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21 records – page 1 of 1.
Accession Number
2012-7-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-7-6
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
12 m of textual records
Date
[197-]-[199-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the North American Jewish Students Network and in particular, its Canadian division.
Custodial History
There is no acquisition information for this material. The accession number has been assigned by the archivist.
Use Conditions
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Children
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
North American Jewish Students Network (Canada)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-12-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-12-1
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
2 v : 36 x 29 x 5 cm and 36 x 29 x 1.5 cm
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two volumes of the Canadian Jewish War Memorial Book of Remembrance. The first of these two volumes contains lists of Jewish soldiers who served in the Canadian military during the South African war, the First and Second World Wars and Korea. It also lists current day Jewish peacekeepers. There are photos and lists of Jewish chaplains who served in the military. For each war, it lists awards, casualties, soldiers' positions and identification numbers. The second volume contains lists of American soldiers who served in the Canadian military.
Custodial History
This book was presented by the Canadian Jewish War Memorial Association to the US Consulate who subsequently donated it to the Ontario Jewish Archives.
Subjects
Korean War, 1950-1953
South African War, 1899-1902
World War, 1914-1918
World War, 1939-1945
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-5-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-5-4
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
4 photograph albums
ca. 450 photographs : b&w and col. (ca. 260 negatives) ; 36 x 30 cm and smaller
3 cm of textual records
Date
[ca. 1963]-[ca. 1995]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of graphic material and textual records documenting Canadian Young Judaea. Included are photographic albums, loose photographs, clippings, photographic contact sheets and negatives, and textual records, including meeting minutes, correspondences, etc. All of the items relate to Ontario-based Jewish summer camps such as Camp Solelim and Camp Biluim, as well as to Canadian Young Judaea.
Custodial History
Records came via Josefa Michaelson, c/o Canadian Young Judaea
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Children
Camps
Name Access
Canadian Young Judaea
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-1
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1917-1964
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting Samuel Berger and his family. Included is Sam's marriage certificate, wedding invitation, naturalization certificates, and pay book and discharge papers from the First World War. Also included is a copy of the birth certificate for Sam's wife, Rebecca (nee Rotenberg) and a newsclipping of the obituary for Rebecca's father, Lazar Rotenberg.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Goldie Berger, the daughter-in-law of Samuel Berger and wife of Leonard Berger.
Administrative History
Samuel Berger enlisted in the Canadian army in Oct. 1918. He was discharged in Dec. 1918. He married Rebecca Rotenberg in 1917.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
World War, 1914-1918
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-1
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
6 yearbooks
Date
1988-1993
Scope and Content
Accession consists of six yearbooks from Solomon's school years.
Administrative History
Dara Solomon was born in Toronto in 1975 to Joseph and Maureen (Kokotow) Solomon. Her sister is Alida Solomon. In 2004, she married Jay Rosenthal of Natick, MA in San Francisco, CA. Solomon attended Bialik Hebrew Day School (1980-89), Arlington Senior Public School (1989), CHAT (1990), and Forest Hill Collegiate Institute (1991-93). She went on to the University of Toronto where she received her BA and to the School of the Art Institute of Chicago where she received her Masters in Arts Administration. She worked in museums in the San Francisco Bay Area for 11 years before returning to Toronto with her family in 2012. Since 2012, she has been the director of the Ontario Jewish Archives. She has a daughter named Stella Rosenthal and a son named Cy Rosenthal.
Subjects
Children
Education
Name Access
Solomon, Dara, 1975-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-4
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1973-1977
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the Rules and Conditions for the Morris Black Memorial Essay Contest, essays submitted, correspondence from the Board of Jewish Education and the vote casting process for the 1976 contest.
Custodial History
There is no information on the acquisition of this material.
