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Accession Number
2016-6-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-6-12
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 60 cm of textual records
11 photographs (3 negatives) : b&w ; 20 x 25 cm or smaller
Date
1976-[ca. 1990]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic records that trace Natan Sharansky's history as a prisoner of political conscience; the broader Refusenik issue; and the community advocacy efforts of Debby and Stan Solomon from 1976 and into the late 1980s at the local, national and international scales. Included are memos and newsletters from the Committee for Soviet Jewry (Ontario Region and national-level); background information as well as petition templates, speeches and planning documentation produced by the Committee to Release Anatoly Sharansky and the Beth Tikvah Synagogue in conjunction with community organizations, including the CJC and its Soviet Jewry social action committees, to support on-going advocacy efforts; correspondence with Canadian and American political representatives at the provincial/state and national levels; white papers/grey literature from non-governmental organizations about the persecution of the Soviet Jewry; planning documentation from the First Annual Sharansky Lectureship on Human Rights in 1980; correspondence, articles and ephemera associated with the granting of Sharansky's honourary law doctorate from York University in 1982; 1985 Freedom Rally/Weekend in Ottawa planning documentation and correspondence; 1987 National Conference on the Soviet Jewry and Mobilization for Freedom planning documentation; 1987 Community Rally at Massey Hall promotional materials; and promotional materials from Sharansky's autobiographical "Fear No Evil" 1988 book launch. Graphic material includes photographs of Sharansky's release during the February 11, 1986 American-Soviet prisoner exchange on the Glienicke Bridge in Berlin.
Identified in the photographs are: Debby Solomon; Alan Solomon; Natan Sharansky; Avital Sharansky; U.S. Ambassador Richard Burt;
Custodial History
Material was collected and/or created by Debby Solomon, Natan Sharansky's cousin. Debby donated it to the OJA.
Administrative History
Debby Solomon is the cousin of Anatoly (Natan) Sharansky, the Soviet born Israeli politician, human activist and author who spent nine years in Soviet prisons. Debby's father Boris Landis (born 1900) and Sharansky's father were first cousins.Their grandfathers were brothers. Debby's father immigrated 1929 to Toronto from Russia as his older brothers were already in Toronto. Debby and her husband Stan Solomon got involved in the community's activism efforts to free Sharansky and other Refuseniks.They were worked for many years on these efforts by planning programs through their synagogue Beth Tikvah and with Sam Filer, a lawyer and volunteer at the CJC who was also a member of Beth Tikvah.
Subjects
Antisemitism
Politics and government
Human rights
Demonstrations
Synagogues
Committees
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
J.B. Salsberg
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
Sept. 1985
Source
Oral Histories
Name
J.B. Salsberg
Number
AC 071
Subject
Labor movement
Labor unions
Women
Demonstrations
Interview Date
Sept. 1985
Quantity
1
Total Running Time
071A: 44:50 minuets 071B: 35:55 minuets
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Joseph Baruch Salsberg (1902-1998) was a labour leader, political activist, politician, newspaper columnist and a man who dedicated his life to Yiddishkeit and the advancement of social justice. He was active in various Jewish organizations, including; the Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC), the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto, and the New Fraternal Jewish Association. In 1938 he was elected as Alderman on Toronto’s City Council and elected to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario in 1943. He is well remembered by contemporaries, such as Sam Lipshitz, as a "champion of the people', committed to social justice, the plight of the working-class, and the preservation of Jewish culture.
This oral history includes Salsberg's personal reminiscences on the Toronto Jewish community, the Polish Jewish community and issues related to women's labour and the unions in the garment industry.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
International Ladies' Garment Workers Union
Salsberg, J. B. (Joseph B.), 1902-1998
Geographic Access
Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
Side 1:
0.0-6.30: Joseph Baruch Salsberg was born in Poland in 1902 to Abraham and Sara Salsberg. Abraham migrated to Toronto in 1910 and Joseph followed with his mother and two younger sisters in 1913.
6.30-18.39: Prior to 1913 Poland was primarily a peasant and agricultural society with the majority of the Jewish population living and working as tradesmen in the villages. Salsberg discusses the difficult relationship between the Poles and Jews under the power of the Czar.
18:40-24.14: Salsberg discusses the Canadian government’s collaboration with the CP Railroad to launch advertising campaigns attracting potential immigrants to come and live in Canada.
24.22-33.24: Salsberg discusses the experiences of his mother as a young Jewish immigrant and her adjustment to life in Toronto.
33.25-37.30: Salsberg discusses the Ward, an area between University and Yonge as being the heartland of early Jewish settlement. He describes the area as being the natural choice for Jews to live, the rents were cheap, Synagogues and community centers were nearby as were and their places of employment. The center for Jewish shopping was Kensington Market with shops along McCaul and Baldwin Streets, shopping at Eatons was reserved for “special occasions”.
37.32-39.50: Salsberg discusses the hardships faced by Polish immigrant Jews arriving in Toronto after World War One.
39.52-44.45: Salsberg discusses his father an Orthodox man who eventually went into the junk business and became one of the founders of the first Talmud Torah, his mother was active in the Ladies Auxillary of the School and remained it’s President for 50 years.
End
Side 2:
0.03-5.37: Salsberg discusses the religious and cultural divisions that dominated social and communal living in Poland under Czarist rule and the resulting division between Jews and non- Jewish Polish immigrants in Toronto
5.38-8.28: Salsberg discusses the example set by his mother on matters of religious observance and importance of the woman’s role in the family.
8.29-11.08: Salsberg discusses his mother’s activities outside the home. Sarah Salsberg was the first woman to challenge the burial custom of not allowing husband and wife to be buried side by side. Sarah won her challenge and was buried alongside her husband.
11.10-12.28: Salsberg discusses his orientation towards labor Zionism and his parent’s reaction to his political views. Sarah Salsberg was a “broad-minded” woman and friendly with those active in the movement, while his father clung to his own group.
12.29-13.53: Salsberg discusses the garment trade and the organizers who become members of the Ladies Garment Workers Union. Salsberg goes on to speak of his mother’s approval and secret admiration of the women in the Ladies Garment Union.
13.54-14.44: Salsberg discusses the role of Jewish immigrant women using the example of the Eatons strike in 1911 led by Jewish tailors, both men and women.
14.45-15.00: Salsberg discusses the Triangle Fire in New York as the impetus that led to the birth of the ILGWU in America and the ILGWU’s influence on the Canadian Garment industry.
15.03-15.40: Salsberg discusses the New York Yiddish Dailies the “Forward” and Tagblat delivered and read daily by Toronto’s Jewish community as another factor in the establishment of the Ladies Garment Workers Union in Canada.
15.41-20.39: Salsberg discusses the introduction by Eatons to changes in production methods that would have tailors, mostly men, taking on the job of women finishers. The refusal by the tailors to take away the jobs of women would lead to the first sit down strike by tailors in Canada.
20.40-21.20: Salsberg discusses the recognition of women’s rights in the early garment workers unions. The Dressmakers section of the ILGWU in Toronto was predominantly women who led strikes and fought on picket lines.
21.21-23.44: Salsberg discusses Union sentiment within the Jewish community and the enforcement by some of the more militant women on community shopkeepers to use Union labels on their products.
23.45-24.39: Salsberg discusses single Jewish women who confronted with financial hardship worked in predominately Jewish factories.
24.40-26.07: Salsberg discusses the economic nature of the garment industry, the competition and undercutting in the industry factories and the continuous strikes and stoppages by employees opposed to wage cuts.
26.08-31.15: Salsberg discusses the important contributions in the areas of the labor force, education and social responsibility made to Ontario by Jewish immigrant women. Women worked alongside men in order to improve their economic position and establish themselves within the community. Jewish women placed a great emphasis on education and as a result a high percentage of their children would graduate from institutions such as Harbord Collegiate and Jarvis Collegiate with scholarships. Salsberg speaks of his late wife Dora Wilensky who graduated from Jarvis Collegiate with the highest mark of any girl student in Ontario earning a five-year scholarship to McMaster University and becoming a prominent Social Worker within the Jewish community.
31.16-33.09: Salsberg discusses the differences in opportunity for young Jewish men and young Jewish women. As the only boy in the family he was expected to set the path by going to a theological school in NY but to the dismay of his parents he became radicalized in leftist politics.
33.10-35.55: Although Salsberg’s parents were never involved in the labour movement and disagreed with his leftist philosophy, they were pleased by his election in 1938 as Alderman on Toronto’s City Council and his election to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario in 1943.
End
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Joseph Salsberg discusses the events that led to the birth of the International Ladies' Garment Workers Union (ILGWU) in America and the ILGWU's influence on the Canadian Garment Industry.

