Search Results

New Search Photo Search Audiovisual Search
163 records – page 1 of 4.
Accession Number
2011-4-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-4-3
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
1 DVD
Date
July 1985
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one DVD copy of a July 1985 interview of Dr. Stephen Speisman by the donor, recorded at the TJC Archives. Dr. Speisman discusses his family's connections with the Gold family because of their common background in Ostrow, Poland. He also talks about the socialist views of many Jewish immigrants, the factors influencing their desire to emigrate in the First World War era, their early experiences learning English, the reasons for Anglicizing their names, and the cultural values that Polish Jews brought to Canadian life.
Custodial History
DVD copy created from original videocassette created by the donor.
Use Conditions
Any re-use requires written permission of the donor.
Subjects
Land, settlement and immigration
Personal and family life
Name Access
Speisman, Stephen
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-2-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-2-3
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
20 cm of textual records
ca. 100 photographs
Date
[190-]-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to three generations of the Ladovsky family and their restaurant, the United Bakers Dairy Restaurant. Also included is a small amount of material related to Jewish organizations in Toronto, such as the Kieltzer Society and B'nai Brith, as well as the Bakery and Confectionary Union. Records include family and business photographs, correspondence, newsclippings, UB menus and other ephemera, and records related to family simchas and celebrations.
Custodial History
The records were created and accumulated by Aaron Ladovsky, Herman Ladovsky and Ruthie Ladovsky.
Administrative History
Aaron Ladovsky was born in 1888 in Kielce, Poland. He immigrated with his wife Sarah to Toronto in 1906 at the age of 18. Soon after arriving, Aaron Ladovsky worked to help form a Jewish bakers’ union to advocate for collective rights among Jewish Bakers. In 1912 he opened the United Bakers Dairy Restaurant at Dundas and Bay Streets (known then as Agnes and Teraulay Streets respectively) in the heart of the Ward. That same year, the couple had twin sons Herman and Samuel, who were born on September 23, 1912.
Only a short time later, in 1920, Aaron moved the location of his restaurant to 338 Spadina Avenue, just north of Dundas. He and his family lived in an apartment upstairs. Herman and Samuel attended Hester How Elementary School until 1919, Lord Lansdowne Public School once the family moved to Spadina, and later Central Commerce. The twins worked in the family business in the 1920s delivering fresh breads and buns by horse cart.
Aaron Ladovsky was involved in a number of community organizations. He was instrumental in founding the Kieltzer Society of Toronto in 1913; a community based immigrant-aid association extending aid to Kielcers in Poland and around the world. Ladovsky remained an active member of the organization until his death on April 5, 1960 . His restaurant provided a welcome gathering place for the Jewish community, serving traditional dishes and maintaining a friendly open-door policy. Aaron Ladovsky was known for his generosity and claimed that no one, whether they had money or not, left his restaurant hungry. The United Bakers' menu was mainly based on Sarah’s original recipes, and continues to be so to this day.
During the Second World War, Herman served overseas as an electrician in the Canadian army show with comics Johnny Wayne and Frank Shuster. After returning from the war, he married Dora Macklin in 1947, a registered nurse from Regina. He also began to take over management of the family business. Later, his son Philip and daughter Ruth would follow in his footsteps, helping to run the restaurant with him and later taking over managment. United Bakers remained on Spadina Avenue for 66 years – until 1986 when it moved to its current location at 506 Lawrence Avenue West, off of Bathurst Street. Herman was an active fixture in restaurant until his death on January 6, 2002. He also supported and was involved in the work of the Ontario Jewish Archives over the years. Today, Philip and Ruth carry on the family tradition of running United Bakers Dairy Restaurant.
Descriptive Notes
To be integrated into the Ladovsky family fonds 83.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Ladovsky, Herman
Ladovsky, Aaron
United Bakers Dairy Restaurant (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-3-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-3-1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 55 photographs
1 folder of textual records
Date
1919-1939, [ca. 2005]
Scope and Content
Accession consists primarily of photographs documenting the early life of Bella (nee Goldbach) Wilder and her family in Poland. Included are images of Bella with her siblings and friends, group photos of Bella at her Jewish school in Poland, a group image of Victor in the Polish army, and other photographs of Bella's family and friends. Also included are two family histories documenting the story of Bella's mother, Shifra Frimeth Goldbach, and the story of Max and Bella Wilder, which was written by their granddaughter Sandee Sharpe. Of particular note is a 1925 school photograph of the Workers Evening School in Opatow (?), which has Yiddish writing suggesting that the school may have received aid from an organization referred to as "Gives Relief" in Toronto.
Custodial History
The records were originally donated to the Jewish Genealogical Society of Canada (Toronto section) by Bella's daughter Ann Sharpe. JGS Toronto donated the material to the OJA a few months later with her consent.
Administrative History
Bella (nee Goldbach) Wilder was born on May 12, 1910 in Opatow, Poland to Chaim Shlomo Goldbach and Shifra Frimeth Schatz Goldbach. Bella's older brothers, Victor, Jack and Hymie began immigrating to Toronto in the 1920s and had saved enough money by 1936 to bring Bella and her mother to Toronto. After arriving in Toronto Bella found work sewing in a factory.
Bella married Max Wilder on September 29, 1939. Max worked at Superior Men's Tailoring where he sewed zippers into men's pants. They had two children together: Ann (born 5 April 1940, married Norman Sharpe) and Stan (born 21 Jan. 1945, died June 1974). Max passed away in 1999 and Bella passed away in 2002.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Wilder, Bella, 1910-2002
Wilder, Max, ?-1999
Goldbach, Shifra
Sharpe, Ann
Places
Opatow, Poland
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-6-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-6-4
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
13 photographs : b&w (11 tif, 2 jpg)
Date
1909-[ca. 1952]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting the Gryfe, Silverman, Saul and Greenberg families. The majority of the images are family portraits, however, also included is a school photograph of Sandy Greenberg at Charles G. Fraser School in Toronto, a photograph of Feda and Izzy Greenberg in Ottawa, a photograph of the Silverman family at Crystal Beach, and a photograph of a family celebration for Morris Silverman's birthday. Also identified in the photographs are: Sam Silverman, Bill Gryfe, Esther (Gryfe) Silverman, Lizzie Gryfe, Bayla Gryfe, Fae Silverman, Tillie Silverman, Sam Silverman, Bertha Silverman, Sam Saul, Joseph Saul, Ida Saul, Anna Saul, Rachel Saul, Nancy Silverman, Ruth Silverman, Lou Weitzman, and Ruth Weitzman.
Administrative History
Izzy Greenberg and Anna (nee Nathan) Greenberg immigrated to Ottawa from Romania around 1910. They had six children together: Freda, Harry, Joe, Anne, Helen, and Earl (b. 1920). Izzy likely worked as a peddler. When Anna passed away in 1923 all of the children, except for Freda, were sent to a Jewish orphanage in Montreal (the Montefiore orphanage). The orphanage closed in 1936 when Earl was 16 years old. He came to Toronto where he met Sandy (or Sylvia) Silverman. They were married in 1947. Earl initially worked as a shoe salesman, but later opened his own business, Sanmarcoda, where he bought and sold electronic surplus. He and Sandy had three children together: Marsha, Corey, and David. Sandy worked as a secretary with the provincial government and sold baby's clothing at flea markets on Sundays.
Joseph and Anna Saul came to Canada from Romania in the early 1900s. They had six children together: Sam (b. 1908), Rachel (Rae, b. 1910), Ida, Jeanette, Bonnie, and Dorothy. Joseph abandoned the family around 1923 and travelled to California to become an actor. Although his family never heard from him again, they later recognized him in movies under the name Maurice Samuels. Anna was deaf and mute and worked as a seamstress, making ladies clothing out of her own home. Rae obtained work in a hat factory when she was 13 years old and continued in this trade throughout the remainder of her life. Around 1950 she opened her own hat store at Eglinton and Dufferin called Rae's Hats. She briefly lived above the store with her husband, Sam Silverman.
Morris Silverman, Esther (Gryfe) Silverman, and their two daughters Fae and Tillie immigrated to Hamilton from Romania in 1907. Esther's sister, Lizzie Gryfe, was already living in Hamilton at the time. In 1909, Morris and Esther had another son together, Sam. By 1922, the family had moved to Nassau Street in Toronto where Morris worked as a tailor for Tip Top Tailors. They lived next door to the Saul Family. Sam married Rae Saul in 1927. Sam had had various jobs throughout his life including, cab driver, venetian blind salesman, and driver for a cleaner's.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Greenberg, Sandy
Places
Ottawa, Ont.
Crystal Beach, Ont.
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-6-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-6-5
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (tiff)
Date
1920-1926
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of Rae Saul and her relatives outside the Saul family homes on Elizabeth or Venaly Street and Nassau Street. Identified are Millie Aaron, Anna Saul, and Sam Saul.
Administrative History
Joseph and Anna Saul came to Canada from Romania in the early 1900s. They had six children together: Sam (b. 1908), Rachel (Rae, b. 1910), Ida, Jeanette, Bonnie, and Dorothy. Joseph abandoned the family around 1923 and travelled to California to become an actor. Although his family never heard from him again, they later recognized him in movies under the name Maurice Samuels. Anna was deaf and mute and worked as a seamstress, making ladies clothing out of her own home. Rae obtained work in a hat factory when she was 13 years old and continued in this trade throughout the remainder of her life. Around 1950 she opened her own hat store at Eglinton and Dufferin called Rae's Hats. She briefly lived above the store with her husband, Sam Silverman.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Silverman, Rae
Saul, Anna
Aaron, Millie
Saul, Sam
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-7-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-7-10
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
1 film reel (ca. 30 min.) : col., si. ; 8mm
Date
1973-1976
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one home movie documenting Eric Slavens and his family. Included is footage of a birthday party, the family playing hockey in front of their home, Eric and his son playing in their front lawn, and Eric's children celebrating Halloween. Also included is footage of Eric and his family at a family farm owned by Eric's parents in Dundalk, Ontario.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Slavens family
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Dundalk, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-7-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-7-7
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
7 cm of textual records
Date
1923-2012, predominant 1923-1945
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting Paula Epstein's family, particularly her parents Benjamin Gorman and Lillie Goldstein. Included are passports, Ben Gorman's high school transcripts, Ben and Lillie's marriage certificate (ketuba), Lillie's high school graduation program (1931, Central High School of Commerce), and records related to Ben's company, Gorman Knitting Mills Limited, including sock patterns. Also included are letters that were sent to Ben and Lillie before and during the Second World War from Ben's parents, brother (Jack) and cousins (the Stencil family) who were living in Poland. Finally accession includes one family memoir written by Paula's husband, Stanley Epstein. This memoir predominantly traces the history of the Epstein family (Nova Scotia), but also includes information about the Goldstein family (Toronto) and Gorman family (Toronto).