Administrative History
The Morris Black Memorial Essay Contest was established by the Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region's Department of Education and Culture. The rules and conditions stated in a booklet dated 1973 was that the 'prize or prizes for the best essay or essays or oral address or addresses on men famous in Jewish history...'. The Contest was open to 'All Jewish children in the Province of Ontario outside of Metropolitan Toronto and Ottawa.' The essays submitted in 1973 appeared to follow the Rules and Conditions. However, in the 1976 contest, now sponsored by The Board of Jewish Education, there were no restrictions on where the Jewish children lived or on the gender of the person in Jewish history being written about.
Subjects
Education
Children
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region (Toronto, Ont.)
Board of Jewish Education (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-11
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-11
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1979
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a document titled 'Educational Counseling Centre (Day School) Guidance and Counseling Program of the Jewish Vocational Service of Metropolitan Toronto (JVS).
Custodial History
There is no information on the acquisition of this material.
Administrative History
The Educational Counseling Centre of JVS provided a guidance and counseling program to the seven Hebrew Day Schools in Toronto.
Subjects
Children
Education
Name Access
Jewish Vocational Service of Metropolitan Toronto
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-4
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
24 photographs : col. ; 20 x 26 cm or smaller
Date
1988-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of the graduating classes of the Downtown Jewish Community School from the first class in 1988 through to 2013. Missing are the photographs from the years 1998, 1999 and 2011. Also included are identification keys as well as class lists detailing student names, addresses, home schools and parent names.
Subjects
Education
Children
Religion
Name Access
Downtown Jewish Community School (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-12-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-12-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1966
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one B'nai B'rith Girls Life Member card issued to Cyrel Troster as a leader in BBG leadership training, dated April 1966.
Subjects
Children
Name Access
Troster, Cyrel
B'nai Birth Youth Organization
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-11-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-11-13
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
7 photographs : col. ; 10 x 15 cm
1 folder of textual records
Date
2006
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 7 colour photographs of Eisen speaking to students, a thank you card signed by the students and student art work in response to the Holocaust.
Administrative History
Alexander Eisen was born in Vienna, Austria, in 1929. After the Anschluss in 1938, the Eisen family fled to Hungary. In 1939, Alex’s father was arrested and fled to Palestine, leaving his wife alone with their three children. Alex and the rest of the family endured the hardships of the Budapest Ghetto, but later managed to escape and live in hiding until being liberated by the Soviet Army in 1945. He immigrated with his wife Renate to Canada in 1952. Eisen is a Neuberger Holocaust Survivor Speaker and author of A Time of Fear (2010).
Subjects
Children
Education
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Name Access
Eisen, Alexander
Places
Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Orah School for Russian Jewish Children series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 48; Series 12
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Orah School for Russian Jewish Children series
Level
Series
Fonds
48
Series
12
Material Format
textual record
Date
1979-2000
Physical Description
40 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
Established in November 1978 as the Orah School for Jewish Children from the Soviet Union, the school was intended for children who recently arrived from the Soviet Union with no previous Jewish education. Funding for the school came from special grants from the Toronto Jewish Congress (TJC; now, the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto), from community fundraising for the school, and from tuition fees. The school was managed by a board of directors, with a staff consisting of a school principal and vice-principal, and as many as eight teachers and junior teachers. The number of teaching staff varied over the years with fluctuations in enrolment and funding. The bulk of the administrative work for the school was carried out by BJE staff, and the school was considered a special project of the BJE and its parent body, the TJC. The executive and associate directors of the BJE were ex-officio members of the Orah board.
The school operated as a Sunday school, with six hours of classes every week. The curriculum was designed to suit families with little familiarity with Judaism, many of whom found the greater time requirements of the day schools and other supplementary schools too onerous. The school also provided children with bar and bat mitzvah training. The school's location varied over the years, moving between branches of the Eitz Chaim schools and the Hurwich Branch of Associated Hebrew Schools.
In recent years, the Orah school's affiliation with the BJE came to an end. Now called the Orah School for Children, the school is currently located in Thornhill at the Spring Farm branch of Eitz Chaim Day School, with Rabbi Yosef Michalowicz serving as principal.
