Search Results

New Search Photo Search Audiovisual Search
21 records – page 1 of 1.
Accession Number
2013-9-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-9-1
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
3 photographs (tiffs) : col.
1 folder of textual records
Date
2005-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of graphic material and a textual record documenting the Transnistria Survivor Association. Included are three photos: 1) Member Arnold Buxbaum standing in front of Memorial for Transnistria at Earl Bales Park; 2) Arnold Buxbaum and Joe Leinburd at UJA Foundation Event, 2011-12; 3) Hazkarah, 2005 at Sharei Shomayim Synagogue. There is also a speech by Arnold Buxbaum presented in 2011 at Sharei Shomayim Synagogue.
Custodial History
Originals were loaned for reproducing.
Administrative History
Founded in 1994, the Transnistria Survivors’ Association works to provide a voice for and raise awareness of a lesser known group of Holocaust survivors. Transnistria was the Romanian authorities’ name for the former Ukrainian region located between the Rivers Dniester and Bug. It was placed under Romanian administration following the German and Romanian conquest of Ukraine in the summer of 1941. Prior to the Second World War, Romania was home to the third largest Jewish population in Europe; but beginning with the Citizenship Revision Laws of 1938, the Jews of Romania were deprived their citizenship rights and became the targets of repressive antisemitic policies and laws. Neighbours turned on neighbours. Thousands of Jews were murdered in pogroms, either by Romanian or German troops, Nazi Einsatzgruppen, or the local population. In 1941, the Jews who remained alive in the Provinces of Bucovina and Bessarabia were deported to camps and ghettos in Transnistria. Thousands were jammed into freight trains while others were marched by foot. Many died along the way. Between 1941 and 1944, it is estimated that German and Romanian authorities, along with Ukrainian collaborators, murdered or caused the deaths of hundreds of thousands of Romanian and Ukrainian Jews in Transnistria. Some of those who survived these tragic circumstances, especially from Bucovina and Bessarabia, and made a new home in Toronto gathered together to lend each other support and to tell their largely unknown story of oppression and survival. The Transnistria Survivor’s Association organized yearly Hazkarah (memorial) services and its dedicated members continue to share their extraordinary stories of survival through speaking engagements at schools, colleges and synagogues. Past presidents include:
1. Felicia (Steigman) Carmelly
2.Osias Nadel
3.Etti Ziegler
4.Lou (Leizer) Hoffer
As of 2017, the current President is Joe Leinburd.
Subjects
Societies and associations
Holocaust
Name Access
Transnistria Survivors Association
Buxbaum, Arnold
Leinburd, Joe
Hoffer, Lou
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-6
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1994-1998
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a book of documents related to the Transnistria Surivors' Association, including correspondence, memos, contracts, financial statements and meeting minutes.
Subjects
Holocaust
Societies and associations
Name Access
Transnistria Survivors' Association (Toronto, Ont.)
Hoffer, Lou
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-5-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-5-1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
6 cm of textual records
1 photograph : b&w ; 9 x 9 cm
Date
1947-1991
Scope and Content
Accession primarily consists of records related to the immigration of Victor and Bayla Lejzerson from a DP camp in US-controlled West Germany. This includes a large block of correspondence between Victor and his cousins in Toronto, Deborah (Lejzersohn) and David Breslove who helped facilitate their immigration and work placement on a farm in Stouffville and in the garment trade. Also included are materials related to Max and Ethel Siegerman's community involvement including a Toronto Joint Board Cloakmakers Union Golden Jubilee book (1961), a Shaarei Shomayim graduation program (1958), two Adath Sholom Synagogue anniversary books (1986, 1991) and a photograph of Norman and Hinda (Richards) Tobias.
Administrative History
Celia Denov is the dauther of Max (1898-1995) and Ethel (Breslove) Siegerman (1891-1966). Max was a union leader and one of the founders of the Minsker Farband. The Minsker Farband was originally located on Cecil Street until it became the Adath Sholom Synagogue and moved north to Sheppard Ave, eventually merging with Beth Tikvah. Ethel's brother was David Breslove, a teacher, author and founder of the Toronto Jewish Historical Society. He was married to Deborah Lejzersohn and had one son. Hinda Richards was a member of the Breslove family and married her music teacher, Norman Tobias. Both were killed in a car accident in 1973. Victor and Bayla Lejerson were married in the DP camp. Both were successful in immigrating to Canada with the help of David and Deborah Breslove.