Administrative History
Benjamin Gorman was born in Rypin, Poland on 12 Oct. 1909 to Shmuel Pesach and Michla Gorman (nee Stencil). He came to Canada in 1928 after finishing high school matriculation in Poland. He was the first person in his town to ever pass the matriculation exam held in Warsaw. In Toronto, he married Lillian (Lillie) Goldstein on 1 Sept. 1939. They had three children together: Paula, Samuel, and Alvin. In 1953, Ben founded and operated a sock manufacturing company called Gorman Knitting Mills Limited. It's original location was 955 Eastern Avenue, but it re-located in 1963 to 1360 Birchmount Road in Scarborough.
Lillie Goldstein was born in Toronto on 10 Feb. 1914 to Harry and Rachel Goldstein. She was a medical secretary for many years and later worked in the family business as a bookkeeper. She was a member of the Karen Or Group where money was raised for muscular dystrophy with an annual card night that was held at the community centre at Eglinton Park.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: English, Yiddish, Hebrew, and Polish.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Gorman, Benjamin
Gorman, Lillie
Epstein, Paula
Epstein, Stanley
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-7-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-7-13
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
moving images
Physical Description
ca. 100 photographs (jpg)
1 DVD
3 film reels (ca. 25 min.) : col., sd. ; 16 mm and super 8 mm
Date
[ca. 1938]-1982
Scope and Content
Accession consists of scanned photographs and home movies taken by Dr. John E. Ackerman, which document his personal and professional activities. Included are photographs of family gatherings, the grocery store owned by Ackerman's mother, Jarvis Collegiate, Dr. Ackerman's dental practice, the military involvement of Dr. Ackerman and his brother Al, beach activities, families living in North Bay and Sudbury, and individuals living in Dr. Ackerman's Toronto neighbourhood of Dundas and Elizabeth. Of note are photos taken by Al Ackerman of his military service overseas as well as an image of him arriving back in Toronto in uniform in front of Union Station. Also of note is an image of Dr. Ackerman in military uniform standing in front of Anshel Wise's Cigar store at 100 Dundas Street West and images likely of the Hudson Street Tennis Club.
The Home movies include footage of a Jewish War Veterans parade and service in front of a monument at Earl Bales Park (ca. 1980), a Beth Tzedec Sukkot service with the children of its Hebrew school (ca. 1978), other unidentified events at Beth Tzedec (one in its banquet hall), a family seder and family trip to Israel. Also included is footage of the 75th anniversary parade of the boy scouts, performances at Camp Shalom for visitor's day (1982), and a film with footage of a trade fair attended by Larry Grossman.
Administrative History
Dr. John E. Ackerman (1921-2008) was born in Toronto on December 16, 1921 to Jacob and Mindel Ackerman. John was one of four children. Jacob worked as a presser in a factory. Mindel opened and ran a grocery store at Dundas and Elizabeth Street. Jacob died around the age 57.
Dr. Ackerman went to school at Jarvis Collegiate and later enrolled in Dentistry school at the University of Toronto. As part of the school program, Dr. Ackerman had to enlist in the Canadian army's General Corp. While in school, he also met his future wife, Frances, at a Hillel lecture on campus. Frances was a graduate student studying psychology. Dr. Ackerman graduated from university in 1946. He initially worked as a dental intern at the Toronto General Hospital, but after a few years he opened his own practice above the Royal Bank at Dundas and Elizabeth Street.
Dr. Ackerman married Frances on September 12, 1954. They had three children together: Martin (born 1959), Penina (born 1963), and David (born 1965).
As a young teenager, Dr. Ackerman took up photography as a hobby and remained passionate about it for the remainder of his life. He took many photographs of family life, Toronto, his military involvement, and other activities. He also shot many family films and even converted part of his house into a darkroom.
Dr. Ackerman became involved in the Jewish Boy Scouts after his son Martin became a cub. He started out as a cub leader and eventually . He was active in Troop 166 out of Beth Tzedec. Frances initially worked in the outpatient department of the Toronto Psychiatric Hospital, but later worked with the Toronto District School Board until her retirement. Dr. Ackerman retired his practice in 1995 or 1996. He passed away on December 13, 2008.
Use Conditions
Credit Dr. John E. Ackerman for all photos and films
Contact donor for permission to publish footage of the family seder and family trips. OJA has copyright of other film footage.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Ackerman, John, 1921-2008
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-9-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-9-3
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w ; 10 x 10 cm or smaller
Date
[ca. 1952]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting the Rosenthal family's activities in the Sudbury Jewish community and at Camp Biluim. Included is a copy photo of a Chanukah celebration and an original photo of an unidentified celebration at the Cedar Street shul in Sudbury. Also included is a photograph of Rosenthal family members relaxing on a beach at the original Camp Biluim at Clear Lake.
Custodial History
Photographs were donated by Lilian Rosenthal.
Subjects
Sports, recreation and leisure
Personal and family life
Events and celebrations
Name Access
Camp Biluim
Rosenthal family
Places
Sudbury, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder textual records
Date
1937-1970
Scope and Content
Accession consists of personal records of Bunny Bergstein. Included is his certificate of graduation from "shule", or Yiddish school, and documents related to the B'Nai Brith Lodge.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Bergstein, Bunny
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-12
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
7 photographs : b&w and col. (tiff)
Date
[1970?]-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of Ben and Carrie Grossman and thier family at family gatherings. Identified in the photographs are: Carrie Grossman, Ben Grossman, Jack Grossman, Warren Grossman, Rita Bergstein, Borris Litman, Ruth Malka Grossman, Miriam (Mimi) Grossman, Lillian Rose, Martha Sud, Hilda Grossman, and David Sud.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Grossman, Carrie
Grossman, Ben
Grossman, Jack
Grossman, Warren
Bergstein, Rita
Litman, Borris
Grossman, Ruth
Grossman, Miriam
Rose, Lillian
Sud, Martha
Grossman, Hilda
Sud, David
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-14
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-14
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1 scrapbook
1 folder of textual records
2 photographs : b&w ; 13 x 18 cm and 21 x 25 cm
Date
1941-1951, 1959-1961
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a scrapbook documenting the military career of Seymour Bernard. Included in the scrapbook are photographs, newspaper clippings, correspondence, the transcript for a CFRB radio segment featuring Bernard, invitations for dinners honouring Bernard, a booklet (possibly by the Canadian Jewish Congress) entitled "Jews Have Always Fought for Freedom", and a torn black ribbon that was likely worn by Bernard's parents during shiva after he died in 1951 (kriah). The scrapbook was likely assembled by Bernard's parents.
Accession also includes material documenting Joel Snitman's confirmation at Holy Blossom Temple and involvement in the BBYO. Included are photographs and programs documenting Holy Blossom Temple's confirmation class of 1959, the program book of the B'nai Brith Youth Organization (BBYO) Southern Ontario Region Fall Conclave (1960), a BBYO AZA Sweetheart Ball booklet (1961), and the Lorac Letter newsletter (1959) which was a chapter of the AZA BBYO. Identified in the photographs are: Joel Snitman, Susie Romm, Karen Smith (?), Don Smith, Rabbi Eisen, and Rabbi Feinberg.
Administrative History
Beatrice Bernard (1913-1998) was born to Louie Bernard (1895?-1956) and Esther Berger (1892-1983) in Toronto in 1913. She had two younger siblings: Seymour (was a tailgunner in the RAF during the Second World War) and Gertrude. The family lived at 410 Crawford Street and Louie owned his own dress store at St. Clair and Yonge Street. Beatrice helped her father in the dress store in the 1930s. Louie eventually owned a coat manufacturing business which was located in the Balfour Building. Beatrice married Michael Snitman in 1935. Michael Snitman (1910-1978) was born to Harry and Lottie in Russia in 1910. He immigrated to Canada with his parents in 1912 and had two younger siblings who were born in Toronto: Bill (1912-2013) and Judy (Judith). Michael attended Harbord Collegiate and ran his own business called Plastwood Products in the early 1940s. Around 1947 he entered the photographic business as a distributor. He ran the Toronto branch of Montreal-based Anglophoto, which was owned by his brother-in-law, Abe Feigelson. Michael and Beatrice had two children together: Joel (b. 1943) and Bernard (Bernie) (b. 1948). Joel received a Bachelor of Science from the University of Toronto and taught Biology for five years before entering the real estate and property management business. He met his wife Blossom (nee Houpt) in the B'nai Brith Youth Organization and they had their first date on April 9, 1960. They later married in Aug. 1964 and had three children together: Aryeh, Sheri, and Aviella.
Subjects
War and military
Children and youth
Personal and family life
Name Access
Bernard, Seymour
Snitman, Beatrice, 1913-1998
Snitman, Michael, 1910-1978
Snitman, Joel, 1943-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-5-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-5-8
Material Format
textual record
moving images
graphic material
Physical Description
2 m of textual records
10 film reels : 8mm
ca. 300 photographs
Date
[192-]-[200-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Steinberg family. The bulk of the material was collected and created by Elise Steinberg. Included are photographs and slides, family films, Israel and Miriam's wedding album and honeymoon scrapbook, correspondence and greeting cards, newsletters, Holy Blossom Temple bulletins, newsletters, certificates, Elise's school notebooks and assignments, and financial and legal records pertaining to the estate of Joseph Steinberg. Of particular note are Elise Steinberg's diaries which span the years from 1974 to 1984. Also of note is material documenting the family's resignation from Holy Blossom Temple.
Custodial History
The material came into the possession of Charles Levi and his parents after the death of Israel and Miriam Steinberg.
Administrative History
Irving (Israel) Steinberg was born to Joseph and Leah Steinberg (Schindermann) on January 16, 1919. Joseph and Leah had immigrated to Canada in 1914. They initially lived in Peterborough, but moved to Toronto by 1921. They lived in Toronto for a few years, but evetually settled in Sudbury and opened the Toronto Bargain Store.
Irving joined the Canadian army in 1942 and served in Canada. He married Miriam (from Philadelphia) and they lived in Toronto. They had one daughter, Elise, on September 25, 1955. Israel worked as an accountant and Miriam was a musician and patron of the arts. In her teen years, Elise developed an intellectual and physical disability (possibly scoliosis). Elise was an avid doll collector and volunteered for many years at Holy Blossom Temple's library. The family were members of Holy Blossom Temple for many years and tried advocating for better access to the synagogue for individuals with disabilities. They resigned thier membership in the 1990s.