Scope and Content
The series documents the BJE's involvement in founding the Orah school and assisting in its operations. The series also documents studies of the school conducted by the TJC and BJE in the early 1980s and again in the early 1990s. The series contains meeting minutes of the board of directors and study committees, memoranda and correspondence relating to the school's operations, and records relating to the school's budget, fundraising activities, and enrolment. Files in the series are organized alphabetically by subject.
Subjects
Children
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
1993-3-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1993-3-1
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1917-1919
Scope and Content
Accession consists of original and copies of documents and newspaper clippings pertaining to Lawrence Kert's service as a pilot during the First World War. Included are his graduation certificate from the Royal Flying Corps, his flight log, documents, and press clippings concerning his capture by the Germans.
Administrative History
Lawrence Kert left the University of Toronto to enlist in the 228th Battalion in 1915, and was transferred to the Royal Air Force in 1917. He was listed as missing, but was actually a prisoner of war. He survived and returned to Canada.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
World War, 1914-1918
Name Access
Kert, Lawrence
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1996-6-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1996-6-4
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1.5 m of textual records
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records of the North American Jewish Students Network.
Use Conditions
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Children
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
North American Jewish Students Network (Canada)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-16
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-16
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1975
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records relating to a "Teach-In on Israel" held at the university on 22 January 1975. There is also an announcement of a meeting of the Revolutionary Marxist Group at York.
MG_RG
MG2 P1d
Subjects
Education
Children
Politics and government
Name Access
Jewish Student Federation (York University)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2005-6-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2005-6-1
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1946-1948
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the Wabi-kronicle, the newsletter for Camp Wabi-Kon, a Jewish camp in Northern Ontario near Temagami.
Subjects
Camps
Children
Name Access
Camp Wabi-Kon
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Cowan family fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 102; File 49
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Cowan family fonds
Level
File
Fonds
102
File
49
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Date
[ca. 1944]-[199-]
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
5 photographs : b&w and col. ; 13 x 20 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Michael Cowan is the son of Saul and Lillian Cowan.
Scope and Content
File consists of photographs of Michael Cowan as a small child, in a group photo of the Homewood Public School choir, as a teenager in front of the family home on Brucewood in Toronto, and with his wife Nancy in Montreal. There is a commencement programme for his 1957 graduation from Bathurst Heights Collegiate, and programmes for recitals, concerts, and theatre events in which Michael was a participant or composed the music. These include the UC Follies at Hart House, University of Toronto, The Royal Conservatory of Music, Temple Sinai Religious School operetta, and The Jazz Singer at the Saidie Bronfman Yiddish Theatre in Montreal. As well there is correspondence between Michael and family members, and a letter written by him at the age of 11 to the Canadian Arthritis and Rheumatism Society offering a suggestion for the cause of rheumatism.
Name Access
Cowan, Michael
Subjects
Children
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Child Welfare Association fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 86
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Child Welfare Association fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
86
Material Format
textual record
Date
1932-1943
Physical Description
23 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Child Welfare Association (JCWA) was formed in 1936 through the amalgamation of the Jewish Children’s Bureau, the Jewish Big Brother Movement, and the Jewish Big Sister Committee. This merger was intended to improve service to families in the community by making one agency responsible for all cases dealing with children and adolescents. The JCWA’s funding primarily came from the Federation for Jewish Philanthropies (later the United Jewish Welfare Fund) and municipal and provincial grants.
The JCWA’s Chairman was Bertram N. Davis and first Executive Secretary was Anne Gussack. Gussack was succeeded by Freda Manson in 1939 and Aaron B. Feld in 1941. Soon after its formation in 1936, the JCWA became one of the first unionized social agencies in Canada when it formed the Staff Association with the Jewish Family Welfare Bureau (JFWB).