Subjects
Land, settlement and immigration
Holocaust
Name Access
Breslove, David
Breslove, Deborah
Siegerman, Max, 1898-1995
Siegerman, Ethel, 1891-1966
Lejerson, Victor
Lejerson, Bayla
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-6
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
11 m of textual records
Date
[195-]-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of United Restitution Organization (URO), Toronto Office case files for the following funds: Hardship Fund; Hardship Fund, Pre-1965 Austrian; German Social Security (EB); German Social Security (DE); Article 2 Fund; Ghetto Lodz; and the immidiate post-Second World War Wiedergutmachung reparations. There is also a small amount of general operational files.
Custodial History
These records were left in the URO office following the departure of the URO staff person. They were boxed and moved by archives staff.
Administrative History
In Canada, the United Restitution Organization (URO) was founded in 1953 under the aegis of the Canadian Jewish Congress. The funds advanced by the Claims Conference were administered by the CJC which also gave support by providing the URO with office space and clerical staff. Offices were set up in Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg and Vancouver. The Winnipeg and Vancouver offices closed in the 1970s and the Montreal office remained open until 2002, after which time the active cases were sent to the Toronto office. The Toronto office officially closed on April 1, 2007. There was one case worker, however, who contintued to tend to any active claims that were left. Her position was transfered to Jewish Family and Child in 2013. The URO dealt with a variety of different types of claims. The first and largest were the BEG cases (Bundesentschaedigungsgesetz), which translates as Federal Indemnification Law for the Compensation of Victims of National Socialist Persecution. This program provided compensation for individuals persecuted for political, racial, religious, or ideological reasons who suffered long-term damage to their health, imprisonment, death of family members, loss of property, reduced income, or reduced professional advancement. The other two major programs or cases covered by the URO were the Hardship Fund and Article 2. The Hardship Fund was established during the 1960s and was open to Jews who emigrated from the former Soviet Union who were not eligible for compensation under the BEG program. The Article 2 program, in turn, arose during the 1990s, after the unification of the German government. It is still operating today and is open to Jewish victims of Nazi persecution who met a certain critiera, and those who are eligible, are provided with a pension paid out in installments every three months each year.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Subjects
Holocaust
Social services
Name Access
United Restitution Organization (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-10
Material Format
textual record
graphic material (electronic)
moving images (electronic)
Physical Description
10 cm of textual records
2240 photographs (jpg and gif)
8 moving images
Date
1944-2015 (predominent 2008-2015)
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the activities of Alex Levin, a Jewish war veteran and Holocaust survivor. Records include letters written to Levin from school children following various speaking engagements; interviews with Crestwood School, CHAT, and Netivot Hatorah; a recording of the Saluting Our Italian Heroes commemorative event; recordings of Remembrance Day ceremonies hosted by the Canadian Jewish War Veterans (Toronto Post); and photographs documenting events attended by Levin including Holocaust remembrance events, Yom Hashoah, Remembrance Day ceremonies, March of the Living, Miracle Dinners and Proms, Azrieli Foundation events including the launch of Levin's book "Under the Yellow and Red Stars", school visits, JWV programs with Sunnybrook veterans, portraits of Levin through the years and various scanned images of Levin's family.
Administrative History
Alex Levin (1932-2016) was born in 1932 in Rokitno, Poland. In 1941, the Germans invaded Rokitno and established a ghetto and formed a Judenrat to carry out their orders. In 1942, the Ghetto was evacuated and the Jews were brought to the town's marketplace to be transported by train to be killed. Levin was ten years old when he escaped into the nearby forest with his brother Samuel where he lived for 18 months in a hole in the ground. He was twelve when he emerged from hiding to find that his parents and youngest brother Moishe had been murdered. In 1944, he joined the Soviet forces as a messenger boy. After the war, he was sent to the USSR and enrolled in cadet school, remaining in the Soviet army until forced out for being Jewish in the 1970s. An engineer by training, Alex came to Canada in 1975 via Austria and Italy, and now lives in Toronto where he regularly speaks about his experiences in the Holocaust.
