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335 records – page 1 of 7.
Accession Number
2015-11-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-13
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
8 photographs : b&w ; 41 x 51 cm and smaller
1 object
1 book
Date
[193-]-1976
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of Sandra (née Title) Samuels; a hanger from Shiffer-Hillman and a published book "The Prominent Jews of Canada" that belonged to Sandra's in-laws, Kate and Alex Samuels.
Administrative History
Samuel (ca. 1882-1929, Russia) and Gussie (nee Moscovitz) (b. ca.1884, Romania) Fishman, immigrated to Welland, Ontario from Romania. Both arrived in the United States as teenagers sometime around the turn of the century. Samuel and Gussie were married in the United States and by 1920 had immigrated with their young family to the historic township of Crowland in Welland County. Here they opened and operated a men's clothing store. Together they had six children; Molly (b. 1909, USA), Abe (b. 1911, USA), Morris (b. 1916, USA), Ruth (b. 1915, USA), Ann (b. 1920, Ontario) and Ethel. Morris married Pauline and lived in St. Catherines, Ruth married Nate Oelbaum and lived in Tucson, Arizona, Anne married Alec Rothman and lived in Port Colborne, Ethel married Eddie Matchtinger and lived in Toronto and Abe never married. Yeva Fishman, the niece of Samuel Fishman married Morris Turk. Her father was (Frank Fishman?) and her mother was Sara Leah Fishman. Molly Fishman married Harry Title (Teitelebaum) (b. ca. 1903). They had three children, Greta (nee Title) Greisman, Sandra (nee Title) Samuels and Stephen (m. Carole Hillman, niece of Ben Hillman). Harry Teitelbaum was the son of Israel and Frumeth Teitelbaum. He was born in Gdansk, Poland (b. ca., 1903). Harry Title had four younger siblings; Lloyd, Birdie (m. Witlin), Arthur and Lorelle (Lieba) the youngest who was born in Toronto. Harry arrived to Canada shortly after the First World War and worked in the garment industry. He and his brother Arthur founded the Title Dress Company in the late 1920s and operated the business out of 355 Adelaide St. West. In the late 1980s, the business moved from this location to Adelaide and Bathurst. Sandra Title (b. Oct 27, 1936, Toronto), the middle daughter of Molly Fishman and Harry Title, married Lawrence Samuels. Together they had five children Joanna, John, Noah, Tom and Caroline. Lawrence was the eldest son of Alex Samuels (d. 1966) and Kate (nee Goldberg) Samuels. He had two younger siblings Herbie and Florence (m. Bill Goodman). Lawrence's father Alex Samuels immigrated to Canada from Dubrovna, White Russia (present day Dubrouna, Belarus). He immigrated to Canada with his parents Samuel and Chana Samuels and his younger siblings Sol, Ben, Riva and Polly. Alex and his brothers Sol and Ben established Reliable Toy Company around 1929 on Carlaw Ave. They sold the company in 1990.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Samuels, Sandra, 1936-
Shiffer-Hillman (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-6
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
2 photographs (tiff) : b&w
Date
1897-1960, 1993
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the activities of Eli Bloch. Included are photocopies of correspondence, newsclippings, Eli's Canadian certificate of naturalization, travel documents, South African licenses, and a genealogical family tree for the Bloch family. Also included are two photographs of Eli in his later years.
Custodial History
The original records are in the possession of Gerry Bloch, the grandson of Eli Bloch. Gerry is the son of Eli's son Norman.
Administrative History
Eli (Elias) Bloch was born in 1872 to Nokhum Tevel Rabinovitch in Kishinev Moldava. He had four siblings: Golda, Joseph, Samuel and Bertha. In the 1890s Eli and his siblings (with the exception of Golda) immigrated to South Africa. Bertha married Theodore Dissler (an importer/exporter). During the Boer War, Eli and his brother Joseph fought with the Dutch. After the war, Dissler employed Eli in his business. In 1907, Dissler sent Eli to sell ostrich feathers in various cities around the world, including: London (England), Montreal and Toronto. While in Toronto, Eli attended the First Roumanian Hebrew Congregation Adath Israel where he met his future wife Leah Madnok and chose to remain in Ontario, without completing his task of selling ostrich feathers in the remaining cities on his itinerary. He married Leah in 1909. From about 1911 until 1922, Eli and Leah lived in Gravenhurst and ran a general store on the main street. They had four children together: Harry (1912-1945), Rose (1914-1994), Rachel (Rae) (1916-2000), and Norman (1916-1989). Rachel and Norman were twins.
In 1922, Elias and Leah moved to Mactier and opened a general store. By 1926, Leah and the children were living in London, ON and Elias continued to operate the general store. He saw the family regularly. Around 1935, Elias left Mactier. He remained in London until he moved to Toronto in 1942. Elias passed away in Toronto in 1960.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: English, Yiddish, and Russian
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Families
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-2
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
19 photographs (tiff)
Date
[1909?]-[196-?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of scanned images of the Fromstein family, particularly relating to Harry and his wife Pearl. Included are family portraits, images of Harry while he was interning at Hashmall's Drugstore and working in his own pharmacy called Central Drugs, an image from a Rokeah Chapter dinner, and other images of the family at a cottage (possibly Tent City or Belle Ewart), in the backyard of their home (likely on Palmerston) and at Sunnyside Beach.
Custodial History
Carol is the daughter is Harry and Pearl Fromstein.
Administrative History
Harry was born in London, England in 1907 to Getzl (from Obodovka, Podolia, Russia) and Yetta (nee Kramer; from Kosow, Stanislawow, Galicia) Fromstein. Harry had six siblings: Max (Mendel, b. 1902 in Kosow), Anne (Chava Yita, b. 23 Sept. 1905 in London), Shep (b. 1911 in London), Minnie (b. 1916? in Toronto), Joe (b. 1918 in Toronto) and Sam (Shimmy, b. 1919 in Toronto). The family immigrated to Toronto in 1912. Getzl arrived first and then paid for the passage for his wife and children. Getzl was a cantor who also wrote music. He also worked as a presser.
Harry attended the College of Pharmacy at the University of Toronto. As part of his training, he did an internship at Hashmall's Drug Store. Harry graduated in 1932. He married Pearl Shimmerman soon after graduation in 1932. They had met at Pearl's sweet 16 birthday party and had been engaged for 5 years.
Pearl was born in 1911 to Aaron and Malka Shimmerman in Pomorzany, Austria (now in the Ukraine). Pearl was the youngest of seven children. Her siblings were: Tzivia (married name Toben), Max, Toby (married name Rockfeld), Sam, Joe, and Anne (married name Kerbel). She immigrated to Toronto with her family when she was 3 months old. Her family lived at 102 Huron Street and Aaron worked as a labourer (collecting and selling scraps of fabric).
Pearl and Harry had two children together: Jerry (Gerald ; b. 1934) and Carol (b. 1937). By 1935, Harry had opened his own drugstore called Central Drugs, located at Church and Queen. The family initially lived above the store. The store moved a few times, but always remained in one of the corner units at the intersection of Church and Queen. Harry eventually moved his store north to Davenport and Dupont. After many years, his store was finally moved to Dufferin Street at Castlefield and re-named Castlefield Drugs. During the summer, the family regularly rented cottages at Tent City and Belle Ewart.
Carol married Harold Tanenbaum in 1956. They had three children together: Mark, Cheryl, and Michelle.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Families
Pharmacists
Name Access
Fromstein family
Fromstein, Harry
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1.2 m of textual records
ca. 250 photographs : b&w and col.
Date
1776, [191-]-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the records related to the life and career of Dr. Fred Wienberg. Included are textual and photographic records documenting his personal and family life, his medial career, scholarly activities, involvement with the Jewish community, his collecting of Judaica, medical antiques and art, and his synagogue involvement. Other items include the Ostrovtzer Mutual Benefit Society minute book and a 1776 letter from Jonas Phillips, a veteran of the American Revolutionary War and an American merchant in New York City and Philadelphia.
Administrative History
Fred Weinberg (1919-2003) was born in Ostrawiec, Poland on July 6, 1919 to Rose and Israel Weinberg. Israel immigrated to Canada in 1920 and his wife and children joined him several years later in March of 1924. The family settled in Toronto where Israel worked in the fur manufacturing business. Israel was a supporter and aficionado of cantorial music as well as a founder of the Associated Hebrew Schools of Toronto and the Ostrovtzer Synagogue on Cecil Street.
Fred completed his primary and secondary education at Clinton Street Public School and Harbord Collegiate. He also attended the Brunswick Talmud Torah, celebrating his bar mitzvah in 1932. Fred decided to pursue a medical career, graduating from the University of Toronto’s medical school in 1944. During his studies he enlisted in the army and completed officers’ training in April 1945, attaining the rank of Captain. During his military career he served in the RCAMC at Camp Borden, Christie St. Hospital and at the Stanley Barracks in Toronto. Towards the end of the war he served as Officer in charge of repatriation of the POWs.
After the war Fred pursued his post-graduate work at Seaview and Bellevue hospitals in New York City from 1946 to 1947 and then moved on to the Children’s and Washington University hospitals in St. Louis, Missouri the following year. He was subsequently accepted as a resident at Sick Kids Hospital in Toronto and was ultimately appointed Chief Resident under the supervision of the internationally renowned paediatrician, Dr. Alan Brown. In 1950, Dr. Weinberg was hired as a physician in paediatrics at Sick Kids Hospital, making him the first Jewish doctor on staff. In addition to his staff responsibilities, he also lectured and was a faculty member at the University of Toronto’s Medical School for many years.
By the mid-point of his career, Dr. Weinberg went on to specialise in Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), delivering lectures and publishing articles in medical journals. He also ran his own practice, which operated from 1950 to 1976, and later become Associate Medical Director of the Child Development Clinic, Neurology Division of Sick Kids until his retirement in 1984. He later continued his service at Sick Kids as a senior staff consultant and ran a specialized practice in Developmental Pediatrics for close to twenty years, which was later situated at 208 Bloor Street West.
Fred married Joy Cherry on December 16, 1952 at Goel Tzedec Synagogue. The couple had four children: Joel (b. 1953), Barry (b. 1955), Sari (b. 1956) and Deena (b. 1961). Throughout his life, Fred was actively engaged in Jewish communal work in a variety of capacities: assisting with the establishment of the United Synagogue Day School during the 1950s; as a fundraiser for the United Jewish Appeal (UJA); and as a participant in two of UJA’s early study missions to Israel in 1960 and 1961. He was also an influential figure within his synagogue, joining the Board of Directors of Beth Tzedec Synagogue during the late 1960s and serving as President from 1972 to 1975.
Fred and his wife Joy also collected Judaica, antiques and artwork. As a physician, Fred developed a passion and expertise in the area of medical antiques. He published articles in both the mainstream and Jewish press on subjects related to Jewish rituals, Judaica and art. He also had a regular column in the Canadian Journal of Diagnosis from 1998 to 2002 entitled “Antique instruments”. Over time, the Weinberg’s assembled a world-class collection of Judaica and became increasingly active in the museum world. Fred assisted in the establishment of Beth Tzedec’s Helene and Rubin Dennis Jewish Museum, contributing items from the couple’s Judaica collection and securing the acquisition of the renowned Cecil Roth collection for the Museum during the early to mid-1960s. As a result of his significant contributions, he was bestowed the title of honourary curator to the Museum. Dr. Weinberg later branched out and assisted with the Koffler Gallery’s Lifecycle exhibition in 1984 as guest curator. The following year, he served as a special presenter and instructor to the docents at the “Precious Legacy” Czech Judaica exhibition at the ROM. The Weinberg’s most significant contribution to the museum world, however, was marked in September of 2000, when they were honoured at the opening of the Dr. Fred and Joy Cherry Weinberg Gallery of Judaica at the ROM, featuring some of their most valuable and treasured pieces.
Dr. Fred Weinberg passed away on October 30, 2003 at 84 years of age. The Weinberg Endowment Fund was established by the family at the University of Toronto’s Jewish Studies Program to honour Fred’s passion for Jewish history, rituals and artefacts. That year the Weinberg family also set up a fund in Fred’s name in support of the Therapeutic Clown Program, a highly visible and successful program within Sick Kids’ Pediatric Division.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Use Conditions Note: Records contain patient names and medical information.
Subjects
Families
Physicians
Societies
Name Access
Weinberg, Fred, 1919-2003
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-11
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-11
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
14 photographs : col. (jpg)
Date
[1981?]-2009
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting various trips Nicole Cohen took to South Africa as a child and adult. Photographs predominatly document Nicole visiting sites around Johannesburg, particularly her family's old apartment building. Also included are photographs of Nicky visiting her grandparents as a child, reconnecting with her family's maid, and visiting the Nelson Mandela Square with her children. Also included is one photograph of Nicole's brother, Jeremy David Cohen, in front of the Cohen family home in Thornhill (1984?).
Administrative History
Nicole (Nicky) Cohen was born in Johannesburg, South Africa to John Cohen and Viviane (nee Lehwess) Cohen in 1972. She has two siblings: Steven (b. 1974), and Jeremy David (1979). Viviane worked as a physiotherapist and John as a textile sales agent. Due to the unstable political situation in South Africa, the family immigrated to North York in March 1977. For the first few weeks, they lived in a rental apartment in North York. They soon moved into a townhouse nearby. In 1980, they bought their first house in Thornhill. Both John and Viviane were able to continue in their professions after immigrating to Canada. The family regularly visited South Africa.
