Search Results

New Search Photo Search Audiovisual Search
22 records – page 1 of 1.
Level
Item
ID
Item 3069
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3069
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1981
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of the exterior of Marky's Delicatessen.
Name Access
Marky's Delicatessen
Subjects
Delicatessens
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Bathurst Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1283
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1283
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1977
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Admin History/Bio
Wellts delicatessen was founded by Peter and Fannie Wellts in the 1910s at 350 College Street. Peter Wellts was born in Tarnigrad, Poland in 1888 and Fannie Brown was born in New York City in 1889. They met in New York and moved with Fannie’s family to Toronto in 1910. Peter worked in the garment district prior at the start of the restaurant business. Fannie’s father David Brown had come earlier from New York to work for Eaton’s in the men’s clothing business. The rest of the Brown family, Fannie’s parents and siblings eventually returned to New York. Peter and Fannie married in Toronto on November 26, 1910. They had two daughters Sylvia (August 26, 1911) (m. Walfish) and Ethel (dob January 7, 1928) (m. Rochwerg). They lived in an apartment above the delicatessen. When Ethel married her husband Nathan Rochwerg in 1948, they moved in with Fannie and Peter above the deli. Ethel and Nathan had three children Martin, Arlene (m. Kochberg), and Sidney. When Peter was in his 70s, it was decided that the family would move north into the Bathurst Manor and close the deli. Peter had a heart attack on December 26, 1959, before the move, and Fannie moved in with Nathan and Ethel and their three children. The deli closed in 1959. The deli was known for 5 cent pastrami/corned beef sandwiches sold during the depression. Peter Wellts never let anyone go hungry during this period. They had Vernor's ginger ale on tap during a time when everything was in bottles. Deliveries would come in through the backyard by the garage. It was kosher. Ethel remembers people coming in to use the phone in the kitchen or the washroom in the basement.
Subjects
Delicatessens
Places
Brunswick Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
College Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 613
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
613
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1975
Physical Description
2 photographs : col. (1 negative)
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of Perl's Meat and Delicatessen, located in a strip mall at 3013 Bathurst St. La Pizza and a Becker's convenience store are also pictured in the photo.
Name Access
Perl's Meat Market
Subjects
Delicatessens
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Bathurst Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3283
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3283
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1913]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Admin History/Bio
Samuel Harris was born in 1869, likely in Lithuania, and died in Toronto in 1936. His wife Sarah [Ruben] (1869-1940) had immigrated to Toronto from Svislocz (near Bialystock) in 1887. The couple lived for a time in the American Midwest before opening the Harris Delicatessen business in 1900 or 1901 at 233 Queen Street West in Toronto. In 1913 they moved the business across the street to 178 Queen Street West and re-opened as a new deli. Harris’ was the first Jewish delicatessen in Toronto. It was later converted by Mr. Harris from a deli to a tobacco store.
The family had three sons: Samuel Aaron (1888-1982) born in Toronto, Dr. William (1895-1955) born in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and Dr. Louis [Jacob] (1906-1986) born in Toronto. Samuel and Sarah Harris were the grandparents of, among others, Judge Sydney M. Harris; Thelma B. Harris [m. Prof. Albert Rose]; and Sgt. Frederick B. Harris of the Queen’s Own Rifles, who was killed at Juno Beach on D-Day.
Sarah Harris was the sister or half-sister of Abraham Rothbart (pharmacist). Samuel Harris was the founding chairman of the Toronto Hebrew Free School, a founder of the Toronto Free Loan Association, and a president of the Toronto Jewish Old Folks Home on Cecil Street.
Scope and Content
The photograph is an interior view of Harris' Deli located at 178 Queen St. W. near Simcoe Street in Toronto. Sarah Harris is pictured inside the deli.
Name Access
Harris, Samuel
Harris, Sarah
Subjects
Delicatessens
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Queen Street West (Toronto, Ont.)
Simcoe Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1982-6-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1173
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1173
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1930
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of Gurion Hyman standing in front of a kosher delicatessen on Spadina Avenue.
Name Access
Hyman, Gurion
Subjects
Delicatessens
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Kensington Market (Toronto, Ont.)
Spadina Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1977-1-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Jewish clubs, businesses and organizations series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 37; Series 8; Item 11
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Jewish clubs, businesses and organizations series