Subjects
War and military
Holocaust
Education
Name Access
Levin, Alex, 1932-2016
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-6
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
[2010?]-[2015?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of thank you cards from schools where Alex was a speaker, sharing his story of Holocaust survival.
Administrative History
Alex Levin (1932-2016) was born Joshua Levin in 1932 in Rokitno, Poland. (He was also known as Yehoshua and Shike.) Rokitno was occupied in 1941 by Nazi Germany and Alex escaped the Rokitno ghetto with his brother in 1942, hiding in the woods for eighteen months. Soviet troops found him in January of 1944 and invited him to join the 13th Army as a field hospital unit helper. Because his Yiddish nickname was unfamiliar (Shike, from his Hebrew name, Yehoshua), they called him Shura or Shurik, diminutive forms of Alexander, which became his formal name. He became an officer in the USSR and an engineer. He immigrated to Canada in 1975 and brought his family to join him in 1980.
Subjects
Education
Holocaust
War and military
Anti-Semitism and discrimination
Name Access
Levin, Alex, 1932-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-13
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a typed account of Lou Hoffer's experience as a Holocaust survivor in Transnistria. The account was written on the occassion of the establishment by Lou and Magda Hoffer of the Transnistria Forest Grove in Jerusalem through the Jewish National Fund (JNF). Also included is a printout of a photo of Lou and Magda alongside a brief description of the JNF gift and the original certificate presented to the Hoffers from JNF.
Subjects
Holocaust
Name Access
Hoffer, Lou
Hoffer, Magda
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-4-16
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-4-16
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
3 DVDs
Date
2006-2007
Scope and Content
Video recordings of Transnistria Survivors' Association's annual commemomoration ceremonies (Haskara) that took place at Shaarei Shomayim Synagogue in Toronto in 2006 and 2007.
Administrative History
Founded in 1994, the Transnistria Survivors’ Association works to provide a voice for and raise awareness of a lesser known group of Holocaust survivors. Transnistria was the Romanian authorities’ name for the former Ukrainian region located between the Rivers Dniester and Bug. It was placed under Romanian administration following the German and Romanian conquest of Ukraine in the summer of 1941. Prior to the Second World War, Romania was home to the third largest Jewish population in Europe; but beginning with the Citizenship Revision Laws of 1938, the Jews of Romania were deprived their citizenship rights and became the targets of repressive antisemitic policies and laws. Neighbours turned on neighbours. Thousands of Jews were murdered in pogroms, either by Romanian or German troops, Nazi Einsatzgruppen, or the local population. In 1941, the Jews who remained alive in the Provinces of Bucovina and Bessarabia were deported to camps and ghettos in Transnistria. Thousands were jammed into freight trains while others were marched by foot. Many died along the way. Between 1941 and 1944, it is estimated that German and Romanian authorities, along with Ukrainian collaborators, murdered or caused the deaths of hundreds of thousands of Romanian and Ukrainian Jews in Transnistria. Some of those who survived these tragic circumstances, especially from Bucovina and Bessarabia, and made a new home in Toronto gathered together to lend each other support and to tell their largely unknown story of oppression and survival. The Transnistria Survivor’s Association organized yearly Hazkarah (memorial) services and its dedicated members continue to share their extraordinary stories of survival through speaking engagements at schools, colleges and synagogues. Past presidents include:
1. Felicia (Steigman) Carmelly
2.Osias Nadel
3.Etti Ziegler
4.Lou (Leizer) Hoffer
As of 2017, the current President is Joe Leinburd.
Subjects
Holocaust
Name Access
Transnistria Survivors Association
Hoffer, Lou
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-11-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-11-13
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
7 photographs : col. ; 10 x 15 cm
1 folder of textual records
Date
2006
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 7 colour photographs of Eisen speaking to students, a thank you card signed by the students and student art work in response to the Holocaust.