Located at 179 Beverley Street, the JCWA’s core activities included: placing children in foster homes, arranging adoptions, supervising children in their own homes, providing housekeeping services to families, and providing supervision and guidance to unmarried mothers. The JCWA paid for the foster children’s room and board, clothing and medical care, supervised their religious education, and supplied scholarships for vocational training through its Jewish Children’s Vocational Fund. The JCWA also ran the Foster Mothers’ Parent Education Group, initiated a foster day care program to allow foster mothers to work, and arranged for the placement of children in summer camps. A constant problem for JCWA was the lack of appropriate foster homes. In order to secure more homes, the agency regularly engaged in a foster homefinding publicity campaign.
The Child Welfare Committee of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society assisted the JCWA with finding and visiting foster homes, arranging adoptions, and attending to chronic clinical cases. The Hebrew Maternity Aid Society also participated in a Car Corp program with the JCWA by providing its social workers with volunteer drivers to help them travel to different locations.
The JCWA’s Big Brother and Big Sister Departments provided guidance for delinquent, troubled, and developmentally disabled adolescents through individual and group work. Both departments assisted troubled youth with employment, vocational training, school adjustment and recreational activities. In 1941, the Big Sister Committee left the JCWA to become affiliated with the JFWB.
Discussions regarding the co-ordination of services between the JCWA and the JFWB began as early as 1935. Since both agencies worked with children and families, a merger was believed necessary to improve service to the community and ease confusion. In February 1943, the JCWA and the JFWB merged to form the Jewish Family and Child Services (JF & CS).
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of textual records documenting the programs, operation, finances and special projects and studies of the Jewish Child Welfare Association and its predecessor the Jewish Children's Bureau. Included is correspondence, reports, surveys, memos, meeting notices, agendas and minutes, financial records, questionnaires, speeches, client and membership lists, case presentations, news articles, theatrical scripts, event invitations and statistics.
Fonds has been arranged with one sous-fonds, which contains the records of the Jewish Children's Bureau. In total there are 25 series. The Jewish Child Welfare Association (main fonds) series are: 1. Board of Trustees; 2. Executive Director; 3. Committees; 4. Adoption; 5. Foster care; 6. Summer camp program; 7. Nursery school; 8. Jewish Children's Vocational Board; 9. Finance and accounting; 10. Human Resources; 11. Operational statistics; 12. Special studies and surveys; 13. Publicity; 14. Liaison with other social welfare organizations; and 15. Welfare Council of Toronto. The Jewish Children's Bureau (sous-fonds) series are: 1. Board of Trustees; 2. Executive Director; 3. Adoption; 4. Foster care; 5. Finance and accounting; 6. Human resources; 7. Building administration; 8. Special studies and surveys; 9. Publicity; and, 10. Liaison with other social welfare organizations.
Notes
Associated material note: for related records held at the City of Toronto Archives, see also: Children's Aid Society of Toronto fonds (fonds 1001); Welfare Council of Toronto records in the University Settlement House fonds (fonds 1024, series 658); and, Department of Public Welfare records in the Former City of Toronto fonds (fonds 200).
Name Access
Jewish Child Welfare Association
Jewish Children's Home
Jewish Children's Vocational Fund
Davis, Bertram N.
Gussack, Anne
Manson, Freda
Feld, Aaron B.
Jewish Big Sisters Committee
Jewish Big Brothers Movement
Jewish Family and Child Services
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies
United Jewish Welfare Fund
Department of Public Welfare
Welfare Council of Toronto
Children's Aid Society
Subjects
Charities
Children
Families
Nonprofit organizations
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director and the head of Jewish Family and Child prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
See also: Jewish Family Welfare Bureau fonds (fonds 87); Jewish Family and Child fonds (fonds 79); Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds (fonds 66); and, United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds (fonds 67).
Arrangement
Records of the Jewish Big Sisters Committee, the Jewish Big Brothers Movement and records documenting programs of the JCWA that continued after the formation of JF & CS, such as the Foster Homefinding Campaign and the Foster Mothers' Parent Education Group, are arranged with the JF & CS fonds 79.
