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761 records – page 1 of 16.
Accession Number
2015-11-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
2015-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records relating to Holy Blossom Temple and includes an Adult Education Guide (2015), L’Shanah Tovah Bulletin (2015) and Family & Youth Education Centre Programs 2015/2016 – 5776.
Administrative History
Nancy Draper is an active member of the Jewish community and has been a volunteer at the Ontario Jewish Archives for many years.
Subjects
Education
Synagogues
Name Access
Draper, Nancy
Holy Blossom Temple (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Bathurst St. (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-1-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-1-5
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 10 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1957-2015, predominant 1974-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting Claude Heimann's immigration to Canada, career, involvement with Temple Har Zion and family life. Included are photographs, correspondence, newsletters and journals, writings and presentations by Heimann, certificates, newspaper clippings, event and conference programs, and business cards. Also included are documents with the text used for Totum Research's website.
Administrative History
Claude Heimann was born on 21 March 1944 in Johannesburg, South Africa to Wilhelm (Bill) Otto Heimann and Lotte Heimann (nee Rosenberg). He received a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Witwatersrand in 1966. In 1969, he married Adele Masail at the Pine Street Synagogue in Johannesburg. They lived in Windsor Park, Johannesburg and had two children together: Nicole Heidi (now married to Marshall Starkman) and Marc Steven.
Claude initially worked for Market Research Africa interviewing farm workers across the country. In 1971 he joined Reader's Digest in South Africa as a Research Director. Believing there would not be a peaceful solution to apartheid, Claude had decided at a young age that he would evenutally leave South Africa. He hoped that Reader's Digest was a company that might be able to transfer him to work in another country. Ten years later, in 1981, an opportunity came up with the Canadian edition of Reader's Digest in a similar role. Claude accepted the position and immigrated with his family to Toronto in May 1981. For their first few months they lived at Glengrove Manor on Yonge Street between Lawrence and Eglinton. In July, they moved into their home in Thornhill. Adele initially stayed home with the family, but eventually worked as a bookkeeper for a variety of different businesses.
Claude left Reader's Digest in 1990 to become a partner in Totum Research. Throughout his career, Claude has served on the Research Committee of PMB and has been a member of the Board of Directors of CARF for whom he served as Technical Director. He has also served on a number of other media research related committees, including the Technical Committee of AMPS and the Magazines Canada Research Committee. Claude was also active on the Board of Temple Har Zion, holding a variety of positions, including: regular Board member, Vice President for Worship, Vice President, Treasurer, President and Past President for two years on the Executive. He also reported Board decisions for the THZ monthly bulletin.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes 2.3 MB of textual records, 6 photographs, 17 slides, and 26.3 MB of photographs.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Occupations
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Synagogues
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-29
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-29
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one document created by the Adath Israel Congregaion honouring the synagogue's past and present members who are veterans of the Second World War. The document lists approximately 180 names, most of whom are deceased.
Subjects
Synagogues
Veterans--Canada
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Adath Israel Congregation (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-30
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-30
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
5 cm of textual records (3 vol.)
Date
1953-1956, 1960-1961
Scope and Content
Accession consists of three bound volumes of the Holy Blossom Temple Bulletin for the years September 1953 to June 1954; August 1955 to May 1956; and September 1960 to July 1961.
Custodial History
There is no information on the acquisition of these records. The accession number has been assigned by the archivist.
Descriptive Notes
RELATED MATERIAL NOTE: Holy Blossom Temple bulletins can also be found in MG3 A1.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
Holy Blossom Temple (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-27
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-27
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
Date
1981-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records of the Congregation Habonim. Included are synagogue bulletins, general correspondence with the membership, event programs and flyers, three financial statements from 1981 and 1987, and records related to invited speakers at the synagogue's breakfast club.
Administrative History
Congregation Habonim Toronto, founded in 1954, is a liberal synagogue located at 5 Glen Park Avenue in Toronto, and one of the first Holocaust refugee/survivor congregations to develop in Canada. Although currently independent of any official denomination, its early founders modeled the synagogue on the example of early Reform Judaism in Germany.
Most of the early members were refugees from Central Europe: some were Holocaust survivors; some were part of the Kindertransport. All arrived in Canada after the Second World War and began to frequent the New World Club, an organization that was dedicated to helping these newcomers settle into Canadian life. In 1953, they organized High Holiday services, and in 1954, they began to hold regular religious services. In 1955, the Congregation was officially chartered. They began holding services in rented premises at 44 St. George Street, Toronto and then moved to the Borochov Centre on Lippincott Street. In 1958, the present building at 5 Glen Park Avenue was rented, and then purchased in 1968.
One of its founders and first President was George Spitz, a Jewish refugee from Berlin, who unsuccessfully attempted to bring over his family from Germany in 1939 on the ill-fated MS St. Louis. Paul Alexander, also a refugee of Berlin, was an early Vice-President of the synagogue. Some of the notable figures associated with the Congregation are Esther Ghan Firestone, the first female cantor in Canada; Rabbi Reuben Slonim (author, and also associate editor of The Toronto Telegram), known for his outspoken views on the Israeli-Arab conflict; Cantor Henry Weingluck, a well known artist who was a pupil of Max Liebermann; and Avrum Rosensweig, founder of Ve’ahavta, the Canadian Jewish Humanitarian Relief Organization.
The synagogue makes its facilities available to a number of other organizations, including Ve’ahavta, co-sponsoring a Passover Seder for the Homeless every year and the Toronto Partnership Minyan, an Orthodox egalitarian initiative in Toronto spearheaded by Professor Martin Lockshin, and has co-sponsored events with other organizations outside the Jewish community such as Free the Children and Me to We. The Congregation supports a choir, the Habonim Youth Choir and is also home to Canada's only multi-denominational introductory conversion course.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
Congregation Habonim of Toronto
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-4-21
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-4-21
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
2006-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting the history and activities of Holy Blossom Temple. Included are synagogue bulletins (2014-2016), pamphlets and a calendar of events. Of note are a series of pamphlets created by the Holy Blossom Temple Archives Committee on various topics including, the history of the synagogue, the synagogue building, the history of education at the synagogue and early founders/leaders (Edmund Scheuer, Abraham Nordheimer, Lewis Samuel, Sigmund Samuel, Alfred Benjamin, and Frank D. Benjamin).
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
Holy Blossom Temple (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-4
Material Format
textual record
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
33.2 MB of textual records
Date
1969-2002
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting the history and professional activities of Cy (Cyril) Charney and his family. Included is an autobiographical family history entitled "My Story" and a variety of documents that trace Cy's career including promotional materials from university courses that he taught; a curriculum vitae; copies of his university diplomas; management-related lecture programs; various certificates of achievement; and newspaper clippings.
Custodial History
Material was in possession of Cy Charney. Cy donated it to the OJA.
Administrative History
Cy (Cyril) Charney was was born on November 21st, 1944 in Johannesburg, South Africa to Daniel and Dora Charney. His parents emigrated from Lithuania to SA before the Second World War. Cy's family moved to Bulawayo in 1950 where his father founded the Anglo African Glass company. The family was involved with the community and were members of the Weitzman Country Club. Cy’s family moved back to Johannesburg after the sudden passing of his father in November of 1954.
Throughout his youth, Cy was involved in South African Zionist organizations. During his early years and into young adulthood he was part of Habonim, the Zionist Socialist movement. He then went on to join the Hebrew Order of David.
Cy married Rhona on March 26th, 1967. Shortly after the Six-Day War, the couple went to make aliyah in Israel. They relocated to Kibbutz Givat Chaim Bet, close to Hadera, some 50 km north of Tel Aviv. Their stay lasted six months and then they returned to SA where Cy worked in insurance. The Charneys had three chlidren who were all born in SA: Daneal (b. 6 February 1961), Thalia (b. 9 July 1970), and Davin (b. 28 May 1972). The Charneys have two granddaughters, Yael and Limona.
As the political situation in SA began to deteriorate in 1976, the Charneys decided to emigrate to Canada. Cy first arrived in London, Ontario upon arrival to Canada and then chose to settle in Toronto in mid-1980. Rhona and the children arrived three months later and in the meantime, Cy had found work with Loblaws. After a year, Cy sought different work opportunities with the Thorne, Stevenson, and Kellogg management consulting group. He then went on to start his own consulting business. Rhona has a Masters in Social Work and has pursued her profession.
