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110 records – page 1 of 3.
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1908]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 9 cm (sight, oval) and 10 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph is a copy of a matted portrait of Ida Abramsky (1882-1950), daughter of Joseph Abramsky and Chaia Novack Abramsky. She was born in Bellorussia and came to Kingston with her family in 1896. She married Moe Breslin 1905 and lived in Toronto until her death in 1950.
Name Access
Abramsky, Ida
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Kingston (Ont.)
Accession Number
1982-7-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1919]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 13 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
Portrait of Joseph Abramsky's second wife. Geisha (Gussie) Abramson (1872-1956) was born in Grodna, Gobernia, and came to Canada after meeting and becoming engaged to Joseph Abramsky, her cousin, in Kingston. She had two children, Samuel (1900-1951) and Annette (Anna) (1902-1970).
Notes
Photograph is a copy.
Original photograph by The Cooke Studio, 244 Princess Street, Kingston.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Kingston (Ont.)
Accession Number
1982-7-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1900]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 13 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
Joseph Abramsky was born November 23, 1857 in Belorussia, to Chaim Heshel (Zvi) Abramsky and Tovah Pessah Belastosky. He came to Kingston, Ontario in 1890 with his wife Chaia Novack and their four children Ida, Edith, Moses and Katherine. Chaia died in 1897 giving birth to their fifth child, Harry. In 1898 Joseph was married again, to his cousin Geisha (Gussie) Abramson. With her, he had two more children, Samuel and Annette (Anna). Joseph died November 23, 1927 in Kingston.
Notes
Photograph is a copy.
Original photograph by Weese of Kingston.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Kingston (Ont.)
Accession Number
1982-7-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1910]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 13 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a copy portrait of the daughter of Joseph Abramsky and Chaia Novack. She was born in Volpe, Belorussia, December 18, 1893, and moved to Kingston with her family in 1896. She married Allan Gould of Boston in 1915 and lived in Boston until her death in 1981.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Kingston (Ont.)
Accession Number
1982-7-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1541
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1541
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1927
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Halifax (N.S.)
Accession Number
1978-4-9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 628
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
628
Material Format
graphic material
Date
6 Feb. 1948
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 21 x 26 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
The General Sturgis was originally a military ship (called a Liberty ship) that was being used to transport people from post-World War Two Europe to Canada. The ship accommodated the men on board in stacked cots in the hold, while the women and children slept separately in cabins. The boat had sailed from Braemanhaven, Germany, landing in Halifax on 6 Feb. 1948. On board were Jewish immigrants from Displaced Persons camps, most of whom were brought over as tailors with the aid of the CJC, and JIAS. Many of the individuals pictured eventually settled in Montreal.
Scope and Content
Item is a copy photograph and corresponding negative of the boat General Sturgis landing at Pier 1 in Halifax. Pictured far left in the front is David Mangarten and [his sister Eva], fourth from the right is Eli Goldberg (b. 1897, Rafalovka, Poland-d. 1983, Montreal). Pictured seventh from the right is Mr. Hister.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Ships
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Halifax (N.S.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Betty Goldstick Lindgren fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 45; Item 18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Betty Goldstick Lindgren fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
45
Item
18
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[192-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : sepia toned ; 29 x 22 cm on mat 44 x 28 cm
Admin History/Bio
Dorothy Dworkin (née Goldstick) was born in Latvia in 1890. She was the daughter of William and Sarah Goldstick. She came to Canada in 1904 at 14 years of age. She studied nursing in the United States, by training at Mount Sinai Hospital in Cleveland. She then took her exams in midwifery, and in 1909, she received her diploma from the State Board of Ohio.
In 1911 she married Henry Dworkin, who was the founder of the Toronto Labour Lyceum. Henry opened a variety store in 1917, which later became a tobacco and shipping agency business called Dworkin Travel, located at 525 Dundas Street West. Together, the Dworkins helped bring in hundreds of immigrants from Poland, Roumania and Latvia. The couple had a daughter, Ellen, whom they referred to as Honey. In 1928, Henry was tragically killed in an automobile accident. After her husband's death, Dorothy brought up her daughter alone, ran the travel business, and continued to do charitable work with Mount Sinai Hospital.
Scope and Content
Portrait of Dorothy Dworkin taken when she was in her 30s at the Lyonde Photo Studio in Toronto.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Related Material
See Dorothy Dworkin fonds 10.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1978-10-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Betty Goldstick Lindgren fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 45; Item 13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Betty Goldstick Lindgren fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
45
Item
13
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1910]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 10 x 7 cm in mat 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Dr. Isadore Goldstick was the son of William and Sarah Goldstick. He was born in Latvia in 1890. He graduated with a Ph.D. from the University of Toronto in the Department of Pedagogy in 1928. He married Anna Nathanson in December 1917, and they had two daughters, Reva and Esther. The family lived in London, Ontario. He spent many years teaching at the secondary school level and later became a professor at the University of Western Ontario. He was the author of 8 German and French texts that were used in Canadian schools.
Scope and Content
Portrait of Isadore Goldstick as a young man.
Notes
The image is an albumen print glued on a mat board.
Subjects
Authors
Immigrants--Canada
Teachers
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Related Material
There is a fonds for the Isadore Goldstick family at the Ottawa Jewish Archives.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1978-10-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 4760
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
4760
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1904
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Notes
For details, please see accession record.
Name Access
Alexandroff, Boris
West Toronto
Junction
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1989-3-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1228
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1228
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[190-?]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Admin History/Bio
Mark Geldzaeler was born in 1862 in Galicia, probably Kolbuszowa, and died in Toronto in 1932. His wife Yetta [Shumer] (1870-1952) had immigrated to Toronto from Stanislau with her parents, Louis (Leib) and Chava Shumer, in the mid-1880s. Mark and Yetta were married in Toronto on February 2, 1890.
Prior to his arrival in Toronto, Mark Geldzaeler had been a religious scholar and teacher in the old country. In 1892, he became the Assistant Chazan at Holy Blossom synagogue on Bond Street. This official title notwithstanding, he was also the synagogue's shamus [caretaker], religious school teacher, and bar mitzvah tutor. He lived with his family just behind the synagogue, in a property owned by the synagogue, before eventually moving to a house on Walmer Road.
The family had six children: Bernard (1891-1974) m. Hortense; Rose (1892-1966) m. Samuel Aaron Harris; Rachel (1897-?) m Isidore Ruskin; Solly (1899-1902); Alfred ("Alfie") Benjamin (1901-1918) d. of influenza during the epidemic; and Freda Frances (1907-2002) m. Simon Ramm.
Scope and Content
Item is a studio portrait of Mark Geldzaeler.
Notes
Photo by A. Barrett, 324 Yonge St., Toronto.
Name Access
Geldzaeler, Mark
Holy Blossom Temple (Toronto, Ont.)
Subjects
Cantors (Judaism)
Immigrants--Canada
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1977-2-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1229
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1229
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[190-?]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Admin History/Bio
Yetta Shumer Geldzaeler (1870-1952) was born in Stanislau to Leib and Chava Shumer. She immigrated to Toronto with her parents in the mid-1880s. In 1890 she married Mark Geldzaeler in Toronto. They had six children: Bernard (1891-1974) m. Hortense; Rose (1892-1966) m. Samuel Aaron Harris; Rachel (1897-?) m Isidore Ruskin; Solly (1899-1902); Alfred ("Alfie") Benjamin (1901-1918) d. of influenza during the epidemic; and Freda Frances (1907-2002) m. Simon Ramm.
Scope and Content
Item is a studio portrait of Yetta Shumer Geldzaeler.
Notes
Photo by A. Barrett, 324 Yonge St., Toronto.
Name Access
Geldzaeler, Yetta Shumer
Gledzaeler, Mrs. Mark
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1977-2-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 520
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
520
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1890]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 25 x 20 cm
Scope and Content
Item is photograph of David Papernick, father of Henry Papernick. David came to Canada in 1884.
Notes
No negative.
Name Access
Papernick, David
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
Acquired 22 June 2005.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 2529
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
2529
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[1908 or 1909]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Admin History/Bio
Abraham Walerstein came from Europe alone. This photo was taken to send back to his family.
Notes
Photo by Wilfrid Joron, 69 St. Lawrence St., Montreal.
Name Access
Walerstein, Abraham
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Montréal (Québec)
Accession Number
1981-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1612
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1612
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1925
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Notes
Photo by Modern Studio.
Name Access
Ukrainian Immigrants' Society of Toronto
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Societies
Ukrainians--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Toronto Islands (Ont.)
Accession Number
1978-12-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
9