Accession Number
2004-1-8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 87
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
87
Material Format
textual record
architectural drawing
Date
1928-1943
Physical Description
67 cm of textual records
1 architectural drawing
Admin History/Bio
Sometime around 1919, the Family Welfare Committee was set up within the newly created Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto (FJPT) to perform social welfare work with Jewish families. Around 1931, the Committee was reorganized as an independent member agency of the FJPT and renamed the Jewish Family Welfare Bureau (JFWB). At the same time, Dora Wilensky (1902-1959), a professionally trained social worker, was hired as the agency’s Executive Director. Throughout its existence, most of its funding came from the FJPT (later the United Jewish Welfare Fund).
Located at 179 Beverley Street, the JFWB’s core activities included: relief provision; helping families met basic needs, such as medical care, heating and clothing; housekeeping assistance; counseling; and case work. The JFWB’s major concerns shifted over time from a rise of immigration and desertion cases in the 1920s to the dramatic increase of wife abuse, suicide and unemployment cases during the Great Depression of the 1930s. After the outbreak of the Second World War, the JFWB sought ways of assisting soldiers and their families, such as, investigating special government grants to soldiers.
In an attempt to meet community needs, the JFWB initiated various programs, such as a Homemaking Club to teach women house management skills, and a Clothing Centre to provide families with inexpensive household goods. It also partnered with other local Jewish organizations in the early 1940s in the Liaison Project for troubled Jewish youth. In the 1930s, the Jewish Employment Service and Hebrew Free Burial Society became departments of the JFWB and, in 1941, the JFWB began guaranteeing loans for clients through the Hebrew Free Loan Association. In the same year, the Jewish Big Sister Committee became affiliated with the agency and the Jewish Big Brother Movement followed soon after.
In 1936, the JFWB became one of the first unionized social agencies in Canada when it formed the Staff Association with the Jewish Child Welfare Association (JCWA), another member of the FJPT. Although the JFWB’s focus was work with families and the JCWA’s focus was work with children, both agencies found it necessary at times to work with both children and families. In order to prevent service duplication and reduce confusion over casework responsibility, the Joint Application Bureau was set up within the FJPT to review all case work applications and determine the appropriate agency to provide assistance. However, a merger between the agencies was still believed necessary to improve service to the community and ease confusion. Discussions regarding the co-ordination of services between the JCWA and the JFWB began as early as 1935 and in February 1943, the JCWA and JFWB merged to form the Jewish Family and Child Services (JF & CS).
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of textual records and one architectural drawing documenting the programs, operation, finances, and special studies of the Jewish Family Welfare Bureau as well as its relationships with other organizations. Included are reports, meeting notices, agendas and minutes, correspondence, memos, budgets, statistics, theatrical scripts, newsclippings, and one architectural blueprint. A number of the records relate to special short-lived committees and projects that the JFWB participated in with other agencies, such as the Jewish Big Sister Committee, Jewish Big Brother Committee, Jewish Child Welfare Association, the Jewish Community Centre Association, the Young Men's and Women's Hebrew Association, and the Jewish Old Folks' Home.
Records have been arranged into the following 19 series: 1. Board of Directors; 2. Executive Director; 3. Jewish Federation Communal Council; 4. United Jewish Welfare Fund Men's and Women's Service Council; 5. Case Committe; 6. Joint Meetings and Committees; 7. Joint Application Bureau; 8. Homemaking Club; 9. Clothing Centre; 10. Liaison Project; 11. Operational statistics; 12. Finance and accounting; 13. Human Resources; 14. Special projects and studies; 15. Publicity; 16. Liaison with other social welfare organizations; 17. Canadian Association of Social Workers; 18. Welfare Council of Toronto; and, 19. Conferences.
Notes
Associated material note: for related records held at the City of Toronto Archives, see also: Welfare Council of Toronto records in the University Settlement House fonds (fonds 1024, series 658); and, Department of Public Welfare records in the Former City of Toronto fonds (fonds 200).
Name Access
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau
Jewish Community Centre Association
Young Men's-Young Women's Hebrew Athletic Association (Toronto, Ont.) (subject)
Jewish Old Folks Home (Toronto, Ont.)