Nicole is a clinical psychologist in Toronto. She married Jordan Kerpinsky on May 16, 1999. They have three children together: Hayley, Justin, and Ryan.
Descriptive Notes
Related Material Note: for an oral history interview with Nicole Cohen see AC 422, for other Cohen family material see accession #2015-3/8.
Subjects
Families
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Vacations
Name Access
Cohen, Nicole
Places
South Africa
Thornhill (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-7
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
60 cm of textual records
Date
1966-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records reflecting the academic, personal and literary life of Dr. Gerald Tulchinsky. Included are the final manuscript, research notes, edits and anciliary materials related to Tulchinsky's book on J. B. Salsberg; a large amount of general research and many unpublished articles on Canada's clothing industry and the Jewish involvment, particularly in Montreal and Toronto; correspondence to various granting bodies; folders of story ideas; genalogical research notes and an unpublished family history; research into a 1950 fatal fire at a garment factory at 447 Richmond St. W in Toronto; a unpublished poem; lecture notes; and personal records related to the lease of his home and the purchase of a Heinzman piano, which was dropped off the truck during delivery.
Of note is a memoir written by Ruth Talesnick documenting her parent's early involvment in the needle trade and a memoir by Anne Tulchinsky, Jerry's mother.
Administrative History
Dr. Gerald Tulchinsky was Professor Emeritus at Queen's University, Department of History, and author of several books on the history of Canadian Jewry and labour issues in Canada. His books include: Shtetl on the Grand (2015); Joe Salsberg: A Life of Commitment (2013); Canada's Jews: A People's Journey (2008); Branching Out: The Transformation of the Canadian Jewish Community (1998); Taking Root: The Origins of the Canadian Jewish Community (1992); and The River Barons: Montreal Businessmen and the Growth of Industry and Transportation, 1837-53 (1977).
Tulchinsky was born in Brantford, Ontario in 1933 to Harry and Anne Tulchinsky. He resided in Kingston, Ontario until his death on 13 Dec. 2017.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Descriptive Notes
SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE: This accession also includes numerous books, some of wihch don't relate to our mandate and others which are duplicates of our current holdings. The books that we have retained have been integrated into the OJA's library holdings.
USE CONDITION NOTE: Access restricted until ten years after the donor's death, at the donor's request.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Tulchinsky, Gerald, 1933-2017
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 300 photographs : b&w, sepia and col. (1 negative) ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
40 cm of textual records
Date
[189-]-2007
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records created and accumulated by Bill Gladstone in the course of researching his book on the genealogical lineage of the Naftolin and Rubinoff families. Included are photographs of the Shmuel Chaim and Rachel Rubinoff branch, the Aaron Rubinowitz branch, the Benjamin Rubinoff branch, the Arnoff branch and the Naftolin branch. The photographs are in the form of family and individual portraits, candid snapshots, event photographs, Rubinoff store exteriors, and photographs of various life event celebrations. The textual records consist of research notes and copied material from various sources detailing the lives of individual family members.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
FINDING AID NOTE: It is recommended that researchers consult the book "One Hundred Years in Canada: the Rubinoff-Naftolin Family Tree" for more context when viewing the material.
USE CONDITIONS NOTE: Donor retains copyright for all original research and writing. Donor wishes to be notified prior to publication. Publication requests must receive permission from donor, if possible.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Gladstone, Bill
Naftolin family
Rubinoff family
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-15
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-15
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 m of textual records
ca. 200 photographs
Date
[189-]-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records created and collected by Bill Gladstone during the course of his research into the family history and genealogy of the Naftolin and Rubinoff families and their various branches. Included are Gladstone's extensive research files on each member of the family, which consist of hand-written research notes, correspondence with family members and government officials, newsclippings, copies of vital statistics, immigration and citizenship records, certificates, bereavement and sympathy cards, telegrams and congratulatory anniversary cards, invitations, and photographs.
Accession also consists of records related to the Agudas Hamishpocha, the family mutual benefit society and social club that was formed in 1928 by the Naftolin and Rubinoff families. These records include meeting invitations and flyers, anniversary and jubilee books, membership lists, photographs, loan society materials, newsclippings and articles, research notes, and a copy of the letters of incorporation.
Administrative History
Bill Gladstone is a direct decendent of the Naftolin-Rubinoff family. The five branches of the family as researched by Gladstone are the Rachel Rubinowitz and Shmuel Chaim Rubinowitz branch; Riva Rishe Rubinowitz and Itsha Maisha Naftolin branch; Binyamin (Benjamin) Rubinoff and Esther Dobin branch; Minya Rubinowitz and Elimelech Arnoff branch; and Aaron Rubinowtiz and Esther Cahansky branch. Rachel, Riva Rishe, Binyamin, Minya and Aaron were all siblings. Other family names include Cohen, Slovin, Rosensweig, Patlik and Alter.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
FINDING AID NOTE: It is recommended that researchers consult the book "One Hundred Years in Canada: the Rubinoff-Naftolin Family Tree" for more context when viewing the material.
USE CONDITION NOTE: Donor retains copyright for all original research and writing. Donor wishes to be notified prior to publication. Publication requests must receive permission from donor, if possible.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Gladstone, Bill
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-26
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-26
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
4 folders of textual records
ca. 10 photographs : col. ; 22 x 28 cm or smaller
Date
1980-2016, predominant 1982-1994
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Herman family's immigration to Ontario, family life in Thornhill, education, communal involvement in Hamilton, and their business endeavours with the Firwin Corporation and Simply Extraordinary. Included are photographs; a family history that was written in commemoration of Paul and Miriam's fiftieth wedding anniversary; a selection of annual family newsletters that detail their life in Canada; correspondence documenting Paul's involvement with Temple Anshe Sholom in Hamilton, Ontario; their childrens' school certificates, secondary school diplomas, and post-secondary convocation programs. Also included is business ephemera, such as, business cards and images documenting Simply Extraordinary corporate gift products.
Identified in the photographs are: Paul Herman, Miriam Herman, Brett Herman, and Adina Ward (nee Herman).
Administrative History
Paul Henry Herman was born on July 3, 1940 to Mr. Leslie Elkan and Mrs. Clare Herman (nee Emdon) of Dunkeld West, Johannesburg, South Africa. Paul is the eldest of five siblings. During his youth, Paul was involved in his synagogue and youth groups as well as the Boy Scouts. He attended Stellenbosch Afrikaans University where he earned a business degree and became fluent in Afrikaans. After university, he joined the family uniform business, H. J. Henochsberg, and was sent to England in 1962 for further clothing industry training.
Paul married Miriam Riva Herman from Wynberg, Cape Town, SA on February 6th, 1965. Miriam worked as a social worker at the Johannesburg General Hospital. Their first son, Stanley, was born in 1966 followed by Rael in 1968, Brett in 1970 and Adina in 1974.
The Herman’s were motivated to emigrate out of a desire to prevent their son from having to enlist in the South Africa army [and thereby become involved in military efforts that they did not support]. After the family business was sold, Paul worked as a quality manager at Edgars Stores while periodically travelling abroad with Miriam to seek out emigration opportunities.
The Herman family came to Canada in 1982 and settled in Thornhill, Ontario. Upon arriving in Ontario, Paul found work at a uniform manufacturer (Saint Hill Levine Uniforms) then at Lady Manhattan and Sunshine T-Shirts. In 1989, Paul and Miriam purchased Firwin Corporation, a high temperature insulation manufacturing company. During the family’s early years in Canada, Miriam started a corporate gift business called Simply Extraordinary.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Occupations
Societies
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-60
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-60
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
ca. 5 cm of textual records
2 photographs : col. & b&w ; 10 x 15 cm and 5 x 4 cm
Date
1972-2010, predominant 1977-1983
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the Robinson family's immigration to Ontario as well as Morris Robinson's professional history and business activities with Libman and Company.
Included is family correspondence; the Robinson's customs paperwork and travel documents; Morris' curriculum vitae, professional records and some documentation of his business activities; and genealogical accounts of the Robinson family including a history by Lilian Henry. Of note is a letter Morris Robinson sent to Irma when he first arrived in Boston on his way to Toronto as well as letters Morris' parents hand delivered to Irma just before she left with the children to join Morris in Canada.
Identified in the photographs are: Morris Robinson and Phoebe Robinson.
Custodial History
Material was in possession of Morris Robinson. Morris donated it to the OJA.
Administrative History
Morris Robinson was born in Cape Town, South Africa on May 27th, 1948 and grew up in Benoni. He completed his Bachelor of Commerce degree at the University of Witwatersrand and graduated as a Chartered Accountant in 1973. On February 25th, 1973. Morris married Irma Startz who was born in Benoni, South Africa on December 10, 1951. Irma earned a Bachelor of Arts degree at the University of Witwatersrand and went on to obtain a Post-Graduate Higher Teacher's Diploma. The Robinsons have three sons. Their first son, Marc, was born in South Africa on September 26th, 1976 (just a few months after the Soweto riots). Their sons Frank (b. December 31, 1980) and Daniel (b. March 12, 1985) were born in Toronto.
The Robinsons were motivated by political unrest, which manifested in the anti-apartheid Soweto uprising of June 1976, and the desire for a safe future for their family, to seek opportunity abroad and to emigrate. In February of 1977, Morris heard through friends about an accounting job opportunity in Canada and was officially appointed to the post of comptroller at Libman and Company, then Canadas’ largest jewellery manufacturer. The Robinsons arrived in Toronto in early 1978 and settled in Thornhill, Ontario. In 1989, Morris became a partner of Libman and Company. During his career in the jewellery industry, Morris was involved with the Canadian Jewellers Association and served as the organization's chairman. He was also a founding member and first treasurer of the Diamond Bourse of Canada. Irma pursued a teaching career with the Toronto District School Board, specializing in ESL and eventually becoming the principal at an ESL school for adults. The Robinsons were founding members of Shaar Shalom Synagogue. In 2012 the Robinsons sold the family home in Thornhill and moved into the city to be closer to their children and grandchildren.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Business
Immigrants--Canada
Families
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-51
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-51
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
2006
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a copy of one family memoir written by Joy Lowenstein, documenting the Lowenstein and Lipinski families.
Custodial History
Material was in possession of Joy Lowenstein.
Administrative History
Joy Lowenstein (nee Lipinski) was born in June 1930 to Rose Davis and Teddy (Edward) Lipinski of Johannesburg, South Africa. Joy married Jules (Julius) Lowenstein on October 8th, 1950 at the Yeoville Shul in Johannesburg, The Lowensteins had three children who were all born in SA: David (b. 1952), Larry (b. 1955) and Kim (b. 1960). The Lowensteins were upset with South Africa’s apartheid politics and wanted to leave when David and Larry had finished their university studies.
David finished his studies at the University of Witwatersrand, but did not wish to serve in the SA army, which was mandatory for all young men. David left SA for Toronto in 1977. Kim, Joy and Jules emigrated from SA to Canada in 1977 and settled in North York. Larry worked abroad in the United States as an American Field Scholar; returned to SA to study at the University of Witwatersrand; pursued studies in law at Oxford; and then joined the family in Toronto in 1979. In Toronto, Joy and Jules opened a gift shop on Eglinton Avenue called Present Place which they owned until their retirement in 2004.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Families
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-2-4
Material Format
textual record
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
33.2 MB of textual records
Date
1969-2002
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting the history and professional activities of Cy (Cyril) Charney and his family. Included is an autobiographical family history entitled "My Story" and a variety of documents that trace Cy's career including promotional materials from university courses that he taught; a curriculum vitae; copies of his university diplomas; management-related lecture programs; various certificates of achievement; and newspaper clippings.
Custodial History
Material was in possession of Cy Charney. Cy donated it to the OJA.
Administrative History
Cy (Cyril) Charney was was born on November 21st, 1944 in Johannesburg, South Africa to Daniel and Dora Charney. His parents emigrated from Lithuania to SA before the Second World War. Cy's family moved to Bulawayo in 1950 where his father founded the Anglo African Glass company. The family was involved with the community and were members of the Weitzman Country Club. Cy’s family moved back to Johannesburg after the sudden passing of his father in November of 1954.
Throughout his youth, Cy was involved in South African Zionist organizations. During his early years and into young adulthood he was part of Habonim, the Zionist Socialist movement. He then went on to join the Hebrew Order of David.
Cy married Rhona on March 26th, 1967. Shortly after the Six-Day War, the couple went to make aliyah in Israel. They relocated to Kibbutz Givat Chaim Bet, close to Hadera, some 50 km north of Tel Aviv. Their stay lasted six months and then they returned to SA where Cy worked in insurance. The Charneys had three chlidren who were all born in SA: Daneal (b. 6 February 1961), Thalia (b. 9 July 1970), and Davin (b. 28 May 1972). The Charneys have two granddaughters, Yael and Limona.
As the political situation in SA began to deteriorate in 1976, the Charneys decided to emigrate to Canada. Cy first arrived in London, Ontario upon arrival to Canada and then chose to settle in Toronto in mid-1980. Rhona and the children arrived three months later and in the meantime, Cy had found work with Loblaws. After a year, Cy sought different work opportunities with the Thorne, Stevenson, and Kellogg management consulting group. He then went on to start his own consulting business. Rhona has a Masters in Social Work and has pursued her profession.