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1925-1989
Physical Description
31.8 m of textual records
319 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Immigrant Aid Society of Canada was established in 1920 by the newly-formed Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC). A Toronto branch was established in Toronto in a storefront office on Spadina Avenue, but the organization was rudimentary, and as the enthusiasm that spurred the founding of CJC died out, JIAS soon faltered. Then in 1922 it was taken over and reactivated under the cooperative support of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto, B'nai B'rith and the Council of Jewish Women. JIAS was legally incorporated on 30 August 1922. It also operated under the moniker of the Emergency Jewish Immigrant Aid Committee, and it changed its name to Jewish Immigrant Aid Services in 1954.
Charged with organizing emergency relief for European Jews in distress, JIAS became the central agency of the Jewish community to facilitate the lawful entry of Jewish immigrants into Canada, and provided them with welfare services, transportation, and assistance with accommodation and employment after their arrival. In addition, JIAS offered consultation services for sponsors of potential immigrants, ran a competitive foreign remittance service, and campaigned to counter the activities of unscrupulous steamboat agents, lawyers and influence peddlers, or “shtadlanim,” who often victimized immigrants and sponsors alike.
In conjunction with similar efforts by the CJC, JIAS was also actively engaged in negotiating for the increased admission of Jewish immigrants to Canada. In 1923, the federal government instituted a permit-based immigration program and JIAS competed with travel agents and solicitors in the private sector for these limited quota permits. After combating the anti-immigration policies of the Depression era, the outbreak of war in 1939 virtually closed the already limited avenues for immigration.
JIAS Canada was organized into a National Office in Montreal and regional offices in Winnipeg (Western Region), Toronto (Central Region) and Halifax (Eastern Region). The Central Region covered Ontario, and established a full-time head office in 1935 at 399 Spadina Avenue in Toronto (hence the Central Region was sometimes called simply the Toronto Office). The office later moved to 265 Spadina Avenue. JIAS Toronto’s board of directors met on a regular basis at different locations in Toronto, including 206 Beverley Street and in the Talmud Torah building at 9 Brunswick Avenue. The first JIAS Toronto board included notable Toronto residents such as Henry Dworkin, Mrs. Draiman, Mr. Kronick, Dr. Brodey and Mrs. Willinsky. The role of the board was to oversee the operations of the Central Region. It rendered decisions on issues relating to finances, procedures and policies, negotiations with the federal Immigration Branch, as well as individual cases that required their attention.
General meetings of the Central Region membership were held annually. The 1943 JIAS constitution states that regional annual meetings were to be held for “receiving and considering reports,” holding nominations and elections for the executive, and discussing JIAS’s program and policies.
In the post-war era, JIAS shifted its focus to renewed efforts on behalf of individual claimants and community support, while the focus for lobbying for a reversal of Canada's immigration policy fell increasingly under the jurisdiction of the CJC. A boom in immigration between 1947 and 1952 saw the arrival of large numbers of Jewish immigrants to all parts of Canada and the Toronto Office of JIAS renewed its efforts to meet the needs of this new influx. Major world events also sparked other waves of immigration from Hungary, Czechoslovakia, North Africa and Russia, to which JIAS responded in turn. JIAS worked in conjunction with other immigrant aid societies such as HIAS, the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, in the United States, to facilitate immigration to the United States, and later to Israel, where many of the immigrants and refugees coming to Canada had family and ultimately settled.
Custodial History
Custody of these records was transferred to the Ontario Jewish Archives by JIAS in 1983, as preparations were under way for the move to a new facility in North York. Much of the material was in four-cubic-foot boxes and in file cabinets.
The accession was divided into three sections: files which were at the JIAS office and had been retained in their original order; files which had been retrieved from a flood in the basement of 152 Beverley St. and consequently had been thrown into dry boxes without regard to order; files discovered in the furnace rooms at 150 and 152 Beverley St., intact but covered in coal dust. The bulk of the records were stored off-site, with dirty files being isolated from the rest.
The dust-covered materials were cleaned at an off-site location, placed in temporary boxes and transferred to the Archives and restored, as far as was possible, to their original order.
Clips were removed and replaced as appropriate with archivally acceptable ones. All materials were transferred to acid-free folders and boxes.
Scope and Content
Fonds contains the records of the Toronto Office (Central region) of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Canada. The fonds consists primarily of textual records: minutes, correspondence, financial records, reports, immigration files, naturalization case files, social service case files and the records of attempts to trace missing individuals. There are also photographs of special events, speakers and arriving immigrants.
The fonds represents an important resource for the study of Canadian Jewry, especially when taken in conjunction with the JIAS National Office records at the Canadian Jewish Congress National Archives in Montreal, and those of the Western Office at the Library and Archives of Canada. It documents the means by which a particular Canadian ethnic community has dealt with the problems of rescue, settlement and government relations. These records also offer insight into the relationship between the Toronto Office and the other branches of JIAS, and invite comparison with similar agencies in the United States, as well as those of other ethnic groups in Canada.
The material collected includes information about the countries of origin, transportation routes, settlement and employment patterns of Jewish immigrants to Canada in the twentieth century. The documents also touch upon important related issues such as advocacy, sponsorship, admission processes, health and social problems.
These records cover several waves of immigration following the Second World War: Holocaust survivors in the late 1940s, Sephardic (North African) and Hungarian Jews in the 1950s, Russian and Czechoslovakian Jews in the 1960s, and additional Russians in the 1970s.
The records also contain significant information for those researchers looking to conduct genealogical research into Jewish immigrants and their descendents.
The fonds has been arranged with one sous-fonds, which contains the records of the National JIAS office in Montreal. In total there are 17 series. The Toronto office (main fonds) series are: 1. Board of Directors and Executive Committee Minutes; 2. Annual meeting proceedings; 3. Reports; 4. Legal ; 5. Administration; 6. JIAS Committees; 7. External committees; 8. Financial ; 9. Arrivals; 10. Immigration case files; 11. Social service assistance case files; 12. Photographs; 13. Miscellaneous. The National Office sous-fonds is divided into the following series: 1. National executive meeting minutes; 2. National annual meeting proceedings; 3. National annual reports; 4. Publications; and Photographs.
Notes
Physical description note: Physical extent is based on fully processed records. Additional accessions are not included (see Related Material note below).
Associated material note: The CJC National Archive, in Montreal, has additional JIAS records from 1920-1989 including 275 m of textual records and graphic materials (3250 photos): collection number I0037; alpha-numeric designation MA 4. The National Archives of Canada, Manitoba branch, in Winnipeg, has Jewish Historical Society of Western Canada JIAS textual records from 1923-1950 on 18 microfilm reels: Former archival reference number MG28-V114 (no replacement listed). The originals of these records are maintained by the Jewish Historical Society of Western Canada.
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
Other OJA records relating to JIAS may be found in the following accessions: 1979-9-5; 1988-5-2; 1991-10-5; 2006-3-11.
Creator
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto
Accession Number
1983-8-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Sous-fonds
ID
Fonds 9-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Sous-fonds
Fonds
9-1
Material Format
textual record
Date
1926-1982
Physical Description
51 cm of textual records
14 photographs : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Immigrant Aid Society of Canada was organized into a national office in Montreal and regional offices in Winnipeg (Western Region), Toronto (Central Region) and Halifax (Eastern Region). The national office was responsible for directing and managing all the affairs of the organization, including defining national and international policy; administration of regional offices; national budget; fundraising; external relations with other organizations, such as the United Jewish Relief Agencies (UJRA) and Jewish Family & Child Services (JF&CS); and publicity. It also organized the annual meeting, special events and conventions.
Membership in JIAS was open to individuals, organizations or companies who paid an annual fee. General meetings of the membership were held at least once every two years, where reports were presented and considered, nominations and elections held for national officers and the national executive committee, policies, programs and problems discussed, and decisions taken.
The National Executive Committee of JIAS was composed of the following members: national president; three vice-presidents (the presidents of the Western, Central and Eastern regions), with the addition in the 1950s of a vice-president at large; three regional treasurers, eventually reduced to one national treasurer; secretary; and twelve members comprising four representatives from each region. In 1929 the ‘executive secretary’ position was renamed ‘executive director.’ According to the 1943 constitution, the executive was required to hold meetings at least three times a year, in alternate cities. In 1954 this was amended to twice a year.
During the early stages of JIAS's operations, it had to face the difficulty of being overstretched financially, as it sought to respond to and to change the often oppressive living conditions of new immigrants and the situation of those held in federal detention centres. The organization’s principled approach to immigrant welfare won JIAS much of its early success, as it became the preferred contact for government officials who had formerly dealt with numerous independent agencies, many of which had profited from the exploitation of desperate immigrants. This situation also profited the government, however, as the responsibility for establishing the priority of applications reverted increasingly to JIAS as it had to limit its appeals by the quotas imposed by the federal government.