Level
Item
Fonds
37
Series
8
Item
11
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1925]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 11 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Union Kosher Delicatessan was owned by H. Garelick and D. Bernholtz; they were also owners of the Union Kosher Sausage Company located at 266 Parliament Street.
Scope and Content
Photograph of a woman standing outside the Union Kosher Delicatessan located at 797 Dundas Street in Toronto. The woman was most likely either Mrs. Garelick or Mrs. Bernholtz.
Name Access
Bernholtz, Mrs.
Garelick, Mrs.
Union Kosher Delicatessan
Subjects
Delicatessens
Storefronts
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Dundas Street West (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2013-9-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-9-7
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
5 photographs
Date
1920-1977
Scope and Content
5 electronic copies of black and white photographs relted to Wellts Deli: 1) Peter and Fannie Wellts 2) Peter Wellts with cleaver in hand in the deli. 3) Exterior of Wellts Deli (1959) taken by realtor when it closed. 4-5) exterior of Wellt's Deli taken in 1977 before building was being torn down. The word "Kosher" in Yiddish/Hebrew is still visible.
Administrative History
Wellts Delicatessen was founded by Peter and Fannie Wellts in the 1910s at 350 College Street. Peter Wellts was born in Tarnigrad, Poland in 1888 and Fannie Brown was born in New York City in 1889. They met in New York and moved with Fannie’s family to Toronto in 1910. Peter worked in the garment district prior at the start of the restaurant business. Fannie’s father David Brown had come earlier from New York to work for Eaton’s in the men’s clothing business. The rest of the Brown family, Fannie’s parents and siblings eventually returned to New York. Peter and Fannie married in Toronto on November 26, 1910. They had two daughters Sylvia (b. August 26, 1911) (m. Walfish) and Ethel (b. January 7, 1928) (m. Rochwerg). They lived in an apartment above the delicatessen. When Ethel married her husband Nathan Rochwerg in 1948, they moved in with Fannie and Peter above the deli. Ethel and Nathan had three children Martin, Arlene (m. Kochberg), and Sidney. When Peter was in his 70s, it was decided that the family would move north into the Bathurst Manor and close the deli. Peter had a heart attack on December 26, 1959, before the move, and Fannie moved in with Nathan and Ethel and their three children. The deli closed in 1959. The deli was known for 5 cent pastrami/corned beef sandwiches sold during the depression. Peter Wellts never let anyone go hungry during this period. They had Vernor's ginger ale on tap during a time when everything was in bottles. Deliveries would come in through the backyard by the garage. It was kosher. Ethel remembers people coming in to use the phone in the kitchen or the washroom in the basement.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Related material note: an article on the deli from one of the local daily newspapers from 1969 is in a vertical file on Wellt's Deli
Subjects
Delicatessens
Places
College Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-11-26
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-11-26
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Date
[194?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one black and white photo of Paskowetz's Meat Inn on College St.
Administrative History
Paskowetz's delicatessen was located on the north side of College Street between Brunswick Avenue and Major Street. Other businesses in the neighbourhood described by one time area resident Harry Turk included: The [Playhouse Theatre] (next door to Paskowetz's deli); Wellts Delicatessen owned by Peter Wellts (west of Paskowetz's deli), Imperial Gas station at College and Major Streets owned by the Rubinoff family and Beckers Delicatessen, owned by the Becker family, located on the south side of College Street. Milt Maskowitz, a Major Street kid recalls "the fragrance of hot dogs boiling in a big pot in the window. They cost 5 cents and I only ate one that my older brother (he was twenty and working and I was seven) bought me once. Wow. It was delicious."
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
Delicatessens
Places
College Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3070
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3070
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1981
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of the exterior of Marky's Delicatessen. Also pictured is Dale Studio Photography.
Name Access
Marky's Delicatessen
Subjects
Delicatessens
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Bathurst Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3071
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3071
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1981
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of the exterior of Marky's Delicatessen. Also pictured is Dale Studio Photography.
Name Access
Marky's Delicatessen
Subjects
Delicatessens
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Bathurst Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1284
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1284
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1977
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Admin History/Bio