The Charneys have been part of Temple Kol Ami since 1993.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Synagogues
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-5-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-5-8
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 photograph : col. ; 20 x 25 cm
Date
1982-1990, 2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of graphic and textual records documenting the Judelman family and Alan Judelman's involvement with the Men’s Service Group at Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care. Documents include a family photograph (Jan. 2015); two issues of the Baycrest News (December 1982 and May 1990); and an invitation to the 1990 Men’s Service Group at Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care Annual Dinner and Installation of Officers.
Custodial History
Material was in possession of Alan and Lin Judelman. The Judelmans donated it to the OJA.
Administrative History
Alan (b. 1939) and Linda (b. 1945, nee Galland) Judelman were born in Johannesburg, South Africa. They were married on January 5th, 1965. Alan was trained as a chartered account and Lin completed a B.A. degree at Witwatersrand University and teacher training. The Judelmans have three children who were all born in SA: Andrew, Vanessa and Greg.
In 1978, political unrest in SA prompted the Judelmans to emigrate. Upon immigration to Canada, the family settled in North York. Alan graduated as a chartered accountant in Canada and eventually went on to start an environmental services company (Diproinduca Canada). Lin re-trained as a teacher and pursued a B.Ed. at York University. She specialized in ESL, history and guidance over the course of her 21 year career at the TDSB.
Alan was actively involved with the Men’s Service Group at Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care in his capacity as the organization’s president. He volunteered with HAIT (organization that promotes head injury awareness and knowledge) and served on the Bernard Betel Centre for Creative Living Board of Directors. The Judelmans are members of the Beth Tikvah synagogue and Alan has also volunteered with the congregation.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Societies
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Synagogues
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-6-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-6-12
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 60 cm of textual records
11 photographs (3 negatives) : b&w ; 20 x 25 cm or smaller
Date
1976-[ca. 1990]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic records that trace Natan Sharansky's history as a prisoner of political conscience; the broader Refusenik issue; and the community advocacy efforts of Debby and Stan Solomon from 1976 and into the late 1980s at the local, national and international scales. Included are memos and newsletters from the Committee for Soviet Jewry (Ontario Region and national-level); background information as well as petition templates, speeches and planning documentation produced by the Committee to Release Anatoly Sharansky and the Beth Tikvah Synagogue in conjunction with community organizations, including the CJC and its Soviet Jewry social action committees, to support on-going advocacy efforts; correspondence with Canadian and American political representatives at the provincial/state and national levels; white papers/grey literature from non-governmental organizations about the persecution of the Soviet Jewry; planning documentation from the First Annual Sharansky Lectureship on Human Rights in 1980; correspondence, articles and ephemera associated with the granting of Sharansky's honourary law doctorate from York University in 1982; 1985 Freedom Rally/Weekend in Ottawa planning documentation and correspondence; 1987 National Conference on the Soviet Jewry and Mobilization for Freedom planning documentation; 1987 Community Rally at Massey Hall promotional materials; and promotional materials from Sharansky's autobiographical "Fear No Evil" 1988 book launch. Graphic material includes photographs of Sharansky's release during the February 11, 1986 American-Soviet prisoner exchange on the Glienicke Bridge in Berlin.
Identified in the photographs are: Debby Solomon; Alan Solomon; Natan Sharansky; Avital Sharansky; U.S. Ambassador Richard Burt;
Custodial History
Material was collected and/or created by Debby Solomon, Natan Sharansky's cousin. Debby donated it to the OJA.
Administrative History
Debby Solomon is the cousin of Anatoly (Natan) Sharansky, the Soviet born Israeli politician, human activist and author who spent nine years in Soviet prisons. Debby's father Boris Landis (born 1900) and Sharansky's father were first cousins.Their grandfathers were brothers. Debby's father immigrated 1929 to Toronto from Russia as his older brothers were already in Toronto. Debby and her husband Stan Solomon got involved in the community's activism efforts to free Sharansky and other Refuseniks.They were worked for many years on these efforts by planning programs through their synagogue Beth Tikvah and with Sam Filer, a lawyer and volunteer at the CJC who was also a member of Beth Tikvah.
Subjects
Antisemitism
Politics and government
Human rights
Demonstrations
Synagogues
Committees
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-48
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-48
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
15 photographs : b&w and col.
Date
[196-?]-1985
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of the Kiever Synagogue. There are 12 images in black and white of both the exterior and the interior. These photos appear to be from the 1960s. There are also three colour photographs, two of which are of the exterior and one of which is of the interior during a service.
Custodial History
There is no information on the acquisition of this material. There is a name on the envelope that holds the photographs but the name cannot be deciphered.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
Kiever Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Toronto, Ontario
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-5-14
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-5-14
Material Format
architectural drawing
Physical Description
1 drawing : pencil ; 46 x 43 cm
Date
[ca. 1911]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a demonstration drawing by architect Benjamin Brown of a synagogue, that bears some resemblance to a later design proposal for Beth Jacob Synagogue. The drawing is of the synagogue's facade. This drawing was likely done when Brown was a student at the University of Toronto, School of Practical Science.
Custodial History
This drawing was part of the larger Benjamin Brown collection, but was not part of the original donation in 1987. It was framed and hanging in Jay Levine's office for many years.
Subjects
Architecture
Synagogues
Name Access
Brown, Benjamin
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-69
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-69
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1950-1991
Scope and Content
Accession consists of interviews with various persons concerning their link with Goel Tzedec and its successor synagogue, Beth Tzedec. The interviews were primarily conducted by Ben Keyfetz and Jack Orenstien, the latter serving as the Executive Director of Beth Tzedec, at that time. Persons interviewed included Carl Keyfetz, N.N. Levine, Meyer Axler, and Bert Godfrey. There is also other information in the file concerning Cantors and Rabbis who served at Goel Tzedec, including Julius Price, Bernard Wladowsky, Jacob Gordon, and Samuel Sachs. There is a document from Bert Godfrey, undated but with a reference to 1950, titled 'Report of Construction Sub-Committee'. This presumably preceded the construction of the building housing the Beth Tzedec Synagogue on Bathurst Street. Also included is a 1955 publication of the Ne'ilah Service of Beth Tzedec to take place on February 6, 1955, concluding a half century of worship at the synagogue on University Avenue. Lastly, there are several pages of notes concerning the synagogue and its history.
Custodial History
There is no information on the acquisition of this material.
Subjects
Committees
Synagogues
Rabbis
Name Access
Kayfetz, Benjamin, 1916-2002
Places
Toronto, Ontario
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-5-11
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-5-11
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w and sepia ; 114 x 25 cm and 54 x 21 cm
Date
1918, 1934
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two photographs: a panoramic of veterans and synagogue members standing in front of Goel Tzedec Synagogue, University Avenue, Toronto to mark the consecration and dedication of branch banners and flags; and a panoramic portrait featuring soldiers making up the 4th Draft of the Jewish Unit at the Imperial Recruits Depot in Halifax Nova Scotia.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
Synagogues
Veterans--Canada
Name Access
Hoffman, Sam
Places
Halifax, N.S.
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-8-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-8-9
Material Format
textual record
architectural drawing
Physical Description
1.3 m of textual records
ca. 50 architectural drawings
Date
1974-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the activities, programs and governance of Shaar Shalom Synagogue. Included are financial statements, meeting minutes, by-laws, brochures, architectural drawings, reports, membership lists, forms filled in by participants in life cycle events (such as weddings and conversions), holiday bulletins, invitations, speeches, Yizkor booklets, office manuals and correspondence. Of note is a land title document from 1981.
Administrative History
Shaar Shalom Synagogue was a conservative synagogue in Markham founded in 1972. The synagogue closed in 2016.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
Shaar Shalom Synagogue (Markham, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-11
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-11
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
architectural drawing
Physical Description
ca. 6 m textual records and graphic material
ca. 20 architectural drawings
Date
1972-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the activities, programs and governance of Shaar Shalom Synagogue. Included are financial records, meeting minutes and agendas, architectural drawings, general administrative files, and photographs.
Administrative History
Shaar Shalom Synagogue was a conservative synagogue in Markham founded in 1972. The synagogue closed in 2016.`
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
Shaar Shalom Synagogue (Markham, Ont.)