JIAS was one of the founding organizations responsible for the establishment of the Canadian Council for Refugees (CCR) in 1978, which has since operated as a non-profit umbrella organization to coordinate the efforts of immigrant and refugee advocacy groups. JIAS continues to operate offices across Canada in Calgary, Edmonton, Halifax, Hamilton, London, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Vancouver, Windsor and Winnipeg. The JIAS National Office moved from Montreal to Toronto in 1989, with the appointment of Susan Davis to National Director, and is now located at 4580 Dufferin St., Suite 306, Toronto, Ontario.
Scope and Content
Sous-fonds consists of National Office records retained by the Toronto JIAS office as reference copies. Records include meeting minutes, speeches and reports from annual meetings, and the published annual reports produced from the annual meetings. The sous-fonds covers the years 1926 to 1982 and is divided into the following series: 1. National Executive meeting minutes; 2. National annual meeting proceedings; 3. National annual reports; 4. Publications; and 5. Photographs.
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Canada (creator)
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
1991-1-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1991-1-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
12 cm of mainly textual material
Date
1923-1971
Scope and Content
Accession consists of materials created by Anshel Wise which document his family and travel business. It consists of genealogical information on his family, two ledgers from his business which document transactions and shipping dates, one scribbler which includes information on steamship sailings, one blank letterhead with his company's logo, and a photograph of his 50th wedding anniversary.
Administrative History
Anshel Wise emigrated from Poland in 1910 and established his home in Toronto. He opened up a cigar store on Dundas street, which later turned into a travel agency called A. Wise Travel Bureau.
During the course of his career, Anshel helped bring in hundreds of Jews from Europe, primarily Poland using the shipping lines. He spoke many languages and was able to assist the community by providing advice and services in this area. Later in his career after the establishment of the welfare state, he began helping residents of the St. John's Ward by providing advice, finding the required documents that they needed and helping them apply for retirement benefits.
Descriptive Notes
Immigration.
Travel Business.
A. Wise Travel Bureau.
Subjects
Business
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Wise, Anshel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1981-4-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1981-4-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
2 folders of textual records
Date
1928-1929
Scope and Content
Accession consists of David Waserman's Polish passport and his Canadian Immigration Identification Card stamped at Halifax upon his arrival on the Megantic, as well as two copies of his birth certificate and a Polish police clearance document and an army service book. there is also a Polish passport for Syma Nachsztern and her Immigration identification card stamped upon arrival on the S.S. United States.
MG_RG
MG1
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Waserman, David
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-12-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-12-5
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 photograph : b&w ; 5 x 4 cm
Date
1921
Scope and Content
Accession consists of documents and a passport photograph pertaining to the immigration of Joseph Kalman Wainryb (Wajnryb) age 17 from Warsaw, Poland to Toronto in 1921.These include his passport, legal and medical certificates, and ship's cabin and landing cards.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Wainryb, Joseph Kalman
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1983-1-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1983-1-10
Material Format
sound recording
textual record
Physical Description
2 audio cassettes
1 folder of textual records
Date
1977
Scope and Content
Accession consists of an interview and corresponding transcript, with Jack Shindman, past-president of JIAS, on immigration and his family.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Shindman, Jack
Drutz, Danny
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Rovno, Ukraine
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
2 May 1976
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one booklet for the annual meeting of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Canada, Central Region held at Temple Sinai with guest speaker Mr. Gaynor Jacobson, Executive Vice-President of H.I.A.S.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services (Toronto, Ont.)
Jacobson, Gaynor
Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-29
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-29
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1911
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one original and one photocopy of Joe Krapivka's naturalization certificate. According to the certificate, Joe immigrated from Russia and became a restaurant keeper in Toronto.
MG_RG
MG1 A1
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Restaurants
Name Access
Krapivka, Joe
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-3-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-3-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1980
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a report prepared by JIAS Canada detailing the situation of recent immigrant arrivals to various small communities in Ontario. The communities discussed are Cambridge, Hamilton, Kitchener, London, Ottawa, St. Catharines and Windsor.
Custodial History
The custodial history for this item is unknown. The accession number has been assigned by the assistant archivist.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Communities
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Cambridge (Ont.)
Hamilton (Ont.)
Kitchener (Ont.)
London (Ont.)
Ottawa (Ont.)
St. Catharines (Ont.)
Windsor (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-16
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-16
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
45 cm of textual records
Date
1970-1997
Scope and Content
This accession consists of records related to Rolf Lederer's role with the Canadian Jewish Congress' Chaplaincy Services Committee, JIAS, and Congregation B'nai Torah. The records include meeting minutes and agendas, correspondence, reports, financial records, bulletins, invitations, and pamphlets, In addition, there is one document that lists the founders of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Toronto.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Rolf Lederer until they were donated to the Archives on 22 November 2010.
Administrative History
Dr. Rolf Lederer was born in Hamburg, Germany in 1934. His family immigrated to South Africa in 1936 and Rolf remained there until 1961, earning his medical degree from Cape Town University. After completing his psychiatric training in Edinburgh and Boston, Rolf settled in Toronto in 1968. There he set up private practice as a General Psychiatrist.
After moving to Toronto, Rolf became actively involved in the Jewish community and served on a number of committees. He was on both the local and national board of directors of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society (JIAS) as well as a number of JIAS sub-committees, including the South African Jewish Association of Canada (SAJAC), the Local Case File Committee and the Management Committee.
From 1985 to 1988 Rolf was chairman of the Canadian Jewish Congress’s (CJC) Chaplaincy Services Committee. He was also a member of other CJC committees; including, the Jewish Cultural Council and the Joint Adult Education Committee. In addition, Rolf co-founded the Jewish Genealogical Society (JGS) in 1985 and served as the society’s president from 1987 to 1991. Finally, he was an active member of B’nai Torah Congregation, serving as secretary and first vice-president in the early 1980s
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Lederer, Rolf, 1934-
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Samuel Posluns fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 70
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Samuel Posluns fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
70
Material Format
cartographic material
graphic material
textual record
Date
1925-1984
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
91 photographs : b&w ; 25 x 20 cm or smaller
1 map : 46 x 65 cm
Admin History/Bio
Samuel Posluns (1910-1994) was born in Toronto to Abraham Isaac Poslaniec (1870-1922) and Sheindel Saltzman (1872-1960). He had three brothers and three sisters: Joseph, Louis, Abe, Gertrude Miriam, Anne, and Sarah. His father Abraham established the family run clothing firm Superior Cloak Company in 1916. In 1934, it was bankrupted and closed after a lengthy strike. In 1936, Samuel opened his own business, Popular Cloak Company. In 1967, the Posluns family purchased Tip Top Tailors, in partnership with entrepreneur Jimmy Kay. A year later they incorporated their new venture under the name of Dylex as a holding company for the Tip Top chain of stores.
During the Second World War, Samuel Posluns served as a member of the Air Force reserves. After the war, he was elected president of the United Jewish Welfare Fund in 1947. That same year, in collaboration with the Canadian Jewish Congress and the Jewish Labour Committee, Posluns helped lead the Tailor Project along with Max E. Enkin, which was aimed at helping Jewish displaced persons immigrate to Canada by securing them employment as tailors. A commited advocate for Jewish Education, Posluns also served as the first president and founding chair of the Board of Jewish Education (BJE) in 1949. He remained Honorary President for life and continued to attend meetings until health problems held back his participation in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Posluns was also a founding board member of the North York General Hospital.
Samuel Posluns died in Toronto in 1994.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records related to the Posluns family and their clothing business, Popular Cloak Company. The records include correspondence, financial records, periodicals and newsletters, photographs, certificates and personal identification. The fonds also includes textual documents and photos documenting Samuel Posluns' involvement in the Tailor Project.
Name Access
Enkin, Max E.
Popular Cloak Company
Superior Cloak Company
Canadian Jewish Congress
Jewish Labour Committee
Posluns, Samuel, 1910-1994
Subjects
Clothing trade
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Immigrants--Canada
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Creator
Posluns, Samuel, 1910-1994
Accession Number
1997-7/6
2004-5/79
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Al Gilbert portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 37; Series 4; Item 15
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Al Gilbert portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
37
Series
4
Item
15
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1970]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 11 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Nat Hennick was born in Poland to Molly and William Hennick. The family immigrated to Canada shortly after his birth. Nathan Hennick was a member of Beth Tzedec Synagogue.
Scope and Content
Photograph of Mr. Nat Hennick.
Name Access
Hennick, Nat
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Related Material
see Photo #51 for Irving Hennick