United Jewish Welfare Fund (Toronto, Ont.) (subject)
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto (subject)
Wilensky, Dora, 1902-1959
Subjects
Charities
Children
Families
Nonprofit organizations
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director and the head of Jewish Family and Child prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
See also: Jewish Child Welfare Association fonds (fonds 86); Jewish Family and Child Services fonds (fonds 79); Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds (fonds 66); and, United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds (fonds 67).
Arrangement
Records relating to programs, committees and liaison with other organizations that continued after the formation of JF & CS are arranged with that fonds.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ethel Mehr fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 68
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ethel Mehr fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
68
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Date
[ca. 1898]-1965
Physical Description
70 photographs
1 folder of textual records
Admin History/Bio
Ethel Mehr (1901-1975) was born in Toronto in March 1901, the daugther of Mendel and Bessie Mehr. She attended Bishop Strachan School in Toronto. On 15 Dec. 1925, Ethel married Henry Greisman (1897-1950) who was a partner in the Balfour Building Company and later owned the Lady Ellis chain of clothing stores. They had two children, John Richard and Sally Barbara. After Henry Greisman's death, Ethel married Myer Brenner, whom she had first met as a young women.
Ethel had four siblings, Pincus, Leonard, Lucille (Warshavsky) and Bernice (Dunkelman).
Custodial History
The materials in this fonds were donated to the Archives in 1988 by Sally (Greisman) Brenzel, the daughter of Ethel Mehr.
Scope and Content
This fonds consists of photographs and a small amount of textual records documenting the Mehr, Greisman and Brenner families. The photographs include images of the Mehr family and friends, including individual members of the Greisman and Brenner families, and images of the Lady Ellis Shops in Toronto, Stratford, Ottawa and Windsor. The textual records include Ethel Mehr's confirmation diploma from Holy Blossom Temple as well as a personal letter and a Bishop Strachan domestic science workbook.
Name Access
Mehr, Ethel, 1901-1975
Subjects
Children
Education
Creator
Mehr, Ethel, 1901-1975
Accession Number
1988-12-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sharon Chapter of Hadassah fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 90
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sharon Chapter of Hadassah fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
90
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1918-1981, predominant 1952-1973
Physical Description
22 cm of textual records (4 v.)
16 microfiches of textual records
2 photographs
Admin History/Bio
Canada’s third chapter of Hadassah was organized in Brantford on January 2, 1918 by Mrs. Anna Selig (later Mrs. Anna Raginsky) and sponsored by Mrs. Leah Lazarus primarily to assist with Canada’s war effort. In 1919, it joined with other Canadian chapters to form the Hadassah Organization of Canada. By 1921, Hadassah Canada had merged with the Women’s International Zionist Organization (WIZO) and changed its name to Hadassah-WIZO. In 1929, the Brantford chapter adopted the name Rose of Sharon, but abbreviated it to the Sharon Chapter of Hadassah.
As a member of Hadassah-WIZO, the Sharon Chapter shared its mandate of financially and socially supporting the peoples of Israel and promoting Jewish culture and ideals in Canada. Following the national organization’s mandate, its administration consisted of two levels: a general membership and an Executive Committee. The general membership voted on all issues and activities, while the Executive Committee ensured all tasks were completed. Although the chapter initially only elected one president, it began electing three presidents in 1943.
Mrs. Sam Fox served as the chapter’s first president over the charter membership of 30 women. Membership initially remained fairly constant, but grew to 92 members by 1962. All members paid annual dues, of which a small portion was used to pay the chapter’s expenses with the remainder being forwarded to the regional Hadassah council to pay administrative costs and donations.
Some of the fundraising activities Sharon Chapter organized include; an annual birthday party (started in 1925), an annual Bazaar (started in 1952), sewing circles, pot lucks, tea and garden parties, rummage and auction sales, and showers. The funds and other goods accumulated from these events were forwarded to the regional Hadassah council to support various Hadassah-WIZO projects, such as Youth Aliyah and the Acco Baby Creche. The Sharon Chapter also supported local projects, such as, assisting new immigrants, and entertaining servicemen at the local canteen during the Second World War.