Elise passed away on April 5, 2005. Miriam passed away on February 28, 2011. Irving passed away the following day on March 1, 2011.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Civil and human rights
Name Access
Steinberg, Irving, 1919-2011
Steinberg, Miriam, ?-2011
Steinberg, Elise, 1955-2005
Holy Blossom Temple (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-10-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
40 cm of textual records and other material
Date
[192-]-[200-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the life and career of David Green and the Jaffey family. Records include sound and video recordings of events, Goodwill Sales accounting ledgers, meeting minutes from the Jewish Canadian Military Archives and Museum, David Green's military ephemera, manuals and reports of the Jewish Federation Board of Trustees and Bequest and Endowment Fund, and Jaffey family correspondence and photographs. Records also include certificates of appreciation awarded to David Green, mainly from UJA Federation.
Administrative History
David Green (1919-2014) was born in the Junction in west Toronto. He served as a private in the Canadian army as part of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. He was captured and designated MIA when he was held as a POW in Belgium. He became a member of General Wingate Branch 256 Jewish Canadian Legion. In the mid-1940s he married his wife, Sylvia (nee Jaffey) (d. 2010) and they had a daughter, Miriam. He was a longtime volunteer for the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto. In 1990, he was one of the first individuals to establish an Endowment Fund at the Jewish Foundation of Greater Toronto.
The Jaffey family consisted of Kaby Jaffey, his wife, Nellie, and their children Sylvia, Jess and Albert.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: Accession also consists of photographs and textiles.
Subjects
Personal and family life
War and military
Philanthropy and fundraising
Name Access
Green, David, 1919-2014
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
architectural drawing (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
ca. 30 photographs (tiff)
ca. 15 architectural drawings (tiff)
3 textual records (pdf)
Date
[1945?]-[ca. 1990]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs and architectural drawings documenting Jaime Levy-Bencheton's architectural career in Ontario and Morocco. The bulk of the material relates to projects Levy-Bencheton designed while working for the Government of Ontario including: a greenhouse for the Ontario Science Centre, OPP Headquarters building in London, ON, Rideau Correctional Centre, and Chestnut Hill (Southwestern Ontario regional archaeological office). Also included are architectutal drawings and photographs related to Levy-Bencheton's private practices in Morocco and Toronto and work for architect Martin Mendelow.
Administrative History
Jaime Levy-Bencheton was born on July 6, 1918 in Casablanca, Morocco. Jaime started a private architectural practice in Morocco in 1945. He immigrated to Canada in 1963 and initially found work with the architect Martin Mendelow. In 1965, he started working for the Government of Ontario's Department of Public Works as a draftsman. Starting in 1969, he worked for the Ministry of Government Services as an architectural job captain until his retirement in 1985. During his career Levy-Bencheton specialized in designing facilities for the handicapped and worked on a variety of buildings across Ontario including, industrial, institutional, and office use buildings. In his retirement, Levy-Bencheton became devoted to the study of the Bible and creating Jewish religious art.
Subjects
Occupations and professions
Personal and family life
Name Access
Levy-Bencheton, Jaime, 1918-
Places
Casablanca, Morocco
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-5
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 30 x 53 cm
Date
28 Oct. 1925
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one photograph taken at the wedding reception of Egmont and Ruth Frankel, which was held at the Blackstone Hotel in Chicago. Identified in the photograph are: Ruth Frankel, Egmont Frankel, Dorothy Frankel and Carl Frankel.
Custodial History
Photograph was in the possession of Cherie Friend. She believes it originally belonged to her grandparents who had a music shop in Chicago. Her grandfather was born in Quebec.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Frankel, Egmont
Frankel, Ruth
Places
Chicago
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-3
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
15 cm of textual records
ca. 100 photographs
Date
1938-2006
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the Max and Anne Tanenbaum and Wolf families. Included are photographs of family, trips and missions to Israel, the establishment of the John Bassett Sports Centre in Israel and other events; certificates; documents related to Anne and Max's philanthropic work and giving to the Baycrest Centre, the University of Toronto, CHAT and the United Jewish Appeal; newsclippings; and photographs and an invitation documenting the honourary doctorate degree bestowed on Anne Tanenebaum by the Ben Gurion University of the Negev.
Administrative History
Max (1909-1983) and Anne (1909-2009) Tanenbaum were notable philanthropists in Toronto, best known for their support of the Jewish community in the areas of medicine and education.
Max Tanenbaum was born in Poland to Abraham and Chippa Sura Tanenbaum in 1909. He immigrated to Canada with his mother and brother, Joseph, in 1914, three years after his father's arrival in 1911. Max began work in the family steel business at the age of 13 and later went on to found his own steel company; York Steel. Max had two additional siblings, sisters Sarah (m. Sam Kates) and Esther (m. Simon Gottlieb).
Anne Tanenbaum was born in New York in 1909 to Herman and Minnie Wolf. Anne had three siblings: Molly (m. ? Raphael), Dorothy (m. Max Roher) and Jack (m. Ann Korolnek). At the age of 10, Anne's mother passed away and her father remarried. Her father and step-mother had three additional children: Bill (m. Sylvia), Noah (m. Marilyn), and Esther (m. Carmen). The family moved from New York to Montreal and then to Toronto.
Max and Anne met in Toronto and married in 1930. Together they had seven children: Harold, Joey (m. Toby), Howard (m. Carol), Larry (m. Judy), Tauba (m. Sol Spiro), Minda (m. Les Feldman), and Carol.
Descriptive Notes
Anne's stepmother was affectionately referred to by the Tanenbaum grandchildren as "Bubbie from Palestine."
Subjects
Personal and family life
Philanthropy and fundraising
Name Access
Tanenbaum, Max, 1909-1983
Tanenbaum, Anne, 1909-2009
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-2
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 100 photographs
1 folder of textual records
Date
1920-1980
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of the Hersch family, a screenplay by Phillip Hersch, school certificates from Landsdowne School, Canadian naturalization certificates, thank you notes, a New Year's greeting card, and a Polish passport. Included are photographs of weddings, Europe vacations, class photos, houses in Toronto, Bar Mitzvah, Niagara falls, Channukah, Farms, studio sets, the beach, and snow scenes
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Norman Hersch until his death in the mid-1980s, at which point the donor took possession of the records and stored them until donating them to the OJA in March 2015.
Administrative History
Norman Hersch was a special effects technician for the CBC from the early 1950s until his retirement in the mid-1980s. He was married to a French woman from Western Canada named Margaret. He is buried in the Mount Albert area with his wife. He served in the Canadian military during the Second World War and graduated from Central Technical School upon his return. In later years, he started P & M Display in Yorkville. Norman's older brother Phillip was a screenwriter in Toronto. He wrote the CBC series Wojek. Their mother Lily (Polish) volunteered at Mount Sinai Hospital. Their father Alexander (Romanian) worked in stainless steel manufacturing. They lived around Cecil Street. Doug Wardle was a friend and colleague of Hersch's at CBC in the Special Effects Department.
Subjects
Arts and culture
Personal and family life
Name Access
Hersch, Norman
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-5
Material Format
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
6 photographs : b&w and col. ; 9 x 13 cm or smaller
1 photograph (electronic) : b&w
Date
[193-]-[197-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of six photographs and one scanned photograph of architect Benjamin Brown with various members of his extended family. The scanned photograph pictures Meyer Brown, Benjamin's father, with his brother.
Administrative History
Benjamin Brown was one of the first Jewish architects in Toronto. Alice Waldman is the daughter of Brown's sister, Sophie Blackstone.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Brown, Benjamin
Lewis, Alice Waldman
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-7
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
4 photographs : b&w and col. ; 77 x 57 cm or smaller
1 VHS cassette
1 object
Date
1939-1998
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to David and Anna Lang. Included are calendars from their pharmacy, two wedding portraits and VHS transfer of their wedding film from 1946, a photograph of Anna and her daughter Karen, a graduation ring and program book for Anna's graduation from the Ontario College of Pharmacy, and a photograph of the Ontario College of Pharmacy in Detroit, Michigan.
Custodial History
The records were donated by Don Perrier, a family friend. They were entrusted to him by Karen Lang upon her death.
Administrative History
David Lang (9 Jan. 1912-11 Dec. 1984) was the son of Abraham Leon Layefsky and Molly Forman. He had three siblings: Fay, Hyem and Sarah. He married Anna Shaw (ca. 1916-17 Nov. 2002) on 16 June 1946 at the Beth Medrosh Hagodol Chevra Tehillim (McCaul Street Synagogue) in Toronto. David and Anna were both practicing pharmacists and jointly owned Lang's Pharmacy on 745 Pharmacy Ave. Anna gradutated from the Ontario College of Pharmacy in 1939. The couple had one child, Karen Lang.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Occupations and professions
Health services and medicine
Name Access
Layefsky, David
Layefsky, Anna
Lang, David
Lang, Anna
Lang, Karen
Beth Medrosh Hagodol Chevra Tehillim (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-5
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
4 cookbooks (pdf)
1 folder of textual records (pdf and tiff)
1 folder of textual records
ca. 1000 photographs (jpg)
Date
[ca. 1950]-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of scanned and photocopied material documenting the Hotz family's activities in South Africa and Canada. Included are family photographs, correspondence, invitations, programmes, school report cards, passports, newsclippings, a wedding speech, and certificates. Also included are copies of four South African Jewish cookbooks: Passover "Palatables", International Goodwill Recipe Book (1951 and 1969), and K.D.S. Recipe Book (1964).
Custodial History
Barbara Weisberg is the wife of Darrel Hotz. The material was either inherited by them after Darrel's parents passed away or created by Barbara and Darrel.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Language Note: English and Afrikaans.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Hotz, Darrel
Wiseberg, Barbara
Places
South Africa
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-9
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
6 photographs : b&w (jpg)
4 documents (jpg)
Date
[195-?]-1979
Scope and Content
Accession consists of six electronic copies of photographs of Irving Levine and the Levine family and electronic copies of three invitations to Irving Levine's birthday party, and one newspaper clipping. Included is Irving and Ruth's wedding portrait and wedding photo with their parents (Sept. 6, 1952), two photographs of Irving with his mother Anne at Cyrstal Beach, a photograph of the Irving brothers in Grimsby, and a photo of Irving with business partner Lionel Robins (ca. 1978). Identified individuals in the photographs include: Irving Levine, Lionel Robins, Harry Levine, David Levine, Anne Levine, Ruth Levine, Sam Levine, Abraham Feldman, and Jennie Feldman.
