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40 records – page 1 of 1.
Accession Number
2012-10-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-10-12
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
21 photographs : b&w (14 negatives) ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
1 folder of textual records
Date
[196-], [197-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of Kalmen Greenspans & sons butcher shop at 170 Brunswick Avenue at Harbord Street. The photographs depict Greenspan and other staff members inside the butcher shop as well as the exterior of the shop. There is also one earlier photograph of the exterior. The textual records include order forms and letterhead.
Subjects
Business
Food
Name Access
Greenspan, Harry
Greenspan, Kalmen
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-8-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-8-3
Material Format
text
Physical Description
1 book : 166 p.
Date
[198-?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one cookbook published by the Sisterhood of the Shaar Hashomayim Synagogue and the Dorothy Rothschild Chapter of Hadassah (Sudbury).
Subjects
Food
Women
Name Access
Shaar Hashomayim Synagogue
Hadassah-Wizo
Places
Subury, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-12-63
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-12-63
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
19 photographs : col. (jpgs) ; 72 MB
1 folder of textual records
Date
[2014?]-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 19 digital photos of Shoresh activities including beekeeping, farming, the Kavanah Garden in Vaughan, Maxie's Garden in Kensington Market, a map of Bela Farm in Hillsburgh, and gardening at Baycrest. Also included is a copy of Shoresh 2016 Year in Review.
Administrative History
Shoresh is a grassroots Jewish environmental organization in Southern Ontario. They exist to nurture a regional Jewish community that sees environmental ethics as a core element of Jewish identity, and is actively committed to responsible stewardship of the earth. They do this through educational programs that link Jewish texts and teachings with experiences of awe and wonder of the natural world; leadership opportunities that invest in the next generation of Jewish environmental leaders; and responsive action including environmental advocacy and the production of sustainable products that enrich Jewish life. They operate out of Shoresh’s Kavanah Garden in Vaughan, Bela Farm in Hillsburgh, and through schools, synagogues, camps, and community organizations throughout the Greater Toronto Area.
Descriptive Notes
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION NOTE: There is a PDF version of image #19 of Bela Farm
Subjects
Agriculture
Food
Name Access
Shoresh (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-11-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-11-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. (jpg) ; 10.3 MB
Date
2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 1 digital photo of Ran Goel with produce. This is a publicity photo for Fresh City Farms.
Administrative History
Fresh City Farms is Canada’s largest commercial city farm located on six acres at Downsview Park in Toronto. Its mission is to create and perfect new ways to connect food makers and eaters. Founder Ran Goel lists “his grandmother’s stories about growing up on a Kibbutz, feeling democracy awaken in his childhood home of South Africa and his mom’s stuffed peppers” as inspiration.
Subjects
Agriculture
Farms
Food
Name Access
Fresh City Farms
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-11-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-11-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
Date
1958-1976
Scope and Content
Accession consists of B'nai Brith Women Toronto cookbooks from 1958, 1960-1963, 1967-1972, and B'nai Brith Women's Council of Toronto yearbooks from 1973, 1975-1976. Each cookbook has a specific theme: Food for Fun; Dinner Dates; Chef's Choice; Gourmet Goodies; Around the World; Candlelight and Wine; Calories a la Carte; Gourmet's Gallery; Confessions of a Bala Busta; Dinner Magic; and People Helping People. The 1972 issue is both a yearbook and a cookbook. From 1973 on, the yearbooks, entitled Pledged to Serve, no longer contained any recipes and instead focused solely on the work of the B'nai Birth Women's Council of Toronto and its chapters.
Custodial History
There is no acquisition information for this accession. The accession number was assigned by the archivist.
Subjects
Food
Women in charitable work
Name Access
B'nai Brith Women's Council of Toronto
B'nai Brith Women (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Joseph Fremar
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
14 May 1974
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Joseph Fremar
Number
AC 021
Subject
Business
Food
Occupations
Interview Date
14 May 1974
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Bess Shockett
Total Running Time
021: 12:59 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Joseph "Joe the Orangeman" Fremar was a produce merchant in Kensington Market and opened his location on Augusta Avenue in 1938. Freamar, commonly referred to as the "Orangeman" was a member of the Kiever Synagogue.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Fremar, Joseph
Kiever Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Shockett, Bess
Geographic Access
Augusta Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
Kensington Market (Toronto, Ont.)
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
Started at location on 334 Augusta Street in 1938
Only one other merchant on Augusta at that time. He sold vegetables
His home was on Oxford Street
Since he arrived in 1938 most of the merchants have “changed around”
When he arrived in 1938 the Anshe Lida Synagogue was located on Augusta. It was located at the current fish store location
The congregants were originally from Romania
There were no religious Jewish Schools on Augusta at the time
Synagogues at the time were: Lubavitcher on Grange; Kiever on Denison; Minsker.
A man by the name of Biasky (?) brought Joseph into the Kiever Synagogue which he attended only on holidays. He also attend the Londoner Synagogue on Spadina
Joseph is still a Kiever member, does not attend but pays dues to in order to maintain his cemetery plot, which the Kiever holds at the Roselawn Cemetery.
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Joseph Fremar, also known as "Joe the Orange Man", talks about the social politics and financial expectations around belonging to certain Toronto synagogues versus others.