Places
Markham, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-9-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-9-3
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
13 cm of textual records
5 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 26 or smaller
Date
1912-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the life of Pearl Freedhoff. The bulk of the material are speeches and other writings related to Pearl's position as President of the Goel Tzedec Sisterhood around 1949-1950, as well as material related to her role with the Eastern Canadian Branch of the Women's League of the United Synagogue. Also included is Pearl's hand-written memoir and the final bound copy edited by her daughter Judith Golden. The remaining records relate to Pearl's work as a travel guide and organizer of trips to Israel, East Asia, and the Lido Spa in Florida; dance cards from the 1920s; a small amount of personal correspondence with a friend living in England; Pearl and Samuel's wedding invitation; a letter to Pearl and her sister Hilda from their mother, Esther; newsclippings; photographs; and a book won as a second place prize by Pearl at Edmund Scheuer's Zionist girls' school.
Administrative History
Pearl (nee Narrol) Freedhoff (17 Sept. 1906-18 Dec. 1997) was born in 1906, the daughter of Harry and Esther (nee Newman) Narrol. She had four siblings: Albert, Gertie, Hilda (m. Spivak), and Mendell (died as infant). Pearl married Dr. Samuel Osias Freedhoff (24 July 1903-19 Feb. 1973) in 1927 and had two children: Stephen and Judith. Samuel was the son of Harry and Mollie (nee Bohnen) Freedhoff. Pearl graduated from the University of Toronto, School of Social Work and Samuel graduated from the School of Dentistry. Both were members of Goel Tzedec Synagogue with Pearl serving as Sisterhood President in 1949-1950 and Samuel as President of the Men's Club in 1952.
Subjects
Manuscripts
Speeches, addresses, etc
Synagogues
Travel
Name Access
Freedhoff, Pearl, 1906-1997
Freedhoff, Samuel, 1903-1973
Goel Tzedec Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-11-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-11-8
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
[1999?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of A guide to Shabbat and Yom Tov Morning Services by Kehillat Shaarei Torah. It is designed to inform attendees of the order and proceedings of the prayers and dedicated to Haim and Riva Ziv by The Ziv families and with thanks to Emmy Gershon. This 11 page booklet has been laminated.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
Kehillat Shaarei Torah of Toronto
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-11-14
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-11-14
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
12 cm textual records
Date
1929-1991
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the history and activities of the Minsker Farband and Adath Shalom Synagogue. Included are a 50th anniversary booklet (1976), 60th anniversary booklet (1986), 65th anniversary booklet (1991) and photocopies of clippings from the Sunday Sun articles dated June 17, [1979] and May 13, 1995 reporting on the men and women (who are well beyond the age of 13) who participated in a group bar and bat mitzvah ceremony, initiated by Cantor Martin Rosenblum who participated in the ceremony as well. Records from the Minsker Farband include a navy leather bound manuscript book with "Young Minsker Social Club" embossed on the cover. "The Book of Life is Presented by William and Charlotte Kaplan in Memory of Libba Elka Kaplan, 26 JUN 1954, Ann Kaplan Goldblatt, 9 JAN 1959 and Chaim Libetsky, 13 DEC 1930. Each page of the book of life lists milestone celebrations, birth announcements and memorials. All entries were hand written in calligraphy from (1961-1968). In addition, there are two minute books handwritten in Yiddish for the periods 1929-1932 and 1935-37; meeting and executive meeting minute books and membership lists including organizations participating in The Young Mens' Minsker Farband (1948-1949); Young Men's Social Club Membership cards listing names, addresses, businesses or employers and other affiliations (1948 to 1953); an invitation and programme for Oneg Shabbat and Shabbat Morning services in honour of the 65th Anniversary of Adath Sholom Synagogue and the 25th Anniversary tribute to Cantor and Spiritual Leader Martin Rosenblum (1991); a timeline on the history of the Minsker Farband handwritten on a note pad by Ms. Bev Breslow; and an unidentified photocopy of a photograph.
Custodial History
The Adath Shalom Synagogue records belonged to donor Shae Eckler. The Minsker Farband records were given to Shae's husband Morey Eckler between 1995 and 2000. Shae could not recall the name of the original donor.
Administrative History
The Minsker Farband was established in 1926 by a small group of men who hailed from the town of Minsk, Russia. In 1927, the wives formed the Minsker Farband Ladies' Auxiliary. (Information as transcribed from the notes of Ms. Bev Breslow).
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
Minsker Farband (Toronto, Ont.)
Adath Shalom Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-1
Material Format
textual record
moving images
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records and other material
Date
1987, 1998-2009
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the history and events of the Kehillat Shaarei Torah. Included are event invitations, programs, and booklets. Of note is the synagogue's 18th anniversary booklet. Also included are VHS tapes and DVDs of the following events: a Purim celebration featuring a mock wedding (2007), the farewell tribute dinner to Rabbi and Rebbetzin Reuven and Joyce Tradburks and family (2009), the Flo Urbach tribute dinner, the synagogue's 18th anniversary celebrations (1999) and an event honouring Margaret Klompas (2004). Finally, accession includes a CD with images from the Abe Goldberg Torah Dedication (2006).
Administrative History
Kehillat Shaarei Torah is a modern Orthodox congregation that was founded in Toronto in 1980. Most of the early founders and members were recent immigrants from South Africa who had settled in the Bayview-Leslie-York Mills-Shepard area. Unable to find a congregation in their area that reflected their Orthodox traditions from South Africa, they formed their own minyan. They initially met in living rooms and basements and in 1987 opened the synagogue's building at 2640 Bayview Avenue.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: Includes 3 videocassettes (VHS), 2 DVDs, and 1 CD (103 photographs)
Subjects
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Synagogues
Name Access
Kehillat Shaarei Torah of Toronto
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-12-69
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-12-69
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
5 videocassettes (ca. 5 hr., 20 min.) : col., sd. ; VHS
Date
1980-1998
Scope and Content
The accession consists of 5 VHS recordings from the Shaar Shalom Synagogue. The recordings include: (001) Shaar Shalom’s official opening ceremony, 25 May 1980; (002) The Trial of Shimon & Levie, starring Roz Chaim & Rabbi Martin Berman with Andrew Sevstin, Cindy Lauer, Aubrey Kauffman, Keith Landy, Igor Ellyn, Paul Kochberg and Special Guest Star, Justice Michael Modayer, 14 Jan 1996; (003) The Magic Transistor starring Shaar Shalom Youth Drama Group, directed by Tamara Brody, 8 March 1998; (004) Shaar Shalom Synagogue Master, 14 Jan 1996; and (005) Phase III construction Spring/Summer 1990 (005).
Custodial History
Mel Fishman was the former executive director of Shaar Shalom. He and his wife Dina have looked after the re-allocation of synagogue assets including its archival records.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
USE CONDITION NOTE: For video 001 only: Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
Shaar Shalom Synagogue (Markham, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-8-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-8-1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
9 cm of textual records
25 photographs : col., sepia and b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
1 crayon enlargment portrait : col. ; 12 x 19 cm
Date
1925-2003
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a colour crayon enlargement portrait of Bessie and Joseph Brown, "A Tribute to Bessie Brown" photograph album (Beth Jacob Synagogue and Sisterhood, Kitchener Ontario, 1976), photographs of Joseph, Bessie and Phillip Brown and [Beth Jacob Congregation's Sisterhood?] in 1964, a certificate of service and affiliaton at Beth Jacob for Bessie Brown, and newsletters from Beth Jacob and Beth Tikvah in Montreal (1980-2004).
Custodial History
Materials were donated by Cantor Avraham Fisher, who served at Beth Jacob from 1985-1994 and was a friend of the Brown family.
Administrative History
Bessie and Joesph Brown lived in Kitchener, Ontario. They had two children: Harry (b. 1926-?) and Phillip (1930-1939).
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIAL NOTE: Bessie, Joseph and Harry Brown appear in Beth Jacob membership lists in accession 2008-6-7
Subjects
Families
Synagogues
Name Access
Beth Jacob Congregation (Kitchener, Ont.)
Brown, Bessie
Brown, Harry
Brown, Joseph
Brown, Phillip, 1930-1939
Places
Kitchener (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-2-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-2-3
Material Format
object
Physical Description
1 plaque ; 28 x 35 cm
Date
2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one plaque documenting Shaar Shalom Synagogue's presidents from 1974-2016.
Administrative History
Shaar Shalom Synagogue was a conservative synagogue in Markham founded in 1972. The synagogue closed in 2016.