In this clip, Joseph Salsberg discusses Canada

Address
52 East Fox Lake Rd.
Source
Landmarks

Established in 1933, Camp Winnebagoe was the first Jewish co-educational camp in Canada, owned and operated by Joe and Sadie Danson. First located on the Rouge River, just east of Toronto, the camp moved to a number of different lakeside locations in the Huntsville area, during its long history. In 1971, Camp Winnebagoe purchased Camp Ogama on Fox Lake and it has been there since, operated by the Lustig family. The camp’s programming includes secular and Jewish traditions including themed days, events honouring individual campers’ outstanding contributions and Friday Night Services.
Address
52 East Fox Lake Rd.
Time Period
1933-present
Scope Note
Established in 1933, Camp Winnebagoe was the first Jewish co-educational camp in Canada, owned and operated by Joe and Sadie Danson. First located on the Rouge River, just east of Toronto, the camp moved to a number of different lakeside locations in the Huntsville area, during its long history. In 1971, Camp Winnebagoe purchased Camp Ogama on Fox Lake and it has been there since, operated by the Lustig family. The camp’s programming includes secular and Jewish traditions including themed days, events honouring individual campers’ outstanding contributions and Friday Night Services.
History
In 1946, David Lieberman founded Camp Ogama, a private a co-educational overnight camp for children aged 6-16, on Fox Lake near Huntsville. It was touted to be “Canada’s most progressive camp for young Jewish boys and girls.” The socially conscience programming offered at Camp Ogama had a profound impact on counselors and campers alike producing highly influential alumni. Former camper journalist Earl Pomerantz reflects, “Camp inoculated us with a passion for justice. And it wasn’t write a check and see you later; this was money where your mouth is.”
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Level
Item
ID
Item 4408
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
4408
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1985
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of Wally Reinstein, the National Hillel co-ordinator lighting a candle for Soviet refuseniks at Nathan Phillips Square. A Jewish Student's Union B'nai Brith Hillel banner can be seen in the background.
Notes
Original photos by Graphic Artists, Toronto.
Subjects
Demonstrations
Hanukkah
Refuseniks
Places
Nathan Phillips Square (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1986-12-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 4407
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
4407
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1985
Physical Description
1 photograph
Scope and Content
Wally Reinstein, National Hillel Co-ordinator.
Notes
Original photos by Graphic Artists, Toronto.
Subjects
Demonstrations
Hanukkah
Refuseniks
Places
Nathan Phillips Square (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1986-12-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
Central Region sous-fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 28-1; Series 7; File 13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
Central Region sous-fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
28-1
Series
7
File
13
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1966
Physical Description
7 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 26 cm and 10 x 14 cm
Scope and Content
The file consists of photographs taken of an Arab protest against Israel.
Subjects
Demonstrations
Israel
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 32; Item 6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
32
Item
6
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[1933?]
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w ; 13 x 18 cm
Admin History/Bio
On July 11, 1933 over 15,000 people (mostly Jewish and working class) walked off the job to protest Nazism, fascism, and other human rights issues. Reported in the Globe and Mail as the largest protest of its kind in Canada since the 1919 Winnipeg general strike, a united front of all the needle trade unions and over fifty Jewish organizations took part.
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of an International Left Opposition (I.L.O.) demonstration depicting a large group of protestors walking carrying banners. This is likely the large anti-fascist protest, which took place in Toronto on July 11, 1933.
Notes
One copy is a close-up photograph.
Name Access
International Left Opposition
Subjects
Anti-fascist movements
Banners
Demonstrations
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Related Material
See also accession #1988-4/8 for a broadside notice for this strike and demonstration. For additional images of this protest see Fonds 32, items 8, 9, 11, 13, and 15.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1979-11-18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 32; Item 7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
32
Item
7
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[193-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 12 x 7 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of a demonstration, likely organized by the International Left Opposition. Several people are walking together displaying banners, one of which reads the Workers' Party of Canada, Toronto Branches.
Name Access
International Left Opposition
Workers' Party of Canada
Subjects
Banners
Communism
Demonstrations
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1979-11-18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 32; Item 8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
32
Item
8
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[1933?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 7 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
On July 11, 1933 over 15,000 people (mostly Jewish and working class) walked off the job to protest Nazism, fascism, and other human rights issues. Reported in the Globe and Mail as the largest protest of its kind in Canada since the 1919 Winnipeg general strike, a united front of all the needle trade unions and over fifty Jewish organizations took part.
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of a woman holding a banner at an International Left Opposition demonstration. There are others holding banners behind her and people sitting along the side watching the demonstration. This image was likely taken during the large anti-fascist demonstration, which took place in Toronto on July 11, 1933.
Name Access
International Left Opposition
Subjects
Anti-fascist movements
Banners
Demonstrations
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Related Material
See also accession #1988-4/8 for a broadside notice for this strike and demonstration. For additional images of this protest see Fonds 32, items 6, 9, 11, 13, and 15.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1979-11-18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 32; Item 9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
32
Item
9
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[1933?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 7 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
On July 11, 1933 over 15,000 people (mostly Jewish and working class) walked off the job to protest Nazism, fascism, and other human rights issues. Reported in the Globe and Mail as the largest protest of its kind in Canada since the 1919 Winnipeg general strike, a united front of all the needle trade unions and over fifty Jewish organizations took part.
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of a group of male and female demonstrators holding banners at an International Left Opposition demonstration. This photo was likely taken during the large anti-fascist demonstration in Toronto on July 11, 1933.
Name Access
International Left Opposition
Subjects
Anti-fascist movements
Banners
Demonstrations
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Related Material