Wellts delicatessen was founded by Peter and Fannie Wellts in the 1910s at 350 College Street. Peter Wellts was born in Tarnigrad, Poland in 1888 and Fannie Brown was born in New York City in 1889. They met in New York and moved with Fannie’s family to Toronto in 1910. Peter worked in the garment district prior at the start of the restaurant business. Fannie’s father David Brown had come earlier from New York to work for Eaton’s in the men’s clothing business. The rest of the Brown family, Fannie’s parents and siblings eventually returned to New York. Peter and Fannie married in Toronto on November 26, 1910. They had two daughters Sylvia (August 26, 1911) (m. Walfish) and Ethel (dob January 7, 1928) (m. Rochwerg). They lived in an apartment above the delicatessen. When Ethel married her husband Nathan Rochwerg in 1948, they moved in with Fannie and Peter above the deli. Ethel and Nathan had three children Martin, Arlene (m. Kochberg), and Sidney. When Peter was in his 70s, it was decided that the family would move north into the Bathurst Manor and close the deli. Peter had a heart attack on December 26, 1959, before the move, and Fannie moved in with Nathan and Ethel and their three children. The deli closed in 1959. The deli was known for 5 cent pastrami/corned beef sandwiches sold during the depression. Peter Wellts never let anyone go hungry during this period. They had Vernor's ginger ale on tap during a time when everything was in bottles. Deliveries would come in through the backyard by the garage. It was kosher. Ethel remembers people coming in to use the phone in the kitchen or the washroom in the basement.
Subjects
Delicatessens
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Brunswick Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
College Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1285
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1285
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1977
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Admin History/Bio
Wellts delicatessen was founded by Peter and Fannie Wellts in the 1910s at 350 College Street. Peter Wellts was born in Tarnigrad, Poland in 1888 and Fannie Brown was born in New York City in 1889. They met in New York and moved with Fannie’s family to Toronto in 1910. Peter worked in the garment district prior at the start of the restaurant business. Fannie’s father David Brown had come earlier from New York to work for Eaton’s in the men’s clothing business. The rest of the Brown family, Fannie’s parents and siblings eventually returned to New York. Peter and Fannie married in Toronto on November 26, 1910. They had two daughters Sylvia (August 26, 1911) (m. Walfish) and Ethel (dob January 7, 1928) (m. Rochwerg). They lived in an apartment above the delicatessen. When Ethel married her husband Nathan Rochwerg in 1948, they moved in with Fannie and Peter above the deli. Ethel and Nathan had three children Martin, Arlene (m. Kochberg), and Sidney. When Peter was in his 70s, it was decided that the family would move north into the Bathurst Manor and close the deli. Peter had a heart attack on December 26, 1959, before the move, and Fannie moved in with Nathan and Ethel and their three children. The deli closed in 1959. The deli was known for 5 cent pastrami/corned beef sandwiches sold during the depression. Peter Wellts never let anyone go hungry during this period. They had Vernor's ginger ale on tap during a time when everything was in bottles. Deliveries would come in through the backyard by the garage. It was kosher. Ethel remembers people coming in to use the phone in the kitchen or the washroom in the basement.
Subjects
Delicatessens
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Brunswick Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
College Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1286
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1286
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1977
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Admin History/Bio
Wellts delicatessen was founded by Peter and Fannie Wellts in the 1910s at 350 College Street. Peter Wellts was born in Tarnigrad, Poland in 1888 and Fannie Brown was born in New York City in 1889. They met in New York and moved with Fannie’s family to Toronto in 1910. Peter worked in the garment district prior at the start of the restaurant business. Fannie’s father David Brown had come earlier from New York to work for Eaton’s in the men’s clothing business. The rest of the Brown family, Fannie’s parents and siblings eventually returned to New York. Peter and Fannie married in Toronto on November 26, 1910. They had two daughters Sylvia (August 26, 1911) (m. Walfish) and Ethel (dob January 7, 1928) (m. Rochwerg). They lived in an apartment above the delicatessen. When Ethel married her husband Nathan Rochwerg in 1948, they moved in with Fannie and Peter above the deli. Ethel and Nathan had three children Martin, Arlene (m. Kochberg), and Sidney. When Peter was in his 70s, it was decided that the family would move north into the Bathurst Manor and close the deli. Peter had a heart attack on December 26, 1959, before the move, and Fannie moved in with Nathan and Ethel and their three children. The deli closed in 1959. The deli was known for 5 cent pastrami/corned beef sandwiches sold during the depression. Peter Wellts never let anyone go hungry during this period. They had Vernor's ginger ale on tap during a time when everything was in bottles. Deliveries would come in through the backyard by the garage. It was kosher. Ethel remembers people coming in to use the phone in the kitchen or the washroom in the basement.
Subjects
Delicatessens
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Brunswick Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
College Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1287
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1287
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1977
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Admin History/Bio
Wellts delicatessen was founded by Peter and Fannie Wellts in the 1910s at 350 College Street. Peter Wellts was born in Tarnigrad, Poland in 1888 and Fannie Brown was born in New York City in 1889. They met in New York and moved with Fannie’s family to Toronto in 1910. Peter worked in the garment district prior at the start of the restaurant business. Fannie’s father David Brown had come earlier from New York to work for Eaton’s in the men’s clothing business. The rest of the Brown family, Fannie’s parents and siblings eventually returned to New York. Peter and Fannie married in Toronto on November 26, 1910. They had two daughters Sylvia (August 26, 1911) (m. Walfish) and Ethel (dob January 7, 1928) (m. Rochwerg). They lived in an apartment above the delicatessen. When Ethel married her husband Nathan Rochwerg in 1948, they moved in with Fannie and Peter above the deli. Ethel and Nathan had three children Martin, Arlene (m. Kochberg), and Sidney. When Peter was in his 70s, it was decided that the family would move north into the Bathurst Manor and close the deli. Peter had a heart attack on December 26, 1959, before the move, and Fannie moved in with Nathan and Ethel and their three children. The deli closed in 1959. The deli was known for 5 cent pastrami/corned beef sandwiches sold during the depression. Peter Wellts never let anyone go hungry during this period. They had Vernor's ginger ale on tap during a time when everything was in bottles. Deliveries would come in through the backyard by the garage. It was kosher. Ethel remembers people coming in to use the phone in the kitchen or the washroom in the basement.
Subjects
Delicatessens
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Brunswick Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
College Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1288
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1288
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1977
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Admin History/Bio
Wellts delicatessen was founded by Peter and Fannie Wellts in the 1910s at 350 College Street. Peter Wellts was born in Tarnigrad, Poland in 1888 and Fannie Brown was born in New York City in 1889. They met in New York and moved with Fannie’s family to Toronto in 1910. Peter worked in the garment district prior at the start of the restaurant business. Fannie’s father David Brown had come earlier from New York to work for Eaton’s in the men’s clothing business. The rest of the Brown family, Fannie’s parents and siblings eventually returned to New York. Peter and Fannie married in Toronto on November 26, 1910. They had two daughters Sylvia (August 26, 1911) (m. Walfish) and Ethel (dob January 7, 1928) (m. Rochwerg). They lived in an apartment above the delicatessen. When Ethel married her husband Nathan Rochwerg in 1948, they moved in with Fannie and Peter above the deli. Ethel and Nathan had three children Martin, Arlene (m. Kochberg), and Sidney. When Peter was in his 70s, it was decided that the family would move north into the Bathurst Manor and close the deli. Peter had a heart attack on December 26, 1959, before the move, and Fannie moved in with Nathan and Ethel and their three children. The deli closed in 1959. The deli was known for 5 cent pastrami/corned beef sandwiches sold during the depression. Peter Wellts never let anyone go hungry during this period. They had Vernor's ginger ale on tap during a time when everything was in bottles. Deliveries would come in through the backyard by the garage. It was kosher. Ethel remembers people coming in to use the phone in the kitchen or the washroom in the basement.
Subjects
Delicatessens
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Brunswick Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
College Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1289
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1289
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1977
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Admin History/Bio
Wellts delicatessen was founded by Peter and Fannie Wellts in the 1910s at 350 College Street. Peter Wellts was born in Tarnigrad, Poland in 1888 and Fannie Brown was born in New York City in 1889. They met in New York and moved with Fannie’s family to Toronto in 1910. Peter worked in the garment district prior at the start of the restaurant business. Fannie’s father David Brown had come earlier from New York to work for Eaton’s in the men’s clothing business. The rest of the Brown family, Fannie’s parents and siblings eventually returned to New York. Peter and Fannie married in Toronto on November 26, 1910. They had two daughters Sylvia (August 26, 1911) (m. Walfish) and Ethel (dob January 7, 1928) (m. Rochwerg). They lived in an apartment above the delicatessen. When Ethel married her husband Nathan Rochwerg in 1948, they moved in with Fannie and Peter above the deli. Ethel and Nathan had three children Martin, Arlene (m. Kochberg), and Sidney. When Peter was in his 70s, it was decided that the family would move north into the Bathurst Manor and close the deli. Peter had a heart attack on December 26, 1959, before the move, and Fannie moved in with Nathan and Ethel and their three children. The deli closed in 1959. The deli was known for 5 cent pastrami/corned beef sandwiches sold during the depression. Peter Wellts never let anyone go hungry during this period. They had Vernor's ginger ale on tap during a time when everything was in bottles. Deliveries would come in through the backyard by the garage. It was kosher. Ethel remembers people coming in to use the phone in the kitchen or the washroom in the basement.