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
Shaar Shalom Synagogue (Markham, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-8-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-8-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
7 cm of textual records
Date
1945-1955
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to Pearl Freedhoff's volunteer work with the Goel Tzedec Sisterhood as well as general records of Goel Tzedec and Beth Tzedec Synagogues. Included are Goel Tzedec Sisterhood bulletins (1945-1950), Sisterhood Annual Torah Tea invitations (1946-1951), Sisterhood Luncheon and Dinner Meeting invitations (1945-1952), Sisterhood Sabbath service invitaions (194-?), a Sisterhood finanical statement (1950), general Goel Tzedec Sisterhood correspondence (1950-1952), a script for a Goel Tzedec Sisterhood play (194-?), a speech given by Pearl Freedhoff (195-?), Beth Tzedec Sisterhood meeting invitations (1955), records related to the binennial convention of the National Women's League of the United Synagogue of America (1950), Goel Tzedec graduation and confirmation programs (1950-1951), a program book for the consecration of the Goel Tzedec Memorial Park (1949), Goel Tzedec Weekly Bulletins (1950-1951), and records documenting the Beth Tzedec Syangogue Dedication (1955).
Administrative History
Pearl (nee Narrol) Freedhoff (17 Sept. 1906-18 Dec. 1997) was born in 1906, the daughter of Harry and Esther (nee Newman) Narrol. She had four siblings: Albert, Gertie, Hilda (m. Spivak), and Mendell (died as infant). Pearl married Dr. Samuel Osias Freedhoff (24 July 1903-19 Feb. 1973) in 1927 and had two children: Stephen and Judith. Samuel was the son of Harry and Mollie (nee Bohnen) Freedhoff. Pearl graduated from the University of Toronto, School of Social Work and Samuel graduated from the School of Dentistry. Both were members of Goel Tzedec Synagogue with Pearl serving as Sisterhood President in 1949-1950 and Samuel as President of the Men's Club in 1952.
Subjects
Women
Synagogues
Name Access
Freedhoff, Pearl, 1906-1997
Goel Tzedec Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-10-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-10-9
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
37 photographs : b&w, some sepia toned ; 9 x 14 cm and 14 x 9 cm
Date
1914-1929
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 37 photographs documenting the extended family of Eva Horwitz (née Lipshitz). Included also is one photograph of Rabbi Yitzhak Yehuda Trunk (1878-1939), who was rabbi in Ciechanow from 1907-1912. (Ciechanow is approximately thirty kilometres from the town of Mlawa, where Eva was born.)
Custodial History
Marian Horwitz, daughter of Eva Horwitz, came into possession of the photographs subsequent to the death of her mother in 1983. Marian gifted the records to Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre on 30 October 2017.
Administrative History
Eva Horwitz (née Lipshitz, 1897-1983) was born in Mlawa, Poland on 20 June 1897. She married Jack Horwitz in Toronto on 30 October 1924. Thereafter, she raised three children: Gloria, Marvin, and Marian. In addition to her duties as a homemaker, Eva was an active member of the Workmen's Circle with her husband. She passed away on 17 February 1983.
Photo Caption (037): Rabbi Yitzhak Yehude Trunk, [192-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-10-9.
All other photos are unidentified.
Use Conditions
Restricted. See administrative notes.
Descriptive Notes
LANGUAGE NOTE: Captions on verso in Polish and Yiddish.
Subjects
Families
Rabbis
Name Access
Horwitz, Eva, 1897-1983
Horwitz family
Trunk, Rabbi Yitzhak Yehuda, 1878-1939
Places
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-12-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-12-2
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
15 cm of textual records
22 photographs : col. (12 negatives) ; 9 x 9 cm and 35 mm
3 signs
Date
[194-]-1982
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records belonging to Rabbi Abraham A. Price. The bulk of the records are marriage registers from 1938 to 1982. There are also some loose marriage certificates spanning 1939 to 1946; Price's registration certificate as a marriage officiant from 1938, a letter in Yiddish, his Isaac Kook Award of Merit certificate, as well as some photographs and corresponding negatives of a family vacation. Also included are three Kashruth signs. One was issued by the Kashruth Council of the Canadian Jewish Congress, likely in the 1950s, the other two are hand-painted and were issued by Rabbi Price, likely in the 1940s. They are in both Yiddish and English and read: Certificate of Kashruth. All meat and meat products of this butcher shop is strictly Kosher under the supervision of Rabbi Abraham A. Price.
Custodial History
The donor is the son-in-law of Rabbi Price.
Administrative History
Rabbi Abraham A. Price (1900-1994) was a prominent Rabbi and Talmudic scholar in Toronto. He was born on December 10, 1900 in Stopnitz, Poland to Rabbi Joseph and Basia Price. He married Sarah Wine, and had two children: a son, Moshe Leib, who predeceased him, and a daughter, Leah (Lola) Zuchowsky. He also had a brother Lazar. Price lived in Poland until 1923, when he moved to Berlin and became a banker. He left Berlin for Paris in 1931, and lived there for 6 years before fleeing to the United States in 1937. Rabbi Price originally went to New York City, but spent only ten days there before moving to Toronto. Rabbi Price studied with world-famous scholars Rabbi Abraham Borenstein and Rabbi Sillman, by whom he was ordained at the Rabbinical Seminary Sochatzow (Sochatov), Poland in 1919. He was hired in 1937 by Moishe Oelbaum, Moishe Sigal, and W.J. Silverberg to head Yeshivah Torath Chaim and to act as the official rabbi of Chevra Shas Congregation. Price remained dean of the yeshivah until at least 1985. He published ten volumes of highly acclaimed rabbinical studies, including three volumes of Mishnath Avraham with commentaries of the Book of the Pious "Sefer Chasidim," which were awarded the Rabbi Abraham Isaac Kook Award of Merit in 1965. It was the first time this prize was given to an author outside Israel. Price was one of Toronto's most influential rabbinic authorities. He worked tirelessly to help European yeshivah students during and after the Second World War. In 1942 he orchestrated the release of over 50 German-Jewish men from an internment camp in Quebec, and brought them to study at the yeshivah. In 1948 he again intervened to sponsor 55 young yeshivah boys from Prague. He brought these boys to study at Torath Chaim as well. Rabbi Price died on Thursday, March 31, 1994 in Toronto.
Descriptive Notes
LANGUAGE NOTE: Records are in Yiddish and English.
Subjects
Marriage records
Rabbis
Name Access
Price, Abraham A., 1900-1994
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-2-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-2-5
Physical Description
14 photographs : b&w ; 20 x 25 cm or smaller
Date
[1955]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs from a B'nai Israel Congregation Purim carnival.
Responsibility
Photographs by Lou Lessin, London, Ont.
Administrative History
In 1899, London established its first permanent synagogue at the corner of Richmond and Simcoe Streets. The B'nai Israel Congregation operated from this location until 1917. With the rapid influx of Jewish residents at the turn of century, the congregation eventually relocated to the site of a former church located at the corner of Wellington and Grey. B'nai Israel operated from this new home until 1960. On September 11, 1960, B'nai Israel Congregation consecrated its new purpose built synagogue at the then northern border of the city. Praised for its ultramodern design, the synagogue complex designed by architect Philip Carter Johnson, housed a school, social hall and youth centre.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Descriptive Notes
HISTORY/BIO NOTE: A History of the Jewish Community of London Ontario by Bill Gladstone.
CONSERVATION NOTE: Photos were originally mounted on display boards. The photo backing has been removed where possible. All identifying information included in the photo captions was on the original display board.
Subjects
Synagogues
Purim
Places
London (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-5-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-5-6
Material Format
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
1 textual record (electronic)
Date
1 Dec. 2003
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a letter written by Rabbi Edward Elkin and addressed to members of the First Narayever Congregation, of which he was the rabbi. In the letter, Rabbi Elkin describes his purpose as follows: "I would like to cover what I see as the salient grounds in Jewish law (halakha) which led me to the point where I can comfortably say that I am prepared to officate at a same-sex marriage."
The letter was written ahead of a congregational meeting and vote on same-sex marriage set for the end of January 2004.
Administrative History
In 1914, Jews from eastern Galicia (now in modern Ukraine) established the First Narayever Congregation in Toronto as a landsmanshaf, i.e. a society of Jewish immigrants from the same town or region. The synagogue takes its name from the small market town of Narayev, which is located in eastern Galicia. The synagogue's founders belonged to the working class and many worked in Toronto's garment industry.
Initially, congregation members met in different locations, but by 1923 their numbers and financial means had grown such that they were able to rent a small house at 70 Huron Street at the corner of Huron and Dundas. This house served as the congregation's home for twenty years.
The congregation's first president was Israel Chaim Katz and its first meeting was held at the Katz home at 156 William Street. The congregation's first rabbi was Solomon Langner, who was hired by the congregation in 1923. He retained this affiliation despite serving the Kiever Synagogue as a full-time rabbi from 1929 until he died in 1973.