See also accession #1988-4/8 for a broadside notice for this strike and demonstration. For additional images of this protest see Fonds 32, items 6, 8, 11, 13, and 15.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1979-11-18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 32; Item 11
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
32
Item
11
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[1933?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 7 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
On July 11, 1933 over 15,000 people (mostly Jewish and working class) walked off the job to protest Nazism, fascism, and other human rights issues. Reported in the Globe and Mail as the largest protest of its kind in Canada since the 1919 Winnipeg general strike, a united front of all the needle trade unions and over fifty Jewish organizations took part.
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of a group of International Left Opposition demonstrators standing together with their banners. This photo was likely taken during the large anti-fascist demonstration, which took place in Toronto on July 11, 1933.
Name Access
International Left Opposition
Subjects
Anti-fascist movements
Banners
Demonstrations
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Related Material
See also accession #1988-4/8 for a broadside notice for this strike and demonstration. For additional images of this protest see Fonds 32, items 6, 8, 9, 13, and 15.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1979-11-18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 32; Item 12
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
32
Item
12
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[193-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 7 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of an International Left Opposition demonstration held in Toronto. The demonstrators are walking down Bathurst Street at Ulster and are carrying banners saying "Fight Wage Cuts", "Workers Organize or Starve", and "For the Revolutionary Defense of the Soviet Union".
Name Access
International Left Opposition
Subjects
Banners
Demonstrations
Socialism
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Bathurst Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Ulster Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1979-11-18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 32; Item 13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
32
Item
13
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[1933?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 7 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
On July 11, 1933 over 15,000 people (mostly Jewish and working class) walked off the job to protest Nazism, fascism, and other human rights issues. Reported in the Globe and Mail as the largest protest of its kind in Canada since the 1919 Winnipeg general strike, a united front of all the needle trade unions and over fifty Jewish organizations took part.
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of two men holding a banner with a slogan which reads "To Victory! Under the Banner of Lenin and Trotsky" at an International Left Opposition demonstration in Toronto. This photo was likely taken during the large anti-fascist demonstration that took place in Toronto on July 11, 1933.
Name Access
International Left Opposition
Subjects
Banners
Communism
Demonstrations
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Related Material
See also accession #1988-4/8 for a broadside notice for this strike and demonstration. For additional images of this protest see Fonds 32, items 6, 8, 9, 11, and 15.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1979-11-18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 32; Item 14
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
32
Item
14
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[193-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 7 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of an International Left Opposition demonstration in Toronto. Demonstrators are carrying banners in support of socialist and communist organizations and their tenets.
Notes
Image is slightly blurred.
Name Access
International Left Opposition
Subjects
Banners
Demonstrations
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1979-11-18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 32; Item 15
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
32
Item
15
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[1933?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 7 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
On July 11, 1933 over 15,000 people (mostly Jewish and working class) walked off the job to protest Nazism, fascism, and other human rights issues. Reported in the Globe and Mail as the largest protest of its kind in Canada since the 1919 Winnipeg general strike, a united front of all the needle trade unions and over fifty Jewish organizations took part.
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of participants holding various banners at an International Left Opposition demonstration in Toronto. This photo was likely taken during the large anti-fascist demonstration which took place in Toronto on July 11, 1933.
Name Access
International Left Opposition
Subjects
Anti-fascist movements
Banners
Demonstrations
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Related Material
See also accession #1988-4/8 for a broadside notice for this strike and demonstration. For additional images of this protest see Fonds 32, items 6, 8, 9, 11, and 13.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1979-11-18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 32; Item 16
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
32
Item
16
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[193-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 7 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of an International Left Opposition demonstration depicting participants carrying banners for the Workers Party of Canada, Toronto Branches and banners containing slogans against fascism.
Name Access
International Left Opposition
Workers' Party of Canada
Subjects
Banners
Communism
Demonstrations
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1979-11-18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 32; Item 17
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
32
Item
17
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[193-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 7 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of International Left Opposition demonstrators standing in a park holding banners for the Workers Party of Canada, Toronto Branches and others with slogans such as "To Victory Under the Banner of Lenin and Trotsky", and "Forward to the New 4th International".
Name Access
International Left Opposition
Subjects
Banners
Communism
Demonstrations
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1979-11-18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 32; Item 10
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
32
Item
10
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[193-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 7 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of International Left Opposition demonstrators walking down Bathurst Street in Toronto carrying banners with socialist slogans.
Name Access
International Left Opposition
Subjects
Banners
Demonstrations
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Bathurst Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1979-11-18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 4406
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
4406
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1985
Physical Description
1 photograph
Scope and Content
Wally Reinstein, National Hillel Co-ordinator.
Notes
Original photos by Graphic Artists, Toronto.
Subjects
Demonstrations
Hanukkah