Subjects
Delicatessens
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Brunswick Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
College Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1290
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1290
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1977
Physical Description
1 photographs : b&w
Admin History/Bio
Wellts delicatessen was founded by Peter and Fannie Wellts in the 1910s at 350 College Street. Peter Wellts was born in Tarnigrad, Poland in 1888 and Fannie Brown was born in New York City in 1889. They met in New York and moved with Fannie’s family to Toronto in 1910. Peter worked in the garment district prior at the start of the restaurant business. Fannie’s father David Brown had come earlier from New York to work for Eaton’s in the men’s clothing business. The rest of the Brown family, Fannie’s parents and siblings eventually returned to New York. Peter and Fannie married in Toronto on November 26, 1910. They had two daughters Sylvia (August 26, 1911) (m. Walfish) and Ethel (dob January 7, 1928) (m. Rochwerg). They lived in an apartment above the delicatessen. When Ethel married her husband Nathan Rochwerg in 1948, they moved in with Fannie and Peter above the deli. Ethel and Nathan had three children Martin, Arlene (m. Kochberg), and Sidney. When Peter was in his 70s, it was decided that the family would move north into the Bathurst Manor and close the deli. Peter had a heart attack on December 26, 1959, before the move, and Fannie moved in with Nathan and Ethel and their three children. The deli closed in 1959. The deli was known for 5 cent pastrami/corned beef sandwiches sold during the depression. Peter Wellts never let anyone go hungry during this period. They had Vernor's ginger ale on tap during a time when everything was in bottles. Deliveries would come in through the backyard by the garage. It was kosher. Ethel remembers people coming in to use the phone in the kitchen or the washroom in the basement.
Subjects
Delicatessens
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Brunswick Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
College Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1291
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1291
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1977
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Admin History/Bio
Wellts delicatessen was founded by Peter and Fannie Wellts in the 1910s at 350 College Street. Peter Wellts was born in Tarnigrad, Poland in 1888 and Fannie Brown was born in New York City in 1889. They met in New York and moved with Fannie’s family to Toronto in 1910. Peter worked in the garment district prior at the start of the restaurant business. Fannie’s father David Brown had come earlier from New York to work for Eaton’s in the men’s clothing business. The rest of the Brown family, Fannie’s parents and siblings eventually returned to New York. Peter and Fannie married in Toronto on November 26, 1910. They had two daughters Sylvia (August 26, 1911) (m. Walfish) and Ethel (dob January 7, 1928) (m. Rochwerg). They lived in an apartment above the delicatessen. When Ethel married her husband Nathan Rochwerg in 1948, they moved in with Fannie and Peter above the deli. Ethel and Nathan had three children Martin, Arlene (m. Kochberg), and Sidney. When Peter was in his 70s, it was decided that the family would move north into the Bathurst Manor and close the deli. Peter had a heart attack on December 26, 1959, before the move, and Fannie moved in with Nathan and Ethel and their three children. The deli closed in 1959. The deli was known for 5 cent pastrami/corned beef sandwiches sold during the depression. Peter Wellts never let anyone go hungry during this period. They had Vernor's ginger ale on tap during a time when everything was in bottles. Deliveries would come in through the backyard by the garage. It was kosher. Ethel remembers people coming in to use the phone in the kitchen or the washroom in the basement.
Subjects
Delicatessens
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Brunswick Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
College Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1292
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1292
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1977
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Admin History/Bio
Wellts delicatessen was founded by Peter and Fannie Wellts in the 1910s at 350 College Street. Peter Wellts was born in Tarnigrad, Poland in 1888 and Fannie Brown was born in New York City in 1889. They met in New York and moved with Fannie’s family to Toronto in 1910. Peter worked in the garment district prior at the start of the restaurant business. Fannie’s father David Brown had come earlier from New York to work for Eaton’s in the men’s clothing business. The rest of the Brown family, Fannie’s parents and siblings eventually returned to New York. Peter and Fannie married in Toronto on November 26, 1910. They had two daughters Sylvia (August 26, 1911) (m. Walfish) and Ethel (dob January 7, 1928) (m. Rochwerg). They lived in an apartment above the delicatessen. When Ethel married her husband Nathan Rochwerg in 1948, they moved in with Fannie and Peter above the deli. Ethel and Nathan had three children Martin, Arlene (m. Kochberg), and Sidney. When Peter was in his 70s, it was decided that the family would move north into the Bathurst Manor and close the deli. Peter had a heart attack on December 26, 1959, before the move, and Fannie moved in with Nathan and Ethel and their three children. The deli closed in 1959. The deli was known for 5 cent pastrami/corned beef sandwiches sold during the depression. Peter Wellts never let anyone go hungry during this period. They had Vernor's ginger ale on tap during a time when everything was in bottles. Deliveries would come in through the backyard by the garage. It was kosher. Ethel remembers people coming in to use the phone in the kitchen or the washroom in the basement.