Administrative History
Alexander Eisen was born in Vienna, Austria, in 1929. After the Anschluss in 1938, the Eisen family fled to Hungary. In 1939, Alex’s father was arrested and fled to Palestine, leaving his wife alone with their three children. Alex and the rest of the family endured the hardships of the Budapest Ghetto, but later managed to escape and live in hiding until being liberated by the Soviet Army in 1945. He immigrated with his wife Renate to Canada in 1952. Eisen is a Neuberger Holocaust Survivor Speaker and author of A Time of Fear (2010).
Subjects
Children and youth
Education
Holocaust
Name Access
Eisen, Alexander
Places
Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-2-23
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-2-23
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
5 photographs
Date
[ca. 2000]-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting Lou Hoffer's involvement with the Transnistria Survivors' Association and the Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre. Included are photographs of Lou with student groups at OISE and Havergal college, an image of Lou lighting a candle with a Bar Mitzvah student as part of the Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre's Bar/Bat Mitzvah Project of Remembrance. Accession also includes a flyer, newspaperclippings and thank you cards.
Administrative History
Lou (Leizer) Hoffer is a Holocaust survivor who is a past President of the Transnistria Holocaust Survivors' Association and was a speaker with the Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre in Toronto.
Lou was born in 1927 in Vijnitz, Northern Bucovina, Romania to David and Chaya Sure Drassinover Hoffer. During the Second World War, Lou and his family was deported (along with all the Jewish people in his town) to the death camps of Transnistria (a territory in Ukraine). He was liberated in 1944.
After the war, Lou, his parents and his younger brother, Joe, wandered through various displaced persons camps in Europe. They eventually immigrated to Canada in March 1948 on the ship Nea Helas. He married Madga (nee Pressburger) in 1959. Together they had three sons and one daughter.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Societies and associations
Holocaust
Name Access
Hoffer, Lou
Transnistria Survivors' Association (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-6-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-6-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
95 cm of textual records
42 photographs : b&w and col. ; 9 x 13 cm and 10 x 15 cm
5 audiocassettes
Date
1974-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the records documenting Nathan Leipciger's role as the Chairman of the Holocaust Remembrace Committee, as well as his affiliation with other Holocaust commemoration organizations in Poland and Toronto. Organizations documented in this collection include: the Canadian Jewish Congress Holocaust Remembrance Committee and its Education Sub-Committee, the March of the Living, Yad Vashem, the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., the State Museum of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the International Council to the Museum of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the Christian-Jewish Dialogue of Toronto, the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews, the Board of Education of North York, and the Holocaust Memorial and Education Centre (now Neuberger). Events documented include Yom HaShoah programs, the Canadian Gathering of Holocaust Survivors and Their Children, and Holocaust Education Week. Records include Holocaust Remembrance Committee meeting minutes, correspondence (including correspondence between Mr. Leipciger and the director of the museum at Auschwitz), programming material, curriculum development material, event flyers, newsclippings, synagogue newsletters featuring published memoirs by Mr. Leipciger. Also included are architectural drawings of the Holocaust Memorial and Education Centre (now Neuberger), one copy of a small book entitled, "60 Days for 6 Million," published by Tribe UK, and five audiocasettes of recordings from the 22nd International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies conference on the topic of the shared history of Poles and Jews (August 2002, Toronto, Ont.).
Administrative History
Nathan Leipciger was born in Chorzów, Poland, in 1928. He survived the Sosnowiec Ghetto and the camps of Auschwitz-Birkenau, Funfteichen, GrossRosen, Flossenberg, Leonberg, and Dachau. Nate and his father were liberated in May 1945, and immigrated to Canada in 1948. In Toronto Nate attended high school and eventually obtained a university degree in engineering. He later established an engineering firm with several partners. In 1982, Nate chaired the Toronto Holocaust Remembrance Committee, later becoming an executive member of the Canadian Jewish Congress National Holocaust Remembrance Committee. Nate was a member of the International Council to the Museum of Auschwitz-Birkenau for fifteen years and has been an educator on March of the Living trips to Poland and Israel for fifteen years. In 2015, The Azrieli Foundation published Nate's 280-page memoir "The Weight of Freedom" as part of their series of Holocaust memoirs by survivors in Canada. In 2016, Mr. Leipciger guided Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on a tour of Auschwitz-Birkenau.