Refuseniks
Places
Nathan Phillips Square (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1986-12-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3078
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3078
Material Format
graphic material
Date
31 May 1981
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 21 x 26 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of Ernst Zundel (pictured centre in a hard hat) with his supporters on the front lawn of his home in Cabbagetown. They are holding signs with various slogans denying the Holocaust.
Notes
Photo by Ben Lechtman.
Name Access
Zundel, Ernst, 1939-2017
Subjects
Antisemitism
Demonstrations
Holocaust denial
Places
Carlton Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 6703
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
6703
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1937]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph depicting Chaim Weizmann speaking at a rally in Toronto at Varsity Stadium on Bloor Street. The photo was taken by Mel Hundert, the donor, who was present at the rally.
Pictured from left to right are: Rabbi Samuel Sachs; J. J. Glass; Chaim Weizman; David Dunkelman.
Name Access
Weizmann, Chaim, 1874-1952
Glass, J.J
Dunkelman, David
Sachs, Samuel, Rabbi
Subjects
Demonstrations
Presidents--Israel
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
2004-9-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 2444
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
2444
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1937
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Scope and Content
Photo is a group shot of campers and staff at Camp Yungvelt with posters which read: "War is murder, the promoters - murderers" and "We want our fathers with us and not in war."
Name Access
Workmen's Circle
Camp Yungvelt
Arbeter Ring
Arbeiter Ring
Subjects
Demonstrations
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Pickering (Ont.)
Accession Number
1979-4-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Protest activities sub-series
Kosygin demonstration file
Level
Item
Fonds
17
Series
3-5
File
7
Material Format
graphic material
Date
Oct. 1971
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 19 x 24 cm
Notes
Photograph is by Gadi Hoz.
Subjects
Demonstrations
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Nathan Phillips Square (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Protest activities sub-series
Level
Sub-series
ID
Fonds 17; Series 3-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Protest activities sub-series
Level
Sub-series
Fonds
17
Series
3-5
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1967-1988
Physical Description
70 cm of textual records
1238 photographs : b&w ; 20 x 25 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Activities undertaken by the Committee for Soviet Jewry in Ontario and its affiliated partner organizations included political lobbying, telephone and letter-writing campaigns, product boycotting, symposiums, public rallies, petitions, marches and demonstrations. Among the highest profile activities were the annual Simcha Torah rallies in October and the annual commemorations of the execution of twenty-four Soviet Jewish writers and intellectuals, which had occurred on August 12, 1952 at Moscow's Liubianka prison. As well as organizing public protest activities, the Committee for Soviet Jewry established, in the 1980s, the Ida Nudel Humanitarian Award which emphasized the humanitarian work of a number of prominent Canadian women. Other non-protest activities included bar/ bat mitzvah twinning, family and prisoner sponsorships, and holiday greetings, all programmes that tied the daily lives of Soviet Jews to their Canadian counterparts.
Scope and Content
Sub-series consists of records documenting the wide range of above-listed protest activities in which the CJC and various affiliated organizations participated. The files include numerous photographs of mass rallies and group demonstrations, planning notes, correspondence, event notices and other promotional materials.
Subjects
Demonstrations
Arrangement
Records of protest activities in this sub-series have been organized chronologically and by event. Indicated date ranges at the file level are of the documents themselves and are not necessarily indicative of the dates of specific events, such as rallies or marches, though such dates are noted in the file description where known.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Anti-Semitism Cases sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 5-3; File 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Anti-Semitism Cases sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
5-3
File
1
Material Format
textual record
Date
1965-1966
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of detailed documentation about the public meeting and demonstration by the Canadian Nazi Party at Allan Gardens, May 30, 1965. This event provoked a a much larger same-day counter-demonstration at the park by members of Toronto's Jewish community, actions sometimes referred to as the Allan Gardens riot. Documentation of these events and the reactions of Toronto's Jewish community and the general populace are also contained within this file.
Notes
Previously processed and cited as part of MG8 S.
Subjects
Demonstrations
Riots
Places
Allan Gardens (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Anti-Semitism Cases sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 5-3; File 16
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Anti-Semitism Cases sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
5-3
File
16
Material Format
textual record
Date
1970
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of one news clipping documenting a rally held by John Beattie (leader of the Canadian National Socialist Party or Nazi Party of Canada) and one letter written by Beattie to apply for a salesclerk job.
Notes
Previously processed and cited as part of MG8 S.
Subjects
Demonstrations
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Anti-Semitism Cases sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 5-3; File 260
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Anti-Semitism Cases sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
5-3
File
260
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1966
Physical Description
15 photographs : b&w ; 9 x 13 cm
Scope and Content
File consists of photographs of members of the Western Guard white supremacist group at a mass demonstration in Toronto.
Notes
Previously processed and cited as part of MG8 S.
Name Access
Western Guard Party
Subjects
Demonstrations
White supremacy movements
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2015-9-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-12
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual material
Date
1973-1974
Scope and Content
Accession file consists of letters, posters, press releases, minutes of meeting and policy statements regarding Israeli prisoners of War in Syria. The documents are from many organizations such as the Labor Zionist Alliance, National Jewish Community Relations Advisory Council, Toronto Jewish Youth Council and the Canada Israel Committee.
Custodial History
There is no information on the acquisition of this material.
Subjects
Demonstrations
Israel--Armed Forces
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-30
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-30
Material Format
sound recording
Physical Description
2 audiotapes
Date
1968
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two reel-to-reel audiotapes recording John Beattie at Allan Gardens on June 30, 1968.
Custodial History
There is no information on the acquisition of this material
Subjects
Antisemitism
Demonstrations
Human rights
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region (Toronto, Ont.)
Beattie, John
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Address
6490 Tilton Lake Road
Source
Landmarks