Administrative History
Irving Levine was born in 1929 to Sam and Anne Levine. He was born in Grimsby, Ontario, where his father owned a junior department store. They were members of Beth Jacob Synagogue in Hamilton. Irving moved to Toronto in 1953, he married Ruth Fern in 1952 and they had three children: Alan, born in 1953, Suzy, born in 1956 and Michael, born in 1961. He has six grandchildren. He purchased Braemar clothing store in the early 1960s, with the first location in Cloverdale Mall. He became the top vice-president of Dylex, Ltd.,one of Canada's largest retail clothing companies, and general manager of Fairweather's division. Lionel Robins became his business partner in 1964.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Further identification can be found with the accession record.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Levine, Irving, 1929-
Places
Grimsby, Ont.
Hamilton, Ont.
Toronto, Ont.
Cyrstal Beach, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-13
Material Format
moving images (electronic)
Physical Description
1 moving image (18 min., 53 sec.) : si., b&w ; mp4
Date
15 July 1930
Scope and Content
Accession consists of footage of the wedding of Lyla Rotenberg to Lou Rasminsky in Forest Hill at Lyla’s home at 181 Warren Road. Included is footage of a procession of the married couple and their guests just after the wedding ceremony, guests having lunch in the garden, wedding toasts, the cutting of the cake, and the couple leaving for their honeymoon. Identified in the footage is: Lou Rasminsky, Lyla Rasminsky, Meta Rotenberg, Lil Salamon, Moe Salamon, Alec Rasminsky, Ken Rotenberg, Arthur Rotenberg, and Phyllis Greisman.
Custodial History
The video was in the possession of Michael Rasminsky, the son of Lyla and Lou. This file was created off of a VHS copy of the wedding film. The donor is not sure where the original film reels are.
Administrative History
Lyla Rotenberg and Lou Rasminsky were sweethearts at the University of Toronto. Lyla’s father, Harry Rotenberg, was a prosperous builder and developer. Lou’s father, David Rasminsky, a small business man. After graduation Lou spent two years at the London School of Economics and returned to Toronto to marry Lyla on July 15, 1930. They were both 22 years old. They went immediately to Geneva where Lou had his first job at the League of Nations. They remained in Geneva until 1939 when they returned to Ottawa and Lou’s initial appointment at the Bank of Canada where he ultimately became Governor in 1961.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Rasminsky, Lyla
Rasminsky, Lou
Rasminsky, Michael
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-8
Material Format
textual record
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 document (docx)
Date
Nov. 2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one memoir written by Muriel Comay regarding her life in South Africa and immigration to Toronto.
Administrative History
Muriel was born to Ellie Goldblatt and Malcah (nee Friedlander) Goldblatt in 1945 in Cape Town, South Africa. She married Stephen Comay. In June 1975, she immigrated to Toronto with Stephen and their three young children.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Comay, Muriel
Places
Cape Town, South Africa
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-5
Material Format
textual record
sound recording
Physical Description
60 cm of textual records
2 DVDs
Date
[196-]-2000
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the life and literary career of Morris J. Granite. Included are manuscript copies of his published works, unpublished poems and essays, bound copies of articles written for the Canadian Jewish Outook, published issues of the same periodical, an essay describing his life in Lodz written to his grandchildren, Laura and Rebecca and an interview conducted with Morris by a group interested in establishing a Jewish Museum in Toronto.
Administrative History
Morris J. Granite (Granatstein) was born in 1911 in Lodz, Poland and in 1926, he immigrated with his family to Toronto, Canada. He had two sisters, Eva and Leah and a brother Layzer, who was killed in the Holocaust.
Morris served in the Royal Canadian Ari Force during the Second World War, and he worked as a teacher and draftsman in his early years and as a builder in his middle and later years. The buildings and homes he worked to create still stand in Cuba, Detroit, and Toronto. He also worked in Toronto, New York City, and Philadelphia as a waiter, power press operator, construction worker, and teacher at Hebrew and Yiddish schools. He was president of the Jewish Public Library, an editor of the Canadian Jewish Outlook, a member of the League of Canadian Poets, and a major supporter of artistic and progressive causes.
Throughout his life, he loved the written word. His published writings include several books of poetry: Street Corners (1935), My City Lodz (1995), Welcome to the Year 2000 (1999), and Toronto, My City (2000).
Morris was married to Barbara Moore Better and had two children, Ettie and David and two granchildren, Laura and Rebecca. Morris died in Toronto on April 29, 2001 of leukemia.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Use Conditions note: Copyright is held by the estate of M. J. Granite. Donor must be contacted prior to publication.
Subjects
Arts and culture
Communications and publishing
Personal and family life
Name Access
Granite, Morris
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-33
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-33
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
2 VHS tapes
13 film reels : 8 mm
Date
1957-1967
Scope and Content
Accession consists of home movies documenting the Levy family of Hamilton, Ontario. Included is footage of birthday parties, children playing at their home and in parks, swimming, sailing, a football game at Ivor Wynne Stadium, a trip to Algonquin Park, family picnics, and trips to Quebec and New York.
Administrative History
Nancy Levy was born in 1951 to Corinne (nee Cohen) and Edgar Levy. Edgar's name was originally Moshe Noss. He was born in the Ukraine and orphaned at an early age. Around 1921 he immigrated to Canada through the help of a Mr. Grafstein. Once in Canada, Edgar and his brothers were adopted into different families. The Levy family adopted Edgar and he took their name.
Edgar married Corrine Cohn in 1946. Edgar had a business in Hamilton called Piston Service, which was a wholesaler for car parts. Corrine drove a truck for this business and eventually became the bookkeeper for another firm. After marriage, they lived in Hamilton at 18 West Third.
Nancy had two younger siblings: Anne (b. 1956) and Lois (b. 1958). She married Wayne Greenberg in 1979 and they divorced around 1985. She studied medical lab technology at a community college and worked at various hospitals and businesses, including Henderson Hospital in Hamilton and Baycrest.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Levy family
Places
Hamilton, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-10
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1930-1989
Scope and Content
Accession consists of various lettters, one in Polish and others in Hebrew and Yiddish. One of the letters appears to have been addressed to Rabbi Shemen's mother (Gitl), although undated, it appears to be from the late 1920s or early 1930s. A letter in Yiddish is addressed to the Boimoil family of Chodel, Poland. Boimol was the original last name of Rabbi Shemen.
Custodial History
It appears that the documents came directly from Rabbi Nachman Shemen
Administrative History
Rabbi Shemen was a Rabbinic scholar, author and Jewish civil servant. He held the following positions: Executive secretary of the Canadian Federation of Polish jews (1940-1993), Director of Orthodox Division of CJC, Ontario (1950-1992). Rabbi Shemen died in 1993.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Shemen, Nachman
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 8 cm of textual records and other material
Date
[ca. 1938]-[ca. 2009]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Silberg family's immigration to Ontario, family life in South Africa and Ontario, education, communal involvement in Hamilton, and pharmacy businesses. Included are photographs, correspondence, ephemera from the pharmacy businesses (such as bags and a name tag), newspaper clippings, certificates, invitations, flyers, school transcripts, architectural drawings for Night-Day Pharmacy on Ryman Road East, cookbooks, and photo albums. Also included is a JNF book for a Negev dinner honouring Hilton and Shirley Silberg as well a copy of Beth Jacob Synagogue's 125th anniversary book (the Beth Jacob Family Album).
Administrative History
Hilton Silberg was born in Durban, South Africa in 1951 to Sam and Brina Silberg. Sam worked in the retail furniture business and Hilton has three siblings: Sheryl, Lynn and Brett. Hilton was very active in sports and played soccer, cricket and swimming. At age 11, he started competing in ballroom dancing with his sister Lynn. At age 16, he and Lynn were the South African Juvenile Ballroom Champions and runners up in the Latin American Championship. In highschool, Hilton started his own DJ business which he continued through his first years of pharmacy school.
Shirley (nee Gitlin) Silberg was born in Durban in 1951 to Max and Isabel Gitlin. Max was a physical medicine specialist and Isabel ran his practice. Shirley has two siblings: Brian and Barbara. Shirley was very active in her school's netball, field hockey and swimming teams.
Hilton and Shirley met at the Natal Pharmacy School in Durban and married in 1974. After marriage, Hilton completed his one-year mandatory service in the South African army as an officer. After his service, he and Shirley went on a ten month long backpacking trip which ended at the 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal. This trip was an eye-opener for them and they realized that they no longer wanted to live in a country with apartaid politics. They didn't want to raise children in South Africa. They chose Canada as their destination and applied three times for entry. Thier application was rejected all three times, but Hilton staged a "sit-in" at the Canadian embassy in Pretoria and an immigration officer eventually met with him and overturned thier rejection. They arrived in Canada in August 1977.
They went to the University of Toronto School of Pharmacy for two years to re-license in Canada. In the evenings they worked in a pharmacy owned by their Canadian sponsor. In 1981, Hilton and Shirley partnered with their Canadian sponsors and opened the Amhurst Pharmacy in Dundas. In 1982 the pharmacy's name was changed to Hilton's Pharmacy. In 1987 Shopper's Drug Mart purchased Hilton's Pharmacy. The Silberg's stayed on to operate two of the franchises in Dundas. In 1992, Hilton and Shirley left Shppers Drug Mart to open the DayNight Pharmacy on the east Hamilton Mountain. This was the first pharmacy in Hamilton to remain open until midnight. Their pharmacy eventually expanded to include five stores. In 2007, they sold their business to Rexall Pharma Plus.
Hilton and Shirley have three children: Mark, Maxine and Brad. Hilton and Shirley were very active in Hamilton's community. Hilton was involved in a variety of organizations including, Beth Jacob synagogue, Shalom Village, and Jewish National Fund Hamilton. Shirley has volunteered with various Hamilton JCC programs, the Hamilton North End Breakfast Program, the 'Out of the Cold' Program, Goldie's Place day program for adults at Shalom Village, and the Jewish National Fund Hamilton.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes ca. 80 photographs, 4 cookbooks, 1 architectural drawing, 3 bags, and 1 name tag.
Related material note: oral history #419.
Subjects
Land, settlement and immigration
Occupations and professions
Personal and family life
Societies and associations
Name Access
Silberg, Hilton
Silberg, Shirley
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-32
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-32
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
5 photographs : b&w
Date
1894-[191-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of five photographs documenting the Danson family. One family photograph is of the children of Bertha and Barnett Danson: Rose (Mann), Joseph, Leo and Florence (Simmons). The second family phorograph is ca. 1904 and includes parents and children, as above. There is a photo ca. 1915 of Leo and his daughter Arna. Finally, there are two additional photos of members of the Danson family without any name identifiers or dates, although likely taken in the 1910s.