The population of Brantford’s Jewish community began declining after the 1960s as younger generations moved to larger cities and were followed by their parents after retirement. By 1999, the Sharon Chapter’s membership had fallen to 24 women and meetings were being held only once a year. The Sharon Chapter likely closed around 2001; the same year that dwindling resources and membership forced the closure of Brantford’s synagogue, Congregation Beth David.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the activities, finances, special programs and fundraising events of Brantford’s Sharon Chapter of Hadassah-WIZO. Included are meeting minutes, correspondence, photographs, ledgers, annual budgets, remittance forms, financial bulletins, financial statements, certificates, invitations, lists, notebooks, programmes, reports, recipes, speeches, news clippings, an auditorium lease, a contract, a theatrical script, and pledge cards.
Fonds has been arranged into five series: 1. Meetings; 2. Special projects and events; 3. Annual Bazaar; 4. Finance and accounting; and, 5. Administration. One item and one file are attached to the fonds-level.
Notes
Physical extent note: fonds was reduced from ca. 50 cm to 22 cm. See accession 2001-10-3 for further information about the culled material.
Name Access
Sharon Chapter
Hadassah-Wizo
Brantford
Subjects
Charities
Children
Related Material
For additional OJA records documenting the Sharon Chapter, see Sadie Stren fonds 78 and the Congregation Beth David fonds 88.
For additional OJA Hadassah-WIZO records, see Toronto Hadassah fonds 71, accessions 1996-11-1, 2008-3-3, and 2009-8-6.
For additional OJA records related to Brantford families and other Jewish organizations, such as the B'nai Brith lodge, please see accession #2001-10-3; #2009-7-1, 1978-11-4, 1977-8-16, 1992-8-3, 1980-1-14, 1978-1-2, 2008-7-1, photo# 109, photo# 755, and photo #758.
See also the Hadassah-WIZO Organization of Canada fonds at Library and Archives Canada, reference #R3454-0-7-E.
Accession Number
2001-10-3
1979-9-21
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
Canadian Young Judaea series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 28; Series 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
Canadian Young Judaea series
Level
Series
Fonds
28
Series
3
Material Format
textual record
Date
1957-1979
Physical Description
15 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
Canadian Young Judaea was founded in 1909 as a Zionist movement for Canadian youth by members of the Herzl Zion Club. As a Zionist organization, Young Judaea continues to be committed to fostering a sense of Jewish identity and values in today's Jewish youth and to encouraging a lifelong commitment to Israel.
In order to foster a closer connection to Israel, Canadian Young Judaea employs educational Shlichim from Israel who are posted to various Jewish communities throughout Canada and to offices at the national level in Toronto Young Judaea also operates several Zionist summer camps located in each region of Canada, and a summer leadership institute called Camp Biluim in Quebec. In addition to the social programme of the organization, Young Judaea also offers educational seminars and conferences.
Young Judaea's national structure includes a National Executive Board and an Administrative Council. Conventions are held regularly, as are regional conferences. In the past, Young Judaea operated as an associated, but distinct, organization from the Zionist Organization Canada. However, Young Judaea operations were overseen by the ZOC executive, and Young Judaea received their budget from the ZOC Treasury. In addition, ZOC and Young Judaea worked in conjuction with one another on many projects and programmes, such as with the operation of the Zionist camps.
Scope and Content
The series consists of files relating to the administrative operations of Canadian Young Judaea at the national level between 1957 and 1979. These records include: National Young Judaea meeting minutes, Young Judaea Adult Committee meeting minutes, executive meeting minutes and reports, Maskirut meeting minutes and reports, national kinus records, education programmes, national publications and newsletters, national studies, financial records, constitutions, staffing and administration records, and camp records.
Name Access
Canadian Young Judaea
Zionist Organization of Canada
Subjects
Children
Source
Archival Descriptions
21 records – page 1 of 1.

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