photos of the Baldwin Street Boys (1940s).
Administrative History
Pearl Godfrey's father was Sam Lottman, owner of Lottman's Bakery which opened in the 1920s and was originally located at 172 Baldwin Street. It had a brick oven and on Friday nights women would bring their pots to keep the chollent warm for the Sabath. Sam Lottman was born in Poland and arrived in Toronto when he was 12 years old. He arrived with nothing but soon got a job as a baker. Sam's first wife Bella died in the 1920s. They had two children Judy Tichberg and Joe Lottman. There was also another daughter that died. Sam was a founder of the Hebrew Loan Society (Axia), where members donated 25 cents per week.
Pearl's mother was Emma (Birkin) Lottman. She arrived from Poland with her sister and mother in 1919 and was a wig maker. Emma Lottman mother would go with neighbours to collect household items for new immigrants. She also worked alongside Sam in the bakery. They lived on top of the bakery until Pearl was 12 years old. Emma and Sam had three children: Jake Lottman, Katie Grossman and Pearl Godfrey. Pearl went to Ryerson Public School and then to Harbord Collegiate for a year before transferring to Forest Hill.
The family lived on top of the store until 1947 when they moved to 50 Ava Road in Forest Hill. They built a new store at 191 Baldwin. It had a traveling oven which was very rare at the time, which allowed for the baked goods to move along a conveyer belt through the heat.
Jake who had built the business alongside his father moved to California. Joe Lottman took over the business when Sam retired. Joe died at the age of 60 in 1981 and his daughter Bonnie Lottman and son Terry Lottman ran the business.
The bakery closed in 1984.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Business
Name Access
Lottman, Sam
Lottman, Emma
Places
Kensington Market (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-4
Material Format
textual record
object
Physical Description
ca. 15 cm of textual records
1 leather hide
Date
1974-2009
Scope and Content
Accession consists of documents related to UJA Federation committees and the Ontario Jewish Archives. Documents include correspondence, reports, meeting minutes and agendas, promotional material, budgets, and newspaper clippings. Accession also includes a shoe leather hide from Edna Shoe Manufacturing Company Limited that was used at a shoe conference.
Administrative History
Cyrel's grandfather, Charles Troster, owned the Edna Shoe Manufacturing Company Limited, a shoe factory, in Toronto. Cyrel's father and all of her uncles worked there. Names on the shoes were as follows: Celina, Lady Edna, Avanti, Charles (Studio of Canada), and Edna.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Business
Fashion and clothing
Meetings
Name Access
Troster, Charles
Troster, Cyrel
Edna Shoe Manufacturing Company Limited (Toronto, Ont.)
Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-8
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Physical Description
2 folders of textual records
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 25 cm
1 pair of shoes
Date
1958-1994
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the activities of Cyrel Troster and the Edna Shoe Manufacturing Company Limited. Included are lists of elected officers and members for B'nai Brith Women (1970-1971), an invitation to a B'nai Brith Women Covenant Breakfast (1958), an issue of the Zionist student publication "masada" (1977), a schedule for High Holiday services at Darchei Noam (1994), an issue of the bulletin "The Window" of B'nai Israel Beth David Congregation (1977), and an issue of the newsletter "Shirayim" of the Canadian Union of Jewish Studies (1972). Also included are a pair of Edna shoes, a sketch of a shoe, a photograph of shoes, and two templates of shoes documenting the work of the Edna Shoe Manufacturing Company Limited.
Custodial History
Cyrel found the shoes at a secondhand store and purchased them.
Administrative History
Cyrel's grandfather, Charles Troster, owned the Edna Shoe Manufacturing Company Limited, a shoe factory, in Toronto. Cyrel's father and all of her uncles worked there.
Subjects
Business
Fashion and clothing
Occupations
Name Access
Troster, Cyrel
Troster, Charles
Edna Shoe Manufacturing Company Limited (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-4
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 250 photographs (3 albums) : b&w and col. ; 53 x 43 cm and smaller
9 cm of textual records
Date
(191-)-(197-), 1992
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the Title, Samuels and Fishman families. Included are family photographs, and photos related to involvement with philanthropy and industry, materials related to Reliable Toy Company, Forest Hill Collegiate "Forester" year books, a land deed for the Ansheir Yoisher Misrachi Synagogue in Welland, news clippings relating to Alex Samuels death, a Holy Blossom "Tempelite" year book, a Crown Bakery Bread promotional item, a wedding menu from the marriage of Molly Fishman and Harry Title, Molly Fishman's high school diplomas and JNF certificates. There are a number of photos of the Fishman and Title families in Welland and the United States, photos of the Crowland Volunteer Fire Department with Sam and Frank Fishman, Turk family albums with Moishe Turk and Yeva Fishman, an album of a sefer torah dedication to Baycrest Hospital in memory of Leah Fishman, photos of the Samuels family, their trip to Israel, promotional photos from the Reliable Toy Company, Beth Tzedec founding board photos, and B'nai Brith Women photos.