In this clip, Joseph Fremar, also known as "Joe the Orange Man", talks about the changing population of Toronto

Name
Morris Fishman
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
12 July 1977
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Morris Fishman
Number
AC 036
Subject
Antisemitism
Nonprofit organizations
Communities
Synagogues
Societies
Food
Occupations
Clubs
Interview Date
12 July 1977
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Richard Menkis
Total Running Time
Side 1 46 minutes Side 2 17 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Morris Fishman was born September 29, 1916 in New Jersey. His family moved to Welland, Ontario when he was an infant. He attended elementary and high school in Welland and completed two years at the University of Toronto. He worked in a family men's wear business in Welland. Morris was actively involved in the Jewish community including participation in the Anshe Yosher Congregation, the Jewish Cultural Society and the Jacob Goldblatt B'nai Brith Lodge. He was married and had two daughters.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Fishman, Morris
Geographic Access
Welland
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\AC 036 Fishman\AC 036 transcript.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Morris Fishman praises the efforts of the non-Jewish community in Welland, Ontario to support the building of a new synagogue following a fire that destroyed the old synagogue in 1954.

In this clip, Morris Fishman discusses the Jacob Goldblatt B’nai Brith Lodge in Welland, Ontario.

Name
Blanche Haber
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
December 18, 1987
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Blanche Haber
Number
AC 189
Subject
Families
Occupations
Immigrants--Canada
Food
Antisemitism
Interview Date
December 18, 1987
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Kaylee Gollom Miller
Total Running Time
Side 1 - 31 minutes Side 2 - 31 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Blanche Haber (nee Heller) was born in a small town in Russia in 1893. She came to Toronto at age 8. Her father worked as a peddler. She married Isadore Haber in 1915. Three of her five children died from illnesses in their childhood. Before her marriage, Blanche worked as a seamstress. Isadore worked as a tailor, primarily for Eaton's. Like her mother, once married, Blanche took boarders into their home at 112 Parliament Street.
Material Format
sound recording
Geographic Access
Toronto
Halifax
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\AC 189 Haber\AC 189 notes.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Blanche Haber describes taking boarders into her mother’s and her own home at 112 Parliament Street.

In this clip, Blanche Haber fondly remembers the warm relationship that developed between her family and the Manischewitz family. She explains that Joe Manischewitz boarded at her family’s home while his family built a matzah factory in Toronto.