Camp Solelim was founded in 1965 as a Young Judaean camp. Its name comes from Kibbutz HaSolelim in Israel which recognizes the builders who were integral to the establishment of the State of Israel. The program is infused with informal social, Jewish and Zionist educational programs. Like many of the camps founded earlier, campers are encouraged to participate in the functioning of the camp and derive a strong sense of responsibility through daily camp operations and camp projects. The camp still exists today and is jointly operated by the Toronto Zionist Council and Canadian Young Judaea.
Address
6490 Tilton Lake Road
Time Period
1965-present
Scope Note
Camp Solelim was founded in 1965 as a Young Judaean camp. Its name comes from Kibbutz HaSolelim in Israel which recognizes the builders who were integral to the establishment of the State of Israel. The program is infused with informal social, Jewish and Zionist educational programs. Like many of the camps founded earlier, campers are encouraged to participate in the functioning of the camp and derive a strong sense of responsibility through daily camp operations and camp projects. The camp still exists today and is jointly operated by the Toronto Zionist Council and Canadian Young Judaea.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1110 Brydon Bay Road
Source
Landmarks

Camp Shalom was founded in 1948 by the Zionist Organization of Canada as a summer camp for youth between the ages of 9 and 13. Located in Gravenhurst, Ontario, Camp Shalom was one of the most successful of the Zionist camps. Camp Shalom was administered by the National Camps Association in conjunction with a regional committee, although, the daily operation and staffing of the camp was provided by Canadian Young Judaea. The camp still exists today and is jointly operated by the Toronto Zionist Council and Canadian Young Judaea.
Address
1110 Brydon Bay Road
Time Period
1948-present
Scope Note
Camp Shalom was founded in 1948 by the Zionist Organization of Canada as a summer camp for youth between the ages of 9 and 13. Located in Gravenhurst, Ontario, Camp Shalom was one of the most successful of the Zionist camps. Camp Shalom was administered by the National Camps Association in conjunction with a regional committee, although, the daily operation and staffing of the camp was provided by Canadian Young Judaea. The camp still exists today and is jointly operated by the Toronto Zionist Council and Canadian Young Judaea.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
367 Niece Road
Source
Landmarks

Camp Kvutza was established in 1944 by Habonim, a Labour Zionist youth movement, on a farm on the northeastern shores of Lake Erie in Lowbanks, Ontario. The camp was sponsored by the Pioneer Women (now Na’amat), the Poalei Zion and the Farband -- groups affliated with the Toronto Labour Zionist Movement. A major part of the programming at Camp Kvutza involved the celebration of Jewish history and culture and the teaching of Zionist ideals. Kvutza campers were taught to appreciate the values of hard work and love for Israel with an eye on encouraging aliyah. The camp closed in 1965.
Address
367 Niece Road
Time Period
1944-1965
Scope Note
Camp Kvutza was established in 1944 by Habonim, a Labour Zionist youth movement, on a farm on the northeastern shores of Lake Erie in Lowbanks, Ontario. The camp was sponsored by the Pioneer Women (now Na’amat), the Poalei Zion and the Farband -- groups affliated with the Toronto Labour Zionist Movement. A major part of the programming at Camp Kvutza involved the celebration of Jewish history and culture and the teaching of Zionist ideals. Kvutza campers were taught to appreciate the values of hard work and love for Israel with an eye on encouraging aliyah. The camp closed in 1965.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
Church St. and Rossland Road, west side of Duffins Creek
Source
Landmarks

The Toronto Workmen’s Circle was established in 1909 to promote workers rights, the Yiddish language and secular Jewish culture. In addition to running schools, the group founded Camp Yungvelt (Young World) on Lake Wilcox in 1925. A year later, the camp moved to a parcel of land in Pickering donated by a group of Workmen’s Circle members who had purchased the land to establish a Jewish cottage colony. The Workmen’s Circle relied on the generous support of its members at a time when the Jewish community supported the study of Hebrew over Yiddish. In addition to recreational activities, the camp focused on teaching Yiddish language and culture. The camp closed in 1971.
Address
Church St. and Rossland Road, west side of Duffins Creek
Time Period
1925-1971
Scope Note
The Toronto Workmen’s Circle was established in 1909 to promote workers rights, the Yiddish language and secular Jewish culture. In addition to running schools, the group founded Camp Yungvelt (Young World) on Lake Wilcox in 1925. A year later, the camp moved to a parcel of land in Pickering donated by a group of Workmen’s Circle members who had purchased the land to establish a Jewish cottage colony. The Workmen’s Circle relied on the generous support of its members at a time when the Jewish community supported the study of Hebrew over Yiddish. In addition to recreational activities, the camp focused on teaching Yiddish language and culture. The camp closed in 1971.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
Morrison Lake
Source
Landmarks

Irene Granovsky, known to staff and campers as “Mrs. G”, founded Balfour Manor Camp on Morrison Lake in the Muskoka Region in 1935. Having previous experience running a day camp on Lake Simcoe, she set out with her husband Ted to create an overnight camp. The property, which had an existing log cabin thought to resemble an English Manor, along with Lord Balfour (architect of the Balfour Declaration that established Palestine as a home for Jewish people in 1917), served as inspiration for the camp name.
Address
Morrison Lake
Time Period
1935-1952
Scope Note
Irene Granovsky, known to staff and campers as “Mrs. G”, founded Balfour Manor Camp on Morrison Lake in the Muskoka Region in 1935. Having previous experience running a day camp on Lake Simcoe, she set out with her husband Ted to create an overnight camp. The property, which had an existing log cabin thought to resemble an English Manor, along with Lord Balfour (architect of the Balfour Declaration that established Palestine as a home for Jewish people in 1917), served as inspiration for the camp name.
History
In addition to activities such as swimming, tennis and horseback riding at Balfour Manor Camp, there were adventurous canoe tripping expeditions down the Severn River to destinations such as Port Carling, Gloucester Pool and Lake Huron. Above all, the camp was recognized for its arts program. At the end of each summer, campers would perform in lavish large-scale productions of musicals and operas. Parents and local cottagers were always invited to enjoy the end of summer performances. The camp closed in 1952.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
2401-05 Ontario Street
Source
Landmarks

The Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home located in Bronte and then Tollandale, was first organized in 1919 by Dora Till, Ida Siegel and Lillian Clavir, members of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society. It was formed in order to provide convalescent care for victims of the influenza epidemic by offering a two week holiday to mothers and young children. First located in a home in Bronte, now Oakville, the Rest Home was officially brought under the auspices of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society in 1921. By this time the Home had moved from being a convalescent home to being a place of respite in the country for women and children of modest means, although they continued to assist those with poor health.
Address
2401-05 Ontario Street
Time Period
1919-1941
Scope Note
The Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home located in Bronte and then Tollandale, was first organized in 1919 by Dora Till, Ida Siegel and Lillian Clavir, members of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society. It was formed in order to provide convalescent care for victims of the influenza epidemic by offering a two week holiday to mothers and young children. First located in a home in Bronte, now Oakville, the Rest Home was officially brought under the auspices of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society in 1921. By this time the Home had moved from being a convalescent home to being a place of respite in the country for women and children of modest means, although they continued to assist those with poor health.
History
By the late 1930s, a search for a replacement location was underway, as the Bronte Rest Home became ill equipped to deal with the increased demand, primarily due to unsuitable grounds and facilities. In 1941, after selling the home in Bronte, the Mothers' and Babes' Rest Home Committee built a second home on eleven acres of lakefront property in Tollandale, near Barrie. In 1948, the Rest Home was admitted into the Jewish Camp Council, which helped the Committee administer the camp and fill staffing vacancies. Following this move, the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society changed its name to the Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home Association, to better reflect the fact that the home was their only remaining activity. In 1957, the camp expanded its mandate to include the addition of two new programs at its facilities: Camp Family Fun for fathers, mothers, and children up to the age of nine and Camp Good Fellowship, a program for senior citizens over the age of 60. Dora Till was the Rest Home's founding president for a total of 15 years and remained active with the home until it ultimately closed in 1977.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
Tollandale Mill Road and Tyndale Road
Source
Landmarks

The Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home located in Bronte and then Tollandale, was first organized in 1919 by Dora Till, Ida Siegel and Lillian Clavir, members of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society. It was formed in order to provide convalescent care for victims of the influenza epidemic by offering a two week holiday to mothers and young children. First located in a home in Bronte, now Oakville, the Rest Home was officially brought under the auspices of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society in 1921. By this time the Home had moved from being a convalescent home to being a place of respite in the country for women and children of modest means, although they continued to assist those with poor health.
Address
Tollandale Mill Road and Tyndale Road
Time Period
1941-1977
Scope Note
The Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home located in Bronte and then Tollandale, was first organized in 1919 by Dora Till, Ida Siegel and Lillian Clavir, members of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society. It was formed in order to provide convalescent care for victims of the influenza epidemic by offering a two week holiday to mothers and young children. First located in a home in Bronte, now Oakville, the Rest Home was officially brought under the auspices of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society in 1921. By this time the Home had moved from being a convalescent home to being a place of respite in the country for women and children of modest means, although they continued to assist those with poor health.
History
By the late 1930s, a search for a replacement location was underway, as the Bronte Rest Home became ill equipped to deal with the increased demand, primarily due to unsuitable grounds and facilities. In 1941, after selling the home in Bronte, the Mothers' and Babes' Rest Home Committee built a second home on eleven acres of lakefront property in Tollandale, near Barrie. In 1948, the Rest Home was admitted into the Jewish Camp Council, which helped the Committee administer the camp and fill staffing vacancies. Following this move, the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society changed its name to the Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home Association, to better reflect the fact that the home was their only remaining activity. In 1957, the camp expanded its mandate to include the addition of two new programs at its facilities: Camp Family Fun for fathers, mothers, and children up to the age of nine and Camp Good Fellowship, a program for senior citizens over the age of 60. Dora Till was the Rest Home's founding president for a total of 15 years and remained active with the home until it ultimately closed in 1977.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1104 Fish Hatchery Road
Source
Landmarks

Camp Ramah has been in operation since 1960 and operates under the educational guidance of the National Ramah Commission and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. It is governed by the Camp Ramah in Canada Committee. The camp is located in the Muskoka Region of Southern Ontario and is known for its experiential Jewish Education where campers learn Hebrew by singing together as a camp, participating in tefillot (prayers) on the beach and learning about Israel from Mishlachat (Israeli staff).
Address
1104 Fish Hatchery Road
Time Period
1960-present
Scope Note
Camp Ramah has been in operation since 1960 and operates under the educational guidance of the National Ramah Commission and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. It is governed by the Camp Ramah in Canada Committee. The camp is located in the Muskoka Region of Southern Ontario and is known for its experiential Jewish Education where campers learn Hebrew by singing together as a camp, participating in tefillot (prayers) on the beach and learning about Israel from Mishlachat (Israeli staff).
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
7861 Chemin River
Source
Landmarks

B’nai Brith’s Ottawa Lodge 885 was officially founded in February 1921 with 25 members. The Ottawa Lodge supported a Jewish Boy Scouts camp which evolved into the first Ottawa B’nai Brith summer camp for Jewish youth in 1935. Since 1935, the camp has delivered traditional camping programs to their community regardless of affiliation, denomination or financial means. Their mission has been to provide children and youth with the opportunity to experience the outdoors, learn new skills and develop life-long friendships while enhancing Jewish values, traditions, affiliation and community.
Address
7861 Chemin River
Time Period
1935-present
Scope Note
B’nai Brith’s Ottawa Lodge 885 was officially founded in February 1921 with 25 members. The Ottawa Lodge supported a Jewish Boy Scouts camp which evolved into the first Ottawa B’nai Brith summer camp for Jewish youth in 1935. Since 1935, the camp has delivered traditional camping programs to their community regardless of affiliation, denomination or financial means. Their mission has been to provide children and youth with the opportunity to experience the outdoors, learn new skills and develop life-long friendships while enhancing Jewish values, traditions, affiliation and community.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
Camperdown
Source
Landmarks

Established in 1930, Camp Camperdown was founded in Orillia by the National Council of Jewish Women as an extension to their long-running Jewish Girls’ Club that provided athletic, cultural and vocational programs to working and school age girls in the city. At Camp Camperdown, girls were provided with even greater opportunities to discover and develop their talents and capabilities. By the late 1930s, the camp moved to the Collingwood area and it closed in the mid-1940s.
Address
Camperdown
Time Period
1930-ca. 1946
Scope Note
Established in 1930, Camp Camperdown was founded in Orillia by the National Council of Jewish Women as an extension to their long-running Jewish Girls’ Club that provided athletic, cultural and vocational programs to working and school age girls in the city. At Camp Camperdown, girls were provided with even greater opportunities to discover and develop their talents and capabilities. By the late 1930s, the camp moved to the Collingwood area and it closed in the mid-1940s.
History
The guiding principle to involve campers in the decision-making process at Camp Camperdown proved highly effective. In 1946, an administrative report described, “The children keep very busy. But the things they do are the things they WANT to do, and activities that they plan, they plan together with their counselors.”
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1068 Burlmarie Road
Source
Landmarks