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Al Gilbert portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 37; Series 4; Item 29
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Al Gilbert portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
37
Series
4
Item
29
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1967]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Nathan Silver was born in 1915 in Poland to Blima and Shul Silver. He married Lily Ann Cooper and they had four children: Shul David, Deborah Ruth, Joseph Baruch, and Bonnie Suzanne. After coming to Canada, he served as a gunner in an artillery division during the Second World War. His occupation was that of a builder and developer and he played an active role within the Toronto Jewish community, operating as National Chairman of the Zionist Revisionist Organization of Canada, executive member of the United Zionist Congress and was a member of the World Executive Zionist Revisionist Movement.
Scope and Content
Photograph of Nathan Silver taken at Al Gilbert's portrait studio.
Name Access
Silver, Nathan
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Revisionist Zionists
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Miscellaneous collection series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 37; Series 9; Item 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Miscellaneous collection series
Level
Item
Fonds
37
Series
9
Item
3
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca 1915]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 11 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Tiana Koffler [née. Reinhorn] was born in Romania, but moved to Saskatchewan with her family while still a baby. She attended the University of Saskatchewan for liberal arts and married Leon Koffler in 1922. Together they parented their only child, Murray Koffler.
Scope and Content
Photograph of a sixteen year old Tiana Reinhorn Koffler.
Name Access
Koffler, Ernestiana (Mrs. Leon)
Koffler's drugstore
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Portraits
Teenagers
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Related Material
see also photographs: 37-S4-3-item-2, 37-S4-3-item-3, 37-S4-3-item-9, 37-S4-3-item-20
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Miscellaneous collection series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 37; Series 9; Item 5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Miscellaneous collection series
Level
Item
Fonds
37
Series
9
Item
5
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1935]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 11 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Elias Pullan was born in Telz, Province of Kovno, Lithuania in 1865. He came to Canada in 1885 and started a waste paper and scrap business called E. Pullan Limited. He married Bertha Helner in 1890 and together they had 10 children named: Harry, Joe, Emanuel, Gordon, Martha, Dorothy, Bessie, Rita, Jennie and Helen. Elias Pullan was the president of the Kehilla in Toronto and President, Treasurer and Parnass of Goel Tzedec Synagogue. He was also the founder and first President of the Simcoe St. Talmud Torah.
Scope and Content
Image is of Elias Pullan.
Name Access
E. Pullan Limited
Pullan, Elias
Subjects
Businesspeople
Immigrants--Canada
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Miscellaneous collection series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 37; Series 9; Item 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Miscellaneous collection series
Level
Item
Fonds
37
Series
9
Item
4
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1914
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 11 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Leon Koffler was born in Romania. He moved to Canada and settled in the Toronto area at the age of fifteen with his mother and his three sisters. Leon Koffler worked for Nelson's when he first moved to Canada as a fruit peddler. He graduated from the Ontario College of Pharmacy in 1921 and two years later opened his first pharmacy on College Street. Leon lived in the apartment above his store with his wife Tiana [née. Reinhorn] and their son Murray.
Scope and Content
Photograph is of Leon Koffler seated in a horse-drawn buggy, peddling fruit and vegetables at age 18.
The buggy has a Nelson's sign on it and the address for 460 Yonge Street.
Name Access
Koffler, Leon
Nelson's
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Peddlers
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Related Material
see also photographs: 37-S4-3-item-2, 37-S4-3-item-3, 37-S4-3-item-9, 37-S4-3-item-15
Places
Yonge Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dorothy Dworkin fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 10; Item 32
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dorothy Dworkin fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
10
Item
32
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1925]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 15 x 10 cm
Admin History/Bio
Henry (Harry) Dworkin, husband of Dorothy (Goldstick) Dworkin, was born in 1886 in Russia and came to Canada in 1905. In the early years, Henry dispersed food to the hungry and helped people from Poland, Rumania, and Latvia after they settled in Canada. Henry opened E. & H. Dworkin Steamship and Bankers in 1917 with his brother Edward. The business continued as Dworkin Travel at 525 Dundas West. Dworkin Travel was the oldest travel agency in Toronto which also carried a wholesale tobacco business at the rear. Henry was also the founder of the Labour Lyceum. Henry and Dorothy had one daughter, Ellen, whose nickname was Honey. He died in an auto accident in 1928 and 20,000 people attended the funeral.
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of Mr. Henry (Harry) Dworkin.
Name Access
Dworkin, Harry
Dworkin, Henry
Subjects
Businesspeople
Immigrants--Canada
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
2005-4-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rebecca Kamarner fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 11
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rebecca Kamarner fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
11
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
[ca.1900]-[196-?]
Physical Description
4.5 cm of textual records
24 photographs : b&w and sepia ; 21 x 13 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Rebecca Kamarner (née Huenstein) (1882-1975) was born in Russia and lived there until her early adulthood. She married Harry Kamarner (1877- 1962) in 1902 and immigrated to Toronto around 1904. Mrs. Chava Kamarner (1847-1929), possibly Harry’s mother, may have immigrated at a later date and lived with the family in Canada. Rebecca and Harry had three children: Bessie (b. 1903), Anne (b. 1906?), and Jack (1907?-1986). Harry and Rebecca lived on 35 Bellevue Avenue in 1925 and later resided at 72 Barton Street.
From the date of her arrival as an immigrant to Canada, Mrs. Kamarner was involved in charitable work through such organizations as The Hebrew Women’s Convalescent Home established in 1936 (of which she was the President and founder), The Hebrew Maternity Aid Society, and The Women’s Auxiliary Toronto Hebrew Free School. During the First and Second World Wars she was actively involved in social aid and the sponsorship of orphans, and she worked as a nurse during the influenza pandemic that began in 1918 and had its greatest effect on the Jewish community in Toronto in 1919 and 1920. She was one of the earliest members of the Toronto Hadassah-Wizo (Schamira Levine chapter) and was also actively involved in fundraising for the Women’s Auxiliary of The New Mount Sinai Hospital, of which she was listed as a charter member. She served on the Board of Directors of The Jewish Home for the Aged and was a preeminent name in the promotion of convalescent care and social advocacy for the disadvantaged throughout her lifetime.
Harry, Nathan "Nutta" (d. 1956), and Louis Kamarnar were men’s clothing and furnishings retailers and owned the Merchant’s Clothing Co. store on 131 Queen Street West. Harry, his son Jack, and his son-in-law Harry Granger, were also affiliated with the Judean Knights of Pythias, a fraternal order.
Bessie Kamarner married Sam Robins (b.1893) in 1922 and they lived together at 273 Queen Street East. Anne Kamarner was married to Harry Graner (d. 1986) in 1931. Jack Kamarner lived in Toronto and married Jeanne (née Rubin). They had two daughters, Ann and Nancy.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of family photographs, a scrapbook, and other textual records, both of a personal nature and those relating to the volunteer work done by Rebecca Kamarner. These records document her community social work, her affiliation with the Women’s Auxiliary and her fundraising efforts for the Hebrew Women’s Convalescent Home, later the Mount Sinai Convalescent Home, in Toronto.
Name Access
Kamarner, Rebecca, 1882-1975
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Volunteers
Related Material
see also clipping, re. photo #2503, from accession 1978-6-4
Arrangement
The fonds has been arranged in five files: the first file is of family photographs; the second contains one passport; the third contains institutional programmes; the fourth is of personal invitations and correspondence; and, the fifth file contains Rebecca Kamarner's scrapbook and clippings from that scrapbook. These are all kept together in one box and each file is housed in a separate folder.
Creator
Kamarner, Rebecca, 1882-1975
Places
Russia
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1986-5-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Betty Goldstick Lindgren fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 45; Item 37
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Betty Goldstick Lindgren fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
45
Item
37
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1910
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 20 x 12 cm on mat 25 x 16 cm
Admin History/Bio
Maurice Goldstick was the fifth child of Sarah and Wolf Goldstick. He was born in Latvia and came to Canada with his family in 1904. He married Regina (Blum) and they had two chlidren, Sylvia and Wilfred. He passed away on August 23rd. 1960. He ran E & M Wrecking Building Company with his brother Edward.
Scope and Content
Portrait of Maurice Goldstick taken at his graduation from university. The photograph was taken by Farmer Brothers Ltd. studio in Toronto.
Subjects
Businesspeople
Immigrants--Canada
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1978-10-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Paul Edell fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Paul Edell fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
5
Material Format
textual record
Date
[191-]-1978
Physical Description
13 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
Paul Edell (1882-1966) was the owner of a Toronto printing business and a prominent member of Shomrai Shabbos Congregation.
Edell was born in Poland and emigrated to Toronto in 1910. He married Molly Weinreb in 1915 and they had 5 children: David, Sol, Ethel, Connie and Sara. When he arrived in Canada he found work as a clerk and salesman. He later apprenticed as a printer and in 1921, he opened his own business, Royal Printing, at 113 Elizabeth Street in Toronto. Edell continued to work at the business until his retirement in the 1960s. His customers included many Jewish businesses, institutions and organizations. Edell was also involved in a number of community activities, mostly centered around religious matters. He served as president of Shomrai Shabbos Congregation for many year and was also involved in the maintenance of the Jones Avenue cemetery. He passed away in 1966.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of records related to Paul Edell's business and community activities. Included is business and synagogue correspondence, property documents, certificates and a ledger book.