Administrative History
Samuel (ca. 1882-1929, Russia) and Gussie (nee Moscovitz) (b. ca.1884, Romania) Fishman, immigrated to Welland Ontario from Romania. Both arrived to the USA as teenagers sometime around the turn of the century. Samuel and Gussie were married in the USA and by 1920 immigrated with their young family to the historic township of Crowland in Welland County. Here they opened and operated a men's clothing store. Together they had six children, Molly (b. 1909, USA), Abe (b. 1911, USA), Morris (b. 1916, USA), Ruth (b. 1915, USA), Ann (b. 1920, Ontario) and Ethel. Morris married Pauline and lived in St. Catherines, Ruth married Nate Oelbaum and lived in Tucson Arizona, Anne married Alec Rothman and lived in Port Colborne, Ethel married Eddie Matchtinger and lived in Toronto and Abe never married. Yeva Fishman, the niece of Samuel Fishman married Morris Turk. Her father was (Frank Fishman?) and her mother was Sara Leah Fishman. Molly Fishman married Harry Title (Teitelebaum) (b. ca. 1903). They had three children, Greta (nee Title) Greisman, Sandra (nee Title) Samuels and Stephen (m. Carole Hillman, niece of Ben Hillman). Harry Teitelbaum is the son of Israel and Frumeth Teitelbaum. He was born in Gdansk Poland (b. ca., 1903). Harry Title had four younger siblings Lloyd, Birdie (m. Witlin), Arthur and Lorelle (Lieba) the youngest who was born in Toronto. Harry arrived to Canada shortly after the first world war and worked in the garment industry. He and his brother Arthur founded the Title Dress Company in the late 1920s and operated the business out of 355 Adelaide St. West. In the late 1980s, the business moved from this location to Adelaide and Bathurst. Sandra Title (b. Oct 27, 1936, Toronto), the middle daughter of Molly Fishman and Harry Title, married Lawrence Samuels. Together they had five children Joanna, John, Noah, Tom and Caroline. Lawrence was the eldest son of Alex Samuels (d. 1966) and Kate (nee Goldberg) Samuels. He had two younger siblings Herbie and Florence (m. Bill Goodman). Lawrence's father Alex Samuels immigrated to Canada from Dubrovna, White Russia (present day Dubrouna, Belarus). He immigrated to Canada with his parents Samuel and Chana Samuels and his younger siblings Sol, Ben, Riva and Polly. Alex and his brothers Sol and Ben established Reliable Toy Company in (ca. 1929) on Carlaw Ave. They sold the company in 1990.
Subjects
Business
Charities
Families
Places
Welland, Ont.
Toronto, Ont.
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-14
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-14
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 13 x 18 cm
Date
[194-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one photograph of Max Swartz standing in front of his dry goods store at 182 Dundas Street West, circa 1940s. The store closed around 1949.
Administrative History
Max Swartz was born in Russia and served in the Russian army. He emigrated to Canada before the First World War. Max is the donor's paternal uncle.
Subjects
Business
Name Access
Swartz, Max
Places
St. John's Ward (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-60
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-60
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
ca. 5 cm of textual records
2 photographs : col. & b&w ; 10 x 15 cm and 5 x 4 cm
Date
1972-2010, predominant 1977-1983
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the Robinson family's immigration to Ontario as well as Morris Robinson's professional history and business activities with Libman and Company.
Included is family correspondence; the Robinson's customs paperwork and travel documents; Morris' curriculum vitae, professional records and some documentation of his business activities; and genealogical accounts of the Robinson family including a history by Lilian Henry. Of note is a letter Morris Robinson sent to Irma when he first arrived in Boston on his way to Toronto as well as letters Morris' parents hand delivered to Irma just before she left with the children to join Morris in Canada.
Identified in the photographs are: Morris Robinson and Phoebe Robinson.
Custodial History
Material was in possession of Morris Robinson. Morris donated it to the OJA.
Administrative History
Morris Robinson was born in Cape Town, South Africa on May 27th, 1948 and grew up in Benoni. He completed his Bachelor of Commerce degree at the University of Witwatersrand and graduated as a Chartered Accountant in 1973. On February 25th, 1973. Morris married Irma Startz who was born in Benoni, South Africa on December 10, 1951. Irma earned a Bachelor of Arts degree at the University of Witwatersrand and went on to obtain a Post-Graduate Higher Teacher's Diploma. The Robinsons have three sons. Their first son, Marc, was born in South Africa on September 26th, 1976 (just a few months after the Soweto riots). Their sons Frank (b. December 31, 1980) and Daniel (b. March 12, 1985) were born in Toronto.