Custodial History
It is likely that these records were provided by W. Bertram Danson.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Danson, Bertarm
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-4
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 250 photographs (3 albums) : b&w and col. ; 53 x 43 cm and smaller
9 cm of textual records
Date
(191-)-(197-), 1992
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the Title, Samuels and Fishman families. Included are family photographs, and photos related to involvement with philanathropy and industry, materials related to Reliable Toy Company, Forest Hill Collegiate "Forester" year books, a land deed for the Ansheir Yoisher Misrachi Synagogue in Welland, news clippings relating to Alex Samuels death, a Holy Blossom "Tempelite" year book, a Crown Bakery Bread promotional item, a wedding menu from the marriage of Molly Fishman and Harry Title, Molly Fishman's high school diplomas and JNF certificates. There are a number of photos of the Fishman and Title families in Welland and the United States, photos of the Crowland Volunteer Fire Department with Sam and Frank Fishman, Turk family albums with Moishe Turk and Yeva Fishman, an album of a sefer torah dedication to Baycrest Hospital in memory of Leah Fishman, photos of the Samuels family, their trip to Israel, promotional photos from the Reliable Toy Company, Beth Tzedec founding board photos, and B'nai Brith Women photos.
Administrative History
Samuel (ca. 1882-1929, Russia) and Gussie (nee Moscovitz) (b. ca.1884, Romania) Fishman, immigrated to Welland Ontario from Romania. Both arrived to the USA as teenagers sometime around the turn of the century. Samuel and Gussie were married in the USA and by 1920 immigrated with their young family to the historic township of Crowland in Welland County. Here they opened and operated a men's clothing store. Together they had six children, Molly (b. 1909, USA), Abe (b. 1911, USA), Morris (b. 1916, USA), Ruth (b. 1915, USA), Ann (b. 1920, Ontario) and Ethel. Morris married Pauline and lived in St. Catherines, Ruth married Nate Oelbaum and lived in Tucson Arizona, Anne married Alec Rothman and lived in Port Colborne, Ethel married Eddie Matchtinger and lived in Toronto and Abe never married. Yeva Fishman, the niece of Samuel Fishman married Morris Turk. Her father was (Frank Fishman?) and her mother was Sara Leah Fishman. Molly Fishman married Harry Title (Teitelebaum) (b. ca. 1903). They had three children, Greta (nee Title) Greisman, Sandra (nee Title) Samuels and Stephen (m. Carole Hillman, niece of Ben Hillman). Harry Teitelbaum is the son of Israel and Frumeth Teitelbaum. He was born in Gdansk Poland (b. ca., 1903). Harry Title had four younger siblings Lloyd, Birdie (m. Witlin), Arthur and Lorelle (Lieba) the youngest who was born in Toronto. Harry arrived to Canada shortly after the first world war and worked in the garment industry. He and his brother Arthur founded the Title Dress Company in the late 1920s and operated the business out of 355 Adelaide St. West. In the late 1980s, the business moved from this location to Adelaide and Bathurst. Sandra Title (b. Oct 27, 1936, Toronto), the middle daughter of Molly Fishman and Harry Title, married Lawrence Samuels. Together they had five children Joanna, John, Noah, Tom and Caroline. Lawrence was the eldest son of Alex Samuels (d. 1966) and Kate (nee Goldberg) Samuels. He had two younger siblings Herbie and Florence (m. Bill Goodman). Lawrence's father Alex Samuels immigrated to Canada from Dubrovna, White Russia (present day Dubrouna, Belarus). He immigrated to Canada with his parents Samuel and Chana Samuels and his younger siblings Sol, Ben, Riva and Polly. Alex and his brothers Sol and Ben established Reliable Toy Company in (ca. 1929) on Carlaw Ave. They sold the company in 1990.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Business and commerce
Arts and culture
Places
Welland, Ont.
Toronto, Ont.
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-10
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
19 photographs : b&w and col. ; 31 x 41 cm and smaller
Date
1916-2007
Scope and Content
Accession consists of family photographs from Penny Rubinoff's mother Rachel (née Rosenberg) Rubinoff and her Aunt Anne (née Rosenberg) Glickman. Textual records include a promotional poster and flyer from Hadassah's 1967 membership campain in which Penny Rubinoff appeared as a model. In addition, there is a 2007 issue of Orah magazine, Hadassah's annual magzazine showcasing a the oriingal promotional poster form the 1967 campaign on page 17.
Custodial History
Penny's mother Rachel, received 12 photographs in this accession from her sister Anne.
Administrative History
Penny Rubinoff is the daughter of David Rubinoff (b. 1913, Rechitsa, Belarus-d. 2008,Toronto) and Rachel (Rae) Rosenberg (b. ca.1916, Toronto). David and Rae moved from Toronto to London, Ontario in 1939 with their infant son Robert (Bob) and opened a ladies' clothing shop "Leeds of London", the first of several successful dress shops that David operated in southwestern Ontario. In the early 1960s, Bob took over the clothing chain and David, among other land development pursuits, opened the first local Holiday Inn hotel. This hotel became the first in his company "Commonwealth Holiday Inns" that he eventually built across Canada, the Caribbean and Europe. David was involved in London's local Jewish community. He served as President of the B'nai Israel Synagogue, assisted with land acquisition for Or Shalom (the 1966 amalgamation of the B’nai Israel and B’nai Moses ben Judah congregations) and the Jewish Community Centre. He participated in the formation of London's Hebrew Day School and supported the local UJA campaign.
Penny's mother Rachel (née Rosenberg) Rubinoff, is the daughter of Philip Rosenberg (b. ca. 1870, (Bialobrzegi, Poland) and Ruth Rosenberg (b. Rachel ca. 1877, Radom, Poland). Philip and Ruth had seven children; Jenny, Morris, Becky (b. ca. 1903, Poland), Rose (b. ca. 1905, Poland), Edyth (b. 1908, Poland), Anne Glickman (b. 1909, Poland) and Rachel Rubinoff (b. 1916, Ontario).
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Rubinoff, Penny
B'nai Israel Synagogue (London, Ont.)
Places
London, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-13
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
8 photographs : b&w ; 41 x 51 cm and smaller
1 object
1 book
Date
[193-]-1976
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of Sandra (née Title) Samuels; a hanger from Shiffer-Hillman and a published book "The Prominent Jews of Canada" that belonged to Sandra's in-laws, Kate and Alex Samuels.
Administrative History
Samuel (ca. 1882-1929, Russia) and Gussie (nee Moscovitz) (b. ca.1884, Romania) Fishman, immigrated to Welland, Ontario from Romania. Both arrived in the United States as teenagers sometime around the turn of the century. Samuel and Gussie were married in the United States and by 1920 had immigrated with their young family to the historic township of Crowland in Welland County. Here they opened and operated a men's clothing store. Together they had six children; Molly (b. 1909, USA), Abe (b. 1911, USA), Morris (b. 1916, USA), Ruth (b. 1915, USA), Ann (b. 1920, Ontario) and Ethel. Morris married Pauline and lived in St. Catherines, Ruth married Nate Oelbaum and lived in Tucson, Arizona, Anne married Alec Rothman and lived in Port Colborne, Ethel married Eddie Matchtinger and lived in Toronto and Abe never married. Yeva Fishman, the niece of Samuel Fishman married Morris Turk. Her father was (Frank Fishman?) and her mother was Sara Leah Fishman. Molly Fishman married Harry Title (Teitelebaum) (b. ca. 1903). They had three children, Greta (nee Title) Greisman, Sandra (nee Title) Samuels and Stephen (m. Carole Hillman, niece of Ben Hillman). Harry Teitelbaum was the son of Israel and Frumeth Teitelbaum. He was born in Gdansk, Poland (b. ca., 1903). Harry Title had four younger siblings; Lloyd, Birdie (m. Witlin), Arthur and Lorelle (Lieba) the youngest who was born in Toronto. Harry arrived to Canada shortly after the First World War and worked in the garment industry. He and his brother Arthur founded the Title Dress Company in the late 1920s and operated the business out of 355 Adelaide St. West. In the late 1980s, the business moved from this location to Adelaide and Bathurst. Sandra Title (b. Oct 27, 1936, Toronto), the middle daughter of Molly Fishman and Harry Title, married Lawrence Samuels. Together they had five children Joanna, John, Noah, Tom and Caroline. Lawrence was the eldest son of Alex Samuels (d. 1966) and Kate (nee Goldberg) Samuels. He had two younger siblings Herbie and Florence (m. Bill Goodman). Lawrence's father Alex Samuels immigrated to Canada from Dubrovna, White Russia (present day Dubrouna, Belarus). He immigrated to Canada with his parents Samuel and Chana Samuels and his younger siblings Sol, Ben, Riva and Polly. Alex and his brothers Sol and Ben established Reliable Toy Company around 1929 on Carlaw Ave. They sold the company in 1990.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Samuels, Sandra, 1936-
Shiffer-Hillman (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-6
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
2 photographs (tiff) : b&w
Date
1897-1960, 1993
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the activities of Eli Bloch. Included are photocopies of correspondence, newsclippings, Eli's Canadian certificate of naturalization, travel documents, South African licenses, and a genealogical family tree for the Bloch family. Also included are two photographs of Eli in his later years.
Custodial History
The original records are in the possession of Gerry Bloch, the grandson of Eli Bloch. Gerry is the son of Eli's son Norman.
Administrative History
Eli (Elias) Bloch was born in 1872 to Nokhum Tevel Rabinovitch in Kishinev Moldava. He had four siblings: Golda, Joseph, Samuel and Bertha. In the 1890s Eli and his siblings (with the exception of Golda) immigrated to South Africa. Bertha married Theodore Dissler (an importer/exporter). During the Boer War, Eli and his brother Joseph fought with the Dutch. After the war, Dissler employed Eli in his business. In 1907, Dissler sent Eli to sell ostrich feathers in various cities around the world, including: London (England), Montreal and Toronto. While in Toronto, Eli attended the First Roumanian Hebrew Congregation Adath Israel where he met his future wife Leah Madnok and chose to remain in Ontario, without completing his task of selling ostrich feathers in the remaining cities on his itinerary. He married Leah in 1909. From about 1911 until 1922, Eli and Leah lived in Gravenhurst and ran a general store on the main street. They had four children together: Harry (1912-1945), Rose (1914-1994), Rachel (Rae) (1916-2000), and Norman (1916-1989). Rachel and Norman were twins.