In 1943, the congregation purchased property at 187-189 Brunswick Avenue from Bethel Church. This is where the the synagogue is located today.
In 1950, Henry Young became president of the congregation. He occupied that position until his death in 1976. Shalom Langner, the son of Rabbi Solomon Langner, succeeded Young as president.
As Toronto's Jewish population began to move north, the First Narayever continued to serve Orthodox Jews living downtown. In the 1980s, the congregation struggled to balance the needs of this older generation with the young generation's desire to make the synagogue more egalitarian with respect to gender. In 1983, the congregation's new leadership team successfully advanced a proposal to allow the full participation of women in traditional services. This innovation led to several long-standing members taking legal action, but their case was dismissed on the grounds that it was not a matter for civil law.
The First Narayever's identity continued to evolve. In 2009, its membership voted to allow its rabbi, Edward Elkin, who began serving the congregation in 2000, to officiate at same-sex marriages.
Subjects
Jewish law
Rabbis
Same-sex marriage
Name Access
Elkin, Ed
First Narayever Congregation (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-5-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-5-7
Material Format
object
textual record
Physical Description
1 object
1 folder of textual records
Date
[197-?]-2017
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Beth Torah Congregation in Toronto. Included are a stole (sash) from the synagogue choir and the summer 2017 issue of the Jewish Review, which features a profile of Yossi Sapirman, the senior rabbi of Beth Torah.
Subjects
Choirs (Music)
Rabbis
Synagogues
Name Access
Beth Torah Congregation (Toronto, Ont.)
Sapirman, Yossi
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-5-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-5-13
Material Format
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
4.15 MB of textual records
Date
2003-2009
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the First Narayever Congregation. Included are five textual records pertaining to the issue of same-sex marriage at the congregation: a report of the Committee on Inclusion submitted to the congregation's board of governors in 2003; a resolution put forward by the Ritual Committee in 2009; a motion on same-sex marriage for the congregation's annual general meeting on June 14, 2009; an agenda for the same meeting; and minutes for the same meeting.
Administrative History
In 1914, Jews from eastern Galicia (now in modern Ukraine) established the First Narayever Congregation in Toronto as a landsmanshaf, i.e. a society of Jewish immigrants from the same town or region. The synagogue takes its name from the small market town of Narayev, which is located in eastern Galicia. The synagogue's founders belonged to the working class and many worked in Toronto's garment industry.
Initially, congregation members met in different locations, but by 1923 their numbers and financial means had grown such that they were able to rent a small house at 70 Huron Street at the corner of Huron and Dundas. This house served as the congregation's home for twenty years.
The congregation's first president was Israel Chaim Katz and its first meeting was held at the Katz home at 156 William Street. The congregation's first rabbi was Solomon Langner, who was hired by the congregation in 1923. He retained this affiliation despite serving the Kiever Synagogue as a full-time rabbi from 1929 until he died in 1973.
In 1943, the congregation purchased property at 187-189 Brunswick Avenue from Bethel Church. This is where the the synagogue is located today.
In 1950, Henry Young became president of the congregation. He occupied that position until his death in 1976. Shalom Langner, the son of Rabbi Solomon Langner, succeeded Young as president.
As Toronto's Jewish population began to move north, the First Narayever continued to serve Orthodox Jews living downtown. In the 1980s, the congregation struggled to balance the needs of this older generation with the young generation's desire to make the synagogue more egalitarian with respect to gender. In 1983, the congregation's new leadership team successfully advanced a proposal to allow the full participation of women in traditional services. This innovation led to several long-standing members taking legal action, but their case was dismissed on the grounds that it was not a matter for civil law.
The First Narayever's identity continued to evolve. In 2009, its membership voted to allow its rabbi, Edward Elkin, who began serving the congregation in 2000, to officiate at same-sex marriages.
Subjects
Same-sex marriage
Synagogues
Name Access
Elkin, Ed
First Narayever Congregation (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-6-22
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-6-22
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1947, 1972-1992
Scope and Content
Accession consists of materials assembled by Stanley Emerson and donated to the Ontario Jewish Archives. Included are: one hardbound book commemorating the Toronto Hebrew Free School's liquidation of its capital debt on May 8, 1947; one spiral-bound book assembled on the occassion of Shomrai Shaboth Congregation's twentieth anniversary testimonial dinner honouring Rabbi Gedalia Felder to be held on Sunday, June 18, 1972; one Associated Hebrew Schools of Toronto programme for its annual dinner to be held on Thursday, June 22, 1978; one programme for a Machanaim Testimonial Dinner honouring Dr. Isadore Cass on Wednesday, May 2, 1979; one Associated Hebrew Schools graduation programme for Wednesday, June 27, 1979; one newspaper clipping from the Thursday, June 6, 1985 edition of the Canadian Jewish News relating to Rabbi Gedalia Felder, former spiritual leader of Shomrai Shaboth-Chevra Mishnayoth Congregation; one newspaper clipping from the Thursday, June 13, 1985 edition of the Canadian Jewish News relating to Harold Dessen, former president of Associated Hebrew Schools; and one paperbound book assembled on the occassion of a Sol Edell tribute dinner commoemorating the fiftieth yahrzeit (death anniversary) of HaRav Yosef Weinreb and the establishment of the Saol Edell Family Endowment Fund to be held on Saturday, October 31, 1992.
Subjects
Anniversaries
Schools
Synagogues
Name Access
Associated Hebrew Schools of Toronto
Cass, Isadore M., 1916-1996
Dessen, Harold
Felder, Gedalia, 1922-
Shomrai Shabbos Chevrah Mishnayos (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-6-21
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-6-21
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
13 cm of textual records
Date
1982-1989
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Cantor Harold Klein and Rabbi Stuart Rosenberg. Cantor Klein's records include sound recordings and sheet music. Rabbi Rosenberg's records include certificates of conversion, divorce, and marriage; counselling and pastoral cards; decree absolutes; a letter to Mr. A. Copnick from Garry Goldberg regarding a "Burn the Mortgage Campaign" (the letter includes a note to the rabbi); a letter Rabbi Rosenberg from Rabbi Bernard Baskin; and wedding record cards.
Custodial History
6/25/2018: Rabbi Yossi Sapirman of Beth Torah Congregation donated the records to the Ontario Jewish Archives.
Administrative History
Cantor Harold Klein was the chazzan of the Shaarei Shomayim Congregation in Toronto. Cantor Klein was a classmate, and then later a student for many years, of Professor Noach Schall of Yeshiva University.
Rabbi Stuart E. Rosenberg led Beth Torah Congregation for nine years. Prior to that, he was senior rabbi for seventeen years at Beth Tzedic, the largest Conservative congregation in Canada.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Cantors (Judaism)
Rabbis
Name Access
Klein, Harold
Rosenberg, Stuart E
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 4; File 8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
4
File
8
Material Format
textual record
Date
1985-1994
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Name Access
Congregation B'nai Torah (Toronto, Ont.)
Subjects
Synagogues
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Name
Dr. Sam and Rivka Hurwich
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
2 July 1974
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Dr. Sam and Rivka Hurwich
Number
AC 022
Subject
Antisemitism
Hospitals
Rabbis
Schools
Teachers
Interview Date
2 July 1974
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Stephen Speisman
Total Running Time
Side One - 43 minutes
Side Two - 3 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Digitized in 2014
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Dr. Sam Hurwich was involved in a number of organzations including the Canadian Jewish Congress, JIAS and several Labour Zionist groups.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Hospital for Sick Children
Hurwich, Rivka
Hurwich, Sam
Geographic Access
Toronto (Ont.)
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
AC 22 Side 1:
00:14 Dr. Hurwich explains that while he was in medical school between 1919 and 1926 a number of organizations started Sunday schools to provide Jewish education for children in the community. The earliest schools he recalls were at Holy Blossom established by Edmund Scheuer and at the Zionist Centre. Dr. Hurwich briefly taught at the Zionist Centre.
1:04 The Ladies Group at the McCaul St. Shul asked Dr. Hurwich to organize a school and serve as Principal. Dr. Hurwich list the women involved with the program. 150 students, both boys and girls met once a week on Sundays initially. Later, classes were held twice a week.
3:00 Dr. Hurwich explains that the leaders of the synagogue were very supportive. Outside of Talmud Torah there was no other formal Jewish education.