Address
52 East Fox Lake Rd.
Source
Landmarks

Established in 1933, Camp Winnebagoe was the first Jewish co-educational camp in Canada, owned and operated by Joe and Sadie Danson. First located on the Rouge River, just east of Toronto, the camp moved to a number of different lakeside locations in the Huntsville area, during its long history. In 1971, Camp Winnebagoe purchased Camp Ogama on Fox Lake and it has been there since, operated by the Lustig family. The camp’s programming includes secular and Jewish traditions including themed days, events honouring individual campers’ outstanding contributions and Friday Night Services.
Address
52 East Fox Lake Rd.
Time Period
1933-present
Scope Note
Established in 1933, Camp Winnebagoe was the first Jewish co-educational camp in Canada, owned and operated by Joe and Sadie Danson. First located on the Rouge River, just east of Toronto, the camp moved to a number of different lakeside locations in the Huntsville area, during its long history. In 1971, Camp Winnebagoe purchased Camp Ogama on Fox Lake and it has been there since, operated by the Lustig family. The camp’s programming includes secular and Jewish traditions including themed days, events honouring individual campers’ outstanding contributions and Friday Night Services.
History
In 1946, David Lieberman founded Camp Ogama, a private a co-educational overnight camp for children aged 6-16, on Fox Lake near Huntsville. It was touted to be “Canada’s most progressive camp for young Jewish boys and girls.” The socially conscience programming offered at Camp Ogama had a profound impact on counselors and campers alike producing highly influential alumni. Former camper journalist Earl Pomerantz reflects, “Camp inoculated us with a passion for justice. And it wasn’t write a check and see you later; this was money where your mouth is.”
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Walk for Israel 1990 sub-sub-series
Walk and Festival event photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
67
Series
17-1-16
File
26
Material Format
graphic material
Date
21 May 1990
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w
Scope and Content
Negative of UJA Walk for Israel volunteers grilling hot dogs
Notes
Title based on content of negative
Negative by Graphic Artists Photographers
Subjects
Food
Volunteers
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
1988-2-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1988-2-12
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1.8 cm of textual records
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records pertaining to the operation of the Kashruth Department of the Toronto Jewish Congress. The department was situated within the Orthodox Division.
Use Conditions
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Religion
Food
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Toronto Jewish Congress
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2005-9-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2005-9-7
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1939
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a notice in Yiddish from Rabbi Meir Levy announcing to the Jewish community that shochtim Yichiel Wagman and Soloway, Hymie Weisfeld, Lazar Salkovitch, and Moishe Gross are valid, certified kosher butchers. These shochtim, it states, are well known in Toronto, learned in Torah, and they have been certified under the strictest rules of kashrut.
Subjects
Religion
Food
Occupations
Name Access
Levy, Meir Zvi
Wagman, Yichiel
Weisfeld, Hymie
Salkovitch, Lazar
Gross, Moishe
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-5-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-5-4
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 item
Date
1985
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one Shopsy's Delicatessen menu from March 1985. The deli introduced a new menu on 1 April 1985. It is a laminated, oversized, three-panel menu and is from the deli located at Yonge and Front Streets, across from the former O'Keefe Centre.
Administrative History
Harry and Jennie Shopsowitz started the family business, Shopsy's Delicatessen, in 1921. The first location was on Spadina Avenue at Dundas Street and was initially an ice-cream parlour, although they quickly converted it into a delicatessen in 1922. Shopsy's became an institution in the city where the likes of Bob Hope, Al Waxman, Dennis Hull and Scotty Bowman were regular customers. Harry's three sons took over the business in 1947. The brothers, Sam and Israel, expanded the business by packaging and distributing their hotdogs and corned beef to grocery stores. Sam Shopsowitz, the more gregarious of the two brothers, was known as the "Corned Beef King".
Subjects
Food
Business
Restaurants
Name Access
Shopsy's Delicatessen (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-7-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-7-5
Material Format
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
1 document (9 jpgs)
Date
1962
Scope and Content
This accession consists of one scanned copy of the Lakehead Hadassah cookbook from 1962.
Custodial History
The original records are in the possession of the donor. The OJA was granted permission to scan the records in July 2007, as part of the Ontario Small Jewish Communities initiative. These copies were then donated to the Archives on 2007-07-19.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Communities
Food
Women
Name Access
Safir, Shari-Lyn
Hadassah-WIZO Organization of Canada
Places
Thunder Bay, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-11-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-11-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
Date
1953, 1956-1957
Scope and Content
Accession consists of three cookbooks produced by the Toronto B'nai Brith Women. The first is entitled "Party Book", the second is "Oven Magic", and the third is "What's Cooking?".
Subjects
Food
Women
Name Access
Toronto B'nai B'rith Women
Source
Archival Accessions
Level
Item
ID
Item 4996
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
4996
Material Format
graphic material
Date
14 August 1961
Physical Description
1 photographs : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph is an exterior view of Shopsowitz Delicatessen's 40th Anniversary. The photographs depicts a line-up of customers outside the entrance. Shopsy's is advertising 1920s prices.
Notes
Graphic Artists.
Name Access
Shopsowitz, Sam
Shopsy's Delicatessen
Subjects
Anniversaries
Food
Restaurants
Small business
Places
Kensington Market (Toronto, Ont.)
Spadina Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1990-1-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1780
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1780
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1914
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Name Access
Duke St. School
Subjects
Children
Education
Food
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1979-9-42
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Mimi Wise fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 16; Item 7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Mimi Wise fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
16
Item
7
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Date
1959
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w (jpg)
Scope and Content
This item is an electronic copy photograph of Mimi Wise cooking cabbage rolls in her kitchen for the Hadassah Bazaar. The photograph was taken for the Toronto Telegram.
Subjects
Food
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Toronto Telegram. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Accession Number
2006-9-7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Address
6490 Tilton Lake Road
Source
Landmarks

Camp Solelim was founded in 1965 as a Young Judaean camp. Its name comes from Kibbutz HaSolelim in Israel which recognizes the builders who were integral to the establishment of the State of Israel. The program is infused with informal social, Jewish and Zionist educational programs. Like many of the camps founded earlier, campers are encouraged to participate in the functioning of the camp and derive a strong sense of responsibility through daily camp operations and camp projects. The camp still exists today and is jointly operated by the Toronto Zionist Council and Canadian Young Judaea.
Address
6490 Tilton Lake Road
Time Period
1965-present
Scope Note
Camp Solelim was founded in 1965 as a Young Judaean camp. Its name comes from Kibbutz HaSolelim in Israel which recognizes the builders who were integral to the establishment of the State of Israel. The program is infused with informal social, Jewish and Zionist educational programs. Like many of the camps founded earlier, campers are encouraged to participate in the functioning of the camp and derive a strong sense of responsibility through daily camp operations and camp projects. The camp still exists today and is jointly operated by the Toronto Zionist Council and Canadian Young Judaea.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1110 Brydon Bay Road
Source
Landmarks