Name Access
Edell, Paul, 1882-1966
Royal Printing
Shomrai Shabbos
Subjects
Businesspeople
Immigrants--Canada
Synagogues
Physical Condition
Ledger book is in poor condition and requires conservation work.
Related Material
For records related to Paul Edell's son, please see the Solomon Edell fonds 4.
For further records on the Edell and Weinreb families, see accession 2012-10-9.
Creator
Edell, Paul, 1882-
Accession Number
2002-12-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
J. Irving Oelbaum fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 24
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
J. Irving Oelbaum fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
24
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Date
[189-]-1966
Physical Description
15 cm of textual records (2 vol.)
63 photographs (19 negatives)
1 artifact
Admin History/Bio
Julius Irving (J. I.) Oelbaum (1899-1966) was a dedicated community leader, whose tireless work with fraternal, educational and philanthropic organizations included an extensive list of Toronto's prominent Jewish organizations. He was born in New York City on 11 October, 1899 to Moishe and Miriam (nee Jacoby) Oelbaum. He had four brothers, Charles, Sidney, Abraham (Babe) and Cuppel (Jack). In 1906, the family moved to Toronto, where Oelbaum received his education. In 1923, he married Sadie (nee Margulies) and had two daughters, Dorothy Koven and Helen Simpson. Oelbaum was a social worker by profession, but in 1932, he went into business with his brothers and became president of the Acme Paper Products Company Limited.
J. I. Oelbaum devoted a lifetime to Jewish communal service, beginning in 1923, when he was hired as the executive director of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto, a post which he retained for five years. Incredibly, during the same period he was also the executive director of the Toronto Hebrew Free Loan Association and the Toronto Hebrew Free School. Oelbaum held executive lay leadership positions with numerous organizations including: District Grand Lodge No. 1, B'nai Brith, United Jewish Welfare Fund, Jewish Family Welfare Bureau, Yeshiva Torath Chaim, Zionist Organization of Canada, Canadian Jewish Congress Central Region, Joint Public Relations Committee, Jewish Immigrant Aid Society of Canada, Jewish Camp Council of Toronto, United Jewish Refugee and War Relief Agencies, Toronto Jewish Old Folks' Home, Mount Sinai Hospital, Canadian Conference of Christians and Jews, Congregation Goel Tzedec, and the Y.M.H.A.
In 1954, Oelbaum was honoured at a Jewish National Fund Negev dinner, which over 1400 people attended. He also received the Queen's Coronation Medal in 1952 and the Canadian Council of Christian and Jews Human Relations award in 1953. J. Irving Oelbaum died on 2 October 1966 after a lengthy illness.
Custodial History
The records in accession 1985-5-15 were in the possession of Oelbaum's daughters, Helen Simpson and the late Dorothy Koven, before they were donated to the Archives on May 29, 1985. The photograph from accession 2004-5-31 was donated to the Archives by Oelbaum's niece, Annette Cohen.
Scope and Content
This fonds consists of records documenting J. I. Oelbaum's family and his work with Toronto Jewish organizations. The records include photographs, correspondence, event booklets and invitations, newsclippings, Oelbaum's certificate of marriage and wedding invitation, a miniature silver shovel from the turning of the sod ceremony at Baycrest Hospital, and two scrapbooks.
The photographs include portraits of Oelbaum as well as his parents, and snapshots of famous individuals attending events in Toronto, such as David Ben Gurion, Eleanor Roosevelt, Richard Nixon and Bob Hope.
Notes
A large amount of the loose newsclippings were removed from the fonds, photocopied and added to the J. I. Oelbaum clipping file.
Name Access
Oelbaum, J. Irving, 1899-1966
Subjects
Businesspeople
Immigrants--Canada
Philanthropists
Creator
Oelbaum, J. Irving, 1899-1966
Accession Number
1985-5-15
2004-5-31
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
William Stern fonds
Toronto Jewish community photographs series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 33; Series 4; Item 18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
William Stern fonds
Toronto Jewish community photographs series
Level
Item
Fonds
33
Series
4
Item
18
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1959]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 26 x 21 cm
Admin History/Bio
Emil Gartner (1914-1960) was born in Vienna in 1914 and came to Canada in 1938, just before the outbreak of the Second World War. In 1939, he became the conductor of the Toronto Jewish Folk Choir. He is considered by many to be the most influential and dynamic conductor in the choir's history. Under his leadership, the choir became more accomplished and increased in size. As a result, its repertoire increased considerably to include Canadian folk songs, and eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth-century works, in addition to the Yiddish and Hebrew folk songs and operettas that they had performed in the past. During Gartner's tenure the choir also performed with many world-renowned guests and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra often assisted the choir. Fagel Freeman Gartner, the director's wife, was the choir's accompanist.
Gartner was also a faculty member at the Hamburg Conservatory of Music in Toronto and remained conductor of the Toronto Jewish Folk Choir until 1959, a year before his sudden death in an automobile crash in 1960.
Scope and Content
This item is a portrait of Emil Gartner, former conductor of the Toronto Jewish Folk Choir.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Musicians
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Accession Number
2004-5-96
Source
Archival Descriptions
Name
Fred Schaeffer
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
11 July 1980
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Fred Schaeffer
Number
AC 024
Subject
Communities
Immigrants--Canada
Interview Date
11 July 1980
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Stephen Speisman
Total Running Time
Side 1: 31 minutes
Side 2: 9 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Fred Schaeffer's wife, Beverley, grew up in Kirkland Lake, Ontario. Beverley's grandfather, Hyman Kaplan, emigrated from Vilna, Lithuania in 1907, and after a few years in New York, moved to Toronto. Shortly afterwards he became the first Jew to settle in Kirkland Lake in 1914.
In the 1920s the Jewish community in Kirkland Lake built a permanent synagogue, and acquired the Aron Kodesh of Eastern European design, its lamps, railings, pews and reader’s desk, from the disbanded Ukrainishe Shul in Montreal. In the 1970s the Kirkland Lake Synagogue disbanded and Fred and Beverly Schaeffer acquired the Aron Kodesh, all of its furnishings, the Ner Tamid and the Parochet. They generously donated these Jewish artifacts to Beth Tikvah Synagogue, Toronto, in 1988, in memory of Isadore Kaplan, father of Beverly Schaeffer and Erich Schaeffer, father of Fred Schaeffer.
Fred, married Beverley in Toronto. Like many children from Kirkland Lake, Beverley had moved to the city to attend university. Fred and Beverley are keen collectors of Canadian art. He is a retired civil engineer and a former chairman of the Canadian art historical committee at the AGO.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Schaeffer, Fred
Geographic Access
Krugerdorf, Ont.
Timmins, Ont.
Kirkland Lake, Ont.
Swastika, Ont.
Ansonville, Ont.
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
AC 024: Side A
0.14: Fred discusses the first Jews to settle in Northern Ontario in the area around Krugerdorf/Engelhart. He mentions Edith Atkinson (nee Martin) as a good primary source of information. Edith’s father, a Russian Jew who came to Canada via Scotland was employed by Temagami and Northern Ontario Railway to bring Russian Jews to work on the railroad.
1.11: Atkinson is related to Atkins and Etkins families.
2.25: Jewish families received land patents in the area of Krugerdorf (north of Engelhart).
2.44: Kurtz family started a hotel in Engelhart in 1908.
3.07: Mentions some of the earliest Jewish settlers. Gurevitch, Korman, Martin, Henerovsky, Purkiss
4.18: Women farmed during the week while the men worked on the railroad. Men came home on weekend.
5.05: Mentions a diary written by Mr. Martin, Edith Atkinson’s father.
5.42: Earliest records in Jewish cemetery in Krugerdorf were 1906. Relates a story involving a canoe accident. Tells a brief history of the cemetery.
8.00: Railway started to develop in 1908/9 with the opening of the mines in Timmins. Many Jews followed the railroad.
8.45: Mentions that the Purkiss family opened a chain of stores in every town that opened.
9.25: Mentions that the Bucavetsky family was well-known in Timmins.
9.58: Jews had settled in Cochrane.
10.16: First Rabbi in Timmins was Shulman.
11.15: Fred discusses early community organizations. One synagogue on a farm in Krugerdorf area. One synagogue in Engelhart that burnt down. Synagogue in Kirkland Lake built in 1926. Minyans were held in Cochrane and Ansonville (1918/19). Timmins synagogue dates back to 1910/12.
17.15: Fred describes Iroquois Falls as an Abitibi company town. Jews who ran businesses lived in nearby Ansonville.
18.02: Fred notes that there were many prominent Jews in Northern Ontario. He names several and describes their positions. (e.g.Dave Korman as Mayor of Engelhart, Rothschild was alderman in Cochrane, Barnie (?) Nasoff was on council and was Reeve of Ansonville, Max Kaplan Kirkland Lake council, Nicky Korman was Mayor).
21.11: Fred relates anecdotes about Roza Brown, the first Jew in Swastika / Kirkland area.
23.36: Fred relates anecdotes about Hyman and Max Kaplan (brothers-in-law) who ran businesses in Kirkland Lake.
25.26: Rabbi Rabinowitch was a long-standing rabbi in Kirkland Lake.
27.26: Discusses the demise /closure of the synagogue in Kirkland Lake. Remained open until 1979. Last Rosh HaShana services were held in 1977.
28.05: Discusses the situation with the Timmins Jewish community.
30.05: Discusses the plight of a poor Jewish family, the Mallins.
AC 024: Side B
0.15: Fred suggests some reference material. “Northland Post” – good source for info about Jewish community in Northern Ontario. “Silverland” – book that describes Kurt’s Hotel. Special edition of a newspaper that published an article on the history of the Jewish community.
1.48: The Jews of the North have themselves as self-sufficient community during the 1920s, 30s and 40s. They were represented in the first Jewish Congress.
3.33: Fred notes that there was a Jewish presence in most towns in Northern Ontario. He suggest that Haileybury may have been the exception due to antisemitic sentiments.
4.10: Mentions a fire in Haileybury in 1916/17 and the Jewish contribution to fire relief.
4.25: Relates an anecdote re. Hyman Kaplan and Haileybury.
5.48: Describes the location of a few small communities (Elk Lake, Charlton)
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Fred Schaeffer and Stephen Speisman discuss some of the earliest synagogues established in Northern Ontario.