Located on the Lake of Bays in Muskoka, Camp New Moon began as a family lodge in the early 1930s. It was transformed into a children’s camp in the 1950s. In 1959, the camp was purchased by Al Goodman and Bert Fine (who ran Bathurst Manor Day Camp, later renamed to Forest Valley) who operated the camp together until around 1960 when Goodman assumed full ownership. Since the 1990s, the camp has been operated by Al’s son Jack and his wife Sue. The camp continues to flourish, providing campers the same experience that has existed for 60 years. There are now third generation campers attending.
Address
1068 Burlmarie Road
Time Period
1959-present
Scope Note
Located on the Lake of Bays in Muskoka, Camp New Moon began as a family lodge in the early 1930s. It was transformed into a children’s camp in the 1950s. In 1959, the camp was purchased by Al Goodman and Bert Fine (who ran Bathurst Manor Day Camp, later renamed to Forest Valley) who operated the camp together until around 1960 when Goodman assumed full ownership. Since the 1990s, the camp has been operated by Al’s son Jack and his wife Sue. The camp continues to flourish, providing campers the same experience that has existed for 60 years. There are now third generation campers attending.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1391 Stoneleigh Road, RR#2
Source
Landmarks

In 1921, the 59th Troop - the first Jewish Boy Scout troop in Ontario - was established in Toronto. During the early years, the troop met at the Orde Street School. In 1922, a summer camp was opened for the Jewish scouts from this troop. The camp was situated on Buckhorne Lake, near Port Bolster. It moved to Lake Couchiching in 1934 and in 1939 acquired a property on Duck Lake near Bracebridge, Ontario. Camp Tamarack, as it was called, provided the boys with an opportunity to leave the city and learn new outdoor skills. The camp operated until 1972. The Camp Tamarack of today is located on the same lake but is not connected to this early Boy Scout camp.
Address
1391 Stoneleigh Road, RR#2
Time Period
1922-1972
Scope Note
In 1921, the 59th Troop - the first Jewish Boy Scout troop in Ontario - was established in Toronto. During the early years, the troop met at the Orde Street School. In 1922, a summer camp was opened for the Jewish scouts from this troop. The camp was situated on Buckhorne Lake, near Port Bolster. It moved to Lake Couchiching in 1934 and in 1939 acquired a property on Duck Lake near Bracebridge, Ontario. Camp Tamarack, as it was called, provided the boys with an opportunity to leave the city and learn new outdoor skills. The camp operated until 1972. The Camp Tamarack of today is located on the same lake but is not connected to this early Boy Scout camp.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
Rouge Hills
Source
Landmarks

In 1925 a group of women from the Jewish Women’s Labour League - Rae Watson, Becky Lapedes, Leah Linzon, Bella Goodis, Gertie Blugerman, Ethel Tempkin and Tillie Chikovsky - founded a children’s camp, Camp Kindervelt (later Camp Naivelt) in Rouge Hills, Ontario, 25 miles southeast of Toronto. The camp committee rented a dilapidated farmhouse which they furnished from their own homes. Adults set up their own camp in tents. Overcrowding soon led to a search for larger grounds. In 1936, Camp Naivelt was established in Eldorado Park in Brampton, ON. The children’s camp operated under the name of Camp Kinderland with the adult portion called Camp Naivelt. Camp Kinderland ceased to operate as an overnight camp in 1962 but continued as a children’s day camp until 1970.
Address
Rouge Hills
Time Period
1925-1970
Scope Note
In 1925 a group of women from the Jewish Women’s Labour League - Rae Watson, Becky Lapedes, Leah Linzon, Bella Goodis, Gertie Blugerman, Ethel Tempkin and Tillie Chikovsky - founded a children’s camp, Camp Kindervelt (later Camp Naivelt) in Rouge Hills, Ontario, 25 miles southeast of Toronto. The camp committee rented a dilapidated farmhouse which they furnished from their own homes. Adults set up their own camp in tents. Overcrowding soon led to a search for larger grounds. In 1936, Camp Naivelt was established in Eldorado Park in Brampton, ON. The children’s camp operated under the name of Camp Kinderland with the adult portion called Camp Naivelt. Camp Kinderland ceased to operate as an overnight camp in 1962 but continued as a children’s day camp until 1970.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
Eldorado Park
Source
Landmarks

In 1936 the Labour League (later the United Jewish People's Order) bought Eldorado Park near Brampton, Ontario from the Canadian National Railway to establish Camp Naivelt. It functioned as a camp for children and families and ran a teacher training facility. Political and social activism was a significant part of Camp Naivelt. Its mission was to promote progressive socialist philosophy, tightly integrated with secular Jewish and Yiddish cultural traditions. A key element of the Camp Naivelt mission was to foster a deep and meaningful understanding of secular Jewish culture and folklore, the Yiddish language, music, folk art and dance.
Address
Eldorado Park
Time Period
1936-present
Scope Note
In 1936 the Labour League (later the United Jewish People's Order) bought Eldorado Park near Brampton, Ontario from the Canadian National Railway to establish Camp Naivelt. It functioned as a camp for children and families and ran a teacher training facility. Political and social activism was a significant part of Camp Naivelt. Its mission was to promote progressive socialist philosophy, tightly integrated with secular Jewish and Yiddish cultural traditions. A key element of the Camp Naivelt mission was to foster a deep and meaningful understanding of secular Jewish culture and folklore, the Yiddish language, music, folk art and dance.
History
At its peak in the 1950s, Camp Naivelt had approximately 90 small cottages, a communal dining hall, a dance hall, a youth recreation hall, a grocery store and a camp office. The community also included a camp director’s cabin, arts and crafts cabin, infirmary, and a communal washroom and shower area known as, “The Ritz”. Activities ranged from lectures on current issues, films, poetry readings, Yiddish theatre, kultur vinkls (cultural corners), folk dancing and singing to boating and swimming, volleyball and other sports tournaments, hikes and nature walks and campfires. Some 300 children would attend camp during the summer and, at its height during the 1940s and 1950s, as many as 5000 people would fill Camp Naivelt on a summer weekend.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1485 Murphy Rd.
Source
Landmarks