The Robinsons were motivated by political unrest, which manifested in the anti-apartheid Soweto uprising of June 1976, and the desire for a safe future for their family, to seek opportunity abroad and to emigrate. In February of 1977, Morris heard through friends about an accounting job opportunity in Canada and was officially appointed to the post of comptroller at Libman and Company, then Canadas’ largest jewellery manufacturer. The Robinsons arrived in Toronto in early 1978 and settled in Thornhill, Ontario. In 1989, Morris became a partner of Libman and Company. During his career in the jewellery industry, Morris was involved with the Canadian Jewellers Association and served as the organization's chairman. He was also a founding member and first treasurer of the Diamond Bourse of Canada. Irma pursued a teaching career with the Toronto District School Board, specializing in ESL and eventually becoming the principal at an ESL school for adults. The Robinsons were founding members of Shaar Shalom Synagogue. In 2012 the Robinsons sold the family home in Thornhill and moved into the city to be closer to their children and grandchildren.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Business
Immigrants--Canada
Families
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-5-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-5-10
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1.4 m of textual records and graphic material
Date
1851-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records reflecting the academic, personal and literary life of Dr. Gerald Tulchinsky. The bulk of the material relates to Canada's garment industry, including photocopied reference material from various sources, reports and statistics, research notes, articles and graduate thesis on the topic, reminiscences by those in the industry and original records from specific firms and associations situated in Ontario and Quebec. Also included are manuscripts and accompanying material for Shtetl on the Grand and a book on the Canadian Clothing Industry, lecture notes, family correspondence and photographs, and the last will and testament of Anne Tulchinsky. All of the material from 1851-1935 are photocopies of original records.
Administrative History
Dr. Gerald Tulchinsky was Professor Emeritus at Queen's University, Department of History, and author of several books on the history of Canadian Jewry and labour issues in Canada. His books include: Shtetl on the Grand (2015); Joe Salsberg: A Life of Commitment (2013); Canada's Jews: A People's Journey (2008); Branching Out: The Transformation of the Canadian Jewish Community (1998); Taking Root: The Origins of the Canadian Jewish Community (1992); and The River Barons: Montreal Businessmen and the Growth of Industry and Transportation, 1837-53 (1977). Tulchinsky was born in Brantford, Ontario in 1933 to Harry and Anne Tulchinsky. He resided in Kingston, Ontario until his death on 13 Dec. 2017.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Descriptive Notes
SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE: This accession also includes numerous books, some of wihch don't relate to our mandate and others which are duplicates of our current holdings. The books that we have retained have been integrated into the OJA's library holdings. USE CONDITION NOTE: Access restricted until ten years after the donor's death, at the donor's request. Records will reopen on Dec. 14, 2027.
LANGUAGE NOTE: Some of the material is in French.
Subjects
Business
Labour and unions
Name Access
Tulchinsky, Gerald, 1933-2017
Places
Montreal, Que.
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-10-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-10-3
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records (1 vol.)
1 photograph
Date
1889-1890, [between 1914-1918]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a ledger book from Henry Sadowski's General Store in Massey, Ontario. The book features entries that document various purchases during 1889 and 1890. Half of the book is written in Yiddish and the other half is in English. The store appears to have operated on credit, allowing purchasers to buy goods and then pay their balance all at once.
There is also one photograph of an unknown soldier of the First World War. The photograph was tucked between the pages of the book. There is Yiddish writing on the reverse side.
Administrative History
Henry Sadowski was married to Rose Sadowski. He was the mayor of Massey, Ontario in 1914 and ran the General Store. Henry and Rose also owned a lumber camp in the area.
Descriptive Notes
SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE: Entries in English are written phonetically. For example, the word "pad" refers to "paid", and the words "to goods" refers to "two goods."
Subjects
Communities
Business
Name Access
Sadowski, Henry
Places
Massey, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-7
Material Format
sound recording
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
13 audio cassettes
1 folder of textual records (PDF)
Date
2001-2007
Scope and Content
Accession consists of audio cassette tapes containing interviews Lisa Newman conducted regarding the Rotenberg and Pines families. Included are interviews with: Aubey Rotenberg, Moe and Bernice Ceresne, Cyril Rotenberg, Lailla Rapoport, Laya Kurtz, David Rotenberg, Ken Rotenberg, Harvey Rotenberg, and Radha Ahuja (born Bluma Rotenberg).
Also included are textual records documenting the Rotenberg family's history. These include issues of the Ivansk Project e-newsletters, which contain entries written by Lisa Newman Greenspan (Issue #15 Nov.-Dec. 2005, Issue #23 Mar.-Apr. 2007, Issue #25 July-Aug. 2007).