The Charneys have been part of Temple Kol Ami since 1993.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Synagogues
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-6-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-6-12
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 60 cm of textual records
11 photographs (3 negatives) : b&w ; 20 x 25 cm or smaller
Date
1976-[ca. 1990]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic records that trace Natan Sharansky's history as a prisoner of political conscience; the broader Refusenik issue; and the community advocacy efforts of Debby and Stan Solomon from 1976 and into the late 1980s at the local, national and international scales. Included are memos and newsletters from the Committee for Soviet Jewry (Ontario Region and national-level); background information as well as petition templates, speeches and planning documentation produced by the Committee to Release Anatoly Sharansky and the Beth Tikvah Synagogue in conjunction with community organizations, including the CJC and its Soviet Jewry social action committees, to support on-going advocacy efforts; correspondence with Canadian and American political representatives at the provincial/state and national levels; white papers/grey literature from non-governmental organizations about the persecution of the Soviet Jewry; planning documentation from the First Annual Sharansky Lectureship on Human Rights in 1980; correspondence, articles and ephemera associated with the granting of Sharansky's honourary law doctorate from York University in 1982; 1985 Freedom Rally/Weekend in Ottawa planning documentation and correspondence; 1987 National Conference on the Soviet Jewry and Mobilization for Freedom planning documentation; 1987 Community Rally at Massey Hall promotional materials; and promotional materials from Sharansky's autobiographical "Fear No Evil" 1988 book launch. Graphic material includes photographs of Sharansky's release during the February 11, 1986 American-Soviet prisoner exchange on the Glienicke Bridge in Berlin.
Identified in the photographs are: Debby Solomon; Alan Solomon; Natan Sharansky; Avital Sharansky; U.S. Ambassador Richard Burt;
Custodial History
Material was collected and/or created by Debby Solomon, Natan Sharansky's cousin. Debby donated it to the OJA.
Administrative History
Debby Solomon is the cousin of Anatoly (Natan) Sharansky, the Soviet born Israeli politician, human activist and author who spent nine years in Soviet prisons. Debby's father Boris Landis (born 1900) and Sharansky's father were first cousins.Their grandfathers were brothers. Debby's father immigrated 1929 to Toronto from Russia as his older brothers were already in Toronto. Debby and her husband Stan Solomon got involved in the community's activism efforts to free Sharansky and other Refuseniks.They were worked for many years on these efforts by planning programs through their synagogue Beth Tikvah and with Sam Filer, a lawyer and volunteer at the CJC who was also a member of Beth Tikvah.
Subjects
Antisemitism
Politics and government
Human rights
Demonstrations
Synagogues
Committees
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-56
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-56
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1930-1976
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a covering letter to Steve (presumably Speisman) from Sidney Harris dated September 14, 1976. The letter refers to two documents (a letter) one of which is in Hebrew and the other being its translation into English. The translation was performed by BGK (likely Ben Kayfetz). The covering letter refers to the Geldzaeler and Scheuer families and also refers to other documents being given to Steve. However, there were no other documents in the folder. The letter was from Mark Geldzaeler to Edmund Scheuer in thanks for a gift of a box of cigars.
Custodial History
There is no information on the acquisition of this material. However, it does appear to come from a family album of Sydney M. Harris.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Harris, Sydney M.
Scheuer, Edmund
Geldzaeler, Mark
Places
Toronto, Ontario
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-7
Material Format
sound recording
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
13 audio cassettes
1 folder of textual records (PDF)
Date
2001-2007
Scope and Content
Accession consists of audio cassette tapes containing interviews Lisa Newman conducted regarding the Rotenberg and Pines families. Included are interviews with: Aubey Rotenberg, Moe and Bernice Ceresne, Cyril Rotenberg, Lailla Rapoport, Laya Kurtz, David Rotenberg, Ken Rotenberg, Harvey Rotenberg, and Radha Ahuja (born Bluma Rotenberg).
Also included are textual records documenting the Rotenberg family's history. These include issues of the Ivansk Project e-newsletters, which contain entries written by Lisa Newman Greenspan (Issue #15 Nov.-Dec. 2005, Issue #23 Mar.-Apr. 2007, Issue #25 July-Aug. 2007).
Administrative History
Louis (Elazar / Loozer) Rotenberg immigrated to Toronto in 1893. He was the first Jew to immigrate to Toronto from Ivansk, Poland. He had married Rivka (nee Cukier) in 1883. She followed him to Toronto with their four children in 1895. They had an additional five children in Toronto. Their children were: Harry, Max, Meta, Louis (Leibish), Meyer, Zechariah (died at age 4 in 1906), Charlie, and Hilda. Louis eventually opened a banking, steamship and insurance office in Toronto with three of his sons (Louis Jr., Harry and Max) in 1916. The business eventually became known as Rotenberg's Ltd. Louis passed away in 1936.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Business
Interviews
Families
Name Access
Rotenberg, Louis
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-8-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-8-1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
9 cm of textual records
25 photographs : col., sepia and b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
1 crayon enlargment portrait : col. ; 12 x 19 cm
Date
1925-2003
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a colour crayon enlargement portrait of Bessie and Joseph Brown, "A Tribute to Bessie Brown" photograph album (Beth Jacob Synagogue and Sisterhood, Kitchener Ontario, 1976), photographs of Joseph, Bessie and Phillip Brown and [Beth Jacob Congregation's Sisterhood?] in 1964, a certificate of service and affiliaton at Beth Jacob for Bessie Brown, and newsletters from Beth Jacob and Beth Tikvah in Montreal (1980-2004).
Custodial History
Materials were donated by Cantor Avraham Fisher, who served at Beth Jacob from 1985-1994 and was a friend of the Brown family.
Administrative History
Bessie and Joesph Brown lived in Kitchener, Ontario. They had two children: Harry (b. 1926-?) and Phillip (1930-1939).
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIAL NOTE: Bessie, Joseph and Harry Brown appear in Beth Jacob membership lists in accession 2008-6-7
Subjects
Families
Synagogues
Name Access
Beth Jacob Congregation (Kitchener, Ont.)
Brown, Bessie
Brown, Harry
Brown, Joseph
Brown, Phillip, 1930-1939
Places
Kitchener (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-2-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-2-12
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
45 cm of textual records and other material
230 photographs : sepia and b&w ; 23 x 30 cm and smaller
8 sound recordings (50 wav files; 1 microcassette)
1 artifact
Date
1937-2004
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records, photographs and audio recordings documenting the lives of Dick Steele, his wife Esther and friend Bill Walsh. The materials are mostly correspondences between Dick and Esther during his internment at the Don Jail and Ontario Reformatory in Guelph, and from Dick and Bill's military service overseas during the Second World War. They also include correspondences between Esther and Bill, Bill and Anne Walsh, "Jack" and Esther, and other family and friends. Some of the letters show evidence of being censored. There are news clippings in English and Yiddish about the family from various newspapers including the Canadian Tribune (a Communist Party paper). There is a letter Esther wrote to campaign for Dick's release from internment, part of women's activism in this period. There is also a photocopy of a memoir written by Moses Kosowatsky and Moses Wolofsky "From the Land of Despair to the Land of Promise" ca. 1930s. The photographs include Dick and Bill in the army during the Second World War, a signed picture of Tim Buck addressed to Esther and the twins and a photo of Dick delivering a speech related to the Steel Workers. Also included is a recording of edited sound clips of Bill and Esther talking about Dick, Esther speaking about the letters, (how she received letters and flowers from Dick after he had already been killed), Bill reading a letter Dick wrote to Esther that he left with friends in England to send her in the case that he was killed (which he was), recordings of "Bill Walsh Oral history" Vols.1 and 2 compiled by Leib Wolofsky's (Bill's nephew), and 5 audio recordings by Adrianna Steele-Card with her grandparents Bill and Esther. There is also a microcassette labelled "Joe Levitt." The accession also includes the stripe of a German corporal that Bill captured as a prisoner, peace stamps and an early copy of Cy Gonick's A Very Red Life: The Story of Bill Walsh, edited by Bill.
Administrative History
Richard (Dick) Kennilworth Steele is the name adopted by Moses Kosowatsky. He was born in 1909 in Montreal to Samuel Kosowatsky and Fanny Held. He lived in a laneway off Clark Street below Sherbrooke where his father collected and recycled bottles. He grew up with his siblings Joseph, Mortimer, Matthew, Gertrude and Edward. Bill Walsh (Moishe Wolofsky) was born in 1910, to Sarah and Herschel Wolofsky, the Editor of the Keneder Adler (Montreal's prominent Yiddish newspaper). He attended Baron Byng and then Commercial High School where he met Dick Steele. Bill recalled that Dick denounced militarism in the school when a teacher tried to recruit students to be cadets. Bill moved to New York City in 1927. His brother, who was living there, helped him get a job as a messenger on Wall Street. He also worked in the drug department at Macy's while attending courses at Columbia University in the evening. Dick worked on a ship for a year and then joined Bill in New York City in 1928. Dick worked at a chemical plant called Linde Air Products while also studying in the evenings at Columbia University. In 1931 Dick and Bill boarded a ship together in New York bound for Copenhagen. Together they travelled across Europe, witnessed a Nazi demonstration in Breslau, Germany and found work in Minsk and Moscow, Russia. This trip inspired them to become Communists. In 1933 Bill's father was on a Canadian trade mission to Poland, which he left to "rescue" his son from the Bolsheviks. Bill agreed to return to Canada after being advised to do so by the Comintern. He then changed his name to Bill Walsh to protect his family. In 1934 Bill moved to Toronto. He worked as the Educational Director for the Industrial Union of Needle Trade Workers and the Communist Party where he met Esther Slominsky/Silver, the organization's office manager. Dick joined Bill in Toronto soon after. Bill introduced Dick and Esther who then married. In 1940, Esther gave birth to twin sons Michael and John Steele. Esther was born in Toronto in 1914 to Joseph Slominsky and Fanny (Blackersany?). Her siblings were Bella, Eileen, Morris and step-sister Eva. Her father Joseph was a cloak maker and Esther also worked in the garment industry. Her mother Fanny passed away in 1920 at the age of 26 from tuberculosis. Dick was a metal worker and became a union organizer in the east end of Toronto. He was the head organizer of the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) and the Steel Workers Organizing Committee of Canada (SWOC) until 1940 when he was dismissed for being a Communist. Bill helped organize Kitchener's rubber workers into an industrial union and was also an organizer for the United Auto Workers of Windsor, Ontario. Jack Steele, an alias for Dick's brother Mortimer, fought with the Mackenzie-Papineau Brigade in the Spanish Civil War. Jack Steele was recalled to Canada in October 1937 to rally support for the efforts in Spain, returned to the front in June 1938 and was killed in action in August. Some of Dick's letters to his wife Esther are signed "Salud, Jack" and were likely written in 1940 when the Communist Party (CP) was banned by the Canadian Government under the War Measures Act. In November 1941, after Mackenzie King's call for enlistment, Dick wrote to the Department of Justice to ask permission to join the army. He never received a reply. On 1 April 1942 Dick's home was raided and he was interned at the Don Jail until September 1942 when he was moved to the Ontario Reformatory in Guelph. Esther wrote a letter to Louis St. Laurent, Minister of Justice to appeal on his behalf. Major public campaigning by communists and the wartime alliance with the USSR after 1941 shifted public opinion toward the CP and the Canadian Government slowly began releasing internees in January 1942. Dick was released in October 1942 and enlisted at the end of the month. Dick died on August 17, 1944 in Normandy, France. He was a tank driver in the Canadian Army. Bill was similarly arrested in 1941, spending time in jail and then an internment camp with other members of the CP. He joined the Canadian army in 1943 and fought in Holland and Belgium. Bill was first married to Anne Weir who died of a brain hemorrhage in 1943 just before he enlisted. The family believes this may have been due to drinking unpasteurized milk. Encouraged by Dick Steele to take care of his family should he pass in the war, Bill married Esther Steele in 1946. They had a daughter named Sheri and were members of the United Jewish People's Order. For 20 years Walsh worked for the Hamilton region of the United Electrical Workers (UE). Bill remained a member of the CP until 1967 when we was expelled for criticizing another union leader. He died in 2004. Esther passed away in 2010 at age 96.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
RELATED MATERIAL NOTE: Library and Archives Canada has the William Walsh fonds and MG 28, ser. I 268, USWA, vol.4, SWOC Correspondence, has various letters from Dick Steele ca. 1938. Museum of Jewish Montreal has an oral history with Leila Mustachi (daughter of Max Wolofsky, Bill's brother) where she speaks about Bill, Dick and Esther. USE CONDITION NOTES: For "Bill Walsh Oral history" Vols.1 and 2, some contributors stipulate that recordings are restricted to personal use only and must not be used for any commercial purpose.
Subjects
World War, 1939-1945
Politics and government
Labour and unions
Name Access
Steele, Michael
Steele, Dick
Walsh, Bill
Walsh, Esther Steele
Places
Guelph, Ont.
Toronto, Ont.
Hamilton, Ont.
Oshawa, Ont.
Ottawa, Ont.
Montreal, Que.
Fort William/Thunder Bay, Ont.