In 1922, Elias and Leah moved to Mactier and opened a general store. By 1926, Leah and the children were living in London, ON and Elias continued to operate the general store. He saw the family regularly. Around 1935, Elias left Mactier. He remained in London until he moved to Toronto in 1942. Elias passed away in Toronto in 1960.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: English, Yiddish, and Russian
Subjects
Land, settlement and immigration
Personal and family life
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-2
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
19 photographs (tiff)
Date
[1909?]-[196-?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of scanned images of the Fromstein family, particularly relating to Harry and his wife Pearl. Included are family portraits, images of Harry while he was interning at Hashmall's Drugstore and working in his own pharmacy called Central Drugs, an image from a Rokeah Chapter dinner, and other images of the family at a cottage (possibly Tent City or Belle Ewart), in the backyard of their home (likely on Palmerston) and at Sunnyside Beach.
Custodial History
Carol is the daughter is Harry and Pearl Fromstein.
Administrative History
Harry was born in London, England in 1907 to Getzl (from Obodovka, Podolia, Russia) and Yetta (nee Kramer; from Kosow, Stanislawow, Galicia) Fromstein. Harry had six siblings: Max (Mendel, b. 1902 in Kosow), Anne (Chava Yita, b. 23 Sept. 1905 in London), Shep (b. 1911 in London), Minnie (b. 1916? in Toronto), Joe (b. 1918 in Toronto) and Sam (Shimmy, b. 1919 in Toronto). The family immigrated to Toronto in 1912. Getzl arrived first and then paid for the passage for his wife and children. Getzl was a cantor who also wrote music. He also worked as a presser.
Harry attended the College of Pharmacy at the University of Toronto. As part of his training, he did an internship at Hashmall's Drug Store. Harry graduated in 1932. He married Pearl Shimmerman soon after graduation in 1932. They had met at Pearl's sweet 16 birthday party and had been engaged for 5 years.
Pearl was born in 1911 to Aaron and Malka Shimmerman in Pomorzany, Austria (now in the Ukraine). Pearl was the youngest of seven children. Her siblings were: Tzivia (married name Toben), Max, Toby (married name Rockfeld), Sam, Joe, and Anne (married name Kerbel). She immigrated to Toronto with her family when she was 3 months old. Her family lived at 102 Huron Street and Aaron worked as a labourer (collecting and selling scraps of fabric).
Pearl and Harry had two children together: Jerry (Gerald ; b. 1934) and Carol (b. 1937). By 1935, Harry had opened his own drugstore called Central Drugs, located at Church and Queen. The family initially lived above the store. The store moved a few times, but always remained in one of the corner units at the intersection of Church and Queen. Harry eventually moved his store north to Davenport and Dupont. After many years, his store was finally moved to Dufferin Street at Castlefield and re-named Castlefield Drugs. During the summer, the family regularly rented cottages at Tent City and Belle Ewart.
Carol married Harold Tanenbaum in 1956. They had three children together: Mark, Cheryl, and Michelle.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Health services and medicine
Occupations and professions
Personal and family life
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1.2 m of textual records
ca. 250 photographs : b&w and col.
Date
1776, [191-]-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the records related to the life and career of Dr. Fred Wienberg. Included are textual and photographic records documenting his personal and family life, his medial career, scholarly activities, involvement with the Jewish community, his collecting of Judaica, medical antiques and art, and his synagogue involvement. Other items include the Ostrovtzer Mutual Benefit Society minute book and a 1776 letter from Jonas Phillips, a veteran of the American Revolutionary War and an American merchant in New York City and Philadelphia.
Administrative History
Fred Weinberg (1919-2003) was born in Ostrawiec, Poland on July 6, 1919 to Rose and Israel Weinberg. Israel immigrated to Canada in 1920 and his wife and children joined him several years later in March of 1924. The family settled in Toronto where Israel worked in the fur manufacturing business. Israel was a supporter and aficionado of cantorial music as well as a founder of the Associated Hebrew Schools of Toronto and the Ostrovtzer Synagogue on Cecil Street.
Fred completed his primary and secondary education at Clinton Street Public School and Harbord Collegiate. He also attended the Brunswick Talmud Torah, celebrating his bar mitzvah in 1932. Fred decided to pursue a medical career, graduating from the University of Toronto’s medical school in 1944. During his studies he enlisted in the army and completed officers’ training in April 1945, attaining the rank of Captain. During his military career he served in the RCAMC at Camp Borden, Christie St. Hospital and at the Stanley Barracks in Toronto. Towards the end of the war he served as Officer in charge of repatriation of the POWs.
After the war Fred pursued his post-graduate work at Seaview and Bellevue hospitals in New York City from 1946 to 1947 and then moved on to the Children’s and Washington University hospitals in St. Louis, Missouri the following year. He was subsequently accepted as a resident at Sick Kids Hospital in Toronto and was ultimately appointed Chief Resident under the supervision of the internationally renowned paediatrician, Dr. Alan Brown. In 1950, Dr. Weinberg was hired as a physician in paediatrics at Sick Kids Hospital, making him the first Jewish doctor on staff. In addition to his staff responsibilities, he also lectured and was a faculty member at the University of Toronto’s Medical School for many years.
By the mid-point of his career, Dr. Weinberg went on to specialise in Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), delivering lectures and publishing articles in medical journals. He also ran his own practice, which operated from 1950 to 1976, and later become Associate Medical Director of the Child Development Clinic, Neurology Division of Sick Kids until his retirement in 1984. He later continued his service at Sick Kids as a senior staff consultant and ran a specialized practice in Developmental Pediatrics for close to twenty years, which was later situated at 208 Bloor Street West.
Fred married Joy Cherry on December 16, 1952 at Goel Tzedec Synagogue. The couple had four children: Joel (b. 1953), Barry (b. 1955), Sari (b. 1956) and Deena (b. 1961). Throughout his life, Fred was actively engaged in Jewish communal work in a variety of capacities: assisting with the establishment of the United Synagogue Day School during the 1950s; as a fundraiser for the United Jewish Appeal (UJA); and as a participant in two of UJA’s early study missions to Israel in 1960 and 1961. He was also an influential figure within his synagogue, joining the Board of Directors of Beth Tzedec Synagogue during the late 1960s and serving as President from 1972 to 1975.
Fred and his wife Joy also collected Judaica, antiques and artwork. As a physician, Fred developed a passion and expertise in the area of medical antiques. He published articles in both the mainstream and Jewish press on subjects related to Jewish rituals, Judaica and art. He also had a regular column in the Canadian Journal of Diagnosis from 1998 to 2002 entitled “Antique instruments”. Over time, the Weinberg’s assembled a world-class collection of Judaica and became increasingly active in the museum world. Fred assisted in the establishment of Beth Tzedec’s Helene and Rubin Dennis Jewish Museum, contributing items from the couple’s Judaica collection and securing the acquisition of the renowned Cecil Roth collection for the Museum during the early to mid-1960s. As a result of his significant contributions, he was bestowed the title of honourary curator to the Museum. Dr. Weinberg later branched out and assisted with the Koffler Gallery’s Lifecycle exhibition in 1984 as guest curator. The following year, he served as a special presenter and instructor to the docents at the “Precious Legacy” Czech Judaica exhibition at the ROM. The Weinberg’s most significant contribution to the museum world, however, was marked in September of 2000, when they were honoured at the opening of the Dr. Fred and Joy Cherry Weinberg Gallery of Judaica at the ROM, featuring some of their most valuable and treasured pieces.
Dr. Fred Weinberg passed away on October 30, 2003 at 84 years of age. The Weinberg Endowment Fund was established by the family at the University of Toronto’s Jewish Studies Program to honour Fred’s passion for Jewish history, rituals and artefacts. That year the Weinberg family also set up a fund in Fred’s name in support of the Therapeutic Clown Program, a highly visible and successful program within Sick Kids’ Pediatric Division.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Use Conditions Note: Records contain patient names and medical information.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Arts and culture
Health services and medicine
Community service
Name Access
Weinberg, Fred, 1919-2003
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-11
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-11
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
14 photographs : col. (jpg)
Date
[1981?]-2009
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting various trips Nicole Cohen took to South Africa as a child and adult. Photographs predominatly document Nicole visiting sites around Johannesburg, particularly her family's old apartment building. Also included are photographs of Nicky visiting her grandparents as a child, reconnecting with her family's maid, and visiting the Nelson Mandela Square with her children. Also included is one photograph of Nicole's brother, Jeremy David Cohen, in front of the Cohen family home in Thornhill (1984?).
Administrative History
Nicole (Nicky) Cohen was born in Johannesburg, South Africa to John Cohen and Viviane (nee Lehwess) Cohen in 1972. She has two siblings: Steven (b. 1974), and Jeremy David (1979). Viviane worked as a physiotherapist and John as a textile sales agent. Due to the unstable political situation in South Africa, the family immigrated to North York in March 1977. For the first few weeks, they lived in a rental apartment in North York. They soon moved into a townhouse nearby. In 1980, they bought their first house in Thornhill. Both John and Viviane were able to continue in their professions after immigrating to Canada. The family regularly visited South Africa.
Nicole is a clinical psychologist in Toronto. She married Jordan Kerpinsky on May 16, 1999. They have three children together: Hayley, Justin, and Ryan.
Descriptive Notes
Related Material Note: for an oral history interview with Nicole Cohen see AC 422, for other Cohen family material see accession #2015-3/8.
Subjects
Land, settlement and immigration
Personal and family life
Travel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-7
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
60 cm of textual records
Date
1966-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records reflecting the academic, personal and literary life of Dr. Gerald Tulchinsky. Included are the final manuscript, research notes, edits and anciliary materials related to Tulchinsky's book on J. B. Salsberg; a large amount of general research and many unpublished articles on Canada's clothing industry and the Jewish involvment, particularly in Montreal and Toronto; correspondence to various granting bodies; folders of story ideas; genalogical research notes and an unpublished family history; research into a 1950 fatal fire at a garment factory at 447 Richmond St. W in Toronto; a unpublished poem; lecture notes; and personal records related to the lease of his home and the purchase of a Heinzman piano, which was dropped off the truck during delivery.
Of note is a memoir written by Ruth Talesnick documenting her parent's early involvment in the needle trade and a memoir by Anne Tulchinsky, Jerry's mother.
Administrative History
Dr. Gerald Tulchinsky is Professor Emeritus at Queen's University, Department of History, and author of several books on the history of Canadian Jewry and labour issues in Canada. His books include: Shtetl on the Grand (2015); Joe Salsberg: A Life of Commitment (2013); Canada's Jews: A People's Journey (2008); Branching Out: The Transformation of the Canadian Jewish Community (1998); Taking Root: The Origins of the Canadian Jewish Community (1992); and The River Barons: Montreal Businessmen and the Growth of Industry and Transportation, 1837-53 (1977).
Tulchinsky was born in Brantford, Ontario in 1933 to Harry and Anne Tulchinsky. He currently resides in Kingston, Ontario.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Descriptive Notes
SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE: This accession also includes numerous books, some of wihch don't relate to our mandate and others which are duplicates of our current holdings. The books that we have retained have been integrated into the OJA's library holdings.