3:30 Dr. Hurwich list the melameds (private teachers) at the time and discusses his own Jewish education.
4:40 Dr. Hurwich mentions Dr. L.J. Solway (the son of one of Sam’s teachers) and describes his path to study medicine. Dr. Hurwich and Stephen Speisman discuss other members of the Solway family. Two brothers were shochtim (ritual slaughterer) and one brother was a sofer (scribe).
6:39 Dr. Hurwich explains that he was approached to be the school’s principal because of his background knowledge and previous experience as a teacher.
7:20 The students were taught Hebrew, Chumash, tefillah and Yiddish.
8:58 Dr. Hurwich explains that he has no knowledge of school established by Ida Siegal in 1912/13.
9:24 Dr. Hurwich’s family attended the McCaul St. Shul.
9:32 Mrs. Hurwich explains that the National Radical School, the first secular Yiddish school, opened in 1911/12 on Simcoe St. Mrs. Hurwich attended this school.
10:25 The Farband School, Zionistic in spirit, was organized in the 1920’s as an offshoot of the Radical School (which later became the Peretz Shule) that was anti-Zionist. The Farband School taught both Yiddish and Hebrew. Dr. Hurwich briefly discusses the history of the Farband (starting in the U.S., opening first in Montreal and later in Toronto).
12:30 Dr. Hurwich mentions other secular schools and their locations.
13:19 Dr. Hurwich discusses the conflict between the religious community and the National Radical School (later Workman’s Circle). E.g. Religious groups opposed the secular groups because they organized events on Saturday; Workman’s Circle opposed Zionist groups, etc.).
14:58 Dr. Hurwich comments that the signing of the Balfour Declaration had a uniting effect on the Jewish community.
16:19 Mrs. Hurwich describes the inception and growth of the National Radical School between 1911 and 1916. The school was able to revive the spirit of Jewish (Yiddish) revival through the teaching of language, music, literature and folklore. At its peak there were 500 children attending the school 3 times a week.
21:00 Mrs. Hurwich discusses that after the First World War, a school was established by Mr. Morris Goldstick. She explains that each Sunday children would collect money for the school at 194 Beverly.
22:11 Stephen Speisman comments that this type of organization grew into the Canadian Jewish Congress.
23:00 Mrs. Hurwich speaks of the influence this school had on her and other children’s lives. She comments, for example, that the children mourned Peretz’s death as if he were a relative.
24:29 Mrs. Hurwich discusses the leadership and teachers of the National Radical School.
25:58 Stephen Speisman cites an incident in which the National Radical School is accused of attempting to convert children to Christianity. Dr. & Mrs. Hurwich were not aware of this accusation.
26:58 Dr. Hurwich suggests that the signing of the Balfour Declaration was the stimulus for the creation of the Sunday school at the Zionist Centre. The school was designed to augment Jewish education with Zionistic ideology.
28:12 Stephen Speisman cites a second incident involving objections from the religious community to a proposal to hold a picnic in Lambton Park on Shabbat. Dr & Mrs. Hurwich concur that this may have occurred.
29:10 Dr. Hurwich explains that the school at Holy Blossom run by Edmund Scheuer did not have a Zionistic spirit. The Zionist Sunday school was a reaction to this school, as well.
31:10 Dr. Hurwich describes the efforts of Mr. ?Hyman, an engineer turned Hebrew teacher, and Mr. Israel Freeman, a chalutz from Palestine who moved to Canada, to organize a Hebrew Speaking Club for young people at Simcoe St. Talmud Torah.
34:26 Dr. Hurwich discusses the various Yiddish and Hebrew groups available for Jewish youth in Toronto.
36:10 Dr. Hurwich suggests there was no animosity among the Zionists. Young Judea had been founded by that time.
37:16 Dr. and Mrs. Hurwich list people who were active in youth groups and education in that era.
39:30 Dr. Hurwich discusses some shuls from that era: a shul on Richmond St that his grandfather helped found and a shul on Elm St. He recalls learning Gemorah at the Elm St. Shul in 1912.
42:24 Rabbi Yudi Rosenberg was Rabbi at the Elm St. Shul. Dr. Hurwich mentions other Rabbis from that era: Rabbis Weinreb, Gordon and Graubart.
AC 22 Side 2
00:10 Dr. Hurwich discusses his encounters with anti-Semitism while in public school and in an attempt to find a Pediatric internship at Hospital for Sick Children.
(interview ends abruptly at 3:06)
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Fred Schaeffer
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
11 July 1980
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Fred Schaeffer
Number
AC 024
Subject
Communities
Immigrants--Canada
Rabbis
Synagogues
Interview Date
11 July 1980
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Stephen Speisman
Total Running Time
Side 1: 31 minutes
Side 2: 9 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Fred Schaeffer's wife, Beverley, grew up in Kirkland Lake, Ontario. Beverley's grandfather, Hyman Kaplan, emigrated from Vilna, Lithuania in 1907, and after a few years in New York, moved to Toronto. Shortly afterwards he became the first Jew to settle in Kirkland Lake in 1914.
In the 1920s the Jewish community in Kirkland Lake built a permanent synagogue, and acquired the aron kodesh of eastern European design, its lamps, railings, pews and reader’s desk, from the disbanded Ukrainishe Shul in Montreal. In the 1970s the Kirkland Lake Synagogue disbanded and Fred and Beverly Schaeffer acquired the aron kodesh, all of its furnishings, the ner tamid and the parochet. They generously donated these Jewish artifacts to Beth Tikvah Synagogue, Toronto, in 1988, in memory of Isadore Kaplan, father of Beverly Schaeffer and Erich Schaeffer, father of Fred Schaeffer.
Fred, married Beverley in Toronto. Like many children from Kirkland Lake, Beverley had moved to the city to attend university. Fred and Beverley are keen collectors of Canadian art. He is a retired civil engineer and a former chairman of the Canadian art historical committee at the AGO.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Atkins (family)
Bucavetsky (family)
Cochrane (Ont.)
Etkins (family)
Mallins (family)
Purkiss (family)
Schaeffer, Fred
Geographic Access
Ansonville (Ont.)
Engelhart (Ont.)
Kirkland Lake (Ont.)
Krugerdorf (Ont.)
Ontario, Northern
Timmins (Ont.)
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
AC 024: Side A
0.14: Fred discusses the first Jews to settle in Northern Ontario in the area around Krugerdorf/Engelhart. He mentions Edith Atkinson (née Martin) as a good primary source of information. Edith’s father, a Russian Jew who came to Canada via Scotland was employed by Temagami and Northern Ontario Railway to bring Russian Jews to work on the railroad.
1.11: Atkinson is related to Atkins and Etkins families.
2.25: Jewish families received land patents in the area of Krugerdorf (north of Engelhart).
2.44: Kurtz family started a hotel in Engelhart in 1908.
3.07: Mentions some of the earliest Jewish settlers. Gurevitch, Korman, Martin, Henerovsky, Purkiss
4.18: Women farmed during the week while the men worked on the railroad. Men came home on weekend.
5.05: Mentions a diary written by Mr. Martin, Edith Atkinson’s father.
5.42: Earliest records in Jewish cemetery in Krugerdorf were 1906. Relates a story involving a canoe accident. Tells a brief history of the cemetery.
8.00: Railway started to develop in 1908/9 with the opening of the mines in Timmins. Many Jews followed the railroad.
8.45: Mentions that the Purkiss family opened a chain of stores in every town that opened.
9.25: Mentions that the Bucavetsky family was well-known in Timmins.
9.58: Jews had settled in Cochrane.
10.16: First Rabbi in Timmins was Shulman.
11.15: Fred discusses early community organizations. One synagogue on a farm in Krugerdorf area. One synagogue in Engelhart that burnt down. Synagogue in Kirkland Lake built in 1926. Minyans were held in Cochrane and Ansonville (1918/19). Timmins synagogue dates back to 1910/12.
17.15: Fred describes Iroquois Falls as an Abitibi company town. Jews who ran businesses lived in nearby Ansonville.
18.02: Fred notes that there were many prominent Jews in Northern Ontario. He names several and describes their positions. (e.g. Dave Korman as Mayor of Engelhart, Rothschild was alderman in Cochrane, Barnie (?) Nasoff was on council and was Reeve of Ansonville, Max Kaplan Kirkland Lake council, Nicky Korman was Mayor).
21.11: Fred relates anecdotes about Roza Brown, the first Jew in Swastika / Kirkland area.