Germany
England
Holland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-2-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-2-13
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 150 photographs : b&w and col ; 21 x 27 cm or smaller
1 photograph : negative print on transparency
1 scrapbook
Date
1925-1976
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting the family life of Henry & Bella Rosenbaum. Included are photos from Poland, their time in Italy, Israel and finally Canada. In addition, there is a scrapbook of photos prepared by their daughter Brenda on the occasion of their 30th wedding anniversary.
Administrative History
Henry (Henoch) Rosenbaum (1925-2015), was born in Radom Poland and is the 7th child of Moshe Rosenbaum & Rachel (née Katz). In the aftermath of the war Henry met his wife Bella (née Rotbard) in Italy and they moved to Israel in 1946. In 1952, they immigrated to Canada and had two children Brenda and Murray Rosenbaum. Henry was a professional printer and worked for Trio Press Ltd. From 1983-1989, Henry served as editor for the quarterly Yiddish and English journal the Voice of Radom and was an active member of the Radomer society.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Expo 67 (Montréal, Québec)
Rosenbaum, Henry, 1925-2015
Places
Canada
Israel
Italy
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-5
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
41 photographs : b&w and col. (1625 kb jpgs) ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Date
1932-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the Latchman Triplets. Included are family photographs of Donald, Marvin and Victor Latchman, a family portrait taken at the wedding of Philip and Sally Latchman, class photos, summer camp photos, and images of the triplets' 75th and 80th birthdays (5 November 2013).
Identified in photographs are: Donald and Annette Latchman, Victor and Rosalie Latchman, Marvin and Shirley Latchman, Philip and Sally Latchman, Morris Latchman, Vera Latchman Berrin, Mari Latchman Lipton, Irv Lipton, and Belle Latchman.
Textual records include Beth Sholom Bulletin June-August 1997, Beth Sholom Brotherhood Ball and Installation 1971, photocopies of news paper articles about the triplets, class photos and letter regarding payment of King's Bounty.
Administrative History
Philip and Sally (Sugarman) Latchman were married in 1932. In November 1933, Sally gave birth to identical triplets Donald, Marvin and Victor. In celebration, they were sent the King's Bounty of 3 British pounds. The boys were interviewed every year on their birthday by Toronto newspapers until they decided to stop the publicity. The family lived in the Bloor-Markham area until the boys were 11. The family then moved to Montclair Avenue where the boys attended Forest Hill Public School. They had their bar-mitzvahs at the Hebrew Men of England Synagogue. The triplets' father, Philip Latchman was a founding members of Beth Sholom Synagogue. Donald Latchman was on the board and Rosalie Latchman was active in the congregation.
Philip and his younger brother Morris Latchman started Federal Farms Limited in 1948 on 150 acres of Holland March in Brantford, Ontario. They grew vegetables: potatoes, carrots, celery and rutabegas. They also had a potato chip company Mad Hatter Snack Foods which was Kosher for Passover. Federal Farms Ltd. went public in 1961 and Loblaws bought 51% of the shares.
Donald attended Ryerson business school and founded Latchman Insurance Brokers. He married Annette Bachst, a holocaust survivor who grew up in New York.
Marvin attended Ryerson business school then worked for Federal Farms at the Ontario Food Terminal. Later he became a real estate broker. He married Shirley Wolkofsky.
Victor worked on the family farm and at Federal Fruit Company at the Ontario Food Terminal. Victor took a business course at Shaw's Business School. In 1966 he bought Taylors shoes, a business at 2934 Dundas Street. West started in 1920 by Sid Taylor. Victor helped start the Junction Business Improvement Association and was twice President of Junction Gardens BIA. He retired in 2009. Victor and Rosalie Greenspan (d. 2014) were married at Beth Sholom in 1958 by Rabbi David Monson. Their children are Howard, and Faith and Mitchell Sherman. Their grand-children are Matthew, Jennifer and Russell Sherman. Victor and Rosalie were honoured at Beth Sholom Synagogue on 26 October 2013 for their 55th wedding anniversary.
In 2012 at age 78, the triplets believed themselves to be the oldest male identical triplets alive in Canada.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
RELATED MATERIALS NOTE: Federal Farms Limited fonds at Simoce Country Archives. ASSOCIATED MATERIALS NOTE: See accession 2016-12\45 (Victor Latchman) and 2002-10\66 (Morris Latchman).
Subjects
Agriculture
Families
Name Access
Latchman, Donald
Latchman, Marvin
Latchman, Victor
Places
Brantford (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-12-45
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-12-45
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w ; col. ; 8 x 11 cm
1 folder of textual records
Date
1958-2010
Scope and Content
Accession consists of family photos of Victor Latchman and textual records about Victor's business Taylors Shoes. Identified in the photos are: Victor Latchman and Rosalie Greenspan, Donald and Annette Latchman and Victor and Rosalie in Miami (1960s). Textual records include a business card for Taylors Shoes and an article about Latchman's retirement published in the Bloor West Town Crier (February 2010).
Administrative History
Philip and Sally (Sugarman) Latchman were married in 1932. In November 1933, Sally gave birth to identical triplets Donald, Marvin and Victor. In celebration, they were sent the King's Bounty of 3 British pounds. The boys were interviewed every year on their birthday by Toronto newspapers until they decided to stop the publicity. The family lived in the Bloor-Markham area until the boys were 11. The family then moved to Montclair Avenue where the boys attended Forest Hill Public School. They had their bar-mitzvahs at the Hebrew Men of England Synagogue. The triplets' father, Philip Latchman was a founding members of Beth Sholom Synagogue. Donald Latchman was on the board and Rosalie Latchman was active in the congregation.
Philip and his younger brother Morris Latchman started Federal Farms Limited in 1948 on 150 acres of Holland March in Brantford, Ontario. They grew vegetables: potatoes, carrots, celery and rutabegas. They also had a potato chip company Mad Hatter Snack Foods which was Kosher for Passover. Federal Farms Ltd. went public in 1961 and Loblaws bought 51% of the shares.
Donald attended Ryerson business school and founded Latchman Insurance Brokers. He married Annette Bachst, a holocaust survivor who grew up in New York.
Marvin attended Ryerson business school then worked for Federal Farms at the Ontario Food Terminal. Later he became a real estate broker. He married Shirley Wolkofsky.
Victor worked on the family farm and at Federal Fruit Company at the Ontario Food Terminal. Victor took a business course at Shaw's Business School. In 1966 he bought Taylors shoes, a business at 2934 Dundas Street. West started in 1920 by Sid Taylor. Victor helped start the Junction Business Improvement Association and was twice President of Junction Gardens BIA. He retired in 2009. Victor and Rosalie Greenspan (d. 2014) were married at Beth Sholom in 1958 by Rabbi David Monson. Their children are Howard, and Faith and Mitchell Sherman. Their grand-children are Matthew, Jennifer and Russell Sherman. Victor and Rosalie were honoured at Beth Sholom Synagogue on 26 October 2013 for their 55th wedding anniversary.
In 2012 at age 78, the triplets believed themselves to be the oldest male identical triplets alive in Canada.
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIALS NOTE: See accession 2016-7-5 (Victor Latchman) and 2002-10-66 (Morris Latchman). RELATED MATERIALS NOTE: Federal Farms Limited fonds at Simcoe County Archives.
Subjects
Business
Families
Name Access
Latchman, Annette
Latchman, Donald
Latchman, Rosalie
Latchman, Victor
Places
Miami (Fla.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-5-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-5-2
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 13 x 18 cm
Date
2004
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one photograph of the Latchman family at the Richmond Hill Country Club, ca. 2004. Identified in the photograph are from left: Donald Latchman, Robyn Latchman, Dante Latchman, Lori Latchman (back row), Annette Latchman (front row), Billi Latchman, Leonard Latchman (back row), Daniel Latchman (back row), Rosalie Latchman, Victor Latchman, Howard Latchman, Russell Sherman (child in front), Mitchell Sherman (back row), Matthew Sherman (middle row), Jennifer Sherman (child), Faith Sherman, Linda Stein, Aaron Stein, Shirley Latchman (front), Eric ? (back row), Michael Stein, Marvin Latchman, Jeffrey Stein (back row), Shael Kalef, Carly Teperman, Stuart Teperman, Phillip Teperman, Wendy Teperman, Zachary Teperman, Laura Kalef, Jarred Kalef (back row), Karyn Kalef, Jennifer Kalef, Ryan Kalef, Randy Kalef.
Administrative History
Philip and Sally (Sugarman) Latchman were married in 1932. In November 1933, Sally gave birth to identical triplets Donald, Marvin and Victor. In celebration, they were sent the King's Bounty of 3 British pounds. The boys were interviewed every year on their birthday by Toronto newspapers until they decided to stop the publicity. The family lived in the Bloor-Markham St. area until the boys were 11. The family then moved to Montclair Avenue where the boys attended Forest Hill Public School. They had their bar-mitzvahs at the Hebrew Men of England Synagogue. The triplets' father, Philip Latchman, was a founding member of Beth Sholom Synagogue. Donald Latchman was on the board and Rosalie Latchman was active in the congregation.
Philip and his younger brother Morris Latchman started Federal Farms Limited in 1948 on 150 acres of Holland Marsh in Brantford, Ontario. They grew vegetables: potatoes, carrots, celery and rutabegas. They also had a potato chip company called Mad Hatter Snack Foods, which was Kosher for Passover. Federal Farms Ltd. went public in 1961 and Loblaws bought 51% of the shares.
Donald attended Ryerson business school and founded Latchman Insurance Brokers. He married Annette Bachst, a holocaust survivor who grew up in New York.
Marvin attended Ryerson business school then worked for Federal Farms at the Ontario Food Terminal. Later he became a real estate broker. He married Shirley Wolkofsky.
Victor worked on the family farm and at Federal Fruit Company at the Ontario Food Terminal. Victor took a business course at Shaw's Business School. In 1966 he bought Taylors shoes, a business at 2934 Dundas St. West in the Junction that was founded in 1920 by Sid Taylor. Victor helped start the Junction Business Improvement Area and was twice President of Junction Gardens BIA. He retired in 2009. Victor and Rosalie (née Greenspan) (d. 2014) were married at Beth Sholom in 1958 by Rabbi David Monson. Their children are Howard, and Faith and Mitchell Sherman. Their grand-children are Matthew, Jennifer and Russell Sherman. Victor and Rosalie were honoured at Beth Sholom Synagogue on 26 October 2013 for their 55th wedding anniversary.
In 2012 at age 78, the triplets believed themselves to be the oldest male identical triplets alive in Canada.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
RELATED MATERIALS NOTE: See the Federal Farms Limited fonds at the Simoce Country Archives. ASSOCIATED MATERIALS NOTE: See accession 2016-12-45 (Victor Latchman), 2016-7-5 (Victor Latchman) and 2002-10-66 (Morris Latchman).
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Latchman, Donald, 1933-
Latchman, Marvin, 1933-
Latchman, Victor, 1933-
Places
Richmond Hill (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-7-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-7-6
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
65 photographs : b&w and col. (tiff)
Date
1948-1964
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Gary Wagman and his family. Included are: 65 photographs of the Gold-Wagman family. 28 of the photographs were taken at Gary's bar mitzvah party, which was held on 8 March 1964 at the North Bathurst Talmud Torah.
Administrative History
Gary Irving Wagman (1951-) was born 19 March 1951 and is the youngest son of Ann Wagman (née Gold, 1926-2017) and Sollie Wagman (1921-2014). His older brother Howard, known as Hushy (1947-2001), was born 9 October 1947. Gary is the grandson of David and Rose Gold (his maternal grandparents) and Celia and Jacob Wagman (his paternal grandparents).
Photo Caption (027): Gary Wagman holding chumash given to him by his grandmother, 8 Mar. 1964. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-7-6.
Photo Caption (017): Gary Wagman swinging baseball bat, 1964. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-7-6.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIALS: Other records relating to the Wagman family can be found in Accessions 2009-11-1 and 2017-8-13.
Subjects
Bar mitzvah
Families
Name Access
North Bathurst Talmud Torah
Wagman family
Wagman, Gary, 1951-
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-8-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-8-13
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
object
Physical Description
45 photographs (tif) : b&w and col.
2 objects : 7 x 38 or smaller
Date
[192-?]-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Gary Wagman and his family. Included are: a commemorative key commemorating the grand opening of the Apter Centre on 13 Mar. 1949, a key to the Apter Centre, and 45 photographs in TIF format. The photographs are largely of members of the extended Gold-Wagman family including Gary Wagman, Gary's brother Howard "Hushy" Wagman, Gary's mother Ann Wagman (née Gold), and Gary's father Sollie Wagman along with various cousins, grandparents, aunts and uncles. The photographs also depict several unidentified individuals who may be related to Gary.
Photo Caption (007): Ann Gold, [194-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-8-11.
Photo Caption (008): Jack Gold with friends, [194-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-8-11.
Photo Caption (010): Howard “Hushy” Wagman and Gary Wagman waiting for their grandparents at Union Station, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, [195-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-8-11.
Photo Caption (013): Leonard Walker, Mrs. Leonard Walker, Bryan Davidson, Rosalie, Charles Davidson, Aaron Miller, and Marry Miller (née Davidson), [197-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-8-11.
Photo Caption (014): Ann Gold, [193-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-8-11.