Administrative History
Louis (Elazar / Loozer) Rotenberg immigrated to Toronto in 1893. He was the first Jew to immigrate to Toronto from Ivansk, Poland. He had married Rivka (nee Cukier) in 1883. She followed him to Toronto with their four children in 1895. They had an additional five children in Toronto. Their children were: Harry, Max, Meta, Louis (Leibish), Meyer, Zechariah (died at age 4 in 1906), Charlie, and Hilda. Louis eventually opened a banking, steamship and insurance office in Toronto with three of his sons (Louis Jr., Harry and Max) in 1916. The business eventually became known as Rotenberg's Ltd. Louis passed away in 1936.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Business
Interviews
Families
Name Access
Rotenberg, Louis
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-12-45
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-12-45
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w ; col. ; 8 x 11 cm
1 folder of textual records
Date
1958-2010
Scope and Content
Accession consists of family photos of Victor Latchman and textual records about Victor's business Taylors Shoes. Identified in the photos are: Victor Latchman and Rosalie Greenspan, Donald and Annette Latchman and Victor and Rosalie in Miami (1960s). Textual records include a business card for Taylors Shoes and an article about Latchman's retirement published in the Bloor West Town Crier (February 2010).
Administrative History
Philip and Sally (Sugarman) Latchman were married in 1932. In November 1933, Sally gave birth to identical triplets Donald, Marvin and Victor. In celebration, they were sent the King's Bounty of 3 British pounds. The boys were interviewed every year on their birthday by Toronto newspapers until they decided to stop the publicity. The family lived in the Bloor-Markham area until the boys were 11. The family then moved to Montclair Avenue where the boys attended Forest Hill Public School. They had their bar-mitzvahs at the Hebrew Men of England Synagogue. The triplets' father, Philip Latchman was a founding members of Beth Sholom Synagogue. Donald Latchman was on the board and Rosalie Latchman was active in the congregation.
Philip and his younger brother Morris Latchman started Federal Farms Limited in 1948 on 150 acres of Holland March in Brantford, Ontario. They grew vegetables: potatoes, carrots, celery and rutabegas. They also had a potato chip company Mad Hatter Snack Foods which was Kosher for Passover. Federal Farms Ltd. went public in 1961 and Loblaws bought 51% of the shares.
Donald attended Ryerson business school and founded Latchman Insurance Brokers. He married Annette Bachst, a holocaust survivor who grew up in New York.
Marvin attended Ryerson business school then worked for Federal Farms at the Ontario Food Terminal. Later he became a real estate broker. He married Shirley Wolkofsky.
Victor worked on the family farm and at Federal Fruit Company at the Ontario Food Terminal. Victor took a business course at Shaw's Business School. In 1966 he bought Taylors shoes, a business at 2934 Dundas Street. West started in 1920 by Sid Taylor. Victor helped start the Junction Business Improvement Association and was twice President of Junction Gardens BIA. He retired in 2009. Victor and Rosalie Greenspan (d. 2014) were married at Beth Sholom in 1958 by Rabbi David Monson. Their children are Howard, and Faith and Mitchell Sherman. Their grand-children are Matthew, Jennifer and Russell Sherman. Victor and Rosalie were honoured at Beth Sholom Synagogue on 26 October 2013 for their 55th wedding anniversary.
In 2012 at age 78, the triplets believed themselves to be the oldest male identical triplets alive in Canada.
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIALS NOTE: See accession 2016-7-5 (Victor Latchman) and 2002-10-66 (Morris Latchman). RELATED MATERIALS NOTE: Federal Farms Limited fonds at Simcoe County Archives.
Subjects
Business
Families
Name Access
Latchman, Annette
Latchman, Donald
Latchman, Rosalie
Latchman, Victor
Places
Miami (Fla.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-4-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-4-8
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1962-2009
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records that include building permits, letters between Ed's Warehouse and Toronto City Hall regarding air pollution, a letter from Mel Lastman, Business Executives' Dining Award (1985,1986), employee benefits and codes, and Honest Ed's Special flyers (2001-2009). The permits include requests to make alterations to the theater and factory building for a theatre (1971) and alter an art studio for a coffee house (1966).
Custodial History
Brought in by Alicia Payne of the Centre for Social Innovation following the Honest Eds' Closing Party.
Administrative History
Honest Ed's (1948-2016) was Canada's first discount retail store opened by Ed and Anne Mirvish at the corner of Bloor and Markham Streets. The store closed on December 31, 2016.
Subjects
Business
Name Access
Mirvish, Ed
Mirvish, David
Honest Ed's (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
30 records – page 1 of 1.

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