Subjects
Holocaust
Name Access
Leipciger, Nathan, 1928-
Places
Poland
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3078
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3078
Material Format
graphic material
Date
31 May 1981
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 21 x 26 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of Ernst Zundel (pictured centre in a hard hat) with his supporters on the front lawn of his home in Cabbagetown. They are holding signs with various slogans denying the Holocaust.
Notes
Photo by Ben Lechtman.
Name Access
Zundel, Ernst, 1939-2017
Subjects
Anti-Semitism and discrimination
Holocaust
Rallies, demonstrations and protests
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
1995-1-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1995-1-3
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 album
16 posters
Date
1945-1946
Scope and Content
Accession includes a scrapbook entitled "Polish Jews in the time of the German occupation, 1939-1945", presented to Sam Lipshitz and H.M. Caiserman by the Central Committee of Polish Jews during their tour of Poland in 1946 as delegates for the Canadian Jewish Congress and United Radomer Relief.
The accession also includes 16 posters created for an exhibition to document their trip and the Holocaust in Poland.
Subjects
Holocaust
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1984-5-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1984-5-7
Material Format
object
graphic material
Physical Description
1 coin
16 photographs : b&w ; 7 x 10 cm
Date
1939-1945
Scope and Content
This accession consists of one Mount Sinai Lodge A.F. & A.M. No. 522 G.R.C. 25th anniversary coin. The coin has the lodge's coat of arms on the recto and a set of tablets with the words "keep these and good fortune will be yours" on the verso.
Also included are 16 photographs of the Allied Forces (including the Canadian Army) at Bergen-Belsen in April 1945 following the liberation of the camp. Pictured are the general grounds, mass graves with sign markers, a group of (local German?) women crowded around the back of an army truck, army personnel observing and taking photographs of a deceased victim, a crematoria, and Sam Pizel (standing right) and other servicemen with a box of human ashes.
Administrative History
Sam Pizel (?-29 Sept. 2004) was married to Lily and was the brother of Irving Pizel.
Subjects
Holocaust
War and military
Name Access
Pizel, Sam
Bergen-Belsen
Places
Germany
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1996-3-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1996-3-3
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
2.4 m of textual records and graphic materials
Date
[ca. 1940]-[ca.1995]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the records created and/or accumulated by Nechemiah Knobel. They relate to the work of the Labour Zionist Alliance and the Borochov movement. Of note are a series of photographs documenting the unveiling of the Holocaust monument at Mount Sinai Cemetery in 1968. Identified individuals include Mayor Phil Givens, Allan Grossman, Ben Himel and Max Federman.
Subjects
Labour and unions
Zionism
Holocaust
Name Access
Knobel, Nechemiah
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2003-8-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2003-8-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
6.6 m of textual records and graphic materials
Date
[198-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records relating to Markson's design work for the Holocaust Centre, for Jewish Family & Child Services, and for the film, Growing up in America. These records include textual records, slides, negatives, photographs, films, and sound recordings in various formats.
Use Conditions
Donor retains copyright. Material can be made available for viewing and reference at the OJA. Researchers who require copies for personal use or publication must obtain permission from donor first.
Subjects
Holocaust
Communications and publishing
Name Access
Markson, Morley
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1978-7-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1978-7-6
Material Format
object
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 document
2 artifacts
8 photographs : b&w ; 9 x 14 cm and 9 x 7 cm
Date
[between 1939 and 1944]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs taken in the Lodz Ghetto during the Second World War, including images of Mordechai Chaim Rumkowski, chairman, and other members of the Judenrat (Jewish Council). Also included is an invitation to Rumkowski's wedding to Regina Wajnberger (Weinberger) from 27 Dec. 1941 and two Lodz Ghetto coins from 1943.