In this clip, Fred Schaeffer relates colourful anecdotes about the first Jewish settler in the Swastika-Kirkland area, Roza Brown.

Name
Fanny (Goldhar) Gertzbein
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
2 October 1984
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Fanny (Goldhar) Gertzbein
Number
AC 033
Subject
Charities
Immigrants--Canada
Interview Date
2 October 1984
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Morris Silbert
Total Running Time
AC 033: 27:34 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
Fanny often speaks Yiddish with Morris Silbert providing a translation.
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Conditional access. Researchers must receive permission from the interviewee or his/her heir prior to accessing the interview. Please contact the OJA for more information.
Biography
Fanny (Goldhar) Gurtzbein immigrated from Poland to Toronto in 1903. Fanny lived with her parents and siblings in Toronto's "Ward" district. Although raised in poverty Barney, Fanny's brother went on to become a successful furrier and her mother Tzyerl Goldhar became the organizer of the Mothers and Babes Summer Rest Home.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
Yiddish
English
Name Access
Goldhar, Myer
Goldhar, Tzeryl
Goldhar, Barney
Gurtzbein, Fanny
Geographic Access
St. John's Ward
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\AC 033, Fanny (Goldhar) Gurtzbein\AC 033 transcript.pdf
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Joe and Minna Loewith
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
June 3, 1984
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Joe and Minna Loewith
Number
AC 037
AC 038
Subject
Agriculture
Immigrants--Canada
Interview Date
June 3, 1984
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Morris Silbert
Total Running Time
AC 037 Side 1 31 minutes AC 037 Side 2 31 minutes AC 038 Side 1 8 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Joe and Minna Loewith immigrated to Canada in November 1938 from Sudetenland, Czechoslovakia. They settled on a farm outside of Hamilton, Ontario.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Loewith, Joe
Loewith, Mina
Silbert, Morris
Geographic Access
Hamilton
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\AC 037 and 038 Loewith\AC 037 and 038 transcript.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Minna Loewith recalls the events beginning in the summer through the fall of 1938 that led her family to emigrate from Czechoslovakia to Canada.