USE CONDITION NOTE: Access restricted until ten years after the donor's death, at the donor's request.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Tulchinsky, Gerald, 1933-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 300 photographs : b&w, sepia and col. (1 negative) ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
40 cm of textual records
Date
[189-]-2007
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records created and accumulated by Bill Gladstone in the course of researching his book on the genealogical lineage of the Naftolin and Rubinoff families. Included are photographs of the Shmuel Chaim and Rachel Rubinoff branch, the Aaron Rubinowitz branch, the Benjamin Rubinoff branch, the Arnoff branch and the Naftolin branch. The photographs are in the form of family and individual portraits, candid snapshots, event photographs, Rubinoff store exteriors, and photographs of various life event celebrations. The textual records consist of research notes and copied material from various sources detailing the lives of individual family members.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
FINDING AID NOTE: It is recommended that researchers consult the book "One Hundred Years in Canada: the Rubinoff-Naftolin Family Tree" for more context when viewing the material.
USE CONDITIONS NOTE: Donor retains copyright for all original research and writing. Donor wishes to be notified prior to publication. Publication requests must receive permission from donor, if possible.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Gladstone, Bill
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-10
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1932
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the wedding invitation for the marriage of Sylvia Mehr and Arthur Warshavsky, as well as photocopies of original announcments of the marriage in the Jewish Standard and another unknown publication, and a copy of M. Mehr & Co. Limited letterhead. The company dealt in iron, steel and metals and was located at the foot of Bathurst St.
Administrative History
Sylvia Mehr was the daughter of Mandel Mehr. She married Arthur Warshavsky in 1932 at her parent's home at 126 Lauder Ave.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Mehr, Mandel
Mehr, Sylvia
Warshavsky, Arthur
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-15
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-15
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 m of textual records
ca. 200 photographs
Date
[189-]-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records created and collected by Bill Gladstone during the course of his research into the family history and genealogy of the Naftolin and Rubinoff families and their various branches. Included are Gladstone's extensive research files on each member of the family, which consist of hand-written research notes, correspondence with family members and government officials, newsclippings, copies of vital statistics, immigration and citizenship records, certificates, bereavement and sympathy cards, telegrams and congratulatory anniversary cards, invitations, and photographs.
Accession also consists of records related to the Agudas Hamishpocha, the family mutual benefit society and social club that was formed in 1928 by the Naftolin and Rubinoff families. These records include meeting invitations and flyers, anniversary and jubilee books, membership lists, photographs, loan society materials, newsclippings and articles, research notes, and a copy of the letters of incorporation.
Administrative History
Bill Gladstone is a direct decendent of the Naftolin-Rubinoff family. The five branches of the family as researched by Gladstone are the Rachel Rubinowitz and Shmuel Chaim Rubinowitz branch; Riva Rishe Rubinowitz and Itsha Maisha Naftolin branch; Binyamin (Benjamin) Rubinoff and Esther Dobin branch; Minya Rubinowitz and Elimelech Arnoff branch; and Aaron Rubinowtiz and Esther Cahansky branch. Rachel, Riva Rishe, Binyamin, Minya and Aaron were all siblings. Other family names include Cohen, Slovin, Rosensweig, Patlik and Alter.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
FINDING AID NOTE: It is recommended that researchers consult the book "One Hundred Years in Canada: the Rubinoff-Naftolin Family Tree" for more context when viewing the material.
USE CONDITION NOTE: Donor retains copyright for all original research and writing. Donor wishes to be notified prior to publication. Publication requests must receive permission from donor, if possible.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Gladstone, Bill
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-26
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-26
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
4 folders of textual records
ca. 10 photographs : col. ; 22 x 28 cm or smaller
Date
1980-2016, predominant 1982-1994
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Herman family's immigration to Ontario, family life in Thornhill, education, communal involvement in Hamilton, and their business endeavours with the Firwin Corporation and Simply Extraordinary. Included are photographs; a family history that was written in commemoration of Paul and Miriam's fiftieth wedding anniversary; a selection of annual family newsletters that detail their life in Canada; correspondence documenting Paul's involvement with Temple Anshe Sholom in Hamilton, Ontario; their childrens' school certificates, secondary school diplomas, and post-secondary convocation programs. Also included is business ephemera, such as, business cards and images documenting Simply Extraordinary corporate gift products.
Identified in the photographs are: Paul Herman, Miriam Herman, Brett Herman, and Adina Ward (nee Herman).
Administrative History
Paul Henry Herman was born on July 3, 1940 to Mr. Leslie Elkan and Mrs. Clare Herman (nee Emdon) of Dunkeld West, Johannesburg, South Africa. Paul is the eldest of five siblings. During his youth, Paul was involved in his synagogue and youth groups as well as the Boy Scouts. He attended Stellenbosch Afrikaans University where he earned a business degree and became fluent in Afrikaans. After university, he joined the family uniform business, H. J. Henochsberg, and was sent to England in 1962 for further clothing industry training.
Paul married Miriam Riva Herman from Wynberg, Cape Town, SA on February 6th, 1965. Miriam worked as a social worker at the Johannesburg General Hospital. Their first son, Stanley, was born in 1966 followed by Rael in 1968, Brett in 1970 and Adina in 1974.
The Herman’s were motivated to emigrate out of a desire to prevent their son from having to enlist in the South Africa army [and thereby become involved in military efforts that they did not support]. After the family business was sold, Paul worked as a quality manager at Edgars Stores while periodically travelling abroad with Miriam to seek out emigration opportunities.
The Herman family came to Canada in 1982 and settled in Thornhill, Ontario. Upon arriving in Ontario, Paul found work at a uniform manufacturer (Saint Hill Levine Uniforms) then at Lady Manhattan and Sunshine T-Shirts. In 1989, Paul and Miriam purchased Firwin Corporation, a high temperature insulation manufacturing company. During the family’s early years in Canada, Miriam started a corporate gift business called Simply Extraordinary.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Land, settlement and immigration
Occupations and professions
Personal and family life
Societies and associations
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-60
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-60
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
ca. 5 cm of textual records
2 photographs : col. & b&w ; 10 x 15 cm and 5 x 4 cm
Date
1972-2010, predominant 1977-1983
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the Robinson family's immigration to Ontario as well as Morris Robinson's professional history and business activities with Libman and Company.
Included is family correspondence; the Robinson's customs paperwork and travel documents; Morris' curriculum vitae, professional records and some documentation of his business activities; and genealogical accounts of the Robinson family including a history by Lilian Henry. Of note is a letter Morris Robinson sent to Irma when he first arrived in Boston on his way to Toronto as well as letters Morris' parents hand delivered to Irma just before she left with the children to join Morris in Canada.
Identified in the photographs are: Morris Robinson and Phoebe Robinson.
Custodial History
Material was in possession of Morris Robinson. Morris donated it to the OJA.
Administrative History
Morris Robinson was born in Cape Town, South Africa on May 27th, 1948 and grew up in Benoni. He completed his Bachelor of Commerce degree at the University of Witwatersrand and graduated as a Chartered Accountant in 1973. On February 25th, 1973. Morris married Irma Startz who was born in Benoni, South Africa on December 10, 1951. Irma earned a Bachelor of Arts degree at the University of Witwatersrand and went on to obtain a Post-Graduate Higher Teacher's Diploma. The Robinsons have three sons. Their first son, Marc, was born in South Africa on September 26th, 1976 (just a few months after the Soweto riots). Their sons Frank (b. December 31, 1980) and Daniel (b. March 12, 1985) were born in Toronto.
The Robinsons were motivated by political unrest, which manifested in the anti-apartheid Soweto uprising of June 1976, and the desire for a safe future for their family, to seek opportunity abroad and to emigrate. In February of 1977, Morris heard through friends about an accounting job opportunity in Canada and was officially appointed to the post of comptroller at Libman and Company, then Canadas’ largest jewellery manufacturer. The Robinsons arrived in Toronto in early 1978 and settled in Thornhill, Ontario. In 1989, Morris became a partner of Libman and Company. During his career in the jewellery industry, Morris was involved with the Canadian Jewellers Association and served as the organization's chairman. He was also a founding member and first treasurer of the Diamond Bourse of Canada. Irma pursued a teaching career with the Toronto District School Board, specializing in ESL and eventually becoming the principal at an ESL school for adults. The Robinsons were founding members of Shaar Shalom Synagogue. In 2012 the Robinsons sold the family home in Thornhill and moved into the city to be closer to their children and grandchildren.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Business and commerce
Land, settlement and immigration
Personal and family life
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-51
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-51
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
2006
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a copy of one family memoir written by Joy Lowenstein, documenting the Lowenstein and Lipinski families.
Custodial History
Material was in possession of Joy Lowenstein.
Administrative History
Joy Lowenstein (nee Lipinski) was born in June 1930 to Rose Davis and Teddy (Edward) Lipinski of Johannesburg, South Africa. Joy married Jules (Julius) Lowenstein on October 8th, 1950 at the Yeoville Shul in Johannesburg, The Lowensteins had three children who were all born in SA: David (b. 1952), Larry (b. 1955) and Kim (b. 1960). The Lowensteins were upset with South Africa’s apartheid politics and wanted to leave when David and Larry had finished their university studies.
David finished his studies at the University of Witwatersrand, but did not wish to serve in the SA army, which was mandatory for all young men. David left SA for Toronto in 1977. Kim, Joy and Jules emigrated from SA to Canada in 1977 and settled in North York. Larry worked abroad in the United States as an American Field Scholar; returned to SA to study at the University of Witwatersrand; pursued studies in law at Oxford; and then joined the family in Toronto in 1979. In Toronto, Joy and Jules opened a gift shop on Eglinton Avenue called Present Place which they owned until their retirement in 2004.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Land, settlement and immigration
Personal and family life
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-4
Material Format
textual record
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
33.2 MB of textual records
Date
1969-2002
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting the history and professional activities of Cy (Cyril) Charney and his family. Included is an autobiographical family history entitled "My Story" and a variety of documents that trace Cy's career including promotional materials from university courses that he taught; a curriculum vitae; copies of his university diplomas; management-related lecture programs; various certificates of achievement; and newspaper clippings.
Custodial History
Material was in possession of Cy Charney. Cy donated it to the OJA.
Administrative History
Cy (Cyril) Charney was was born on November 21st, 1944 in Johannesburg, South Africa to Daniel and Dora Charney. His parents emigrated from Lithuania to SA before the Second World War. Cy's family moved to Bulawayo in 1950 where his father founded the Anglo African Glass company. The family was involved with the community and were members of the Weitzman Country Club. Cy’s family moved back to Johannesburg after the sudden passing of his father in November of 1954.