Administrative History
Gary Irving Wagman (1951-) was born 19 March 1951 and is the youngest son of Ann Wagman (née Gold, 1926-2017) and Sollie Wagman (1921-2014). His older brother Howard, known as Hushy (1947-2001), was born 9 October 1947. Gary is the grandson of David and Rose Gold (his maternal grandparents) and Celia and Jacob Wagman (his paternal grandparents).
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIALS: Other records relating to the Wagman family can be found in Accessions 2009-11-1 and 2017-7-6.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Apter Friendly Society (Toronto, Ont.)
Gold family
Wagman, Gary, 1951-
Wagman family
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-9-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-9-1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
moving images
Physical Description
ca. 14 cm of textual records
ca. 275 photographs : b&w and col. ; 26 x 21 cm or smaller
1 DVD
Date
[191-?]-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the life of Abe Zukerman and several family members including Abe's father-in-law Elia Rubin and brother-in-law Jack Rubin. Included are: certificates of various sorts, correspondence, a DVD of the dedication of the restored Jewish cemetery in Wachock, eulogies, a family calender, financial documents, identity documents for Abe and Margot Zukerman, memorial books/records for Abe Zukerman and Elia Rubin, photographs, and a small number of administrative and financial records from the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society.
Custodial History
The material that makes up accession 2017-9-1 belonged to Abe Zukerman. Mr. Zukerman's stepson, Mel Perlmutter, gathered the material and donated it to the Archives
Administrative History
Abram "Abe" Zukerman (1914-2009) was born in Wierzbnik, Poland in 1914. He was the only member of his family to survive the Holocaust. In 1948, he came to Canada, where he became involved in the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society and married. His first wife, Esther, predeceased him. In 1975, he married his second wife, Margot, who had two children from a previous marriage. In addition to serving as a senior executive member of the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society for over 50 years, Abe volunteered with United Jewish Appeal and State of Israel Bonds. He passed away 8 Feb. 2009. Photo Caption (001): Abe Zukerman at his store on Queen St. W., Toronto, Ontario, Canada, [196-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (002): Lansdowne Cut Rate Store on Queen St. W., Toronto, Ontario, Canada, [196-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (011): Abe Zukerman at the Western Wall, [199-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (017): Abe Zukerman with others, possibly in Israel, [196-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Caption (018): Abe Zukerman, [193-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11. Photo Captions (032) - (087): Unidentified individuals, [192-?]-[195-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-9-11.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
A number of photographs have writing in Polish and Yiddish on their opposite side, which might prove useful in their identification.
Subjects
Cemeteries
Families
Societies
Name Access
Rubin, Elia
Rubin, Jack
Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society
Zukerman, Abe, 1914-2009
Zukerman, Margot
Places
Canada
Israel
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-6-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-6-5
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
ca. 30 cm of textual records
89 photographs : b&w and col. (7 negatives) ; 18 x 13 cm or smaller
1 CD-ROM (textual record)
19 videocassettes (ca. 22 hr.)
Date
[19--?]-2008
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Abe and Margot Zukerman, their family, and the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society. Included are: awards, identity documents, legal documents, letters, photographs, publications, videocassettes, and vital records.
Photo Caption (015): Abe Zukerman's father, [19--?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-6-5.
Custodial History
Mel Perlmutter, stepson of Abe Zukerman and son of Margot Zukerman, donated the records to the Archives.
Administrative History
Abe Zukerman (1914-2009) was born in Wierzbnik, Poland in 1914. He was the only member of his family to survive the Holocaust. In 1948, he came to Canada, where he became involved in the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society and married. His first wife, Esther, predeceased him. In 1975, he married his second wife, Margot, who had two children from a previous marriage. In addition to serving as a senior executive member of the Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society for over 50 years, Abe volunteered with United Jewish Appeal and State of Israel Bonds. He passed away 8 Feb. 2009. Margot Zukerman (née Rubin) was born in Berlin, Germany on 31 December 1922. Still a child when the National Socialists came to power, she was denied schooling. She arrived in Toronto in 1939 never having received a formal education. Despite this, she was able to learn English and operate her father's small ladies' wear store in Hamilton for at least a dozen years. In 1944, she married her first husband Alexander Perlmutter, with whom she had two children: one in 1945 and another in 1948. In 1970, she moved to Toronto, where she acted as caregiver to her father. In 1974, she met Abe, whom she married on 14 February 1975. Like her husband, Margot was an active member of Toronto's Jewish community.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIALS: Other records relating to Abe Zukerman can be found in Accession 2017-9-1.
Subjects
Families
Societies
Name Access
Wierzbniker Friendly Mutual Benefit Society
Zukerman, Abe, 1914-2009
Zukerman, Esther, 1912-1972
Zukerman, Margot, 1922-
Zukerman family
Places
Canada
Israel
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-10-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-10-9
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
37 photographs : b&w, some sepia toned ; 9 x 14 cm and 14 x 9 cm
Date
1914-1929
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 37 photographs documenting the extended family of Eva Horwitz (née Lipshitz). Included also is one photograph of Rabbi Yitzhak Yehuda Trunk (1878-1939), who was rabbi in Ciechanow from 1907-1912. (Ciechanow is approximately thirty kilometres from the town of Mlawa, where Eva was born.)
Custodial History
Marian Horwitz, daughter of Eva Horwitz, came into possession of the photographs subsequent to the death of her mother in 1983. Marian gifted the records to Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre on 30 October 2017.
Administrative History
Eva Horwitz (née Lipshitz, 1897-1983) was born in Mlawa, Poland on 20 June 1897. She married Jack Horwitz in Toronto on 30 October 1924. Thereafter, she raised three children: Gloria, Marvin, and Marian. In addition to her duties as a homemaker, Eva was an active member of the Workmen's Circle with her husband. She passed away on 17 February 1983.
Photo Caption (037): Rabbi Yitzhak Yehude Trunk, [192-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-10-9.
All other photos are unidentified.
Use Conditions
Restricted. See administrative notes.
Descriptive Notes
LANGUAGE NOTE: Captions on verso in Polish and Yiddish.
Subjects
Families
Rabbis
Name Access
Horwitz, Eva, 1897-1983
Horwitz family
Trunk, Rabbi Yitzhak Yehuda, 1878-1939
Places
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-11-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-11-5
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
11 photographs : b&w, some sepia toned ; 13 x 18 cm or smaller
Date
[192-?] - [193-?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 9 photographs documenting the Horwitz family including a number of individuals presumed to be relatives living in Europe.
Photo Caption (002): Jacob "Jack" Horwitz (left) and six other men, November 1920. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-11-5.
Photo Caption (004): Eva Horwitz (centre) and two other women, Mlawa, Poland, [192-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-11-5.
Photo Caption (007): Jack Horwitz posing with book, [192-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-11-5.
Photo Caption (009): Marian Horwitz (first row standing, right) with other students, Clinton Street Public School, Toronto, Ont. [193-]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2017-11-5.
All other photos unidentified.
Custodial History
Marian Horwitz, daughter of Eva Horwitz, came into possession of the photographs subsequent to the death of her mother in 1983. Marian gifted the records to Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre on 16 November 2017.
Administrative History
Eva Horwitz (née Lipshitz, 1897-1983) was born in Mlawa, Poland on 20 June 1897. She married Jack Horwitz in Toronto on 30 October 1924. Thereafter, she raised three children: Gloria, Marvin, and Marian. In addition to her duties as a homemaker, Eva was an active member of the Workmen's Circle with her husband. She passed away on 17 February 1983.
Jack Horwitz (1900-1980) was born in Polaniec, Poland on 13 December 1900. In 1920, he set sail from Antwerp and arrived in Canada. Four years later, on 30 October 1924, he married Eva Lipshitz. On 23 April 1927, he was naturalized as a British subject with his occupation listed as tailor. He passed away on 26 February 1980.
Marian Horwitz is the daughter of Eva and Jack Horwitz. The youngest of three children, she grew up with her two siblings in Toronto and attended Clinton Street Public School. Later, she moved to New York where she attended Fordham College at Lincoln Center and held a number of jobs. Eventually, she returned to Toronto where she currently resides.
Use Conditions
Restricted. See administrative notes.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Clinton Street Public School (Toronto, Ont.)
Horwitz, Eva, 1897-1983
Horwitz family
Horwitz, Jack, 1900-1980
Horwitz, Marian
Places
Poland
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-8-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-8-4
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
20 film reels (ca. 131 mins) : pos., col., si, ; 16 mm
Date
[194-]-[195-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 20 colour home movie reels documenting the Cherniak family from Windsor, Ontario. Pictured in the films are Bob Cherniak, his sisters Ellen and Donna and their parents Biddy and Archie. Contents of the films include family trips to Banff, Alberta, Boston, and Florida; the three children playing at home; various birthday parties; Ellen's sweet sixteen party; summer camp; Bob's first day of school; ice-skating at the park; bringing Donna home from the hosptial; and a New Year's Eve party at the Kate's home. There are also eight films featuring unknown content.
Administrative History
Robert Cherniak is the son of Biddy Cherniak (née Rotenberg) and Archie Cherniak. He has two siblings; an older sister Ellen and a younger sister Donna.
Use Conditions
Conditional Use. Researchers must receive permission from the donor prior to publication. Please contact the OJA for more information.
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Cherniak, Robert
Places
Windsor (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-1-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-1-5
Material Format
textual record
object
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
3 objects
Date
[190-?]-1967
Scope and Content
Accession consists of materials documenting the Grosman family, in particular Max Grosman. Included are Max's certificate of naturalization, various Polish-language documents including Max's Polish passport, an old age security application, and an insurance book. The accession also includes a pin commemorating the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union's fortieth anniversary and two rings that belonged to Max.
Custodial History
Max Grosman's son, Wilfred Grosman, came into possession of the records constituting Accession 2018-1-5 following the death of his father. He donated the records to the Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre on 17 January 2018.
Administrative History
Max Grosman was born 25 March 1884 in Novoradomsk, Poland. He became a naturalized British subject in 1914. Max's wife, Minnie "Majja" Grosman (née Bocian), came to Canada in 1913. Together, they had four sons: Jack, Morris, Samuel, and Wilfred. Max made his living as a tailor. He passed away on 17 October 1960 at the age of seventy-seven.
Descriptive Notes
LANGUAGE: Accession contains records in both English and Polish.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Bocian, Majja
Bocian, Minnie
Grosman, Majja
Grosman, Minnie
Grosman, Max
Grosman, Wilfred
International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union
Places
Canada
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-4-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-4-1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
ca. 40 photographs : b&w and col. ; 17 x 13 cm or smaller
1 folder of textual records
Date
1921-2017
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Glen Eker's family. Included are: ca. 40 photographs of family and friends; biographical information for Benjamin Eker, Glen's grandfather; a genealogy article by Deborah Pekilis, Glen's wife, on the Issenmans of Montreal; and a copy of Glen's grandparents' marriage certificate.
Administrative History
Glen Eker was born in Toronto, Ontario to Paul Eker and Dorothy Horwitz. He grew up in the Forest Hill neighbourhood of Toronto before moving with his family to Hamilton. He received two master’s degrees (one in sociology, the other in political science) from McMaster University and a third master’s degree (in library science) from the University of Toronto.
Glen's wife, Deborah Pekilis, was born in Montreal and lived there until her parents moved to Toronto. She was the librarian for the Jewish Genealogical Society and sat on the Hamilton Historical Board. She is currently a writer.
Glen has worked as a research assistant and a teaching assistant at McMaster and has taught at Ryerson University and Mohawk College. At present, he works as an estate and genealogy researcher.
Glen has published a book on Karl Marx, five indexes of Jews in Canada, and one index of Amish and Mennonites in Canada. His genealogy articles have appeared in various magazines and his short stories and poems have appeared in print as well.
Glen has worked on his family genealogy for a number of years. His paternal family line derives from Russia, Ukraine, Lithuania, and Poland while his maternal line derives from Byelorussia and Romania. He is descended from the Horwitz and Strachman families on the latter.
Descriptive Notes
Associated materials: Other accessions donated by Glen Eker include 2018-3-1, 2018-4-2, 2018-4-16, and 2018-5-1.
Subjects
Families
Genealogy
Name Access
Eker (family)
Eker, Glen
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-4-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-4-4
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
ca. 35 photographs : b&w and col. ; 33 x 27 cm or smaller
Date
1891-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting members of Harvey Freeman's family, several of whom served in the armed forces. Included are: family photographs, a Krugel family tree, a copy of Itzik Kriegel (Harvey's grandfather)'s army discharge, an attestation paper for Louis Krugel (Harvey's uncle), a signed program for a "stag whoopee dinner and night of blissful freedom" in honour of Lou Krugel's approaching marriage, and printed images of Harvey's daughter Tamar Freeman in Afghanistan. One of the photographs depicts Louis Krugel with professional wrestler and actor Tor Johnson, aka the Swedish Angel.