In this clip, Minna shares some of her earliest recollections of when she and her family arrived in Canada in November 1938.

In this clip, Joe Loewith explains the conditions for Czech immigration to Canada set by the CPR and how they were met.

Name
Tobie Taback
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
February 23, 1983
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Tobie Taback
Number
AC 136
Subject
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Interview Date
February 23, 1983
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Jack Lipinsky
Total Running Time
34 minutes 58 secons
Conservation
Copied November 2006
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Tobie Taback was the long-time secretary for the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society in Toronto. He retired in 1982.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Society (Toronto, Ont.)
Taback, Tobie
Lipinsky, Jack
Geographic Access
Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Tobie Taback discusses the helplessness faced by JIAS in bringing immigrants out of Europe during the period of Canada's strict "no immigration" policy.

In this clip, Tobie Taback discusses the activities of Jewish Immigrant Aid Society (JIAS) employees during the years 1937-39, the obstacles they faced vis a vis immigrant applications and the "parcels to Russia and Poland" aid program run by JIAS.

Name
Rabbi Elimelech Ittamar
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
May 11, 1976
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Rabbi Elimelech Ittamar
Number
AC 141
Subject
Education
Immigrants--Canada
Rabbis
Synagogues
Zionists
Interview Date
May 11, 1976
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Doris Newman
Total Running Time
Side 1: 46 minutes Side 2: 19 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Rabbi Ittamar was born in Poland. He came to Toronto in 1923. He attended Landsdowne and Ryerson Public Schools in Toronto for one year and then continued his education at a theological seminary in New York which later became Yeshiva University. Throughout his life, Rabbi Ittamar was an ardent Zionist. From 1930 until June 1932, Rabbi Ittamar served as Rabbi of Beth Jacob and Adas Yisroel Synagogues in Hamilton. He then worked as principal of the Seattle Talmud Torah and attended graduate school at the University of Washington for three and a half years. He served for 20 years in Detroit as rabbi and president of Yeshiva. He made Aliyah in 5715 (1955) when he was invited by Chief Rabbi Herzog to become secretary of the Chief Rabbinate. He was married (nee Unger) in 1936 and had 2 children, Tamar and Yehoshua.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Ittamar, Elimelech
Geographic Access
Toronto
Hamilton
Detroit
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\AC 141, Rabbi Elmelech Ittamar\AC 141 notes.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Rabbi Ittamar shares some of his early memories as a boy in Toronto.

While attending Yeshiva in New York, Rabbi Ittamar headed the debating team. In this clip he describes his first English-speaking public presentation while representing the debating team in 1930 at the Jewish People’s Institute in Chicago.

Name
Dora Till
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
May 4, 1983
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Dora Till
Number
AC 151
Subject
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Labor
Labor unions
Women
Occupations
Interview Date
May 4, 1983
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Stephen Speisman
Total Running Time
46 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Dora Till (nee Tobias) was born in New York City in 1896. She came to Toronto in 1900. She married Morris Till in 1918. They had one daughter, Cecile. As a youth, Dora was involved with Herzl Girls and the Boot and Shoe Society. Dora was active in community service and contributed greatly to social service work. She was co-founder and first President for Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home, Vice-President of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society, a board member for the Jewish Family and Child Services, an executive for the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies, Honourary Vice-President of United Jewish Welfare Fund, on the board of Canadian Jewish Congress and past President of the Naomi Chapter of Hadassah-WIZO.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Herzl Girls Boot and Shoe Society, 1920
Mothers and Babes Summer Rest Home
Baycrest Hospital
United Jewish Welfare Fund
Beth Tzedec Synagogue
Timothy Eaton Company
Till, Dora
Geographic Access
Toronto
Bronte
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Dora Till discusses some of the services provided by Hebrew Maternity Aid.

Dora Till was co-founder and first President for Mothers and Babes Summer Rest Home. In this clip, Dora describes the efforts to solicit and fundraise on behalf of the Mothers and Babes Summer Rest Home.

Name
Kalmen Kaplansky
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
September 20, 1985
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Kalmen Kaplansky
Number
AC 109
Subject
Antisemitism
Human rights
Immigrants--Canada
Labor
Labor unions
Refugees--Canada
Interview Date
September 20, 1985
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Phyllis Platnick
Total Running Time
109A: 60 minutes 109B: 6 minutes
Conservation
Not copied. Need 120 minute tape.
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Kalmen was born January 5, 1912 in Poland. He worked in Montreal as a typesetter and linotype operator. He was active in the labour and human rights movements in Canada. Kalmen served as the director of the Jewish Labour Committee in 1945. In collaboration with the Canadian Jewish Congress, the Canadian government and trade unions the Jewish Labour Committee helped Jewish displaced persons immigrate to Canada by securing them employment. Kalman sat on the Refugee Status Advisory Committee for the federal government.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Kaplansky, Kalmen
Platnick, Phyllis
Jewish Labour Committee
Geographic Access
Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Kalmen Kaplansky discusses some of the obstacles to the relocation of displaced Jews to Canada after the Second World War. He describes a tripartite proposal involving consultation and cooperation among trade unions, management and government that enabled the immigration project.

In this clip, Kalmen Kaplansky explains that bribery, corruption and perjury were a way of life after the Second World War. He relates anecdotes as illustration.

Name
Max Enkin
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
April 13, 1986
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Max Enkin
Number
AC 113
AC 114
Subject
Antisemitism
Immigrants--Canada
Labor unions
Nonprofit organizations
Occupations
Refugees--Canada
Interview Date
April 13, 1986
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Phyllis Platnick
Total Running Time
AC113: 19:40 minuets
AC114:
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Max Enkin was founder and a leading member of the Jewish Vocational Service of Toronto. The original purpose of the organization was to help survivors of the Second World War find employment. In 1947, as Associate Administrator and representative for the Men's Clothing sector in Ontario, Max Enkin became involved in The "Tailor Project". The project was designed to identify and select skilled tailors from the DP camps of Europe and help to settle them in Canada.
Max Enkin was awarded the OBE in Recognition of services to Wartime Prices.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Enkin, Max
Platnick, Phyllis
Geographic Access
Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
AC 113
History of Immigration of Skilled Tailors from the Displaced Person Camps after WWII 1946 –
0.07: How the project got started
0.20: Canadian Government in relation to skilled workers in Canada 1946
1.19: Canadian Jewish Congress in relation to DP camps in Europe.
2.45: Canadian Government restricted immigration 1946.
3.11: Canadian Jewish Congress in relation to Garment industry.
4.13: Canadian Government in relation to UNRRA and immigration to Canada (UNRRA: United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration founded 1943 and became part of the UN in 1945).
5.29: JIAS Jewish Immigrant Aid Services.
5.39: Congress and Immigration to Canada.
5.58: Garment industry Union and Immigration to Canada
6.30: McNamara Deputy Minister of Labour from Winnipeg (circa 1946).
7.18: Labor and Management Representatives of the ILGE 1946 (ILGE - International Ladies Garment Workers Union?). Mr. Sam Hirsch of Winnipeg, representative of the Union for Men & Women. Mr. Bernard Shane of Montreal, Executive Director of the ILGE. Mr.? Solomon of Montreal, representative of Manufacturers Union of Montreal. Sam Posluns of Toronto representative of the Women’s Union. Max Enkin of Toronto, representative of the Men’s Union Ontario.
9.05: Beginning of the project by the ILGE to bring Jews from DP camps in Europe to Canada. Trip to London England by the 5 member body of ILGE. Difficulty in gaining clearance papers to gain entry into Germany & Austria.
11.34: C.D Howe Canadian Cabinet Minister serving under McKenzie King Meeting with ILGE in Canada House, London England.
13.20: Enkin meeting with C.D. Howe and question of quota of Jews allowed into Canada.
14.13: Federal Liberal Government, Quebec and Ottawa vis a vis Jewish immigration.
15.5: McKenzie King, Prime Minister and Ernest Lapointe, Member of Parliament/Quebec and immigration of Jews.
15.56: Jewish population, Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 3 largest centers 17.0-19.4: Anti-Semitism in Canada.
End: Rest of tape 19.50 -30.42 inaudible.
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Max Enkin discusses the organizations, government departments and union representatives involved in the development and implementation of the Tailor Project.

In this clip, Max Enkin discusses the Liberal Government

Name
Morris Silbert
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
1986
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Morris Silbert
Number
AC 123
AC 124
Subject
Agriculture
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Communities
Interview Date
1986
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Brooky Robins
Total Running Time
AC123A - 30. minutes AC123B - 31. minutes AC124A - 46. minutes. AC124 Side2 - 44 minutes good
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Morris Silbert was born in 1912 on a farm outside of Hamilton. His parents came from Lithuania. His father arrived in Canada in 1905 and his mother and 3 older siblings joined him in 1906. Morris spent his youth growing up on farms and at age 16 in 1928 his family moved to Hamilton. In his youth, Morris was involved in several Jewish organizations including Young Judea, AZA and Hashomer Hatzair. He was married in 1938. He served in the army in 1943 during the Second World War. Morris was second vice president of the Council of Jewish Organizations, served on the executive, was chairman of the nursery school board and participated on several committees.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Silbert, Morris
Robins, Brooky
Geographic Access
Hamilton
Wentworth
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Morris Silbert shares memories about Jewish peddlers who were welcomed on his family's farm in southern Ontario. He includes names of peddlers with descriptions of their wares and their carts.