Camp Moshava was founded in 1962 in the Kawartha Lakes Region on Lake Buckhorn. Affiliated with the Zionist youth movement B’nei Akiva, Moshava is one of several camps they operate in North America.
Address
1485 Murphy Rd.
Time Period
1962-present
Scope Note
Camp Moshava was founded in 1962 in the Kawartha Lakes Region on Lake Buckhorn. Affiliated with the Zionist youth movement B’nei Akiva, Moshava is one of several camps they operate in North America.
History
Historically, the primary aim of the movement was to promote avodah, specifically agricultural work in the field and aliyah, migration to Israel. Today, Camp Moshava provides an informal environment for campers to encounter Judaism through programming and observances that promote Torah education, prayer and Zionist ideals.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1 Arowhon Road
Source
Landmarks

Camp Arowhon has been owned and operated by the Kates family since 1934. It is located on a private lake in Algonquin Provincial Park. Matriarch Lillian Kates established this family business, three generations long, in 1934. A formidable entrepreneur, Kates was undeterred by obstacles of the day such as adventurous travel through Ontario’s wilderness, anti-Semitism, sexism and a lack of financial resources. She passionately pursued her dream of creating a unique Canadian summer camp and single handedly recruited all of its first campers.
Address
1 Arowhon Road
Time Period
1934-present
Scope Note
Camp Arowhon has been owned and operated by the Kates family since 1934. It is located on a private lake in Algonquin Provincial Park. Matriarch Lillian Kates established this family business, three generations long, in 1934. A formidable entrepreneur, Kates was undeterred by obstacles of the day such as adventurous travel through Ontario’s wilderness, anti-Semitism, sexism and a lack of financial resources. She passionately pursued her dream of creating a unique Canadian summer camp and single handedly recruited all of its first campers.
History
When Kates’ son Eugene took over as director, he set up Arowhon’s unique system where campers independently chose their daily activities. True to the inspiration of its name-Samuel Butler’s Utopian novel “Nowhere” spelt backwards “Erehwon”-Arowhon did indeed become “a perfect world for children”. Today the camp is operated by Eugene’s daughter Joanne Kates, the celebrated food critic.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1612 Dudley Rd
Source
Landmarks

In 1958, Camp Timberlane was founded by Barry and Philomena Lowes on the shores of the Lake of Two Islands in the Haliburton Highlands. Their vision was to create a camping experience that would build confidence, spirit and leadership. They strived to provide a nurturing environment that recognized a person’s uniqueness and where values would be learned that would benefit them over a lifetime. The tradition continues today and is being carried out by the present Director and Owner Corey Mandell who attended Timberlane as a camper and counselor.
Address
1612 Dudley Rd
Time Period
1958-present
Scope Note
In 1958, Camp Timberlane was founded by Barry and Philomena Lowes on the shores of the Lake of Two Islands in the Haliburton Highlands. Their vision was to create a camping experience that would build confidence, spirit and leadership. They strived to provide a nurturing environment that recognized a person’s uniqueness and where values would be learned that would benefit them over a lifetime. The tradition continues today and is being carried out by the present Director and Owner Corey Mandell who attended Timberlane as a camper and counselor.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
Black Lake
Source
Landmarks

Camp Massad located in Torrance, Ontario, was a summer camp for Jewish Canadian youth co-sponsored by the Zionist Organization of Canada and Karen Hatarbut. Camp Massad was in operation from 1948 to 1977. The camp was situated on Black Lake. It was the only Hebrew-speaking camp in Ontario and was under the jurisdiction of the Ontario Camps Association.
Address
Black Lake
Time Period
1948-1977
Scope Note
Camp Massad located in Torrance, Ontario, was a summer camp for Jewish Canadian youth co-sponsored by the Zionist Organization of Canada and Karen Hatarbut. Camp Massad was in operation from 1948 to 1977. The camp was situated on Black Lake. It was the only Hebrew-speaking camp in Ontario and was under the jurisdiction of the Ontario Camps Association.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1335 Camp White Pine Ct.
Source
Landmarks

Camp White Pine, a children’s summer camp located in the Haliburton Highlands outside of Toronto was founded by Joe Kronick in 1956. Joe's son, Adam, took over as director of Camp White Pine in 1987. He has run the camp with his wife, Dana, as co-Director since 1990.
Address
1335 Camp White Pine Ct.
Time Period
1956-present
Scope Note
Camp White Pine, a children’s summer camp located in the Haliburton Highlands outside of Toronto was founded by Joe Kronick in 1956. Joe's son, Adam, took over as director of Camp White Pine in 1987. He has run the camp with his wife, Dana, as co-Director since 1990.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1030 Lower Lions Club Road
Source
Landmarks

Camp Kadimah is a day camp for children between the ages of 2-14 operated by the Hamilton Jewish Community Centre.
Address
1030 Lower Lions Club Road
Time Period
1949-present
Scope Note
Camp Kadimah is a day camp for children between the ages of 2-14 operated by the Hamilton Jewish Community Centre.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
Lake Waseosa
Source
Landmarks

Camp Revivim, a Labour Zionist camp, was founded in 1951 by M. Federman, H. Green, B. Himel and A. Ben Gurion (nephew of David Ben Gurion) at Hockley Valley, Orangeville. A permanent location was purchased in 1953 at Lake Waseosa near Huntsville. In 1962, Camp Revivim (serving children from Toronto) joined with Camp Kissufim (serving children from Ottawa and Montreal) for one summer. The following summer, the two camps merged to form Camp Gesher.
Address
Lake Waseosa
Time Period
1951-1962
Scope Note
Camp Revivim, a Labour Zionist camp, was founded in 1951 by M. Federman, H. Green, B. Himel and A. Ben Gurion (nephew of David Ben Gurion) at Hockley Valley, Orangeville. A permanent location was purchased in 1953 at Lake Waseosa near Huntsville. In 1962, Camp Revivim (serving children from Toronto) joined with Camp Kissufim (serving children from Ottawa and Montreal) for one summer. The following summer, the two camps merged to form Camp Gesher.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
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