Photo Caption (001): Wellesley Public School, [ca. 1915]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (002): Louis Krugel. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (003): Buba Sluva with Sara, Moe, Lou, and Harry, 1909. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (004): Berel Krugel in front of 22 Gerard Street West, Toronto, [ca. 1919]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (005): Wedding, 28 September 1926. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (006): Louis Krugel. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (007): Baba Tzluva with Harry, [189-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (008): Louis Krugel. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (009): Shabbat dinner, [ca. 1940]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (010): Norman, Buba Sluva, and Bert, [ca. 1922]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (011): Family portrait, 1909. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (012): Harry and Sara, 1916. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (013): Louis Krugel, [192-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (014): Louis Krugel and unknown man posing with boxing gloves, [1918?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (015): Louis Krugel, 1918. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (016): Harvey Freeman at Camp Borden, 1945. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (017): Unknown. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (018): Louis Krugel and unknown man, 1918. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (019): Louis Krugel with Tor Johnson, aka the Swedish Angel, [194-]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (020): Signed portrait of Louis Krugel. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Photo Caption (021): Louis Krugel, [192-]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-4-4.
Administrative History
Harvey Freeman was born on May 22, 1928. As a youth, he attended Harbord Collegiate and went on to join the militia, where he was the lone Canadian Jewish bagpiper.
Harvey made his living in business, working in different areas including furniture manufacturing and property management. As part of a change in lifestyle, he took up marathons in his early seventies.
Harvey has four children.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIALS: Records for Harvey's daughter Tamar can be found in Accession 2013-7-8.
Subjects
Afghan War, 2001---Participation, Canadian
Families
Soldiers--Canada
Name Access
Freeman, Harvey
Freeman, Tamar
Johnson, Tor, 1903-1971
Places
Afghanistan
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-5-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-5-1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
5 photographs : b & w ; 23 x 18 cm or smaller
Date
[191-]-1949
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting members of Glen Eker's family. Included are: copies of Benjamin Eker's military records, black and white photographs of Dorothy Horwitz and Paul Eker from their wedding album, and a Bayview Pharmacy Christmas card.
Administrative History
Glen Eker was born in Toronto, Ontario to Paul Eker and Dorothy Horwitz. He grew up in the Forest Hill neighbourhood of Toronto before moving with his family to Hamilton. He received two master’s degrees (one in sociology, the other in political science) from McMaster University and a third master’s degree (in library science) from the University of Toronto. Glen's wife, Deborah Pekilis, was born in Montreal and lived there until her parents moved to Toronto. She was the librarian for the Jewish Genealogical Society and sat on the Hamilton Historical Board. She is currently a writer. Glen has worked as a research assistant and a teaching assistant at McMaster and has taught at Ryerson University and Mohawk College. At present, he works as an estate and genealogy researcher. Glen has published a book on Karl Marx, five indexes of Jews in Canada, and one index of Amish and Mennonites in Canada. His genealogy articles have appeared in various magazines and his short stories and poems have appeared in print as well. Glen has worked on his family genealogy for a number of years. His paternal family line derives from Russia, Ukraine, Lithuania, and Poland while his maternal line derives from Byelorussia and Romania. He is descended from the Horwitz and Strachman families on the latter.
Descriptive Notes
Associated materials: Other accessions donated by Glen Eker include 2018-3,1, 2018-4-1, 2018-4-2, and 2018-4-16.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
Families
Married people
Name Access
Eker (family)
Eker, Glen
Places
Ontario
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-4-15
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-4-15
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
8 photographs : b&w and col. (hand-tinted) ; 21 x 26 or smaller
Date
1885-2003
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the records of Pearl "Pesh" and Solly Zucker. Included is Jennie Davis' birth certificate (1885), the invitation to the marriage of Jennie Davis and Simon Sidman (1910), Jennie and Simon's ketubah from the New Synagogue and Beth-Hamidrash, Cheetham Hill Rd (1910), Simon Sidman's burial card (1928), Pearl's birth certificate (1914), Solly's birth certificate (1908), Pearl and Solly's ketubah from the United Synagogue in Manchester (1934), marriage certificate of Jennie Sidman and Myer Cohen (1956), British passports for both Jennie Cohen and Pearl and Solly Zucker, Canadian citizenship certificates for Solly and Pearl, and photos of Simon Sidman, Solly and Pearl, Solly, Gerald and Simon, Pearl's wedding portrait, and two portraits of Esther and Isaac Sugar. Also included are writings by Pearl, mostly written after the passing of Solly in 2001, and typed by her daughter-in-law, Jan Zucker.
Administrative History
Pearl Miller Zucker (née Sidman) was born on 18 Jan. 1914 in Manchester, England to Jennie Sidman Cohen (née Davis) (b. 5 May 1885, Russia-d. 31 Dec. 1983, Toronto) and Simon Sidman. Miller was the middle name given to Pearl at birth by her father. Pearl's mother Jennie had married Simon Sidman on 21 Aug. 1910. Simon died on 10 Dec. 1928 at age 45. Jennie then married Myer Cohen on Feb. 15, 1956 in Manchester, who died sometime between 1956 and 1959. Jennie became a landed immigrant in Canada in 1959.
Moses Solomon "Solly" Zucker (Sugar) (b. 6 Feb. 1908, County of Gateshead, England-d. 22 Jan. 2001, Toronto) was born to Isaac and Esther Sugar (née Greenbaum). He married Pearl "Pesh" Sidman on 20 June 1934. Miller was Pearl's given middle name. The couple had two sons: Gerald Zucker (b. 5 July 1936) and Simon Zucker (b. 15 Nov. 1937). Solly served with the fire brigade in Manchester during the Second World War.
The couple immigrated to Canada from England in June 1952 for economic reasons. Pearl had a cousin named Mark Gilbert already living in Canada. The couple and their two sons first landed in Montreal, but only stayed a year before moving to Toronto. Upon arrival in Canada, Solly got a job with the Canadian Government, possibly with the RCAF at Downsview. Pearl worked for Bell Canada. The family belonged to Shaarei Tefillah Synagogue and lived in the Bathurst and Eglinton area.
Pearl died on 20 February 2018 at the age of 104.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Zucker, Pearl, 1914-2018
Places
England
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-6-15
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-6-15
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 26 x 21 cm
Date
1946
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of Beverley Kelman on her first birthday. Pictured in the photograph with Beverley are her father Marvin Lister, mother Ruth Lister, grandfather Rabbi Leibish Noble, and grandmother Bella. Rabbi Noble was the first principal of Eitz Chaim, Toronto's second-oldest Jewish day school. the photograph was taken at the family home that Ruth and Marvin Lister shared with Ruth's parents Bella and Rabbie Leibish Noble at 73 Bordend St., Toronto.
Administrative History
Rabbi Leibish Noble immigrated to Toronto in 1912. The outbreak of World War I hampered his effort to bring over his wife Bella and two young daughters Gertrude and Mary (Miriam).
Subjects
Birthdays
Families
Portraits, Group
Name Access
Noble, Leibish
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-6-18
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-6-18
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w ; 15 x 10 cm or smaller
2 letters
Date
1930-1948
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Miriam and Moshe Beckerman. Incuded are: one photograph taken of road builders in Palestine in 1930; one photograph of the British Eighth Army (pre-Jewish Brigade), of which Moshe was a part, in the first half of the 1940s; one letter in Hebrew addressed to Miriam by a friend of hers; one photograph (enclosed with the aforementioned letter in an envelope) of Moshe Beckerman, Mrs. Mirsky, and Miriam Beckerman taken in Ramat Gan, Israel in 1948; and one letter sent by Miriam Beckerman, then residing in Tel Aviv, to Esther Berger in Canada and dated January 12, 1948. The last letter briefly mentions the tense situation prevailing in Mandatory Palestine.
Photo Caption (001): British Eighth Army, [194-]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-6-18.
Photo Caption (002): Road builders, Palestine, 1930. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-6-18.
Photo Caption (003): Moshe Beckerman, Mrs. Mirsky, and Miriam Beckerman, Ramat Gan, Israel, 1948. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2018-6-18.
Administrative History
Miriam Beckerman immigrated to British Mandatory Palestine in 1947. Only nineteen years old, she made her way to Kfar Blum, a kibbutz in Hula Valley. After a few months, she relocated to another kibbutz, Ramat Yochanan. After relocating to Ma'ayan Baruch, another settlement, she mer her husband Moshe Beckerman. Moshe had been with the British Eighth Army, serving in the North Africa campaigns. The couple married in October 1947 and moved to Tel Aviv, where Moshe was originally from. In 1952, Miriam and Moshe made the decision to move to Canada.
Descriptive Notes
Conservation: The archivist removed two sticky notes from the back of photographs for preservation reasons. Prior to removing them, he scanned them so that researchers would be able to read what was written on them.
Language: One of the letters is in Hebrew.
Subjects
Families
Palestine
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Beckerman, Miriam
Beckerman, Moshe
Great Britain. Army. Army, Eighth
Places
Canada
Israel
Palestine
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-6
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
62 photographs : b&w and col. ; 10 x 15 cm or smaller
4 cm of textual records
Date
1920-2018
Scope and Content
Accession contains material documenting Gabriella Szanto and her family. Included are family photographs, vital records, correspondence, and a 2018 Baycrest calendar that features a portrait and short biography of Gabriella.
Custodial History
Shirley Worth served as the executor of Gabriella Szanto's estate. Following Gabriella's death, Shirley donated the records that make up the accession to the Ontario Jewish Archives.
Administrative History
Gabriella "Gabi" Szanto (née Lazlo) was born in Budapest, Hungary on 26 January 1916. Gabriella's parents, Arnold and Ilonka Lazlo (née Diamenstein), were women's clothing manufacturers who employed twenty-five people. Their skills complemented each other: Arnold had studied design in Berlin for two years while Ilonka was a dressmaker. On 18 May 1919, Arnold and Ilonka had their second child, George.
During the Second World War, Gabi and her mother moved to the outskirts of Budapest where they passed as Catholics, rarely leaving their house. Miklos Szanto—the man Gabriella married after the war—was sent to the Mauthausen concentration camp. Gabriella's brother, George, was sent to a camp in Siberia and did not survive. It is not known where or how Gabriella's father survived the war.
After the war, Gabriella, her mother and father, and her husband Miklos reunited in Budapest. The four lived in the family apartment near the city opera house.
During the period of Communist rule, Gabriella and Miklos bribed their way out of Hungary and travelled to Vienna. From Vienna, they travelled to Australia, where they lived for five or six years, working as a short order cook and a seamstress respectively.
At some point, Gabriella and Miklos made the decision to immigrate to Canada. Their first stop—most likely in the 1950s—was Montreal. There, Gabriella worked for a high-end retailer before moving with her husband to Toronto one year later. In Toronto, Miklos worked again as a short order cook at the Noshery Restaurant on Eglinton, holding this job until he retried. Gabriella, meanwhile, worked as a seamstress until she was in her mid-80s.
In their retirement, Gabriella and Miklos spent two months each winter in Florida. Gabriella died in 2018.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
LANGUAGE NOTE: English, Hungarian, German.
Subjects
Families
Holocaust survivors
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Szanto, Gabriella, 1916-2018
Places
Australia
Austria
Canada
Hungary
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-22
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-22
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
47 photographs : b&w and col. ; 19 x 14 cm or smaller
Date
1949-2007
Scope and Content
Accession consists of forty-seven photographs documenting Lilian Rosenthal's family.
Identified in the photographs are: Emy Berman (née Rosenthal), Ella Fleischmann (née Schwarcz), Esther Fleischmann, Jack Fleischmann, Ivan Fleischmann, Joanne Howe (née Fleischmann), Livia Bitton Jackson, Leah Kedar, Allan Leibler, Mary Leibler (née Schwarcz) Bram Morrison, Ruth Raphael, Amir Rosenthal, Annette Rosenthal, Arthur Rosenthal, Eddie Rosenthal, Herschel Rosenthal, Jack Rosenthal, Keren Rosenthal, Leslie Rosenthal, Lilian Rosenthal, Miriam Rosenthal (née Schwarcz), Murray Rosenthal, Nili Rosenthal, Ron Rosenthal, Shira Rosenthal, Valerie Rosenthal, William Rosenthal, Carmelle Rutman, Serena Rutman, Tami Rutman (née Rosenthal), Yasmin Rutman, Alexander Schwarcz, Manci Schwarcz, Susan Schwarcz, Miriam Sharon (née Stern), Mr. Shoychet, Mrs. Shoychet, Rochelle Treister (née Fleischmann), and Ugo Vero.
Administrative History
Lilian Rosenthal is the daughter of Holocaust survivors Miriam Rosenthal (née Schwarcz) and Rabbi William Rosenthal. She grew up in Sudbury, Ontario with her siblings, Leslie and Murray.
Lilian's parents were born in eastern Europe and came to Canada in 1947. They lived in Timmins for a year before moving to Sudbury, where William ("Bela") served as a rabbi, cantor, and teacher for sixteen years.
In 1965, the family moved to Toronto and Miriam and William opened a Judaica store at the corner Bathurst Street and Caribou Road. Together, Lilian's parents ran the store for more than forty years until retiring in 2007. William died on 11 April 2008; Miriam died on 10 February 2018.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Availabilityusc of other formats: Digital access copies (jpg) have been created.
Finding aids: A short description including dates and identification is available for each photograph.
Associated material: The USC Shoah Foundation produced an oral history with Miriam Rosenthal, which has been digitized.
Subjects
Families
Family-owned business enterprises
Holocaust survivors
Name Access
Rosenthal (family)
Rosenthal, Lilian
Rosenthal, Miriam, 1922-2018
Rosenthal, William, 1911-2008
Places
Bathurst Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Caribou Road (Toronto, Ont.)
Sudbury (Ont.)
Timmins (Ont.)