In this clip, Morris Silbert shares memories about Jewish peddlers who were welcomed on his family

In this clip, Morris Silbert describes the restructuring of the Hamilton Jewish community as a result of the Depression in the 1930s. He explains how the Council of Jewish Organizations was formed to replace United Hebrew Association.

Name
Dr. Esther Volpe and Ida Siegel
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
January 4, 1971
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Dr. Esther Volpe and Ida Siegel
Number
AC 161
AC 162
Subject
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Nonprofit organizations
Interview Date
January 4, 1971
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Eva Kayfetz and Stephen Spiesman
Total Running Time
AC161 Side 1: 47 minutes AC161 Side 2: 47 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
Toronto Historical Society lecture
Use Restrictions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Esther Volpe (nee Shulman) was born on February 24, ?1898. As a child, she and her family briefly lived in Romington, ON and Havlock, ON. Her family later settled in Toronto. In her youth, she participated in the Herzl Girls' Club. She attended University of Toroonto in the Faculty of Arts. She married Dr. Aaron Volpe in 1921. Esther was involved in several Jewish organizations, including the old Mount Sinai Medical Auxillary, Council of Jewish Women, Hadassah, UJA Appeal, JIAS and BBYO and non-Jewish organizations, including Toronto Local Council of Women. She represented the Jewish community of Toronto on the Wartime Price and Trade Board and helped organize the Ontario Food Council.
Ida Siegel (nee Lewis) (1885-1982) was born 14 February 1885 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In 1894, Ida and her family moved to Toronto. On 14 February 1905, Ida married Isidore Hirsch Siegel. They had six children. An extremely active communal leader, Ida helped found Daughters of Zion in 1899, the Herzl Girls Club in 1904 and Hadassah in 1916. In the mid-1920s, Ida established The Mothers' and Babes' Rest Home,a camp for poor women with young children. She helped organize the first free Jewish dispensary in Toronto which eventually developed into Mount Sinai Hospital. Ida was also very active in womens peace movements, the Toronto Board of Education and the Toronto Bureau (elected to Board, 1930-36) of Jewish Education. In 1917, Ida helped to organize Federation of Jewish Philanthropies which later became the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Volpe, Esther
Siegel, Ida
Kayfetz, Eva
Speisman, Stephen
Hadassah-WIZO
National Council of Jewish Women
Geographic Access
Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories

In 1947, Esther Volpe was elected President of the National Council of Jewish Women. In this clip, Esther discusses how, with the support of the United Welfare Fund, the Canadian Jewish Congress and JIAS, she helped make arrangements for groups of Jewish refugees who settled in Toronto.

In this clip, Esther Volpe explains her involvement in the creation of the "Good Age Club" the first recreational program for Jewish seniors.

In this clip, Ida Siegel relates anecdotes from her childhood growing up in downtown Toronto.

Name
Blanche Haber
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
December 18, 1987
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Blanche Haber
Number
AC 189
Subject
Families
Occupations
Immigrants--Canada
Food
Antisemitism
Interview Date
December 18, 1987
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Kaylee Gollom Miller
Total Running Time
Side 1 - 31 minutes Side 2 - 31 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Blanche Haber (nee Heller) was born in a small town in Russia in 1893. She came to Toronto at age 8. Her father worked as a peddler. She married Isadore Haber in 1915. Three of her five children died from illnesses in their childhood. Before her marriage, Blanche worked as a seamstress. Isadore worked as a tailor, primarily for Eaton's. Like her mother, once married, Blanche took boarders into their home at 112 Parliament Street.
Material Format
sound recording
Geographic Access
Toronto
Halifax
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\AC 189 Haber\AC 189 notes.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Blanche Haber describes taking boarders into her mother’s and her own home at 112 Parliament Street.

In this clip, Blanche Haber fondly remembers the warm relationship that developed between her family and the Manischewitz family. She explains that Joe Manischewitz boarded at her family’s home while his family built a matzah factory in Toronto.

Name
Dr. Sydney Wise
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
September 29, 2003
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Dr. Sydney Wise
Number
AC 278
Subject
Business
Immigrants--Canada
Physicians
Interview Date
September 29, 2003
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Ellen Scheinberg
Total Running Time
Side 1: 46 min.
Side 2: 30 min.
Conservation
Digital copy made April 11, 2011.
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Dr. Sydney Wise was a Toronto physician and was a long-time volunteer at the Ontario Jewish Archives. Sydney was married to Mimi Wise who had been an active member of Hadassah-Wizo for most of her life. Sydney's father, Anshel Wise, opened a cigar store on Dundas street, which later turned into a steamship agency called A. Wise Travel Bureau that helped bring immigrants over from Europe.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Wise, Anshel
Wise, Sydney
Scheinberg, Ellen
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories

In this portion of the interview, Syd describes his father, Anshel Wise’s, cigar store and travel business that opened in the Ward in 1918. Anshel was one of the first steamship agents in Toronto.

In this portion of the interview, Sydney describes his entry into medical school at the University of Toronto. He outlines some of the challenges encountered by Jewish medical students in their search for internship positions.

Name
Irving Milchberg
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
July 26, 2007
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Irving Milchberg
Number
AC 333
Subject
Immigrants--Canada
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Holocaust survivors
Refugees--Canada
Interview Date
July 26, 2007
Quantity
1 mini DV ; 1 archival DVD ; 1 reference DVD
Interviewer
Sharon Gubbay Helfer
Total Running Time
1 hr
Notes
Part of Ontario Small Jewish Communities Project.
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Irving Milchberg, the Holocaust survivor known from Joseph Ziemian's book "The Cigarette Sellers of Three Crosses Square," used to sell cigarettes to Nazis in Warsaw as an orphan Jewish kid during WWII. Milchberg, leader of a group of orphaned Jewish children hiding their identities, used to gather at Three Crosses Square, the center of the German occupation of Warsaw, to sell cigarettes. They wandering around under the very noses of policemen, gendarmes, Gestapo men and ordinary spies. Before joining the cigarette sellers, Milchberg twice escaped from the Nazis. The first time he scaled a fence and fled the Umschlagplatz, where Jews were put aboard trains to the Treblinka death camp. The second time, he managed to break the bars of the train taking him to Treblinka and scramble out. His father, mother and three sisters were all murdered by the Nazis. In 1945, Milchberg made his way to Czechoslovakia, then Austria, then to a camp for displaced people in occupied Germany, where he learned watchmaking, his lifelong occupation. In 1947 he moved to Canada, ending up in Niagara Falls, where he opened his own jewelry and watch business. In 1953 he met his wife, Renee, who had survived the war. They had two children and three grandchildren. Milchberg died in January 2014 at the age of 86 years.
Material Format
moving images
Geographic Access
Niagara Falls, Ont.
Original Format
Mini DV
Copy Format
DVD
Source
Oral Histories
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
4
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1955]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Isadore Caplan was born on 4 February 1888, in Russia, to David and Ida Caplan. He settled in Canada in 1905. He married Sophie (née Gold) in 1910 and had four children: Arthur, Harold, Leonard and Evelyn (Herschorn).
Isadore was president of I. Caplan Limited, his realty company, which was located in the Caplan Building on Duncan Street. He was a founding member of Shaarei Shomayim Congregation and was on the board of directors for the Toronto Talmud Torah and the Mount Sinai Hospital. He was president of the Hebrew Free Loan Association of Toronto, and was affiliated with other organizations such as the Jewish Home for the Aged, Baycrest Hospital, the Primrose Club and the Mount Sinai Lodge AF & AM.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Isadore Caplan, which was used in the 1967 edition of the Who's Who in Canadian Jewry.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
110 records – page 1 of 3.

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