Camp Shalom was founded in 1948 by the Zionist Organization of Canada as a summer camp for youth between the ages of 9 and 13. Located in Gravenhurst, Ontario, Camp Shalom was one of the most successful of the Zionist camps. Camp Shalom was administered by the National Camps Association in conjunction with a regional committee, although, the daily operation and staffing of the camp was provided by Canadian Young Judaea. The camp still exists today and is jointly operated by the Toronto Zionist Council and Canadian Young Judaea.
Address
1110 Brydon Bay Road
Time Period
1948-present
Scope Note
Camp Shalom was founded in 1948 by the Zionist Organization of Canada as a summer camp for youth between the ages of 9 and 13. Located in Gravenhurst, Ontario, Camp Shalom was one of the most successful of the Zionist camps. Camp Shalom was administered by the National Camps Association in conjunction with a regional committee, although, the daily operation and staffing of the camp was provided by Canadian Young Judaea. The camp still exists today and is jointly operated by the Toronto Zionist Council and Canadian Young Judaea.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
367 Niece Road
Source
Landmarks

Camp Kvutza was established in 1944 by Habonim, a Labour Zionist youth movement, on a farm on the northeastern shores of Lake Erie in Lowbanks, Ontario. The camp was sponsored by the Pioneer Women (now Na’amat), the Poalei Zion and the Farband -- groups affliated with the Toronto Labour Zionist Movement. A major part of the programming at Camp Kvutza involved the celebration of Jewish history and culture and the teaching of Zionist ideals. Kvutza campers were taught to appreciate the values of hard work and love for Israel with an eye on encouraging aliyah. The camp closed in 1965.
Address
367 Niece Road
Time Period
1944-1965
Scope Note
Camp Kvutza was established in 1944 by Habonim, a Labour Zionist youth movement, on a farm on the northeastern shores of Lake Erie in Lowbanks, Ontario. The camp was sponsored by the Pioneer Women (now Na’amat), the Poalei Zion and the Farband -- groups affliated with the Toronto Labour Zionist Movement. A major part of the programming at Camp Kvutza involved the celebration of Jewish history and culture and the teaching of Zionist ideals. Kvutza campers were taught to appreciate the values of hard work and love for Israel with an eye on encouraging aliyah. The camp closed in 1965.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
Church St. and Rossland Road, west side of Duffins Creek
Source
Landmarks

The Toronto Workmen’s Circle was established in 1909 to promote workers rights, the Yiddish language and secular Jewish culture. In addition to running schools, the group founded Camp Yungvelt (Young World) on Lake Wilcox in 1925. A year later, the camp moved to a parcel of land in Pickering donated by a group of Workmen’s Circle members who had purchased the land to establish a Jewish cottage colony. The Workmen’s Circle relied on the generous support of its members at a time when the Jewish community supported the study of Hebrew over Yiddish. In addition to recreational activities, the camp focused on teaching Yiddish language and culture. The camp closed in 1971.
Address
Church St. and Rossland Road, west side of Duffins Creek
Time Period
1925-1971
Scope Note
The Toronto Workmen’s Circle was established in 1909 to promote workers rights, the Yiddish language and secular Jewish culture. In addition to running schools, the group founded Camp Yungvelt (Young World) on Lake Wilcox in 1925. A year later, the camp moved to a parcel of land in Pickering donated by a group of Workmen’s Circle members who had purchased the land to establish a Jewish cottage colony. The Workmen’s Circle relied on the generous support of its members at a time when the Jewish community supported the study of Hebrew over Yiddish. In addition to recreational activities, the camp focused on teaching Yiddish language and culture. The camp closed in 1971.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
Morrison Lake
Source
Landmarks

Irene Granovsky, known to staff and campers as “Mrs. G”, founded Balfour Manor Camp on Morrison Lake in the Muskoka Region in 1935. Having previous experience running a day camp on Lake Simcoe, she set out with her husband Ted to create an overnight camp. The property, which had an existing log cabin thought to resemble an English Manor, along with Lord Balfour (architect of the Balfour Declaration that established Palestine as a home for Jewish people in 1917), served as inspiration for the camp name.
Address
Morrison Lake
Time Period
1935-1952
Scope Note
Irene Granovsky, known to staff and campers as “Mrs. G”, founded Balfour Manor Camp on Morrison Lake in the Muskoka Region in 1935. Having previous experience running a day camp on Lake Simcoe, she set out with her husband Ted to create an overnight camp. The property, which had an existing log cabin thought to resemble an English Manor, along with Lord Balfour (architect of the Balfour Declaration that established Palestine as a home for Jewish people in 1917), served as inspiration for the camp name.
History
In addition to activities such as swimming, tennis and horseback riding at Balfour Manor Camp, there were adventurous canoe tripping expeditions down the Severn River to destinations such as Port Carling, Gloucester Pool and Lake Huron. Above all, the camp was recognized for its arts program. At the end of each summer, campers would perform in lavish large-scale productions of musicals and operas. Parents and local cottagers were always invited to enjoy the end of summer performances. The camp closed in 1952.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
2401-05 Ontario Street
Source
Landmarks

The Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home located in Bronte and then Tollandale, was first organized in 1919 by Dora Till, Ida Siegel and Lillian Clavir, members of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society. It was formed in order to provide convalescent care for victims of the influenza epidemic by offering a two week holiday to mothers and young children. First located in a home in Bronte, now Oakville, the Rest Home was officially brought under the auspices of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society in 1921. By this time the Home had moved from being a convalescent home to being a place of respite in the country for women and children of modest means, although they continued to assist those with poor health.
Address
2401-05 Ontario Street
Time Period
1919-1941
Scope Note
The Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home located in Bronte and then Tollandale, was first organized in 1919 by Dora Till, Ida Siegel and Lillian Clavir, members of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society. It was formed in order to provide convalescent care for victims of the influenza epidemic by offering a two week holiday to mothers and young children. First located in a home in Bronte, now Oakville, the Rest Home was officially brought under the auspices of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society in 1921. By this time the Home had moved from being a convalescent home to being a place of respite in the country for women and children of modest means, although they continued to assist those with poor health.
History
By the late 1930s, a search for a replacement location was underway, as the Bronte Rest Home became ill equipped to deal with the increased demand, primarily due to unsuitable grounds and facilities. In 1941, after selling the home in Bronte, the Mothers' and Babes' Rest Home Committee built a second home on eleven acres of lakefront property in Tollandale, near Barrie. In 1948, the Rest Home was admitted into the Jewish Camp Council, which helped the Committee administer the camp and fill staffing vacancies. Following this move, the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society changed its name to the Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home Association, to better reflect the fact that the home was their only remaining activity. In 1957, the camp expanded its mandate to include the addition of two new programs at its facilities: Camp Family Fun for fathers, mothers, and children up to the age of nine and Camp Good Fellowship, a program for senior citizens over the age of 60. Dora Till was the Rest Home's founding president for a total of 15 years and remained active with the home until it ultimately closed in 1977.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
Tollandale Mill Road and Tyndale Road
Source
Landmarks

The Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home located in Bronte and then Tollandale, was first organized in 1919 by Dora Till, Ida Siegel and Lillian Clavir, members of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society. It was formed in order to provide convalescent care for victims of the influenza epidemic by offering a two week holiday to mothers and young children. First located in a home in Bronte, now Oakville, the Rest Home was officially brought under the auspices of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society in 1921. By this time the Home had moved from being a convalescent home to being a place of respite in the country for women and children of modest means, although they continued to assist those with poor health.
Address
Tollandale Mill Road and Tyndale Road
Time Period
1941-1977
Scope Note
The Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home located in Bronte and then Tollandale, was first organized in 1919 by Dora Till, Ida Siegel and Lillian Clavir, members of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society. It was formed in order to provide convalescent care for victims of the influenza epidemic by offering a two week holiday to mothers and young children. First located in a home in Bronte, now Oakville, the Rest Home was officially brought under the auspices of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society in 1921. By this time the Home had moved from being a convalescent home to being a place of respite in the country for women and children of modest means, although they continued to assist those with poor health.
History
By the late 1930s, a search for a replacement location was underway, as the Bronte Rest Home became ill equipped to deal with the increased demand, primarily due to unsuitable grounds and facilities. In 1941, after selling the home in Bronte, the Mothers' and Babes' Rest Home Committee built a second home on eleven acres of lakefront property in Tollandale, near Barrie. In 1948, the Rest Home was admitted into the Jewish Camp Council, which helped the Committee administer the camp and fill staffing vacancies. Following this move, the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society changed its name to the Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home Association, to better reflect the fact that the home was their only remaining activity. In 1957, the camp expanded its mandate to include the addition of two new programs at its facilities: Camp Family Fun for fathers, mothers, and children up to the age of nine and Camp Good Fellowship, a program for senior citizens over the age of 60. Dora Till was the Rest Home's founding president for a total of 15 years and remained active with the home until it ultimately closed in 1977.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1104 Fish Hatchery Road
Source
Landmarks

Camp Ramah has been in operation since 1960 and operates under the educational guidance of the National Ramah Commission and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. It is governed by the Camp Ramah in Canada Committee. The camp is located in the Muskoka Region of Southern Ontario and is known for its experiential Jewish Education where campers learn Hebrew by singing together as a camp, participating in tefillot (prayers) on the beach and learning about Israel from Mishlachat (Israeli staff).
Address
1104 Fish Hatchery Road
Time Period
1960-present
Scope Note
Camp Ramah has been in operation since 1960 and operates under the educational guidance of the National Ramah Commission and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. It is governed by the Camp Ramah in Canada Committee. The camp is located in the Muskoka Region of Southern Ontario and is known for its experiential Jewish Education where campers learn Hebrew by singing together as a camp, participating in tefillot (prayers) on the beach and learning about Israel from Mishlachat (Israeli staff).
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
7861 Chemin River
Source
Landmarks