Subjects
Holocaust
Name Access
Fogel, Morris
Places
Lodz, Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-3-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-3-3
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
70 photographs : b&w ; 50 x 40 cm. or smaller
Date
1994
Scope and Content
This accession consists of seventy photographs taken by Nir Bareket in 1994, documenting the March of the Living trip. This collection includes images of the participants visiting Jewish cemeteries in Warsaw and Lublin, the Jewish ghetto in Krakow, the Auschwitz Museum and Camp, Birkenau Camp, Majdanek Camp and Treblinka Camp, and finally, the Yad Vashem Museum and the Western Wall in Jerusalem.
Administrative History
Nir Bareket (1939-2015) was born in Haifa, Israel in 1939, and moved to New York City in 1964, where he studied photography at the New York Institute of Photography and the School of Visual Arts. He opened up his own photography studio in New York soon after. In 1969 he moved to Geneva, Switzerland where he worked across Europe as the head of a team of international photographers known as Investors Overseas Services (IOS). In 1970 he returned to Israel where he became the chief photographer at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem. Five years later he immigrated to Canada and established a photography studio in Toronto, which he continues to operate today.
In 1994, he was the official photogrrapher for the March of the Living pilgrimage, which is overseen by UJA Federation of Greater Toronto as part of the Canadian Israel Experience program. This trip operates each year and is intended to expose a new generation of Jews to two of the most significant events of Jewish history -- the Shoah (the Holocaust) and the birth of the State of Israel. The participants are teenagers who are exposed to key places in Europe and Israel where these events took place. The photographs that Mr. Bareket took to capture this trip were displayed at an exhibition held in 1995 at the Loggia Gallery within the Koffler Centre of the Arts.
Throughout his career, Bareket has taken part in approximately thirty-five exhibits held in Toronto, New York City, Jerusalem, China and Cuba. Some of his noted displays have included the March of the Living (1995) as well as a series on the homeless of Toronto (2000-2001) which was held at BCE Place, Toronto City Hall, the Dufferin Mall, and the BJCC. He has also taught photography at a variety of institutions such as George Brown College, York University, Hebrew University, the Israel Museum and the New York Institute of Photography.
Nir Bareket passed away on 12 May 2015.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Holocaust
Name Access
Bareket, Nir, 1939-2015
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-3-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-3-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
12.5 m of textual material and 6 boxes of index cards
Date
[195-?] - [198-]
Scope and Content
This accession consists of 43 cubic foot boxes of closed case files as well as six boxes of index cards created by the United Restitution Organization, Toronto Office. The case files document the Article 2 (boxes 1 - 11) and Hardship (boxes 12 - 43) programs. Most of the documentation within the case files are in German.
The index cards document the BEG and Russlandfaille programs and correspond to records that were transferred to the Holocaust Museum in Washington. The files were created during the early years of the URO that were donated by URO to the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. in October, 1990. That institution has approximately 100 boxes of closed case files from the Toronto Office. The index cards DO NOT correspond to any case files that we have as part of our holdings.
Custodial History
After the Toronto URO office closed, the one case worker left moved from the second floor of the Lipa Green Building to the same floor as the OJA the end of March, 2007. Before the move, the OJA was asked to take all of the historical files that were there in boxes, listed them and transferred them to the UJA Warehouse. The index cards are in the OJA vault.