23.36: Fred relates anecdotes about Hyman and Max Kaplan (brothers-in-law) who ran businesses in Kirkland Lake.
25.26: Rabbi Rabinowitch was a long-standing rabbi in Kirkland Lake.
27.26: Discusses the demise /closure of the synagogue in Kirkland Lake. Remained open until 1979. Last Rosh HaShana services were held in 1977.
28.05: Discusses the situation with the Timmins Jewish community.
30.05: Discusses the plight of a poor Jewish family, the Mallins.
AC 024: Side B
0.15: Fred suggests some reference material. “Northland Post” – good source for info about Jewish community in Northern Ontario. “Silverland” – book that describes Kurt’s Hotel. Special edition of a newspaper that published an article on the history of the Jewish community.
1.48: The Jews of the North have themselves as self-sufficient community during the 1920s, 30s and 40s. They were represented in the first Jewish Congress.
3.33: Fred notes that there was a Jewish presence in most towns in Northern Ontario. He suggest that Haileybury may have been the exception due to antisemitic sentiments.
4.10: Mentions a fire in Haileybury in 1916/17 and the Jewish contribution to fire relief.
4.25: Relates an anecdote re. Hyman Kaplan and Haileybury.
5.48: Describes the location of a few small communities (Elk Lake, Charlton)
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Fred Schaeffer and Stephen Speisman discuss some of the earliest synagogues established in Northern Ontario.

In this clip, Fred Schaeffer relates colourful anecdotes about the first Jewish settler in the Swastika-Kirkland area, Roza Brown.

Name
Morris Fishman
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
12 July 1977
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Morris Fishman
Number
AC 036
Subject
Antisemitism
Nonprofit organizations
Communities
Synagogues
Societies
Food
Occupations
Clubs
Interview Date
12 July 1977
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Richard Menkis
Total Running Time
Side 1 46 minutes Side 2 17 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Morris Fishman was born September 29, 1916 in New Jersey. His family moved to Welland, Ontario when he was an infant. He attended elementary and high school in Welland and completed two years at the University of Toronto. He worked in a family men's wear business in Welland. Morris was actively involved in the Jewish community including participation in the Anshe Yosher Congregation, the Jewish Cultural Society and the Jacob Goldblatt B'nai Brith Lodge. He was married and had two daughters.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Fishman, Morris
Geographic Access
Welland
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\AC 036 Fishman\AC 036 transcript.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Morris Fishman praises the efforts of the non-Jewish community in Welland, Ontario to support the building of a new synagogue following a fire that destroyed the old synagogue in 1954.

In this clip, Morris Fishman discusses the Jacob Goldblatt B’nai Brith Lodge in Welland, Ontario.

Name
Belle James
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
21 April 1975
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Belle James
Number
AC 016
Subject
Families
Rabbis
Interview Date
21 April 1975
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Stephen Speisman
Total Running Time
Side One: 46 minutes
Side Two: 5 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Belle James (nee Levy) was born in Toronto in 1908. Her father, Rabbi Meyer Levy became chief rabbi of Toronto in 1905/6.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
James, Belle
Levy, Meyer
Weiss, Lottie
Geographic Access
Toronto, Ont.
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Transcript
AC 16: Side A.
0.00 - 1.57: Sound quality is poor.
2.04: Belle refers to an autobiography written by her father, Rabbi Meyer H. Levy. Her father was ordained at age 22 in 1891 in Vilna. He immigrated to New York in 1892. He worked in Syracuse as a rabbi for 5 years. He left the rabbinate and entered business but business failed.
5.58: Rabbi Levy returned to the rabbinate to serve as Chief Rabbi in Toronto in 1905/6.
6.18: While in business, Rabbi Levy worked in Rochester and Detroit and knew Henry Ford.
7.18: Belle’s parents were married in Europe.
7.54: Belle was born in 1908.
7.59: Rabbi Levy came originally to the Chestnut Street Synagogue and then went to the Russishe Shul.
8.50: Belle recalls where the family lived. She was born on University Ave., next door to Mary Pickford. They then moved to 2 homes on Alice Street, 2 homes on Baldwin, 288 Bathurst St. and 2 homes on Palmerston St.
11.35: Belle’s sister is Lottie Weiss.
11.52: Belle recounts the synagogues with which Rabbi Levy was affiliated. Russishe Shul, Adath Israel, Rumainishe Shul, Hebrew Men of England, Berkley Street Shul, Palmerston Avenue Shul.
12.44: Belle explains how Rabbi Levy was remunerated for his services.
13.18: Belle describes her mother’s charitable acts. She was a founder of the Home for the Aged.
14.16: Belle recalls travelling with her father to open synagogues in Niagara Falls, St. Catharine and Welland, ON.
14.51: Belle recalls Rabbi Levy’s visits to Kingston to visit Jewish in-mates and to the jail farm north on Yonge Street.
16.04: Belle recalls the good relationships between her father and other rabbis in the city. e.g. Rabbi Jacob, Rabbi Brickner and Rabbi Isserman.
18.00: Belle describes the controversies concerning kashrut.
20.00: Rabbi Levy gave hashgacha (supervisory overseer) for some products. Belle recalls his relationship with George Weston.
21.07: Rabbi Levy had some political influence.
22.58: Belle describes her father as charismatic and more liberal in behaviour. Other orthodox rabbis tended to be less approachable.
25.58: Belle describes her Jewish education.
29.40: Belle’s brothers studied at the Simcoe Street Talmud Torah with Nathanson.
30.42: Belle recalls that her father was close with other Orthodox rabbis.
31.40: Rabbi Levy remained active in the rabbinate until 1951, when Belle’s mother passed away.
32.43: Belle and Stephen Speisman discuss the names and locations of some of the downtown synagogues.
33.37: Belle relates a story involving Rabbi Levy and a mashgiach, Reverend Margolis.
34.43: Belle recalls the shachtim of the time in Toronto. Mittel Farber, Yankel David Farber, Garfinkel.
35.18: Belle recalls accompanying her father to the cemetery to an event that seemed like a party.
36.18: Belle explains why Rabbi Levy is buried in the Lubavicher section of Mount Sinai Cemetery.
37.08: Belle notes that her parents did not eat meat for many years because they did not recognize the hashgacha. Belle recounts a story involving her mother tempted to eat meat immediately before she died but in the end not succumbing.
41.42: Rabbi Levy was responsible for the Yiddish Hebrew Journal. Helped to bring Hirsch.
42.18: Belle recalls her father dancing on the table in response to the signing of the Balfour Declaration
43.05: Rabbi Levy requested in his will to be buried in Israel.
43.40: Belle reminisces about mishalachim from Rishon LeTzion in Palestine staying with her family.
AC 16: Side B
0.20: Rabbi Levy was instrumental in starting a matzah factory in Toronto on Dundas Street.
1.50: Rabbi Levy secured a permit for Jews to buy Passover wine during the Prohibition. Additionally, he got a wine permit for Rabbi Gordon who later sold the permit to Parkdale wines.
3.49: Rabbi Levy had connections with Hirsch-Manischewitz.
End
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Rabbi Elimelech Ittamar
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
May 11, 1976
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Rabbi Elimelech Ittamar
Number
AC 141
Subject
Education
Immigrants--Canada
Rabbis
Synagogues
Zionists
Interview Date
May 11, 1976
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Doris Newman
Total Running Time
Side 1: 46 minutes Side 2: 19 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Rabbi Ittamar was born in Poland. He came to Toronto in 1923. He attended Landsdowne and Ryerson Public Schools in Toronto for one year and then continued his education at a theological seminary in New York which later became Yeshiva University. Throughout his life, Rabbi Ittamar was an ardent Zionist. From 1930 until June 1932, Rabbi Ittamar served as Rabbi of Beth Jacob and Adas Yisroel Synagogues in Hamilton. He then worked as principal of the Seattle Talmud Torah and attended graduate school at the University of Washington for three and a half years. He served for 20 years in Detroit as rabbi and president of Yeshiva. He made Aliyah in 5715 (1955) when he was invited by Chief Rabbi Herzog to become secretary of the Chief Rabbinate. He was married (nee Unger) in 1936 and had 2 children, Tamar and Yehoshua.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Ittamar, Elimelech
Geographic Access
Toronto
Hamilton
Detroit
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\AC 141, Rabbi Elmelech Ittamar\AC 141 notes.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Rabbi Ittamar shares some of his early memories as a boy in Toronto.

While attending Yeshiva in New York, Rabbi Ittamar headed the debating team. In this clip he describes his first English-speaking public presentation while representing the debating team in 1930 at the Jewish People’s Institute in Chicago.