Throughout his youth, Cy was involved in South African Zionist organizations. During his early years and into young adulthood he was part of Habonim, the Zionist Socialist movement. He then went on to join the Hebrew Order of David.
Cy married Rhona on March 26th, 1967. Shortly after the Six-Day War, the couple went to make aliyah in Israel. They relocated to Kibbutz Givat Chaim Bet, close to Hadera, some 50 km north of Tel Aviv. Their stay lasted six months and then they returned to SA where Cy worked in insurance. The Charneys had three chlidren who were all born in SA: Daneal (b. 6 February 1961), Thalia (b. 9 July 1970), and Davin (b. 28 May 1972). The Charneys have two granddaughters, Yael and Limona.
As the political situation in SA began to deteriorate in 1976, the Charneys decided to emigrate to Canada. Cy first arrived in London, Ontario upon arrival to Canada and then chose to settle in Toronto in mid-1980. Rhona and the children arrived three months later and in the meantime, Cy had found work with Loblaws. After a year, Cy sought different work opportunities with the Thorne, Stevenson, and Kellogg management consulting group. He then went on to start his own consulting business. Rhona has a Masters in Social Work and has pursued her profession.
The Charneys have been part of Temple Kol Ami since 1993.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Land, settlement and immigration
Personal and family life
Synagogues
Societies and associations
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-4-20
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-4-20
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 4 cm of textual records
7 photographs : col. ; 10 x 15 cm or smaller
Date
1953-2014, predominant 1965-1995
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic records documenting the history and professional activities of Ismé Bennie. The accession includes: a report card from Vereeniging Medium English High School; a SA identification card; documentation from her early employment history in SA; clippings of her work with News/Check magazine; newspaper articles documenting reactions to the "South Africa Speaks" documentary and her involvement with the production; correspondence received while working in public broadcasting at NET (National Educational Television, later succeeded by PBS [Public Broadcasting Service]) and OECA (Ontario Educational Communications Authority, also known as TVOntario); an invitation to the Canadian Film and Television Production Association (CFTPA) Personal Achievement Award party in 1990 and correspondence related to her receipt of the award; a commemmorative document written by Stuart Foxman entitled "Paragon International: Bennie Celebrates Decade at the Helm"; correspondence regarding Bennie's ten year anniversary at Paragon; an invitation to the CFTPA Jack Chisholm Award for Lifetime Contribution to the Motion Picture and Television Industry luncheon and correspondence related to her receipt of the award.
Identified in the photos are: Ismé Bennie and Veronica Tennant.
Custodial History
Material was in possession of Ismé Bennie. Isme donated it to the OJA.
Administrative History
Ismé Bennie was born in Vereeniging, South Africa in 1940. She graduated from Witwatersrand University in 1960 with a B.A. in Library Science. She intially worked as a librarian at the City of Johannesburg Library and briefly left SA to seek opportunity in London. After returning from London, Ismé worked as a writer, researcher and editor with News/Check magazine until the mid-1960s. During this period, she participated in the production of "South Africa Speaks"; a Peabody Award-winning NET/WGBH produced documentary that was critical of the apartheid regime.
Bennie left SA in 1965 in search of professional opportunity and to leave the politics of apartheid. She began working primarily in public broadcasting in the United States. She continued in this field after relocating to Canada 1960s and rose to success in production at OECA,
In 1983, she founded Ismé Bennie International, a media distribution company. After it merged with production company Paragon, Bennie returned to broadcasting. She joined CHUM, (the Toronto-based media company), as Director of Development, rising to Director of Programming and Acquisitions in 1995, and that year won the (CFTPA) Jack Chisholm Award. Previously, she had received the CFTPA Personal Achievement Award in 1990. In 2003, Women in Film and Television – Toronto (WIFT–T) recognized her contribution to supporting and developing women in broadcasting, and she received the WIFT-T Outstanding Achievement Award. Canadian Television Network (CTV) acquired CHUM in 2007 and Bennie was one of the executives retained in the acquisition. Around 2010, Bennie left CTV. Since leaving she has done consulting work and freelance writing. In 2015, she published a memoir entitled, White Schooldays : Coming of Age in Apartheid South Africa.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Related material note: oral history AC 429
Subjects
Women
Communications and publishing
Personal and family life
Land, settlement and immigration
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-56
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-56
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1930-1976
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a covering letter to Steve (presumably Speisman) from Sidney Harris dated September 14, 1976. The letter refers to two documents (a letter) one of which is in Hebrew and the other being its translation into English. The translation was performed by BGK (likely Ben Kayfetz). The covering letter refers to the Geldzaeler and Scheuer families and also refers to other documents being given to Steve. However, there were no other documents in the folder. The letter was from Mark Geldzaeler to Edmund Scheuer in thanks for a gift of a box of cigars.
Custodial History
There is no information on the acquisition of this material. However, it does appear to come from a family album of Sydney M. Harris.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Harris, Sydney M.
Scheuer, Edmund
Geldzaeler, Mark
Places
Toronto, Ontario
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-9-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-9-3
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
13 cm of textual records
5 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 26 or smaller
Date
1912-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the life of Pearl Freedhoff. The bulk of the material are speeches and other writings related to Pearl's position as President of the Goel Tzedec Sisterhood around 1949-1950, as well as material related to her role with the Eastern Canadian Branch of the Women's League of the United Synagogue. Also included is Pearl's hand-written memoir and the final bound copy edited by her daughter Judith Golden. The remaining records relate to Pearl's work as a travel guide and organizer of trips to Israel, East Asia, and the Lido Spa in Florida; dance cards from the 1920s; a small amount of personal correspondence with a friend living in England; Pearl and Samuel's wedding invitation; a letter to Pearl and her sister Hilda from their mother, Esther; newsclippings; photographs; and a book won as a second place prize by Pearl at Edmund Scheuer's Zionist girls' school.
Administrative History
Pearl (nee Narrol) Freedhoff (17 Sept. 1906-18 Dec. 1997) was born in 1906, the daughter of Harry and Esther (nee Newman) Narrol. She had four siblings: Albert, Gertie, Hilda (m. Spivak), and Mendell (died as infant). Pearl married Dr. Samuel Osias Freedhoff (24 July 1903-19 Feb. 1973) in 1927 and had two children: Stephen and Judith. Samuel was the son of Harry and Mollie (nee Bohnen) Freedhoff. Pearl graduated from the University of Toronto, School of Social Work and Samuel graduated from the School of Dentistry. Both were members of Goel Tzedec Synagogue with Pearl serving as Sisterhood President in 1949-1950 and Samuel as President of the Men's Club in 1952.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Synagogues
Name Access
Freedhoff, Pearl, 1906-1997
Freedhoff, Samuel, 1903-1973
Goel Tzedec Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-7
Material Format
sound recording
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
13 audio cassettes
1 folder of textual records (PDF)
Date
2001-2007
Scope and Content
Accession consists of audio cassette tapes containing interviews Lisa Newman conducted regarding the Rotenberg and Pines families. Included are interviews with: Aubey Rotenberg, Moe and Bernice Ceresne, Cyril Rotenberg, Lailla Rapoport, Laya Kurtz, David Rotenberg, Ken Rotenberg, Harvey Rotenberg, and Radha Ahuja (born Bluma Rotenberg).
Also included are textual records documenting the Rotenberg family's history. These include issues of the Ivansk Project e-newsletters, which contain entries written by Lisa Newman Greenspan (Issue #15 Nov.-Dec. 2005, Issue #23 Mar.-Apr. 2007, Issue #25 July-Aug. 2007).
Administrative History
Louis (Elazar / Loozer) Rotenberg immigrated to Toronto in 1893. He was the first Jew to immigrate to Toronto from Ivansk, Poland. He had married Rivka (nee Cukier) in 1883. She followed him to Toronto with their four children in 1895. They had an additional five children in Toronto. Their children were: Harry, Max, Meta, Louis (Leibish), Meyer, Zechariah (died at age 4 in 1906), Charlie, and Hilda. Louis eventually opened a banking, steamship and insurance office in Toronto with three of his sons (Louis Jr., Harry and Max) in 1916. The business eventually became known as Rotenberg's Ltd. Louis passed away in 1936.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Business and commerce
Personal and family life
Name Access
Rotenberg, Louis
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-10-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-10-7
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
3 photographs : sepia ; 19 x 24 cm
1 folder of textual records
Date
[ca. 1919]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a marriage certificate, invitation and photographs for the wedding of Sara Lavine and Max Rotenberg on 25 March 1919 in Toronto. Indentified in photos are Sara Lavine and Max Rotenberg and portraits of David Lavine and (Anne?) Lavine.
Administrative History
David and Anne are the parents of Sara Lavine and the grandparents of Risa Rotenberg. Anne lived in Marmora, Ontario and David may have owned a general store. Sara Lavine and Max Rotenberg are the parents of Risa Rotenberg.
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIAL NOTE: There is more material about the family of Max Rotenberg in accession 2015-7-14.
Subjects
Personal and family life
Name Access
Rotenberg, Risa
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-8-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-8-1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
9 cm of textual records
25 photographs : col., sepia and b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
1 crayon enlargment portrait : col. ; 12 x 19 cm
Date
1925-2003
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a colour crayon enlargement portrait of Bessie and Joseph Brown, "A Tribute to Bessie Brown" photograph album (Beth Jacob Synagogue and Sisterhood, Kitchener Ontario, 1976), photographs of Joseph, Bessie and Phillip Brown and [Beth Jacob Congregation's Sisterhood?] in 1964, a certificate of service and affiliaton at Beth Jacob for Bessie Brown, and newsletters from Beth Jacob and Beth Tikvah in Montreal (1980-2004).
Custodial History
Materials were donated by Cantor Avraham Fisher, who served at Beth Jacob from 1985-1994 and was a friend of the Brown family.
Administrative History
Bessie and Joesph Brown lived in Kitchener, Ontario. They had two children: Harry (b. 1926-?) and Phillip (1930-1939).
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIAL NOTE: Bessie, Joseph and Harry Brown appear in Beth Jacob membership lists in accession 2008-6-7
Subjects
Synagogues
Personal and family life
Name Access
Brown, Joseph
Brown, Bessie
Brown, Harry
Brown, Phillip, 1930-1939
Beth Jacob Congregation (Kitchener, Ont.)
Places
Kitchener, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
163 records – page 1 of 4.

Narrow By

Collection Name

Source

Format

Date

Description Level

Subject

Name

Place

Language

Restrictions

Available Digital Content