Administrative History
In Canada, the United Restitution Organization (URO) was founded in 1953 under the aegis of the Canadian Jewish Congress. The funds advanced by the Claims Conference were administered by the CJC which also gave support by providing the URO with office space and clerical staff. Offices were set up in Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg and Vancouver. The Winnipeg and Vancouver offices closed in the 1970s and the Montreal office remained open until 2002, after which time the active cases were sent to the Toronto office. The Toronto office officially closed on April 1, 2007. There was one case worker, however, who contintued to tend to any active claims that were left. Her position was transfered to Jewish Family and Child in 2013. The URO dealt with a variety of different types of claims. The first and largest were the BEG cases (Bundesentschaedigungsgesetz), which translates as Federal Indemnification Law for the Compensation of Victims of National Socialist Persecution. This program provided compensation for individuals persecuted for political, racial, religious, or ideological reasons who suffered long-term damage to their health, imprisonment, death of family members, loss of property, reduced income, or reduced professional advancement. The other two major programs or cases covered by the URO were the Hardship Fund and Article 2. The Hardship Fund was established during the 1960s and was open to Jews who emigrated from the former Soviet Union who were not eligible for compensation under the BEG program. The Article 2 program, in turn, arose during the 1990s, after the unification of the German government. It is still operating today and is open to Jewish victims of Nazi persecution who met a certain critiera, and those who are eligible, are provided with a pension paid out in installments every three months each year.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Subjects
Holocaust
Social services
Name Access
United Restitution Organization (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-11-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-11-7
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
Date
1995
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one dinner invitation and journal entitled "From Tears to Triumph" presented by the Yeshiva Yesodei Hatorah at a testimonial dinner marking fifty years since the end of the Second World War. The dinner was in honour of the survivors of the Holocaust and their impact on religious life in Toronto. It was held at the Regal Constellation Hotel in Toronto on Sunday, April 2, 1995 and featured Rabbi Ezriel Tauber as guest speaker. The journal features stories of survivors and photographs depicting Jewish religious life in Europe during and after the Second World War.
Administrative History
Yeshiva Yesodei Hatorah was founded in 1945 as Shlomei Emunei Yisroel. It was founded as a school for boys by survivors of the Holocaust who immigrated to Canada with their children.
Descriptive Notes
Shlomei Emunei Yisroel
Subjects
Education
Holocaust
Name Access
Yeshiva Yesodei Hatorah
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Samuel Posluns fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 70
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Samuel Posluns fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
70
Material Format
cartographic material
graphic material
textual record
Date
1925-1984
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
91 photographs : b&w ; 25 x 20 cm or smaller
1 map : 46 x 65 cm
Admin History/Bio
Samuel Posluns (1910-1994) was born in Toronto to Abraham Isaac Poslaniec (1870-1922) and Sheindel Saltzman (1872-1960). He had three brothers and three sisters: Joseph, Louis, Abe, Gertrude Miriam, Anne, and Sarah. His father Abraham established the family run clothing firm Superior Cloak Company in 1916. In 1934, it was bankrupted and closed after a lengthy strike. In 1936, Samuel opened his own business, Popular Cloak Company. In 1967, the Posluns family purchased Tip Top Tailors, in partnership with entrepreneur Jimmy Kay. A year later they incorporated their new venture under the name of Dylex as a holding company for the Tip Top chain of stores.
During the Second World War, Samuel Posluns served as a member of the Air Force reserves. After the war, he was elected president of the United Jewish Welfare Fund in 1947. That same year, in collaboration with the Canadian Jewish Congress and the Jewish Labour Committee, Posluns helped lead the Tailor Project along with Max E. Enkin, which was aimed at helping Jewish displaced persons immigrate to Canada by securing them employment as tailors. A commited advocate for Jewish Education, Posluns also served as the first president and founding chair of the Board of Jewish Education (BJE) in 1949. He remained Honorary President for life and continued to attend meetings until health problems held back his participation in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Posluns was also a founding board member of the North York General Hospital.
Samuel Posluns died in Toronto in 1994.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records related to the Posluns family and their clothing business, Popular Cloak Company. The records include correspondence, financial records, periodicals and newsletters, photographs, certificates and personal identification. The fonds also includes textual documents and photos documenting Samuel Posluns' involvement in the Tailor Project.
Name Access
Enkin, Max E.
Popular Cloak Company
Superior Cloak Company
Canadian Jewish Congress
Jewish Labour Committee
Posluns, Samuel, 1910-1994
Subjects
Business and commerce
Land, settlement and immigration
Holocaust
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Creator
Posluns, Samuel, 1910-1994
Accession Number
1997-7/6
2004-5/79
Source
Archival Descriptions
21 records – page 1 of 1.

Narrow By

Collection Name

Source

Format

Date

Description Level

Subject

Name

Place

Restrictions

Available Digital Content