Name
Merle Koven
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
Oct. 17, 2007
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Merle Koven
Number
AC 324
Subject
Antisemitism
Education
Synagogues
Interview Date
Oct. 17, 2007
Quantity
2 mini DVs, 2 archival DVDs, 2 reference DVDs
Interviewer
Sharon Gubbay Helfer
Total Running Time
2 hrs
Notes
Part of Ontario Small Jewish Communities Project.
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Merle Koven grew up in Kingston and attended Kingston Collegiate. After high school, Merle enrolled in teachers college in Toronto, then later taught school in Kingston. Merle married Philip Koven, a well-known local businessman, philanthropist and community volunteer, who died in 2008. He was owner of Rosen Heating and Cooling, which merged with another old, established city business to form Rosen, Triheat and Anglin, now run by their two sons.
During their 45 years of marriage, the Kovens raised three children - Adam, Kenneth and Rebecca. Both Phil and Merle Koven were prominent in the community. In 1982, Merle Koven broke new ground when she became president of Beth Israel, in Kingston, possibly the first woman president of an Orthodox synagogue in North America. She was vice-chair of Queens 1990s, although she did not have a degree.
The Merle and Philip Koven Bursary in Art History at Queen's University was initially established by Philip Koven in honour of his wife, Merle Koven, both passionate supporters of the arts in Kingston. This fund provides financial support for upper-year students in art history. After Philip Koven passed away in 2008, the fund received many gifts in his memory.
Material Format
moving images
Name Access
Queen's University
Hadassah WIZO Organization of Canada
Bader, Alfred
Geographic Access
Kingston
Original Format
Mini DV
Copy Format
DVD
Source
Oral Histories
Part Of
Beth Isaiah Congregation fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 59
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Beth Isaiah Congregation fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
59
Material Format
textual record
Date
1929-1976
Physical Description
65 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
The Guelph Hebrew Congregation, precursor of Beth Isaiah Congregation, was established in the early 1900s by the Jewish families which settled in Guelph shortly after 1900. Rev. Pearl was the congregation's first spiritual leader and teacher. Services were held in private homes until 1925, when the congregation purchased a building at the intersection of Surrey and Dublin Streets and remodeled it as a synagogue. An extension was added to this building in 1935 to meet the needs of the increasing membership. Planning for a new synagogue began in the early 1940s, and construction was completed in 1949 of the new synagogue on the same site. The name of the congregation was changed to Beth Isaiah, in honour of congregation member Isaiah (Sidney) Acker, who was killed on active service on 3 November 1942, while with the Royal Canadian Air Force.
Over the years, congregation members formed other organizations whose activities were tightly intertwined with the congregation, given the relatively small size of Guelph's Jewish community. These organizations included the Beth Isaiah Congregation Hebrew School, the Guelph Jewish Welfare Fund, the Ir Shalom Chapter of Hadassah, and the B'nai Brith Guelph Lodge. The B'nai Brith Guelph Lodge was chartered in Apr. 1942. It held the first Brotherhood dinner in Canada in 1947, which gave impetus to the formation of the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews. Beth Isaiah celebrated the 100th anniversary of the congregation in 2004.
Scope and Content
The fonds documents the activities, membership, and finances of Beth Isaiah Congregation and affiliated organizations, including the Beth Isaiah Ladies' Auxiliary, Beth Isaiah Congregation Hebrew School, the Guelph Jewish Welfare Fund, the Ir Shalom Chapter of Hadassah, and the B'nai Brith Guelph Lodge. The records in the fonds include financial records, membership ledgers, meeting minutes, correspondence and newsletters, and fundraising materials. The fonds also includes blueprints and other records relating to the construction of Beth Isaiah Synagogue in 1949.
Name Access
Beth Isaiah Congregation (Guelph, Ont.)
Subjects
Synagogues
Creator
Beth Isaiah Congregation (Guelph, Ont.)
Places
Guelph (Ont.)
Accession Number
1985-3-11
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Congregation Beth David fonds
Events series
Groundbreaking at Waterloo Street file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 88; Series 6; File 1; Item 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Congregation Beth David fonds
Events series
Groundbreaking at Waterloo Street file
Level
Item
Fonds
88
Series
6
File
1
Item
1
Material Format
graphic material
Date
3 Apr. 1947
Physical Description
3 photographs (1 negative) : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph, copy print and corresponding negative of the groundbreaking ceremonies for Congregation Beth David at 50 Waterloo Street in Brantford, Ontario. The photograph depicts a group of men standing at the site of the new synagogue. One man is holding a shovel.
Notes
Title taken from writing on photograph.
Subjects
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1978-11-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sadie Stren fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 78; File 3; Item 29
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sadie Stren fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
78
File
3
Item
29
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1965]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 13 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Rabbi Stanley Weber (centre) with an unidentified gentlemen and boy, standing at a podium.
Subjects
Rabbis
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Accession Number
1978-11-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sadie Stren fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 78; File 3; Item 42
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sadie Stren fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
78
File
3
Item
42
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[197-]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print of the former Beth David Synagogue at the corner of Palace and Albion streets, in Brantford, Ontario.
Subjects
Architecture
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Accession Number
1978-11-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sadie Stren fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 78; File 3; Item 45
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sadie Stren fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
78
File
3
Item
45
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[197-]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 13 x 18 cm
Scope and Content
This item a copy photograph of the exterior of Beth David Synagogue on Waterloo Street in Brantford, Ontario.
Subjects
Architecture
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Accession Number
1978-11-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1136
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1136
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1954
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 13 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of the burning of the mortgage ceremony at Beth David Synagogue in Brantford, Ontario. The photograph depicts Ethel Rapoport (m. Rotberg), Louis Rapoport and Edith Rapoport (m. Kanter) lighting several candles placed on a banquet table. Looking on in the background on the right is Mrs. Sam (Celia) Axler. In the background on the left is Hyman Stemeroff.
Notes
Acquired on June 18, 1976.
Name Access
Beth David Synagogue (Brantford, Ont.)
Subjects
Communities
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Brantford (Ont.)
Accession Number
1976-6-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1125
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1125
Material Format
graphic material
Date
July 1946
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of the house at 63 Water Street in Galt, Ontario (now Cambridge), which was purchased from the Canadian Bank of Commerce for use by the community synagogue.
Subjects
Dwellings
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Galt (Cambridge, Ont.)
Accession Number
1976-6-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Ontario synagogues series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 64; Series 2; File 116
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
The Shuls Project fonds
Ontario synagogues series
Level
File
Fonds
64
Series
2
File
116
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1979
Physical Description
5 photographs : col. slides ; 35mm
Admin History/Bio
Shlomei Emunai (Yesodai Hatorah) was located at 567 Lawrence Avenue West in Toronto.
Scope and Content
File consists of 5 slides of the exterior and interior of Shlomei Emunai (Yesodai Hatorah).
Name Access
Shlomei Emunai (Toronto, Ont.)
Subjects
Synagogues
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 4121
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
4121
Material Format
graphic material
Date
July 1978
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 9 x 9 cm and 35 mm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of the exterior of the synagogue in Belle Ewart, Ontario.
Notes
Location of negatives: 31:3
Name Access
Hebrew Centre of Belle Ewart
Subjects
Communities
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Belle Ewart (Ont.)
Accession Number
1977-8-20
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 4123
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
4123
Material Format
graphic material
Date
July 1978
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 9 x 9 cm and 35 mm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of the synagogue's shed in Belle Ewart, Ontario.
Notes
Location of negatives: 31:4
Name Access
Hebrew Centre of Belle Ewart
Subjects
Communities
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Belle Ewart (Ont.)
Accession Number
1977-8-20
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 535
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
535
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[194-]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative); 21 x 26 cm and 4x 5 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a copy photograph of a procession at Kiever Synagogue, Toronto. Second from left is Isaac Belfer who was Gabbai of Kiever Shul for many years.
Notes
Credit Mr. Jack Belfer.
Name Access
Belfer, Isaac
Kiever Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Subjects
Processions
Synagogues
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Kensington Market (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
Acquired June 22, 1975.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 543
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
543
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1946
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative); 13 x 18 cm and 4 x 5 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of the Belzer Rebbe walking with Chassidim in Israel.
Name Access
Belzer Rebbe
Subjects
Hasidism
Rabbis
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Israel
Source
Archival Descriptions
761 records – page 1 of 16.

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