Toronto Islands (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-8-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-8-12
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
sound recording
Physical Description
4 folders
2 audio discs (ca. 82 min.) : vinyl
Date
1903-1986
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Nirenberg family. Included are four folders of textual and graphic material documenting folk singer Miriam Nirenberg (née Goldberg), her husband Eliezar Nirenberg, and their two sons, Les and Harvey Nirenberg. Included also are two copies of Miriam Nirenberg's Folksongs in the East European Jewish Tradition on vinyl.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Availability of other formats: Access copies (jpg) have been created for the photographs; preservation copies (tif) have been created for the most fragile documents.
Finding aids: Caption table available for photographs.
Asssociated material: Records of Mariam Nirenberg's niece, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett,are located in the YIVO Archives and Library, including Kirshenblatt-Gimblett's field recordings of Mariam Nirenberg.
Accruals: Further accruals are expected.
Subjects
Families
Folk singers
Name Access
Nirenberg (family)
Nirenberg, Mariam
Places
Europe, Eastern
Ontario
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-8-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-8-13
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records and architectural drawings
1 videocassette (ca. 27 min.)
Date
2006
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Eker family. Included are: a videocassette of home video footage; a memoir written by P. M. Eker, Glen Eker's father, in 2006; and architectural drawings of Eker residences at 1050 College Street in Toronto and 5034 Esplanade Avenue in Montreal.
Administrative History
Glen Eker was born in Toronto, Ontario to Paul Eker and Dorothy Horwitz. He grew up in the Forest Hill neighbourhood of Toronto before moving with his family to Hamilton. He received two master’s degrees (one in sociology, the other in political science) from McMaster University and a third master’s degree (in library science) from the University of Toronto.
Glen's wife, Deborah Pekilis, was born in Montreal and lived there until her parents moved to Toronto. She was the librarian for the Jewish Genealogical Society and sat on the Hamilton Historical Board. She is currently a writer.
Glen has worked as a research assistant and a teaching assistant at McMaster and has taught at Ryerson University and Mohawk College. At present, he works as an estate and genealogy researcher.
Glen has published a book on Karl Marx, five indexes of Jews in Canada, and one index of Amish and Mennonites in Canada. His genealogy articles have appeared in various magazines and his short stories and poems have appeared in print as well.
Glen has worked on his family genealogy for a number of years. His paternal family line derives from Russia, Ukraine, Lithuania, and Poland while his maternal line derives from Byelorussia and Romania. He is descended from the Horwitz and Strachman families on the latter.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Eker (family)
Eker, Glen
Places
College Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Montréal (Québec)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-10-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-10-2
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
ca. 50 photographs : b&w ; 25 x 20 cm or smaller
Date
[194-?]-[197-?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Glek Eker and his family. Included are approximately fifty black and white photographs of Eker as a child; Eker's uncle, Irving Howard; Eker's maternal grandparents, Joe and Rebecca Horwitz; and Eker's cousin, Wand Gordon.
Administrative History
Glen Eker was born in Toronto, Ontario to Paul Eker and Dorothy Horwitz. He grew up in the Forest Hill neighbourhood of Toronto before moving with his family to Hamilton. He received two master’s degrees (one in sociology, the other in political science) from McMaster University and a third master’s degree (in library science) from the University of Toronto. Glen's wife, Deborah Pekilis, was born in Montreal and lived there until her parents moved to Toronto. She was the librarian for the Jewish Genealogical Society and sat on the Hamilton Historical Board. She is currently a writer. Glen has worked as a research assistant and a teaching assistant at McMaster and has taught at Ryerson University and Mohawk College. At present, he works as an estate and genealogy researcher. Glen has published a book on Karl Marx, five indexes of Jews in Canada, and one index of Amish and Mennonites in Canada. His genealogy articles have appeared in various magazines and his short stories and poems have appeared in print as well. Glen has worked on his family genealogy for a number of years. His paternal family line derives from Russia, Ukraine, Lithuania, and Poland while his maternal line derives from Byelorussia and Romania. He is descended from the Horwitz and Strachman families on the latter.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Eker (family)
Eker, Glen
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-10-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-10-4
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
7 cm of graphic material and textual records
Date
[193-?]-[196-?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Glen Eker and his family. Included are photographs of Glen Eker and his parents in Banff Alberta, Glen's graduation pictures from McMaster University, and other family photographs.
Administrative History
Glen Eker was born in Toronto, Ontario to Paul Eker and Dorothy Horwitz. He grew up in the Forest Hill neighbourhood of Toronto before moving with his family to Hamilton. He received two master’s degrees (one in sociology, the other in political science) from McMaster University and a third master’s degree (in library science) from the University of Toronto.
Glen's wife, Deborah Pekilis, was born in Montreal and lived there until her parents moved to Toronto. She was the librarian for the Jewish Genealogical Society and sat on the Hamilton Historical Board. She is currently a writer.
Glen has worked as a research assistant and a teaching assistant at McMaster and has taught at Ryerson University and Mohawk College. At present, he works as an estate and genealogy researcher.
Glen has published a book on Karl Marx, five indexes of Jews in Canada, and one index of Amish and Mennonites in Canada. His genealogy articles have appeared in various magazines and his short stories and poems have appeared in print as well.
Glen has worked on his family genealogy for a number of years. His paternal family line derives from Russia, Ukraine, Lithuania, and Poland while his maternal line derives from Byelorussia and Romania. He is descended from the Horwitz and Strachman families on the latter.
Descriptive Notes
Availability of other formats: JPEG and TIF copies are available for 30 of the photographs.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Eker (family)
Eker, Glen
Places
Canada, Western
Ontario
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Newman
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
4 January 1975
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Newman
Number
AC 019
Subject
Families
Interview Date
4 January 1975
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Stephen Spiesman
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
May also include interview with Mr. and Mrs. Sam Newman
Early life in Toronto
Use Restrictions
Conditional access. Researchers must receive permission from the interviewee or his/her heir prior to accessing the interview. Please contact the OJA for more information.
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Ben Newman was born in July 1920 in St Catharines. He married Sheila Gould from Winnipeg. Ben's father, Abraham emigrated to St. Catharines from Russia in 1909, living with his aunt and uncle and helping them with their junk business. His wife, Mary and two children followed later. Four more children were born in Canada: Norman, Benjamin, Rebecca and Gordon. Benjamin took over the company after Abe’s retirement and turned it into one of the largest steel manufacturers in Canada. Ben Newman was active in all phases of Jewish life in the community and was the first Jewish Alderman in St Catharines, a position he held for several years.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Newman, Benjamin
Newman, Sheila
Geographic Access
St. Catharines, Ont.
Toronto, Ont.
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Cyrus Coppel
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
21 July 1976
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Cyrus Coppel
Number
AC 061
AC 062
Subject
Communities
Families
Interview Date
21 July 1976
Interviewer
Larry Troster
Total Running Time
061A: 46:22 minuets 061B: 45:27 minuets 062A: 45:55 minuets 062B: 28:58 minuets
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Cassette tapes were digitized in 2012
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Cyrus Coppel son of Aaron Coppel and Chaya (Gertrude) Seigel was born in 1911 in Galt Ontario. Cyrus remained in Galt throughout his life and became a central figure within it's Jewish community. Cyrus initially worked as a mechanic and later worked in the office of an auto shop trading in auto parts. Cyrus also traded in livestock as a hobby. Cyrus Coppel was one of the founders of the B'nai Israel Synagogue in Galt.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Coppel, Cyrus
Troster, Larry
B'nai Israel Synagogue (Galt, Ont.)
Geographic Access
Galt
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Cyrus Coppel discusses the growth of Galt's Jewish community following the Second World War and the need to purchase a new and larger synagogue to accommodate the growing population.

In this clip, Cyrus Coppel discusses the difficulties of raising Jewish children in a small town.

Name
Fay (Haber) Gardner
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
19 November 1974
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Fay (Haber) Gardner
Number
AC 003
Subject
Families
Interview Date
19 November 1974
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Sophie Milgram
Total Running Time
Side one: 30 minutes Side two: 2 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Fay Gardner (nee Haber) was born in Toronto in December 1896. Her parents came from Austria. They met and married in New York and moved to Toronto in about 1894. As a child, Fay's family lived on King Street, LaPlante Street and Walton Street. She attended Elizabeth Street (later Hester Howe) Public School and Wellesley Street Public School. At age 16, Fay and her family moved to Margueretta Street. She got married at age 18.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Gardner, Fay
Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Transcript
AC 003 Side A:
0.14: Fay was born in Toronto in 1896. Her parents came from Austria. They met and were married in New York.
1.11: Fay’s parents moved to Toronto. Her father was a fur cutter for Fairweather’s on Yonge St. for about 30 years and her mother looked after a second hand shop on King St. for a short time.
2.37: Fay’s family moved to LaPlante Ave. There were few Jewish families in the neighbourhood. Across the street from their home was a mission and the old Sick Children’s Hospital.
4.19: At around age 10, Fay’s family moved to Walton St.
4.33: Fay and her sister attended Elizabeth St. School (which later became Hester Howe School). Hester Howe was the Principal. Fay reminisces fondly about Hester Howe. Fay recalls that she experienced no incidents of antisemitism at school or in the neighbourhood.
6.40: Fay graduated to Wellesley School.
7.00: Fay warmly recalls a welcoming incident with a non-Jewish neighbour, Mrs. Denson.
7.54: Fay recalls that when she came down with diphtheria she was sent to an isolation hospital located next door to the Don Jail. She recalls that Sam Factor (later a Judge) was in the hospital with her at the same time.
8.50: Fay remembers other Jewish families in the area near her Walton St. home – the Factors, the Goldhars and the Baers (?). Gradually, more Jewish families moved into the area.
9.39: Fay reminisces about first meeting Esther Manilla (Rosen) who became a lifelong friend.
10.54: Fay’s family moved to Margueretta St.
11.06: While still living on Walton St., Fay’s family belonged to the Bond St. Synagogue. Fay and her sister attended Sunday school at Bond St. Shul (Holy Blossom) until they moved to Margueretta St.
11.45: Fay’s in-laws belonged to the Rumaneshe Shul on Centre Ave.
12.53: Fay’s sister worked in the millinery at Fairweather’s.
13.06: Fay recalls that the old Toronto Star building was next door to Fairweather’s. She identifies Greg Clark as a journalist & Jimmy Fries as a cartoonist at the time.
13.44: Fay stayed at home to help her mother look after her younger siblings (2 brothers and a sister). She then became an apprentice for Mrs. Holmes in a dressmaking shop on Queen St.
14.33: Fay recalls the few Jewish families near her Margueretta St. home – the Greenwoods (Sol. There were no synagogues in the area.)
16.41: Fay’s younger brothers and sisters attended Kent School at Dufferin and Bloor.
17.26: Fay recalls how she met her husband at age 18. His family lived around Dovercourt Road near Bloor.
19.16: Fay discusses the start of Temple Sinai. Fay’s daughter, Kay, married to Lorne Sandy joined Temple Sinai and Fay followed suit.
20.00: Fay reports no awareness of discrimination against Jews or Blacks when she lived on Margueretta St. Her family was friendly with the neighbours.
21.30: Fay continued to live with her parents after she was married. Her first daughter was born there. Then she and her husband moved to a house on Beatrice and College. Then they moved to Bloor and Gladstone Ave. for more than 30 years.
23.02: Fay recalls shopping on Thursdays in Kensington Market with her mother. (Kaplan’s Creamery, Permutter’s Bakery).
25.11: Fay recounts a visit to Hester Howe School.
26.36: Fay recalls her home on LaPlante St. – outdoor plumbing, potbelly stove, coal oil lamps, chimney lamps. On Walton St. they had indoor plumbing.
28.38: Fay recounts a story from her childhood. Her father purchased a goat to provide milk for her mother’s health. The goat that was kept in an empty neighbouring lot escaped and the neighbourhood ran after the goat to catch it.
AC 003 Side B:
0.0: Fay describes the condition of the sidewalks and roads from her childhood. She mentions an aunt and uncle living on Haggerman St. and Brenner’s Junk Shop.
1.41: Sophie Milgram clarifies a few points made in the interview. Fay was born in December 1896. Her family moved to Margueretta St. when she was age 16. The club she mentioned was the Nordau Club. Fay recalled that while living on Walton St., there was a convert named Singer who attempted to proselytize in the neighbourhood and operated out of the mission.
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Barney and Tillie Nosov [with Wilfred Kideckel]
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
22 September 1975
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Barney and Tillie Nosov [with Wilfred Kideckel]
Number
AC 011
Subject
Families
Religion
Interview Date
22 September 1975
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Fred Schaeffer
Total Running Time
side 1: 43:39 minutes
side 2: 43:36 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
Most of the interview is conducted with Barney Nosov. Wilfred Kideckel is also featured on the tape, and Tillie Nosov is interviewed briefly.
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Conditional access. Researchers must receive permission from the interviewee or his/her heir prior to accessing the interview. Please contact the OJA for more information.
Biography
Barney Nosov arrived in Canada in 1916. Nosov lived in Ansonville, Ontario. He was a merchant, owned a store, and was also in politics for many years.
Wilfred Kideckel was born in Kreugerdorf on a farm in 1917. His father was one of the first immigrants to the area. Kideckel had 10 people in his family. He moved to Ansonville and got married. Kideckel moved to Toronto in 1942.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Nosov, Barney
Nosov, Tillie
Kideckel, Wilfred
Geographic Access
Kriegerdorf, Ont.