B’nai Brith’s Ottawa Lodge 885 was officially founded in February 1921 with 25 members. The Ottawa Lodge supported a Jewish Boy Scouts camp which evolved into the first Ottawa B’nai Brith summer camp for Jewish youth in 1935. Since 1935, the camp has delivered traditional camping programs to their community regardless of affiliation, denomination or financial means. Their mission has been to provide children and youth with the opportunity to experience the outdoors, learn new skills and develop life-long friendships while enhancing Jewish values, traditions, affiliation and community.
Address
7861 Chemin River
Time Period
1935-present
Scope Note
B’nai Brith’s Ottawa Lodge 885 was officially founded in February 1921 with 25 members. The Ottawa Lodge supported a Jewish Boy Scouts camp which evolved into the first Ottawa B’nai Brith summer camp for Jewish youth in 1935. Since 1935, the camp has delivered traditional camping programs to their community regardless of affiliation, denomination or financial means. Their mission has been to provide children and youth with the opportunity to experience the outdoors, learn new skills and develop life-long friendships while enhancing Jewish values, traditions, affiliation and community.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
Camperdown
Source
Landmarks

Established in 1930, Camp Camperdown was founded in Orillia by the National Council of Jewish Women as an extension to their long-running Jewish Girls’ Club that provided athletic, cultural and vocational programs to working and school age girls in the city. At Camp Camperdown, girls were provided with even greater opportunities to discover and develop their talents and capabilities. By the late 1930s, the camp moved to the Collingwood area and it closed in the mid-1940s.
Address
Camperdown
Time Period
1930-ca. 1946
Scope Note
Established in 1930, Camp Camperdown was founded in Orillia by the National Council of Jewish Women as an extension to their long-running Jewish Girls’ Club that provided athletic, cultural and vocational programs to working and school age girls in the city. At Camp Camperdown, girls were provided with even greater opportunities to discover and develop their talents and capabilities. By the late 1930s, the camp moved to the Collingwood area and it closed in the mid-1940s.
History
The guiding principle to involve campers in the decision-making process at Camp Camperdown proved highly effective. In 1946, an administrative report described, “The children keep very busy. But the things they do are the things they WANT to do, and activities that they plan, they plan together with their counselors.”
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1068 Burlmarie Road
Source
Landmarks

Located on the Lake of Bays in Muskoka, Camp New Moon began as a family lodge in the early 1930s. It was transformed into a children’s camp in the 1950s. In 1959, the camp was purchased by Al Goodman and Bert Fine (who ran Bathurst Manor Day Camp, later renamed to Forest Valley) who operated the camp together until around 1960 when Goodman assumed full ownership. Since the 1990s, the camp has been operated by Al’s son Jack and his wife Sue. The camp continues to flourish, providing campers the same experience that has existed for 60 years. There are now third generation campers attending.
Address
1068 Burlmarie Road
Time Period
1959-present
Scope Note
Located on the Lake of Bays in Muskoka, Camp New Moon began as a family lodge in the early 1930s. It was transformed into a children’s camp in the 1950s. In 1959, the camp was purchased by Al Goodman and Bert Fine (who ran Bathurst Manor Day Camp, later renamed to Forest Valley) who operated the camp together until around 1960 when Goodman assumed full ownership. Since the 1990s, the camp has been operated by Al’s son Jack and his wife Sue. The camp continues to flourish, providing campers the same experience that has existed for 60 years. There are now third generation campers attending.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1391 Stoneleigh Road, RR#2
Source
Landmarks

In 1921, the 59th Troop - the first Jewish Boy Scout troop in Ontario - was established in Toronto. During the early years, the troop met at the Orde Street School. In 1922, a summer camp was opened for the Jewish scouts from this troop. The camp was situated on Buckhorne Lake, near Port Bolster. It moved to Lake Couchiching in 1934 and in 1939 acquired a property on Duck Lake near Bracebridge, Ontario. Camp Tamarack, as it was called, provided the boys with an opportunity to leave the city and learn new outdoor skills. The camp operated until 1972. The Camp Tamarack of today is located on the same lake but is not connected to this early Boy Scout camp.
Address
1391 Stoneleigh Road, RR#2
Time Period
1922-1972
Scope Note
In 1921, the 59th Troop - the first Jewish Boy Scout troop in Ontario - was established in Toronto. During the early years, the troop met at the Orde Street School. In 1922, a summer camp was opened for the Jewish scouts from this troop. The camp was situated on Buckhorne Lake, near Port Bolster. It moved to Lake Couchiching in 1934 and in 1939 acquired a property on Duck Lake near Bracebridge, Ontario. Camp Tamarack, as it was called, provided the boys with an opportunity to leave the city and learn new outdoor skills. The camp operated until 1972. The Camp Tamarack of today is located on the same lake but is not connected to this early Boy Scout camp.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
Rouge Hills
Source
Landmarks