Subjects
Delicatessens
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Brunswick Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
College Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1293
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1293
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1977
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Admin History/Bio
Wellts delicatessen was founded by Peter and Fannie Wellts in the 1910s at 350 College Street. Peter Wellts was born in Tarnigrad, Poland in 1888 and Fannie Brown was born in New York City in 1889. They met in New York and moved with Fannie’s family to Toronto in 1910. Peter worked in the garment district prior at the start of the restaurant business. Fannie’s father David Brown had come earlier from New York to work for Eaton’s in the men’s clothing business. The rest of the Brown family, Fannie’s parents and siblings eventually returned to New York. Peter and Fannie married in Toronto on November 26, 1910. They had two daughters Sylvia (August 26, 1911) (m. Walfish) and Ethel (dob January 7, 1928) (m. Rochwerg). They lived in an apartment above the delicatessen. When Ethel married her husband Nathan Rochwerg in 1948, they moved in with Fannie and Peter above the deli. Ethel and Nathan had three children Martin, Arlene (m. Kochberg), and Sidney. When Peter was in his 70s, it was decided that the family would move north into the Bathurst Manor and close the deli. Peter had a heart attack on December 26, 1959, before the move, and Fannie moved in with Nathan and Ethel and their three children. The deli closed in 1959. The deli was known for 5 cent pastrami/corned beef sandwiches sold during the depression. Peter Wellts never let anyone go hungry during this period. They had Vernor's ginger ale on tap during a time when everything was in bottles. Deliveries would come in through the backyard by the garage. It was kosher. Ethel remembers people coming in to use the phone in the kitchen or the washroom in the basement.
Subjects
Delicatessens
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Brunswick Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
College Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1294
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1294
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1977
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Admin History/Bio
Wellts delicatessen was founded by Peter and Fannie Wellts in the 1910s at 350 College Street. Peter Wellts was born in Tarnigrad, Poland in 1888 and Fannie Brown was born in New York City in 1889. They met in New York and moved with Fannie’s family to Toronto in 1910. Peter worked in the garment district prior at the start of the restaurant business. Fannie’s father David Brown had come earlier from New York to work for Eaton’s in the men’s clothing business. The rest of the Brown family, Fannie’s parents and siblings eventually returned to New York. Peter and Fannie married in Toronto on November 26, 1910. They had two daughters Sylvia (dob August 26, 1911) (m. Walfish) and Ethel (dob January 7, 1928) (m. Rochwerg). They lived in an apartment above the delicatessen. When Ethel married her husband Nathan Rochwerg in 1948, they moved in with Fannie and Peter above the deli. Ethel and Nathan had three children Martin, Arlene (m. Kochberg), and Sidney. When Peter was in his 70s, it was decided that the family would move north into the Bathurst Manor and close the deli. Peter had a heart attack on December 26, 1959, before the move, and Fannie moved in with Nathan and Ethel and their three children. The deli closed in 1959. The deli was known for 5 cent pastrami/corned beef sandwiches sold during the depression. Peter Wellts never let anyone go hungry during this period. They had Vernor's gingerale on tap during a time when everything was in bottles.Deliveries would come in through the backyard by the garage. It was kosher. Ethel remembers people coming in to use the phone in the kitchen or the washroom in the basement.
Subjects
Delicatessens
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Brunswick Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
College Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
July 1945
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print of Hyman Silverman standing next to the front window of Hyman's Delicatessen in Kingston, Ontario.
Name Access
Hyman's Delicatessen
Silverman, Hyman
Subjects
Delicatessens
Storefronts
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Kingston (Ont.)
Accession Number
1986-3-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
22 records – page 1 of 1.

Narrow By

Collection Name

Source

Format

Date

Description Level

Subject

Name

Place

Restrictions

Available Digital Content