Cochrane, Ont.
Cobalt, Ont.
Ansonville, Ont.
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Transcript
AC 011: SIDE 1
BARNEY NOSOV
0.24: Nosov talks about how he came to Ansonville, Ontario. Talks about his aunt, Mrs. Perkiss?
1.14: Nosov talks about the families in Cochrane – was about 6 families. Rothchild, Kurtzer? Perkiss, Bernstein. Rothchild’s son was mayor at that time.
2.16: First Jewish people in Cochrane were peddlers. Cochrane is close to Cobalt, which had more Jews.
3.29: Nosov arrived in Canada in 1916. Opened a store in 1917.
4.37: Nosov talks about other Jewish families who were there when he arrived, and who came later. Mentions Korman.
5.18: There was religious instruction at that time; was a cheder; Korman was a teacher.
5.46: 1922 Korman decided to build a synagogue. Was about 16 Jewish families at that time.
6.44: Rabbi Gordon donated a sefer Torah .
7.25: Nosov tells a story about the Lubachitcher Rabbi.
8.10: Nosov talks about children being sent (conscripted?) into the army [unsure where this took place]. When the children were allowed to leave the army, they all prayed at a specific synagogue.
9.56: Nosov talks about a synagogue located on Synagogue Street.
10.52: Nosov talks about the synagogue they built. Rabbi was named Rabinovitch.
11.44: Congregation functioned until 1930, and then Nosov sold the building.
11.55: Nosov talks about himself – he was a merchant, owned a general store, was in politics. Nosov was a councilor for many years from 1930 to 1944.
13.43: Nosov explains how he got started in politics – he felt discriminated against in business, so he decided to tell the public what was going on. He ran for fun; never believed he would even get elected.
16.25: Nosov talks about antisemitism
19.43: Nosov tells a story to describe the antisemitism. a Jewish dentist wanted to go to a small town (Hansville?). Came to Nosov’s store and Nosov told him he had no chance of getting a job, because he was Jewish. No Jewish dentists allowed in that time. They would rather have no dentist at all in town.
22.23: Nosov talks about the first mayor of Ansonville who was a gentile; used to hire Jews in early 1920s.
23.18: Nosov talks about talked about a farming settlement in Kreugerdorf (most settlers there were Russian immigrants)
25.25: Kreuger was a German (not Jewish), and he taught people how to work the land. That’s why the land is named Kreugerdorf
WILFRED KIDECKEL
Born in Kreugerdorf on a farm in 1917. His father was one of the original immigrants. Family of 10. Doesn’t have too many memories of the farm.
26.57: Kideckel talks about how his father got to Krugerdorf (thought he would get free land).
27.45: Kideckel talks about Jewish life in Kriegerdorf. Talks about how his father used to chop wood in return for someone teaching his children to read Hebrew. Still a cemetery there, but no people living there.
28.57: Kideckel moved to Ansonville, got married, moved to Toronto in 1942.
30.17: [no sound audible for the rest of the recording]
43.39: End
AC 011: SIDE 2
TILLIE NOSOV
0.08: Nosov came to farm in Kreugerdorf in 1906. Maiden name Abromson?, 11 children in her family.
0.59: Nosov talks about her childhood and her family; what her house looked like.
2.15: Nosov talks about her father working on the railroad and on the farm.
2.54: Nosov talks about what she did on the farm; life on the farm; religious life on the farm. People kept kosher; women’s roles on the farm equal to men.
WILFRED KIDECKEL
4.33: Kideckel talks about inter-dating – the Jewish mayor used to discourage it.
5.05: [no sound audible for the rest of the recording]
43.36: End
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Dr. Hana (nee David) Gelber
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
29 July 1973
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Dr. Hana (nee David) Gelber
Number
AC 013
AC 014
Subject
Antisemitism
Families
Israel
Occupations
Interview Date
29 July 1973
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Stephen Speisman
Total Running Time
013 Side One 30 minutes
014 Side One 30 minutes
014 Side Two 30 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Conditional access. Researchers must receive permission from the interviewee or his/her heir prior to accessing the interview. Please contact the OJA for more information.
Biography
Hana Gelber (nee David) was born in Safed (Tzfat), Palestine in 1907. She studied sciences at the University of Paris-Sorbonne and prepared her thesis at Hebrew University. She graduated from University of Paris-Sorbonne in 1929. Hana moved to Toronto in December 1929 and married Eddie Gelber in March 1930. Hana and Eddie moved to New York where Eddie was completing his final year at the Jewish Theological Seminary and Hana conducted research at the Rockefeller Institute. They returned to Toronto in July 1930. Hana graduated from Medical School at the University of Toronto in 1934. She completed her medical internship in Palestine. Hana and Eddie lived in Palestine from 1934-1939. They returned to Toronto in 1939 where they remained until 1954 at which time they made Aliyah. Hana worked at Women's College Hospital until 1954. Hana had 3 children; Edna, Lynn and David.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Gelber, Hana
Gelberg, Eddie
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Belle James
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
21 April 1975
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Belle James
Number
AC 016
Subject
Families
Rabbis
Interview Date
21 April 1975
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Stephen Speisman
Total Running Time
Side One: 46 minutes
Side Two: 5 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Belle James (nee Levy) was born in Toronto in 1908. Her father, Rabbi Meyer Levy became chief rabbi of Toronto in 1905/6.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
James, Belle
Levy, Meyer
Weiss, Lottie
Geographic Access
Toronto, Ont.
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Transcript
AC 16: Side A.
0.00 - 1.57: Sound quality is poor.
2.04: Belle refers to an autobiography written by her father, Rabbi Meyer H. Levy. Her father was ordained at age 22 in 1891 in Vilna. He immigrated to New York in 1892. He worked in Syracuse as a rabbi for 5 years. He left the rabbinate and entered business but business failed.
5.58: Rabbi Levy returned to the rabbinate to serve as Chief Rabbi in Toronto in 1905/6.
6.18: While in business, Rabbi Levy worked in Rochester and Detroit and knew Henry Ford.
7.18: Belle’s parents were married in Europe.
7.54: Belle was born in 1908.
7.59: Rabbi Levy came originally to the Chestnut Street Synagogue and then went to the Russishe Shul.
8.50: Belle recalls where the family lived. She was born on University Ave., next door to Mary Pickford. They then moved to 2 homes on Alice Street, 2 homes on Baldwin, 288 Bathurst St. and 2 homes on Palmerston St.
11.35: Belle’s sister is Lottie Weiss.
11.52: Belle recounts the synagogues with which Rabbi Levy was affiliated. Russishe Shul, Adath Israel, Rumainishe Shul, Hebrew Men of England, Berkley Street Shul, Palmerston Avenue Shul.
12.44: Belle explains how Rabbi Levy was remunerated for his services.
13.18: Belle describes her mother’s charitable acts. She was a founder of the Home for the Aged.
14.16: Belle recalls travelling with her father to open synagogues in Niagara Falls, St. Catharine and Welland, ON.
14.51: Belle recalls Rabbi Levy’s visits to Kingston to visit Jewish in-mates and to the jail farm north on Yonge Street.
16.04: Belle recalls the good relationships between her father and other rabbis in the city. e.g. Rabbi Jacob, Rabbi Brickner and Rabbi Isserman.
18.00: Belle describes the controversies concerning kashrut.
20.00: Rabbi Levy gave hashgacha (supervisory overseer) for some products. Belle recalls his relationship with George Weston.
21.07: Rabbi Levy had some political influence.
22.58: Belle describes her father as charismatic and more liberal in behaviour. Other orthodox rabbis tended to be less approachable.
25.58: Belle describes her Jewish education.
29.40: Belle’s brothers studied at the Simcoe Street Talmud Torah with Nathanson.
30.42: Belle recalls that her father was close with other Orthodox rabbis.
31.40: Rabbi Levy remained active in the rabbinate until 1951, when Belle’s mother passed away.
32.43: Belle and Stephen Speisman discuss the names and locations of some of the downtown synagogues.
33.37: Belle relates a story involving Rabbi Levy and a mashgiach, Reverend Margolis.
34.43: Belle recalls the shachtim of the time in Toronto. Mittel Farber, Yankel David Farber, Garfinkel.
35.18: Belle recalls accompanying her father to the cemetery to an event that seemed like a party.
36.18: Belle explains why Rabbi Levy is buried in the Lubavicher section of Mount Sinai Cemetery.
37.08: Belle notes that her parents did not eat meat for many years because they did not recognize the hashgacha. Belle recounts a story involving her mother tempted to eat meat immediately before she died but in the end not succumbing.
41.42: Rabbi Levy was responsible for the Yiddish Hebrew Journal. Helped to bring Hirsch.
42.18: Belle recalls her father dancing on the table in response to the signing of the Balfour Declaration
43.05: Rabbi Levy requested in his will to be buried in Israel.
43.40: Belle reminisces about mishalachim from Rishon LeTzion in Palestine staying with her family.
AC 16: Side B
0.20: Rabbi Levy was instrumental in starting a matzah factory in Toronto on Dundas Street.
1.50: Rabbi Levy secured a permit for Jews to buy Passover wine during the Prohibition. Additionally, he got a wine permit for Rabbi Gordon who later sold the permit to Parkdale wines.
3.49: Rabbi Levy had connections with Hirsch-Manischewitz.
End
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Dora Till
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
May 4, 1983
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Dora Till
Number
AC 151
Subject
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Labor
Labor unions
Women
Occupations
Interview Date
May 4, 1983
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Stephen Speisman
Total Running Time
46 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Dora Till (nee Tobias) was born in New York City in 1896. She came to Toronto in 1900. She married Morris Till in 1918. They had one daughter, Cecile. As a youth, Dora was involved with Herzl Girls and the Boot and Shoe Society. Dora was active in community service and contributed greatly to social service work. She was co-founder and first President for Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home, Vice-President of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society, a board member for the Jewish Family and Child Services, an executive for the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies, Honourary Vice-President of United Jewish Welfare Fund, on the board of Canadian Jewish Congress and past President of the Naomi Chapter of Hadassah-WIZO.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Herzl Girls Boot and Shoe Society, 1920
Mothers and Babes Summer Rest Home
Baycrest Hospital
United Jewish Welfare Fund
Beth Tzedec Synagogue
Timothy Eaton Company
Till, Dora
Geographic Access
Toronto
Bronte
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Dora Till discusses some of the services provided by Hebrew Maternity Aid.

Dora Till was co-founder and first President for Mothers and Babes Summer Rest Home. In this clip, Dora describes the efforts to solicit and fundraise on behalf of the Mothers and Babes Summer Rest Home.

Name
Lillian (Slovens) Gollom
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
December 8, 1986
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Lillian (Slovens) Gollom
Number
AC 122
Subject
Families
Women
Occupations
Antisemitism
Hospitals
Interview Date
December 8, 1986
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Morris Silbert and Nancy Draper
Total Running Time
Side 1 31 minutes
Side 2 17 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Lillian Gollom (nee Slovens) was born in Russia in1903. She came to Toronto around 1907. She attended Ogness Public School and Canada Business College. She married Nat Gollom in 1924 and had a son and a daughter. Lillian was actively involved with the "Sinais" and served as President of the organization in 1939. The fund-raising efforts of the the "Sinais", Ezrat Nashim and "Twigs" assisted with the establishment of the first Mount Sinai Hospital on Yorkville Ave. Lillian was an involved volunteer at the hospital. Lillian remained active with the Sinais following the building of the second Mount Sinai Hospital on University Ave. when the organization's focus shifted to fund-raising for the Canadian Cancer Society.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Mount Sinai Hospital
Dworkin, Dorothy
Canadian Cancer Society
Singer, E.F.
Gollom, Lillian
Geographic Access
Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\AC 122, Lillian Gollom\AC 122 notes.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Lillian Gollom discusses the establishment and early days of the first Mount Sinai Hospital. She describes the fund-raising efforts of Ezrat Nashim, the Sinais and the Twigs.

In this clip, Lillian Gollom relates anecdotes pertaining to the impact of the Great Depression on Jewish families in the early 1930s.

Name
Edna Jacobs
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
December and March 1986
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Edna Jacobs
Number
AC 125
Subject
Families
Travel
Education
Occupations
Antisemitism
Girl Guides
Religion
Volunteers
Interview Date
December and March 1986
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Nancy Draper
Total Running Time
Side 1: 36 minutes Side 2: 46 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Edna (nee Frankel) Jacobs was born March 20, 1904 in Toronto, Her parents, Sigmund and Paula Frankel, were early immigrants from Germany. Edna attended Havergal from kindergarten through high school. She studied general arts for two years at the University of Toronto. She married Arthur Jacobs, the son of Rabbi Solomon Jacobs, in 1936. Together, they had one daughter, Patsy and a baby who died during infancy. Edna was involved with the Girls Club and the Junior Council of Jewish Women.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Toronto Girl's Club
Toronto Council of Jewish Women
Geographic Access
Toronto
Germany
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\AC 125 Jacobs\AC 125 notes.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Edna Jacobs shares memories from a trip she and her family took to Biblis, Germany to celebrate her grandparents’ golden anniversary.

In this clip, Edna Jacobs reminisces about several prominent Toronto Jewish families.

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