In 1925 a group of women from the Jewish Women’s Labour League - Rae Watson, Becky Lapedes, Leah Linzon, Bella Goodis, Gertie Blugerman, Ethel Tempkin and Tillie Chikovsky - founded a children’s camp, Camp Kindervelt (later Camp Naivelt) in Rouge Hills, Ontario, 25 miles southeast of Toronto. The camp committee rented a dilapidated farmhouse which they furnished from their own homes. Adults set up their own camp in tents. Overcrowding soon led to a search for larger grounds. In 1936, Camp Naivelt was established in Eldorado Park in Brampton, ON. The children’s camp operated under the name of Camp Kinderland with the adult portion called Camp Naivelt. Camp Kinderland ceased to operate as an overnight camp in 1962 but continued as a children’s day camp until 1970.
Address
Rouge Hills
Time Period
1925-1970
Scope Note
In 1925 a group of women from the Jewish Women’s Labour League - Rae Watson, Becky Lapedes, Leah Linzon, Bella Goodis, Gertie Blugerman, Ethel Tempkin and Tillie Chikovsky - founded a children’s camp, Camp Kindervelt (later Camp Naivelt) in Rouge Hills, Ontario, 25 miles southeast of Toronto. The camp committee rented a dilapidated farmhouse which they furnished from their own homes. Adults set up their own camp in tents. Overcrowding soon led to a search for larger grounds. In 1936, Camp Naivelt was established in Eldorado Park in Brampton, ON. The children’s camp operated under the name of Camp Kinderland with the adult portion called Camp Naivelt. Camp Kinderland ceased to operate as an overnight camp in 1962 but continued as a children’s day camp until 1970.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
Eldorado Park
Source
Landmarks

In 1936 the Labour League (later the United Jewish People's Order) bought Eldorado Park near Brampton, Ontario from the Canadian National Railway to establish Camp Naivelt. It functioned as a camp for children and families and ran a teacher training facility. Political and social activism was a significant part of Camp Naivelt. Its mission was to promote progressive socialist philosophy, tightly integrated with secular Jewish and Yiddish cultural traditions. A key element of the Camp Naivelt mission was to foster a deep and meaningful understanding of secular Jewish culture and folklore, the Yiddish language, music, folk art and dance.
Address
Eldorado Park
Time Period
1936-present
Scope Note
In 1936 the Labour League (later the United Jewish People's Order) bought Eldorado Park near Brampton, Ontario from the Canadian National Railway to establish Camp Naivelt. It functioned as a camp for children and families and ran a teacher training facility. Political and social activism was a significant part of Camp Naivelt. Its mission was to promote progressive socialist philosophy, tightly integrated with secular Jewish and Yiddish cultural traditions. A key element of the Camp Naivelt mission was to foster a deep and meaningful understanding of secular Jewish culture and folklore, the Yiddish language, music, folk art and dance.
History
At its peak in the 1950s, Camp Naivelt had approximately 90 small cottages, a communal dining hall, a dance hall, a youth recreation hall, a grocery store and a camp office. The community also included a camp director’s cabin, arts and crafts cabin, infirmary, and a communal washroom and shower area known as, “The Ritz”. Activities ranged from lectures on current issues, films, poetry readings, Yiddish theatre, kultur vinkls (cultural corners), folk dancing and singing to boating and swimming, volleyball and other sports tournaments, hikes and nature walks and campfires. Some 300 children would attend camp during the summer and, at its height during the 1940s and 1950s, as many as 5000 people would fill Camp Naivelt on a summer weekend.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1485 Murphy Rd.
Source
Landmarks

Camp Moshava was founded in 1962 in the Kawartha Lakes Region on Lake Buckhorn. Affiliated with the Zionist youth movement B’nei Akiva, Moshava is one of several camps they operate in North America.
Address
1485 Murphy Rd.
Time Period
1962-present
Scope Note
Camp Moshava was founded in 1962 in the Kawartha Lakes Region on Lake Buckhorn. Affiliated with the Zionist youth movement B’nei Akiva, Moshava is one of several camps they operate in North America.
History
Historically, the primary aim of the movement was to promote avodah, specifically agricultural work in the field and aliyah, migration to Israel. Today, Camp Moshava provides an informal environment for campers to encounter Judaism through programming and observances that promote Torah education, prayer and Zionist ideals.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1 Arowhon Road
Source
Landmarks

Camp Arowhon has been owned and operated by the Kates family since 1934. It is located on a private lake in Algonquin Provincial Park. Matriarch Lillian Kates established this family business, three generations long, in 1934. A formidable entrepreneur, Kates was undeterred by obstacles of the day such as adventurous travel through Ontario’s wilderness, anti-Semitism, sexism and a lack of financial resources. She passionately pursued her dream of creating a unique Canadian summer camp and single handedly recruited all of its first campers.
Address
1 Arowhon Road
Time Period
1934-present
Scope Note
Camp Arowhon has been owned and operated by the Kates family since 1934. It is located on a private lake in Algonquin Provincial Park. Matriarch Lillian Kates established this family business, three generations long, in 1934. A formidable entrepreneur, Kates was undeterred by obstacles of the day such as adventurous travel through Ontario’s wilderness, anti-Semitism, sexism and a lack of financial resources. She passionately pursued her dream of creating a unique Canadian summer camp and single handedly recruited all of its first campers.
History
When Kates’ son Eugene took over as director, he set up Arowhon’s unique system where campers independently chose their daily activities. True to the inspiration of its name-Samuel Butler’s Utopian novel “Nowhere” spelt backwards “Erehwon”-Arowhon did indeed become “a perfect world for children”. Today the camp is operated by Eugene’s daughter Joanne Kates, the celebrated food critic.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1612 Dudley Rd
Source
Landmarks

In 1958, Camp Timberlane was founded by Barry and Philomena Lowes on the shores of the Lake of Two Islands in the Haliburton Highlands. Their vision was to create a camping experience that would build confidence, spirit and leadership. They strived to provide a nurturing environment that recognized a person’s uniqueness and where values would be learned that would benefit them over a lifetime. The tradition continues today and is being carried out by the present Director and Owner Corey Mandell who attended Timberlane as a camper and counselor.
Address
1612 Dudley Rd
Time Period
1958-present
Scope Note
In 1958, Camp Timberlane was founded by Barry and Philomena Lowes on the shores of the Lake of Two Islands in the Haliburton Highlands. Their vision was to create a camping experience that would build confidence, spirit and leadership. They strived to provide a nurturing environment that recognized a person’s uniqueness and where values would be learned that would benefit them over a lifetime. The tradition continues today and is being carried out by the present Director and Owner Corey Mandell who attended Timberlane as a camper and counselor.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
Black Lake
Source
Landmarks

Camp Massad located in Torrance, Ontario, was a summer camp for Jewish Canadian youth co-sponsored by the Zionist Organization of Canada and Karen Hatarbut. Camp Massad was in operation from 1948 to 1977. The camp was situated on Black Lake. It was the only Hebrew-speaking camp in Ontario and was under the jurisdiction of the Ontario Camps Association.
Address
Black Lake
Time Period
1948-1977
Scope Note
Camp Massad located in Torrance, Ontario, was a summer camp for Jewish Canadian youth co-sponsored by the Zionist Organization of Canada and Karen Hatarbut. Camp Massad was in operation from 1948 to 1977. The camp was situated on Black Lake. It was the only Hebrew-speaking camp in Ontario and was under the jurisdiction of the Ontario Camps Association.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1335 Camp White Pine Ct.
Source
Landmarks

Camp White Pine, a children’s summer camp located in the Haliburton Highlands outside of Toronto was founded by Joe Kronick in 1956. Joe's son, Adam, took over as director of Camp White Pine in 1987. He has run the camp with his wife, Dana, as co-Director since 1990.
Address
1335 Camp White Pine Ct.
Time Period
1956-present
Scope Note
Camp White Pine, a children’s summer camp located in the Haliburton Highlands outside of Toronto was founded by Joe Kronick in 1956. Joe's son, Adam, took over as director of Camp White Pine in 1987. He has run the camp with his wife, Dana, as co-Director since 1990.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1030 Lower Lions Club Road
Source
Landmarks

Camp Kadimah is a day camp for children between the ages of 2-14 operated by the Hamilton Jewish Community Centre.
Address
1030 Lower Lions Club Road
Time Period
1949-present
Scope Note
Camp Kadimah is a day camp for children between the ages of 2-14 operated by the Hamilton Jewish Community Centre.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
Lake Waseosa
Source
Landmarks

Camp Revivim, a Labour Zionist camp, was founded in 1951 by M. Federman, H. Green, B. Himel and A. Ben Gurion (nephew of David Ben Gurion) at Hockley Valley, Orangeville. A permanent location was purchased in 1953 at Lake Waseosa near Huntsville. In 1962, Camp Revivim (serving children from Toronto) joined with Camp Kissufim (serving children from Ottawa and Montreal) for one summer. The following summer, the two camps merged to form Camp Gesher.
Address
Lake Waseosa
Time Period
1951-1962
Scope Note
Camp Revivim, a Labour Zionist camp, was founded in 1951 by M. Federman, H. Green, B. Himel and A. Ben Gurion (nephew of David Ben Gurion) at Hockley Valley, Orangeville. A permanent location was purchased in 1953 at Lake Waseosa near Huntsville. In 1962, Camp Revivim (serving children from Toronto) joined with Camp Kissufim (serving children from Ottawa and Montreal) for one summer. The following summer, the two camps merged to form Camp Gesher.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
1 Camp Gesher’s Rd
Source
Landmarks

Camp Gesher originated in 1963 from a merger between Camp Revivim (serving campers from Ottawa and Toronto) and Camp Kissufim (serving campers from Montreal). It is part of Habonim Dror, the Labour-Zionist youth movement and is located near Cloyne, Ontario.
Address
1 Camp Gesher’s Rd
Time Period
1963-present
Scope Note
Camp Gesher originated in 1963 from a merger between Camp Revivim (serving campers from Ottawa and Toronto) and Camp Kissufim (serving campers from Montreal). It is part of Habonim Dror, the Labour-Zionist youth movement and is located near Cloyne, Ontario.
History
Camp Gesher’s small size is central to the spirit of the camp where a culture of acceptance, individuality and mutual respect is fostered. The camp philosophy revolves around socialist ideals and its structure is similar to that of a kibbutz. Hebrew is used in day-to-day conversation and there are many opportunities to learn about Jewish and Israeli history and culture. There is a kosher kitchen and Shabbat and Havdalah are celebrated.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
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